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									                Quality & Standards Unit




D1 – CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME

       SECTION CURRENTLY UNDER REVIEW
                         C O N T E N T S
           D1 – CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME

                                                                         Page
                                                                      [hyperlinked-
                                                                       please click
                                                                       on page no]

1   The History of the Scheme                                              1

2   Objectives of the Scheme                                               1

3   Key Features of the Scheme                                             2

4   The Credit Accumulation & Modular Scheme [CAMS] Framework              3

5   Recognition of Achievement                                             21


                                 APPENDICES

A   Clarification of the Use of Titles UCPD/UCCE (and Related Award        30
    Titles) and the Management and Administration of those Awards
    within the University

B   School Academic Standards Committee [SASC] Pro Rata Credit             32
    Proposal

C   Generic MRes Framework                                                 33
       SECTION D1 – CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME


GLOSSARY OF ABBREVIATIONS:

APEL           Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning
APL            Accreditation of Prior Learning
AQSPC          Academic Quality & Standards Policy Committee
BPS            British Psychological Society
CAMS           Credit Accumulation & Modular Scheme
CATS           Credit Accumulation & Transfer Scheme
CertEd         Certificate in Education
CertHE         Certificate in Higher Education
CPD            Continuing Professional Development
DBA            Doctor of Business Administration
DClinPsy       Doctorate in Clinical Psychology
DipHE          Diploma in Higher Education
DfLD           Department for Learning Development
DProf          Doctor in Professional Studies
DVC(L&SE)      Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Learning & Student Experience)
FHEQ           Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
HE             Higher Education
HN             Higher National
HNC            Higher National Certificate
HND            Higher National Diploma
LTAS           Learning, Teaching & Assessment Strategy
MRes           Master in Research
NLF            Negotiated Learning Framework
NQF            National Qualifications Framework
PDPC           Portfolio Development Policy Committee
PgC            Postgraduate Certificate
PgCE           Postgraduate Certificate in Education
PgD            Postgraduate Diploma
PPQ            Professional Practitioner Qualification
ProfGradCert   Professional Graduate Certificate
PSRBs          Professional, Statutory & Regulatory Bodies
QAA            Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education
QTLS           Qualified Teacher Learning & Skills
RFSC           Regulatory Frameworks Sub-Committee
SASC           School Academic Standards Committee
SCCB           Short Course Credit Board
TUBS           Teesside University Business School
UAB            University Academic Board
UCACE          University Certificate in Advanced Continuing Education
UCAPD          University Certificate in Advanced Professional Development
UCCE           University Certificate in Continuing Education
UCFS           University Certificate in Foundation Studies
UCPCE          University Certificate in Postgraduate Continuing Education
UCPD           University Certificate in Professional Development
UCPPD          University Certificate in Postgraduate Professional Development
       SECTION D1 – CREDIT ACCUMULATION MODULAR SCHEME


1.   THE HISTORY OF THE SCHEME

     The University‟s first Credit Accumulation Modular Scheme [CAMS] was validated in
     July 1990. A number of developments of the Scheme have been introduced since
     that time and documented within successive revisions of the CAMS Handbook.

     During the 2003/2004 Academic Session, the University undertook a major academic
     restructuring exercise. This involved:

      a change in the standard size of a module from 12 credits to 20 credits
      a move away from a semester-based structure
      revisions to the Assessment & Progression Regulations for all awards of the
       University
      full inclusion of Foundation Degrees and Doctoral level awards within the Scheme
      for Higher National [HN] programmes, the introduction of a module size of 15
       credits

2.   OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHEME

     The CAM Scheme is designed to enable the University to:

      clearly articulate the aims, objectives, learning outcomes, indicative content,
       resource requirements and assessment methods associated with all University
       modules

      facilitate flexible programme development (at both Undergraduate and
       Postgraduate level)

      provide a clear statement of the learning outcomes associated with all University
       awards, and a clear articulation of the progression in learning outcomes between
       modules, stages and levels of learning, in line with the University‟s Learning
       Teaching & Assessment Strategy [LTAS] and the Quality Assurance Agency‟s
       [QAA‟s] requirement for Programme Specifications

      provide comprehensive and coherent frameworks for assessment and
       progression, at sub-degree, degree and postgraduate level, which are capable of
       being consistently applied across all University provision in order to both
       guarantee and protect the application of appropriate academic standards

      operate Assessment & Progression Regulations across the University, which will
       enable the University to provide students with transcripts and intermediate awards
       (at undergraduate and postgraduate level)

      facilitate the efficient and unambiguous transfer of credit between academic
       institutions

      provide an effective system of credit accumulation and transfer which will enable
       students to both gain appropriate recognition of achievement for all learning
       undertaken and accumulate credit towards recognised qualifications as part of the
       University‟s widening participation and lifelong learning agenda
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      maximise the opportunities for students who have successfully completed awards
       within Higher Education [HE] to progress to other awards at a higher level

      effectively and consistently accredit students‟ prior learning and experience

      respond quickly and flexibly to changes in demands for educational opportunities,
       whilst ensuring that quality and standards are maintained

      facilitate international exchanges

      facilitate access to small components of learning via an integrated Continuing
       Professional Development [CPD] framework

3.   KEY FEATURES OF THE SCHEME

     The University CAM Scheme is characterised by the following features:

      a modular framework (at sub-degree, degree and postgraduate level) based
       around:

        o   for all programmes except HN awards, the use of “standard” 20 credit
            modules (or multiples thereof), where each standard module equates to 200
            notional hours of student work

        o   for HN programmes the use of a “standard” module size of 15 credits
            (equivalent to 150 notional hours of student work) where there is no overlap
            with undergraduate provision. However the use of 20 credit modules is also
            permissible where they overlap with undergraduate provision or where the
            programme leads to a BTEC Higher National award title

        o   each year of Undergraduate full-time study (normally 28 weeks) carrying a
            minimum credit rating of 120 credits

        o   each year of Postgraduate full-time study (normally 48 weeks) carrying a
            minimum credit rating of 180 credits

      a University-wide framework of Assessment & Progression Regulations for sub-
       degree, undergraduate and postgraduate awards, with ALL deviations from these
       standard regulations having to be formally approved by the Regulatory
       Frameworks Sub-Committee [RFSC], chaired by a nominee of the Chair of
       Academic Quality & Standards Policy Committee [AQSPC].

      an extensive portfolio of full-time, part-time and flexible study opportunities leading
       to the following portfolio of awards: professional doctorates, taught masters, single
       honours, joint honours, major/minor programmes, Foundation Degrees, generic
       awards, Negotiated Learning Awards, sub-degree awards (e.g. Certificate in
       Higher Education [CertHE], Diploma in Higher Education [DipHE] or Higher
       National Certificate/Diploma [HNC/D]), and study towards smaller awards such as
       University Certificates (University Certificate in Continuing Education [UCCE],
       University Certificate in Professional Development [UCPD], University Certificate
       in Advanced Continuing Education [UCACE], University Certificate in Advanced
       Professional Development [UCAPD], University Certificate in Postgraduate
       Professional Development [UCPPD], University Certificate in Postgraduate
       Continuing Education [UCPCE], etc.).
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         the availability of “Intermediate Awards” for students who, having achieved the
          necessary level of specific credit for the intermediate award, either:

           o   wish to terminate or suspend their studies prior to completion of the entire
               programme of study for which they were originally registered; or

           o   fail to achieve the full learning outcomes of the higher level award for which
               they were registered.

         mechanisms whereby students who can demonstrate that they have already met,
          either through prior study or through learning gained from practical experience,
          the learning outcomes associated with a module(s), within a programme can be
          given full credit for those modules, up to a specified maximum credit limit, where
          that learning is deemed to be current.

4.      THE CREDIT ACCUMULATION MODULAR SCHEME [CAMS] FRAMEWORK

        Credit Rating is the process of assigning a credit value to elements of learning.
        Credit is an educational currency that provides a means of recognising learning
        achievement. Credits are measures of the amount and level of learning achievement
        arising from any training or educational programme. Credit Rating involves
        assigning credit points to learning and normally also concerns attaching points to one
        of five levels widely used in HE Credit Accumulation & Transfer Schemes [CATS],
        namely 4, 5, 6, 7 or 8. The process of credit rating provides recognition of learning
        achieved on programmes which will normally also be acceptable to other institutions
        operating credit based systems.

        General Credit is a numerical value representing the credit points attached to an
        element of learning removed from the context of a particular programme of study.
        Each single unit of credit will be equivalent to 10 notional learning hours.

        Specific Credit is a value representing the credits allocated to an element of
        learning in the context of a particular programme of study. The value of specific
        credit will normally be equal to or less than that of general credit.

4.1     Modules

4.1.1   General Description

        The module is the basic building block for all academic work and resourcing within
        the University, and is the term which is used to describe a discrete unit of learning
        which is separately assessed. All modules are clearly specified in terms of their
        aims, learning outcomes, learning, teaching and assessment strategy and resource
        requirements utilising the UTREG2 proforma.

        All modules at levels 5, 6, 7 and 8 must be assigned to appropriate External
        Examiners to ensure the maintenance of appropriate academic standards.

        Whilst undergraduate CAMS Level 4 modules are not normally subject to external
        examining processes, the following principles should apply:

         Assessment Approval, except reference to Module External Examiner;



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         Second Marking and Marks Moderation except that second marking will normally
          operate only to determine distribution around the Pass/Fail criteria. It will also
          operate around Merit and Distinction points where these apply;

         Feedback to Students.

        It should be noted that External Examiners may be involved in Level 4 Higher
        National work and will be involved where awards are made at Level 4. [Refer to
        Section C3: External Examining Handbook for detail].

        Modules may either be delivered over a full academic year or within a shorter block,
        as appropriate to the nature and content of the module and the learning and teaching
        strategies proposed. However, consideration of all assessment results will normally
        be scheduled to coincide with the University‟s normal cycle of Module Assessment
        Boards. End assessments taking the form of examinations/time constrained
        activities will also, where appropriate, be scheduled to fit into the University‟s normal
        cycle of assessments.

        For all organisational, administrative and resourcing purposes (including ongoing quality
        assurance), modules are “owned” by the Subject Group within the University that
        designed and delivers them, and have Module Leaders who are members of the relevant
        Subject Groups/Sections. A small number of modules exist which have been devised
        centrally within the University (e.g. Information skills) and these modules will, normally,
        be allocated to a School (and Subject Group/Section) as appropriate.

4.1.2   Standard Module

        A “standard module” at both undergraduate and postgraduate level will be worth 20
        credits, and will represent 200 notional hours of learning activity by a student (broken
        down according to the amount of time a student shall be expected to spend in direct
        contact with academic staff and undertaking directed study, independent learning
        and assessed work).

        For HN Awards, a standard 15 credit module should be used where there is no
        overlap with University 20 credit provision. This represents 150 notional learning
        hours. Where there is a proposal for overlap of credit sizes or where the programme
        leads to a BTEC Higher National award title, approval should be sought through the
        appropriate University committee or Approval/Review process.

4.1.3   Other Module Sizes
        [See also Section 4.1.7: Dissertation Modules]

        Larger modules (i.e. greater than 20 credits) may be included within programmes, but
        ALL modules greater than 20 credits MUST be multiples of the standard module size
        (i.e. 40, 60 credits etc.). The exception is for UCPD/UCPPD/HN awards where a
        module size of 30 credits may be used.

        The use of half modules (i.e. 10 credits) is not encouraged but will be permitted in
        order to create flexibility. No more than 2 half modules may be used in any stage of
        a programme. Careful consideration should be taken to ensure that the student work
        load and assessment load associated with half modules accurately reflects the
        reduced module size, and that the half module has sufficient rigour and coherence to
        constitute a meaningful learning experience.



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        Wherever a programme of study is developed which includes either half modules or
        modules of greater than 40 credits in size, a clear rationale for the size of those
        modules MUST be included within the programme documentation, and this rationale
        will be carefully explored as part of the programme approval process.

4.1.4   Module Types

                                    TABLE 1: MODULE TYPES
                                            Modules which all students within a programme
         Programme Compulsory               must take (referred to simply as “compulsory”),
         (Core) Modules                     to qualify for that particular award. [See Section
                                            4.2 for definition of a “programme”].
                                            Modules which must be taken by all students
         Pathway Compulsory Modules         following a particular “named”
                                            pathway/specialism within a programme.
                                            Non-compulsory (optional) modules undertaken
                                            through choice (subject to availability), by
         Options                            students following a particular programme (or
                                            pathway), which are of direct relevance to their
                                            chosen area of study.
                                            A module which a student is required to have
                                            either:
                                             successfully completed
         Pre-Requisite Module(s)             studied and is awaiting confirmation of results
                                            or
                                            been credited with prior to commencing a given
                                            module
                                            Modules which are specified as co-requisites
                                            must be taken together, but will be considered
         Co-Requisite(s)
                                            separately for the purpose of awarding credit for
                                            achievement.

4.1.5   Module Specification

        All modules within the CAMS are fully defined (in terms of their stage, level, aims,
        learning outcomes, size, learning and teaching strategy, assessment strategy,
        associated reading and other resource needs, etc.) using a standard descriptor
        known as a “Module Specification”. The Academic Registry has developed an on-
        line submission system for module specification proforma [UTREG2] for use by ALL
        module authors [see Section 4.1.1].

4.1.6   Module Approval (New Modules and Alterations to Existing Modules)

        All new modules and all changes to existing modules must be approved by the
        School Academic Standards Committee [SASC] to whom the module belongs (or
        through a programme approval/review event, or a module approval event), and, in
        ALL cases, copies of the approved module specification proforma UTREG2 [see
        Section 4.1.1] should then be:

         forwarded electronically to the Academic Registry for action and inclusion on the
          Student Records System;

         forwarded to all Schools running programmes which will include the module(s) for
          filing as part of the definitive documentation for the programme(s);
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         lodged with the definitive programme documentation in School(s).

        All Programme Leaders whose programmes may be affected by any changes to a
        module must be consulted and must indicate their support for the change(s)
        proposed.

        [See Section C1: Approval & Review of Programmes Handbook for further
        details].

4.1.7   Project/Dissertation Modules

        Inclusion of a project/dissertation module within Undergraduate programmes is NOT
        mandatory, and programme teams may wish to identify alternative methods through
        which students can demonstrate achievement of the level of learning associated with
        “honours” level.

        Where projects/dissertations are included within undergraduate programmes
        however, they will normally be of 40 credits in size but 60 credit projects/dissertations
        are also permitted. Programme teams MUST include a clear rationale for the size of
        the project/dissertation within the programme documentation (which will be
        considered in detail at the programme approval event). The team MUST also make
        explicit how the learning outcomes, student activities and assessment methods
        associated with the module justify the credits awarded.

        ALL Masters level programmes MUST contain a core element of advanced
        independent work in the form of a project or dissertation module which must be at
        least 60 credits in size. Programmes teams may decide to recommend inclusion of
        a project or dissertation which is greater than 60 credits in size, but in all such cases
        a clear rationale must be presented for the size of the project/dissertation proposed,
        and this should be clearly reflected in all aspects of the learning outcomes, learning
        strategy and assessment of the module. Programme teams may choose to
        incorporate elements of the work throughout all stages of the Masters programme or
        place it all in the last stage.

        All Professional Doctoral programmes MUST contain a core element of advanced
        independent work in the form of a project or dissertation of not less than 180 credits,
        and not more than 300 credits. The Advanced Independent Work element of the
        professional doctoral award forms a separate assessment element. A mark is not
        allocated for the Advanced Independent Work element but the student is required to
        successfully complete the Advanced Independent Work element in order to be
        eligible for the Professional Doctorate award.

4.2     Programmes

4.2.1   Awards

        Named awards are the titles used to describe the qualifications awarded to students
        for successful completion of an approved programme of learning.

        Award titles will seek to reflect as accurately and simply as possible the nature and
        content of the programme.

        All proposed new programme titles MUST be approved by the Portfolio Development
        Policy Committee [PDPC] of the University Academic Board [UAB] [refer to Section
        B: Portfolio Development Planning Handbook for details]. Programme teams are
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        encouraged to submit titles for approval as soon as possible within the development
        cycle and certainly before progressing to the first stage of the programme approval
        process.

4.2.2   Programme of Studies

        A programme of studies is the term used to describe the package of modules which
        lead to a named “award” or group of related awards.

        Academic programmes may include within them a number of “pathways” which
        provide students with the opportunity to focus their studies more directly towards one
        particular aspect/area of the academic discipline being studied.

        Provision of advice in relation to pathway and module choices and the most
        appropriate mode of attendance for a given student is the responsibility of the “home”
        School.

        If appropriate, the name of a particular “pathway” may be reflected in the award title
        as either the full title of the award or as a “bracketed extension” to the overall award
        title. In either case, the use of the pathway title in the title of the award will need to
        be approved as part of the approval process for the award (via PDPC).

4.2.3   Programme Structure

        All programmes at undergraduate degree level (with the exception of HN Awards) will
        comprise of modules organised into “Stages”. Aims, Objectives and Learning
        Outcomes should be defined for each stage within a programme and care should be
        taken to demonstrate, through an appropriate mapping exercise, that these
        objectives and learning outcomes will be met by ALL students successfully
        completing the modules within the stage (irrespective of their individual pathway or
        option choice(s)). This should also be clearly demonstrated in the programme
        specification.

        Each stage of a programme may contain a mixture of “programme compulsory”
        (core), “pathway compulsory” and “option” modules.

        ALL programmes MUST demonstrate clear progression in learning outcomes between
        stages, such that at undergraduate degree level the learning outcomes to be achieved
        by the end of Stages 4, 5 and 6 are indicative of the level of knowledge and skills that
        will be attained by a successful full-time undergraduate at the end of his/her first,
        second and final year of Undergraduate study respectively. Similarly, sub-degree
        programmes including more than one stage, such as Foundation Degree and DipHE,
        must provide clear evidence of progression between Stage 4 and Stage 5.

        The Definitive Documentation for ALL programmes MUST include a comprehensive
        Programme Specification. From 2010/2011 the Programme Specification should
        be entered into the online Programme Catalogue. Further guidance on
        Programme Specifications is available on the Quality & Standards Unit SharePoint
        site.

4.2.4   Programme Stages

        Academic study at undergraduate degree level is divided into three “stages”, with
        each stage normally being associated with a particular year of a full-time
        undergraduate degree.
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        All students should normally complete their award within three years of the end of the
        normal period of registration.

        The term “stage” is used to define the point within a programme at which a particular
        module is to be (or has been) taken. For most full-time students, Stages 1–3 of a
        degree are synonymous with Years 1–3 of academic study, but in the case of most
        part-time students (who will typically be completing the programme over a longer
        period of time), students may not complete an entire stage within one year and
        therefore the concept of “years” of study can be unhelpful and confusing.

        Taught Masters programmes will normally be divided into three stages:

         Stage 1 (completion of the first 60 credits at Level 7) will correspond to the
          Postgraduate Certificate [PgC]

         Stage 2 (completion of the next 60 credits at Level 7 following Stage 1) will
          correspond to the Postgraduate Diploma [PgD]

         Stage 3 (completion of at least 60 credits at Level 7 after completion of Stage 2)
          will correspond to the Masters award

        Within the Taught Masters framework, there is an opportunity for students to either:

         enrol directly onto a Masters award; or

         enrol, in the first instance, on a PgC or PgD programme and progress between
          awards as part of a programme of continuing development; or

         exit from a higher level award, for personal or other reasons, with an appropriate
          interim award [see Section 5.1]

        Higher National Awards do not utilise the concept of Stages.

4.2.5   Programme Design

        In designing the programme, consideration should be given to each of the following
        factors:

        a) The balance between compulsory and optional programme components:

        Within any programme, there may be a variety of pathways, and care must be taken
        to ensure that all of the programme aims and objectives will be fully satisfied
        irrespective of the pathway followed.

        Whilst recognising the need to maintain a strong programme core, programme teams
        can offer specialised pathway choices through the use of “pathway compulsory”
        modules [see Section 4.1.4]. In addition, students can be given the opportunity to
        pursue particular interest areas through the availability of option modules.

        b) The pre-requisite facility

        The identification of essential “Pre-requisite modules” [see Section 4.1.4] can, in
        some circumstances, be an important vehicle for ensuring effective academic


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        development within a programme and programme teams are encouraged to utilise
        pre-requisites as a mechanism for clearly establishing progression.

        Attempts should, however, be made to try and minimise the use of pre-requisites in
        order to maximise the level of flexibility and student choice within programmes, and
        teams should take care to ensure that the use of pre-requisites has not imposed
        unnecessary restrictions upon student choice.

        c) Use of larger modules (40 credits or above)

        See Sections 4.1.3 and 4.1.7.

        d) Use of modules for external purposes

        The design of modules/programmes should take into account their potential target
        audiences. While some modules may be specifically for internal University use
        (albeit across a number of possible programmes), others may be of interest to
        external agencies.

        As well as being integral to University programmes, modules can also be offered to
        individuals within the community or to organisations. Modules offered in this way can
        be delivered either “on a stand-alone basis”, “as part of a package of modules
        delivered over a period of time” or “as an intensive programme for in-company
        delivery”. Individuals successfully completing such modules in these ways would, of
        course, earn the associated credits.

        It should be noted, however, that whenever the assessment strategy/methodology
        associated with a module is varied to satisfy the needs of a particular target audience
        it will be necessary to ensure that a different module code is allocated to each
        version of the module and that the Academic Registry is notified accordingly.

        e) Programme Structure Diagram

        In order to facilitate the transfer of programme structure information to the “SITS”
        Student Information System and the timetabling system, programme design teams
        are requested to compile a programme structure diagram and forward it to the
        Academic Registry.

4.2.6   Skills Development

        Appropriate skills development is an essential requirement within ALL programmes
        of study, and will be closely monitored by the QAA. The QAA have identified four
        explicit areas within which the development of skills must take place namely:

         Knowledge and Understanding

         Cognitive & Intellectual Skills

         Practical & Professional Skills

         Key Transferable Skills

        Ensuring that appropriate attention has been given to both the development and
        assessment of each of these skill areas will be formally considered as part of the


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        approval of ALL University programmes and details of these skills are required to be
        entered on the Programme Specification Template.

        Further details can be found in the University Level Descriptors.

4.3     Programme Types – Undergraduate Degree Programmes

        The following categories of undergraduate degree programmes are available within
        the Scheme, namely:

4.3.1   Single Honours Awards

        This involves the in-depth study of one academic discipline. For organisational and
        management purposes single honours awards are seen as “belonging” to a particular
        School, despite the fact that single honours awards may involve substantial inputs
        from more than one School.

4.3.2   Combined (“Cluster”) Awards

        The University has established a framework for delivery of combined awards
        (major/minors and joints), which involves the study of 2 academic disciplines/subject
        areas.

        When specifying combined awards, Schools may designate specific modules as
        compulsory requirements within the overall credit limit.

           Major/Minor Awards

            This involves the in-depth study of one discipline (the “major”) and a less
            comprehensive study of a second discipline (the “minor”).

            A major/minor degree is composed of a minimum of 240 credits from the Major
            subject and a maximum of 120 credits from the Minor subject, normally
            distributed as detailed in Table 2 below.

            An honours degree programme which involves the study of subject “A” as a
            “major” and subject “B” as a “minor” will be referred to as an honours degree in “A
            with B”.

            Other than in exceptional cases, major/minor awards will involve 2 disciplines
            drawn from the same School, and are therefore the responsibility of that School.

            Where the major and minor are drawn from different Schools, the School
            delivering the major component will act as the “home” School for the programme
            and be the responsibility of that School.

                             TABLE 2: STRUCTURE OF A MAJOR/MINOR
                                   HONOURS DEGREE AWARD
                   Year                 Major                Minor                  Total
                    1                 80 credits            40 credits            120 credits
                    2                 80 credits            40 credits            120 credits
                                    80-100 credits        20-40 credits
                Final Year                                                        120 credits
                                      maximum               maximum
                                   240-260 credits       100-120 credits
                  TOTAL                                                          360 credits
                                      maximum              maximum

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    (Variants across the 3 years are permissible within the total minimum and
    maximum credits stated above - subject to approval by an appropriately
    constituted approval/review panel.)

   Dissertation
    The dissertation may be based on the major field only or build on several areas of
    study, subject to confirmation that:

    o   there is no Professional, Statutory & Regulatory Body [PSRB] requirement
        which would preclude such an approach
    o   the areas of study are clearly related and can be supported, in the case of a
        cross-School programme, through primary support from the home School and
        formal agreement between the Programme Leader in that School about
        further support arrangements from the “Minor” School [see also “Management
        of Combined Awards below]
    o   the formal agreement must designate the responsibilities of each School and
        this must be communicated clearly to the student.

   Joint Honours Awards

    This involves the study, in approximately equal depth, of 2 academic
    disciplines/subject areas. Joint honours programmes will normally involve the
    study of 2 related academic subjects where emphasis can be appropriately
    applied to the integration between the 2 disciplines and, generally speaking, there
    will be an established body of literature at the interface between the 2 disciplines
    involved.

    An honours degree programme which involves the joint study, in approximately
    equal depth, of subject “A” and subject “B” will be referred to as an honours
    degree in “A and B”.

    A Joint Honours degree is composed of either 180 credits from both subjects or
    not more than 220 credits from one subject and not less than 140 credits from the
    other subject. In each subject, at least 40 credits must be successfully completed
    at each stage.

   Management of Combined Awards
    A proposal for a cross-University combined award should be explored through a
    programme approval event. At that event, the following areas should be
    explored/confirmed:

    o   Designated Staff – nomination of the designated staff should be in place at
        the time of the event, e.g. Programme Leader or Combined Route Co-
        ordinator, Minor Route Co-ordinator, named contacts in each School for staff
        and students; administrative contacts. These arrangements should be
        confirmed in writing to all parties, with responsibilities clearly identified.
    o   Student Experience – the approval event should focus on the student
        experience and explicitly identify:
         how a cohort identity will be established
         specific induction arrangements
         any differences between Schools in matters such as referencing; the
            approach to PDP; mitigating circumstances arrangements;
            communication mechanisms; student evaluation strategies including

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                   sharing of information across Schools; consolidation weeks; approaches
                   to TQSs, e.g. in assessment procedure
           o   Regulatory Matters – in terms of regulatory matters, a Panel should consider
               the arrangements for synchronising future shelf-life/validation; explore the
               appropriateness of the Minor module offerings to ensure no “tailoring” is
               required; explore and confirm re-assessment strategies; confirm the
               programme specification and Student Handbook for the Combined Award.

4.3.3   Generic Awards

        This involves the study of a broad range of modules drawn from one generic
        academic discipline e.g. BSc (Hons) Computer Studies. Such awards enable
        Schools to offer a very broad based education to students within a particular
        academic area. Individual Schools have responsibility for ensuring that the balance,
        coherence, progression and level of academic rigour are appropriately maintained for
        all students completing generic awards of this type.

        Schools are also responsible for ensuring that appropriate counselling and guidance
        procedures are in place to support these students to ensure that they receive an
        effective and properly supported student experience throughout.

        Generic awards can also be used to provide progression opportunities for students
        who, having embarked upon a specialist programme, decide on the basis of either
        their academic performance or a change in their aspirations/interests to transfer to a
        more general programme of study.

        Within any generic award a student may opt to take up to 20% of his/her programme
        at each Stage from modules offered by other Schools.

4.3.4   Pass Degree (at Honours) Awards

        These are awarded for completion of a programme of study involving completion of a
        minimum of 300 credits (at least 60 of which are at Level 3), rather than the 360
        credits normally required for an honours degree award. Pass Degree awards cover a
        wide spectrum of study opportunities and can be made to students who have either
        undertaken the in-depth study of one (or two) academic subject areas or to students
        completing a more “generic programme of study” of the type described under
        “generic awards”.

        Pass Degree awards are normally made to students who opt, for a range of personal
        or academic reasons (most frequently associated with the level, duration and/or cost
        of the award), to register for a more restricted programme of study than that required
        for an honours award.

        A student who has obtained a total of 180 credits over Stages 2 and 3 (which may
        include 20 Stage credits) (with at least 60 module credits from Level 6) or who has
        studied 120 module credits at Stage 3 and has an overall average Stage 3 mark of at
        least 35%, but fails to fully satisfy the requirements for the award of an honours
        degree, will also be eligible for a “Pass Degree at Honours” award [see Section D2:
        Framework for Assessment, Award & Progression, 2.5].




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4.3.5   Negotiated Learning Awards

        These awards are, by their nature, personally negotiated programmes of study which
        are not available as part of the University‟s mainstream portfolio of approved
        pathways/programmes.

        These programmes are managed through Teesside University Business School
        [TUBS] via the Work Based Studies Framework. The School has responsibility for
        ensuring that an appropriate level of balance, coherence, progression and academic
        rigour is maintained within each student‟s academic programme of study.

4.3.6   Foundation Degree Awards

        These awards involve the in-depth study of an academic discipline with a distinctive
        Work Based/Work Related Learning element of the programme, leading to an
        unclassified award over 2 years of full-time study or equivalent part-time study. For
        organisational and management purposes, Foundation Degrees are seen as
        “belonging” to a particular School despite the fact that these awards may involve
        inputs from more than one School and may involve agencies external to the
        University.

        The amount of “specific credit” that a Foundation Degree holder will be awarded
        when progressing to a degree programme will depend upon the extent to which the
        foundation degree completed satisfies, in general terms, the learning outcomes of
        modules within the degree programme. Students progressing to closely related
        degree programmes will normally be awarded between 120 and 240 (120 Level 4
        and 120 Level 5) credits of “specific credit” on entry to the programme. In some
        circumstances, the level of specific credit awarded may also be constrained by the
        requirements of the PSRBs associated with the degree programmes concerned.

        Foundation Degree awards will specify, at approval, possible progression routes for
        those awards and any necessary bridging programmes.

4.3.7   Professional Graduate Certificate Awards [ProfGradCert] Awards

        This title is for awards where students must hold a graduate or equivalent
        qualification to enrol on the award, but the level of modules studied is at
        undergraduate level. For example, Professional Graduate Certificate in Education
        (QTLS) comprising 60 Level 4 and 60 Level 5 credits. This curriculum and level of
        study is issued by Standards Verification UK as a recognised award for teacher
        education in the learning and skills sector.

        Total credit rating and level: a minimum of 120 undergraduate credits (based on a
        combination of Level 4 and Level 5 credits).

4.4     Programme Types - Sub-Degree Programmes

        The following categories of sub-degree programme and a range of other sub-degree
        awards are available within the Scheme, namely:

4.4.1   Higher National Diploma [HND] Awards

        These awards normally involve 2 years of full-time (or three years part-time),
        vocationally oriented study focusing upon development in one particular subject area.
        For organisational and management purposes all HND awards are seen as
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        “belonging” to a particular School, despite the fact that some awards may involve
        inputs from more than one School.

        “Generic” HND awards involving the study of a broad range of modules drawn from
        one generic academic discipline, e.g. HND Computer Studies, may also be used by
        Schools to offer students a very broad based education within a particular academic
        area. In such cases, the individual Schools involved are responsible for ensuring that
        the balance, coherence, progression and level of academic rigour is appropriately
        maintained for all students completing generic awards of this type.

        Schools are also responsible for ensuring that appropriate counselling and guidance
        procedures are in place to support these students to ensure that they receive an
        effective and properly supported student experience throughout.

        Generic awards can also be used to provide progression opportunities for students
        who, having embarked upon a specialist programme, decide, on the basis of either
        their academic performance or a change in their aspirations/interests, to transfer to a
        more general programme of study.

        All HND awards comprise of 240 credits. All credits associated with HND awards will
        be at Levels 4 and 5 such that all awards will include at least 120 credits at Level 4
        and at least 120 credits at Level 5.

        The amount of “specific credit” that an HND holder will be awarded when progressing
        to a degree programme will depend upon the extent to which the HND award
        completed satisfies, in general terms, the learning outcomes of modules within the
        degree programme. Students progressing to closely related degree programmes will
        normally be awarded between 120 and 240 (120 Level 4 and 120 Level 5) credits of
        “specific credit” on entry to the programme. In some circumstances, the level of
        specific credit awarded may also be constrained by the requirements of the PSRBs
        associated with the degree programmes concerned.

4.4.2   Higher National Certificate [HNC] Awards

        These awards involve a minimum of 1 year of vocationally orientated study but the
        approval panel should determine the normal length of study appropriate to a
        particular programme. The maximum period of registration will be determined by
        standard University regulations.

        All HNC awards comprise of a minimum of 120 credits. All credits associated with
        HNC awards will normally be at Level 4 although the use of Level 5 credits is
        permitted.

        The amount of “specific credit” that an HNC holder will be awarded when progressing
        to another programme will depend upon the extent to which the HNC award
        completed satisfies, in general terms, the learning outcomes of modules within the
        degree programme. Students progressing to closely related degree programmes will
        normally be awarded 120 Level 4 credits of “specific credit” on entry to the
        programme.

4.4.3   Certificate in Higher Education [CertHE] Awards

        This normally involves one year of full-time study (or equivalent) and is awarded for
        successful completion of a coherent programme of study comprising of 120 credits at
        Level 4 or above.
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        In addition to awards which have been designed for delivery as CertHE programmes,
        the University may also confer a CertHE on a student who, having satisfied in full, the
        requirements for progression to Stage 2 of a degree or DipHE award (i.e. having
        achieved 120 credits at Level 4 or above) decides to terminate her/his studies for
        personal reasons or fails to fully satisfy the requirements for success at the next
        stage.

4.4.4   Diploma in Higher Education [DipHE) Awards

        These awards normally involve 2 years of full-time study (or equivalent), and are
        awarded for successful completion of a coherent programme of study comprising of
        240 credits (with at least 120 credits at Level 5).

        In addition to awards which have been designed for delivery as DipHE programmes,
        the University may also confer a DipHE on a student who, having satisfied, in full, the
        requirements for progression to Stage 3 of a degree programme (i.e. having
        achieved 120 credits at each of Levels 4 and 5) decides to either terminate her/his
        studies for personal reasons or fails to fully satisfy the requirements for success at
        the next stage.

4.4.5   Postgraduate Certificate in Education [PgCE] Awards

        This normally involves one year of full-time study (or equivalent). The award is
        postgraduate in time, in that students admitted to the award must be graduates or
        equivalent but undergraduate in level. It is awarded for successful completion of
        specific study comprising of 120 credits at Level 6.

4.4.6   Certificate in Education [CertEd] Awards

        This normally involves the equivalent of one year of full-time study. It is awarded
        for successful completion of specific study comprising a total of 120 credits of which
        a minimum of 20 credits should be at Level 5 or above.

4.4.7   Graduate Conversion Diploma in Psychology Awards

        This award title is specifically approved for a conversion programme for graduates
        with a degree in a subject other than Psychology who wish to become Graduate
        members of the British Psychological Society [BPS].

        The award normally involves the equivalent of one year of full-time study. It is
        awarded for successful completion of specific study comprising a total of 120 credits,
        with a minimum 60 Level 5 credits and 60 Level 6 credits.

4.4.8   University Certificate in Professional Development [UCPD] and
        University Certificate in Advanced Professional Development [UCAPD] Awards [see
        Appendix A for further clarification of the use of titles UCPD/UCCE (and related
        award titles), and the management of these awards].

        These awards are flexible programmes of study comprising of modules which have a
        clear, and normally vocational, focus upon personal professional development.
        UCPD/UCAPD programmes are intended to provide a range of study opportunities to
        individuals wishing to complete small programmes of certificated learning which will
        underpin their continuing professional development. UCPD and UCAPD


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        programmes can exist as either formally approved programmes of study undertaken
        by groups of students, or as small individual programmes of learning taken either:

         in response to a particular study/training need or interest
          or
         as a “taster” programme prior to registering for a recognised academic award at
          CertHE, DipHE or degree level

        Programmes will be approved, in principle, by School Academic Standards
        Committees [SASCs] and formally reported into PDPC for title ratification.

        UCPD and UCAPD programmes normally comprise of at least 20 credits and at least
        60 credits of study respectively (with most UCPD and UCAPD modules being at
        Level 4, although they can comprise of credits at higher levels).

        Credit gained through successful completion of a UCPD award may be accredited
        towards a UCAPD award, and similarly credit gained through completion of either a
        UCPD or UCAPD award may be accredited towards an award (e.g. CertHE, HN
        awards, DipHE, Foundation Degree, or degree).

4.4.9   University Certificate in Continuing Education [UCCE] and
        University Certificate in Advanced Continuing Education [UCACE] Awards [see
        Appendix A for further clarification of the use of titles UCPD/UCCE (and related
        award titles), and the management of these awards].

        These awards are flexible programmes of modules which, despite their academic
        coherence, would not qualify for the use of the title “Professional Development”.

        Like UCPD and UCAPD, UCCE/UCACE programmes can exist as either formally
        approved programmes of study undertaken by groups of students, or as small
        individual programmes of learning taken:

         in response to a particular study/training need or interest
          or
         as a “taster” programme prior to registering for a recognised academic award at
          CertHE, DipHE or degree level

        UCCE and UCACE programmes normally comprise of at least 20 credits and at least
        60 credits respectively (with most UCCE and UCACE modules being at Level 4,
        although they can comprise of credits at higher levels).

        Credit gained through successful completion of a UCCE award may be accredited
        towards a UCACE award, and similarly credit gained through completion of either a
        UCCE or UCACE award may be accredited towards an award (e.g. CertHE, HN
        awards, DipHE, Foundation Degree, or degree).

        In many cases, UCCE and UCACE awards will involve 2 (or more) disciplines drawn
        from the same School, and are therefore the responsibility of that School. In cases
        where the disciplines involved are from different Schools, a decision will be taken in
        advance about which School will have responsibility for the organisation,
        administration and management of the programme.




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4.4.10 University Certificate in Foundation Studies [UCFS] Awards

        The “Certificate in Foundation Studies” in (named area of study) has been developed
        for pre-higher education “foundation level” study undertaken specifically to facilitate
        access to recognised HE awards. This is based on a minimum of 60 level „3‟ credits,
        for programmes which provide access to a University-level award, subject to
        application through the University approval process on a case-by-case basis. As
        these awards arise from quite specialist subject areas and are infrequently used,
        PDPC has delegated authority to SASCs to approve new award titles.

        Subject to SASCs‟ approval, Schools are responsible for liaising with Academic
        Registry to register the award on SITS.

4.5     Programme Types - Taught Postgraduate Programmes

        There are a number of categories of taught postgraduate awards available within the
        Scheme, namely:

4.5.1   Professional Doctoral Awards

        These awards (Doctor of Clinical Psychology [DClinPsy], Doctor of Health & Social
        Care [DHSC], Doctor of Business Administration [DBA], etc.) normally involve three
        years of full-time study (or equivalent), and are awarded for successful completion
        of a specified programme of study comprising of 540 Level 8 credits (5400 notional
        learning hours) of which no more than 1201 credits at Level 7 may be included,
        subject to the Level 7 credits being relevant to the programme as a whole.

        All professional doctorate programmes must contain a core element of advanced
        independent work of not less than 180 credits, and not more than 300 credits. The
        word length of the advanced independent work should be commensurate with the
        number of credits allocated and with Level 8 outcomes, normally between 25,000
        (180 credits) and 60,000 (300 credits).

        All professional doctorate programmes must include an element of research
        methods, defined as specific techniques required to conduct research in a particular
        discipline, minimally to the value of 60 credits (600 hours of notional learning time).
        The programme document must state clearly how and where in the programme this
        is achieved.

4.5.2   Taught Masters Awards

        These awards (MA, MSc, etc.) normally involve one year of full-time study (or
        equivalent part-time study), and are awarded for the successful completion of a
        specified programme of study comprising of 180 Level 7 credits (1800 notional
        learning hours).

        All Masters level programmes must contain a core element of advanced independent
        work in the form of a project or dissertation module which must be at least 60
        credits in size.




1
 Under discussion in light of Framework for Higher Education Qualifications [FHEQ] developments
which permit 180 credits at Level 7.
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                                   SECTION D1-CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME FRAMEWORK
4.5.3   Master in Research [MRes]

        Additional guidance has been produced for MRes awards [see Appendix C].

4.5.4   Postgraduate Diploma [PgD] Awards

        These are awarded for successful completion of a coherent programme of study
        comprising of 120 Level 7 credits (1200 notional learning hours).

        In addition to awards which have been designed for delivery as PgD programmes,
        the University may also confer the award of PgD on a student who, having satisfied,
        in full, the requirements for progression to the final stage of a Masters programme
        (i.e. having achieved 120 Level 7 credits) decides to either terminate her/his studies
        for personal reasons or fails to fully satisfy the requirements for progression to the
        next stage.

4.5.5   Postgraduate Certificate [PgC] Awards

        These are awarded for successful completion of a coherent programme of study
        comprising of 60 Level 7 credits (600 notional learning hours).

        In addition to awards which have been designed for delivery as PgC programmes,
        the University may also confer the award of PgC on a student who, having satisfied,
        in full, the requirements for progression to the Postgraduate Diploma stage of a
        masters programme (i.e. having achieved 60 Level 7 credits) decides to terminate
        her/his studies for personal reasons or fails to fully satisfy the requirements for
        progression to the next stage.

4.5.6   University Certificate in Postgraduate Professional Development [UCPPD] Awards

        These awards are flexible programmes of study comprising of modules which have a
        clear, and normally vocational, focus upon personal professional development.
        UCPPD programmes are intended to provide a range of study opportunities to
        individuals wishing to complete small programmes of certificated learning at Level 7
        which will underpin their continuing professional development.

        UCPPD normally comprise of at least 20 credits at Level 7. Credit gained through
        successful completion of a UCPPD award may be accredited towards an award (e.g.
        PgC, PgD, Masters degree), or may be offered as a fallback award.

4.5.7   University Certificate in Postgraduate Continuing Education [UCPCE] Awards

        These awards are flexible programmes of modules which, despite their academic
        coherence, would not qualify for the use of the title “Professional Development”.
        UCPCE programmes can exist as either formally approved programmes of study
        undertaken by groups of students, or as small individual programmes of learning.

        UCPCE programmes normally comprise of at least 20 credits at Level 7.

4.5.8   Professional Practitioner Qualification [PPQ] Awards

        This title is an interim award title only used for students studying on the Doctorate in
        Health Psychology. This award will be given to students who wish to achieve BPS
        chartered status as a Health Psychologist, but who do not wish to complete the


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                                   SECTION D1-CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME FRAMEWORK
      Advanced Independent Work, or who wish to take a significant break in their studies
      prior to completion of their Advanced Independent Work.

      It is not anticipated that the award would be utilised by any other Doctoral
      programmes as an interim award. Any further proposals for the use of this title would
      be considered by PDPC.

      Total credit rating and level: 240 Level 8 credits.

4.6   Level of Study

      In common with most other CAT Schemes, the University CAM Scheme incorporates
      the notion of “levels”, such that the “level” of credit attached to a module provides an
      indication of the level of academic outcomes achieved. Assigning a “level” to each
      module within a programme enables the achievement of Stage outcomes to be
      demonstrated and also facilitates the demonstration of progression of learning
      development and achievement within a programme. [Undergraduate Level
      Descriptors, Postgraduate Level Descriptors].

      In order to encourage and facilitate participation in higher education, the University
      has, as part of its Widening Participation agenda, introduced the concept of Level “3”
      modules which are modules of preparatory study designed to build confidence in key
      areas and support learners through the period of transition into higher education.

      The credit awarded for successful completion of modules can be at one of six
      different “levels” (Levels 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 respectively) as shown in Table 3 below:

                                  TABLE 3: LEVELS OF STUDY
        Level                             Normally associated with:
                  Pre-higher education “foundation level” study undertaken specifically to
           3
                  facilitate access to recognised HE awards.
                  Modules associated with the first stage/year of undergraduate degree
           4
                  full-time study (or equivalent study at HNC/D or CertHE level).
                  Modules associated with the second stage/year of undergraduate
           5      degree full-time study (or equivalent study at HNC/D or DipHE or
                  Foundation Degree level).
                  The third and final stage/year 3 (and/or 4) of undergraduate full-time
           6
                  study (or equivalent).
           7      Modules normally associated with taught postgraduate programmes.
                  Modules normally associated with specialist professional taught
           8
                  doctoral programmes.

      Depending upon the role and contribution of a module within the overall structure of a
      programme, it is permissible for either:

       the same module to be included within 2 programmes at different, but adjacent,
        “levels” of learning (most notably at Levels 5 and 6)
        or
       different modules at adjacent levels of learning to be delivered jointly

      For example, a module included as a Level 5 module within a narrowly focused
      single honours specialist degree programme could be appropriately offered as a
      Level 6 module within a more broad based or multidisciplinary programme e.g. a

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      specialist module in Financial Reporting could be offered at both Level 5 within a
      specialist BA (Hons) Accounting & Finance degree programme and at Level 6 within
      a more broad based BA (Hons) Business Studies programme.

      Similarly, a module taught as a “core” module at Level 5 within a specialist
      programme may be offered as a Level 6 “option” module for non-specialist students.

      In proposing modules for dual designation (i.e. for delivery at 2 different levels), it will
      therefore be necessary to complete separate Module Specification Forms for each of
      the levels at which the module will be offered on each of the programmes of which it
      forms a part.

      All modules approved for delivery at 2 different levels will need to be separately
      coded for each level and the Academic Registry will need to be notified accordingly.
      The students involved in each module will be separately assessed using criteria
      appropriate to learning outcomes at the level at which they are studying.

      Other situations exist however where 2 different modules at adjacent levels, OR 2
      different modules at Levels 6 and 7, share sufficient common knowledge and/or
      skills content that is appropriate for the teaching and learning strategies utilised to
      deliver both modules to be the same, to the point where the students involved may
      even share common learning materials and joint teaching but, the students involved
      in each module will be separately assessed using criteria appropriate to learning
      outcomes at the level at which they are studying. In such cases, the modules will be
      separately coded and each module will be approved with a full module description.

      The inclusion of Level 6 credit within a postgraduate programme is NOT permitted.

4.7   Assessment [University Marking Criteria].

      Assessment is the process through which learning is confirmed. Consequently, the
      assessment methods used within a module should:

       be appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed;

       match to the student profile involved;

       include clear and appropriate assessment criteria.

      Module designers should seek to be innovative in the methods of assessment
      adopted, but should remember that, for most students, their module is only one of a
      number of modules being studied at any one time.

      The potential for over-assessment increases with the flexibility of programmes and
      module tutors should take care to guard against over assessment either within a
      module (particularly where more than one mode of assessment is being considered)
      or across a programme. Normally, a maximum of 2 assessment components in any
      one module is permitted.

      Programme teams should ensure that students have, in good time, an assignment
      schedule which minimises the “bunching” of assessment at particular times of the
      year.

      Unless non-numerical grades are awarded, or a constraint has been imposed by an
      external PSRB, or a Variance has been formally agreed by the Regulatory
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                                  SECTION D1-CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME FRAMEWORK
      Frameworks Sub-Committee [RFSC], the pass mark for all modules at
      undergraduate level is 40% and at postgraduate level is 50%. Foundation Degree
      awards may utilise a combination of marks and grades.

      Standard Institutional Assessment and Progression Regulations exist for Higher
      National, Foundation, undergraduate, postgraduate and professional doctorate
      awards [see Section D2: Framework for Assessment, Award & Progression]. All
      deviations from these regulations must be formally approved by the RFSC, chaired
      by a nominee of the Chair of AQSPC.

4.8   Structure of the Academic Year

      The University‟s normal Undergraduate academic year is 28 weeks long. Modules
      may be delivered over the whole year or in shorter blocks as appropriate to the
      learning outcomes to be achieved and the optimal learning, teaching and
      assessment strategies identified for each of the modules concerned.

      Full-time Masters and Professional Doctoral programmes are normally based upon
      an extended academic year of 48 weeks duration.

4.9   Modes of Study

      A number of modes of study are available at both undergraduate and postgraduate
      level which include:

       full-time with attendance

       part-time with regular daytime attendance

       part-time evening only

       block attendance

       distance learning (including supported independent learning)

       work-based learning

       independent study

      The University is committed to making its academic provision as flexible and
      accessible as possible.

5.    RECOGNITION OF ACHIEVEMENT

      All students who successfully satisfy all of the assessment requirements for a module
      will be awarded the amount of credit associated with that module, at the relevant
      “level”.

      All students will receive or have electronic access to a record of progress following
      the end of each academic year showing:

       all the modules taken;




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                                 SECTION D1-CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME FRAMEWORK
         the status of their progress within each module e.g. passed, referred, deferred,
          credited or exempted;

         the grade/mark awarded (where assessment has been completed);

         the number, and level, of credits gained during the academic year.

        Upon leaving the Institution all qualifying students will, in addition to the Certification
        relating to any awards to which they are entitled, receive a Diploma Supplement
        showing:

         all modules passed, credited or exempted;

         the grades awarded;

         the overall number, and levels, of credits gained;

         programme details, including learning outcomes, etc.

5.1     Intermediate Awards

5.1.1   Undergraduate Programmes

        Excluding Edexcel HNC/D awards and Foundation Degrees, there are seven
        possible “intermediate” University awards at undergraduate level, namely the UCCE,
        the UCPD, the UCACE, UCAPD, the CertHE, the DipHE and the pass degree (at
        Honours).

        Each of these award titles can be used to describe a full programme of study which
        involves a quantity and level of learning which is below that required for an honours
        degree.

        These awards can also be made available as:

         “fallback” awards to certify the achievements of students who, for valid personal
           reasons, wish to terminate their studies at a particular stage prior to completion of
           the full honours programme
           or
         certificated recognition of the achievements of students who do not meet the full
          requirements of the higher award for which they were registered

        Any student who qualifies, on academic grounds, to progress to the next stage
        of the award for which (s)he was originally registered will not normally be
        offered an intermediate award, unless (s)he withdraws or is withdrawn from a
        programme holding sufficient credits for conferment of the intermediate award.
        Students who accept awards in these circumstances will not be permitted to
        use these credits towards completion of the higher level award within the same
        cohort.

        The requirements for conferment of a degree award i.e. the number of credits to be
        “gained” at each level to obtain the award (which may differ, at the margin, from the
        number of credits “studied” due to the possibility, in certain circumstances, of
        students being allowed to “carry” a failed module) are set out in the Undergraduate
        Assessment & Progression Regulations in Section D2: Framework for
        Assessment, Award & Progression.
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Students studying for an HND award by either full-time or part-time study may be
awarded an HNC as an intermediate award only on one of the following 2 bases:

 as a “fallback” award to certify the achievements of students who, for valid
  personal reasons, wish to terminate their studies at a particular stage prior to
  completion of the full HND award and have met the requirements for the HNC
  award; or

 to provide certificated recognition of the achievements of students who, despite
  satisfying the requirements for an HNC, do not meet the full requirements of the
  HND award for which they were registered

Any student who qualifies, on academic grounds, to progress to the next stage
of the award for which (s)he was originally registered will not normally be
offered an intermediate award, unless (s)he withdraws or is withdrawn from a
programme holding sufficient credits for conferment of the intermediate award.
Students who accept awards in these circumstances will not be permitted to
use these credits towards completion of the higher level award within the same
cohort.

The requirements of the various intermediate awards, in terms of the amount of
credits to be studied, are as shown in Table 4A and 4B below.

   TABLE 4A: MINIMUM UNDERGRADUATE AWARD REQUIREMENTS FOR
                      UNIVERSITY CERTIFICATES
                                   Minimum Total   Minimum Total
    Award         CATS Credits      Credits to be Notional Learning
                                      Studied          Hours
     UCCE          At least 20       At least 20        200
     UCPD          At least 20       At least 20        200
   UCACE or
                   At least 60       At least 60        600
    UCAPD




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                          SECTION D1-CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME FRAMEWORK
             TABLE 4B: MINIMUM UNDERGRADUATE AWARD REQUIREMENTS
                                                                       Minimum
                         Minimum            Minimum
                                                          Minimum        Total
                          Level 4        Level 5 and 6
            Award                                       Total Credits  Notional
                       Credits to be Credits to be
                                                        to be Studied  Learning
                          Studied            Studied
                                                                        Hours
            CertHE           120                 0       At least 120    1200
             HNC        At least 120             0       At least 120    1200
             HND        At least 120      At least 120        240        2400
            DipHE        Up to 120        At least 120   At least 240    2400
         Foundation
                             120          At least 120   At least 240    2400
            Degree
                                          At least 180
                                          (including at
            Degree           120                         At least 300    3000
                                           least 60 at
                                             Level 6)
                                          At least 240
           Honours                        (including at
                             120                         At least 360*   3600
            Degree                        least 120 at
                                             Level 6)
             PgCE             -          120 at Level 6       120        1200
                        Minimum of        Minimum of
            CertEd                                            120        1200
                             100           20 Level 5
                                          At least 120
           Graduate
                                          (including at
         Conversion
                              -            least 60 at   At least 120    1200
          Diploma in
                                          Level 5 and
         Psychology
                                         60 at Level 6)
         Professional    Minimum 120 (based on a
           Graduate      combination of Level 4 and      At least 120    1200
          Certificate           Level 5 credits)

        * Programmes which include periods of supervised (and in some cases accredited),
          industrial training may necessitate the achievement of in excess of 360 credits in
          order to qualify for the award of an honours degree.

        NOTE: The University also offers an award of “University Certificate in Foundation
              Studies” based on a minimum of 60 Level 3 credits for programmes which
              provide access to a University-level award, subject to application through
              the University approval process on a case-by-case basis.

5.1.2   Postgraduate Awards

        “Professional Doctorate awards” - subject to meeting the requisite regulations,
        students enrolling on a professional doctoral programme may exit with a Masters
        award. The student must achieve a minimum of 180 credits at Level 7/8 of which at
        least 60 credits must be achieved by a successful piece of Advanced Independent
        Work. Subject to meeting the requisite regulations for the programme and credit
        requirements, students may also be allowed to exit with a PgC or PgD (i.e. without
        the requirement for at least 60 credits via a dissertation or equivalent).

        The title of such awards will be determined at the approval stage of the programme.



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          Any student enrolling for a professional doctoral programme will not, normally, be
          permitted to receive an intermediate award unless (s)he withdraws (or is withdrawn)
          from a programme holding sufficient credits for the conferment of the intermediate
          award.

          “Taught Masters awards” – subject to achieving the requisite number of credits,
          students enrolling on a Masters programme, i.e. enrolling for MA, MSc, MBA etc.,
          may exit with either a PgC or PgD, and similarly students enrolling on a PgD
          programme may exit with a PgC. In exceptional circumstances, a student enrolling
          on a Masters degree, PgD or PgC may be awarded a UCPCE/UCPPD.

          Any student enrolling for a Masters or PgD award will not, normally, be permitted to
          receive an intermediate award unless (s)he withdraws (or is withdrawn) from a
          programme of study holding sufficient credits for that intermediate award.

          Students who have been awarded an intermediate postgraduate award under this
          Scheme will not be permitted to use those credits towards completion of the higher
          level award within the same cohort.

          Table 5 below illustrates the requirements of the various postgraduate intermediate
          awards, in terms of the amount of credits to be studied.

                   TABLE 5: MINIMUM POSTGRADUATE AWARD REQUIREMENTS
                                                                                Notional Learning
                       Award                         CATS Credits
                                                                                     Hours
                                              540 of which no more than
           Taught Doctorate                   1202 may be at Level 7 and           At least 5400
                                               the remainder at Level 8
           Professional Practitioner
                                                 At least 240 at Level 8           At least 2400
           Qualification [PPQ]

           Masters Degree                        At least 180 at Level 7           At least 1800

           Postgraduate Diploma                  At least 120 at Level 7           At least 1200

           Postgraduate Certificate*             At least 60 at Level 7             At least 600
           University Certificate in
           Postgraduate Professional             At least 30 at Level 7             At least 200
           Development [UCPPD]**
           University Certificate in
           Postgraduate Continuing               At least 20 at Level 7             At least 200
           Education [UCPCE]**

          * Any 60 credits at Level 7 can lead to the award of a generic PgCert
          ** UCPPD and UCPCE are normally flexible programmes of part-time modules.
             UCPPD awards are designed to reflect a clear focus of professional development
             whereas UCPCE awards are used to describe more diverse programmes.




2
    Under discussion in light of FHEQ developments which permit 180 credits at M Level.
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                                      SECTION D1-CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME FRAMEWORK
5.2       Use of Detailed Names/Titles for Awards

           any student who is registered for a degree level programme within the University
            may exit with an “un-named” CertHE or DipHE for successful completion of “at
            least 120 general credits at Level 4” and “240 general credits, including at least
            120 at Level 5” respectively.

              Any student who is registered for a HN programme under the University license
              may exit with an “un-named” CertHE for successful completion of “at least 120
              general credits at Level 4”.

           students exiting from a degree/higher national programme may only receive a
            “named” award at CertHE or DipHE level if the title of the CertHE and DipHE
            award has been approved at the point of approval of the programme and the
            exact requirements for each award have been specified on a Programme
            Specification Template.

              Schools wishing to introduce named CertHE or DipHE awards within programmes
              which are already in approval may do so by gaining approval of the titles of these
              awards by PDPC, via their SASC.

           UCPD/UCAPD/UCPPD may be named awards, subject to the name of the award
            being approved at the time of approval of the award and appropriate
            documentation completed.

           UCCE/UCACE awards will, normally, be un-named awards.

           Postgraduate Certificates [PgCs] awarded to students who, having enrolled on
            Masters or Postgraduate Diploma programmes, exit the programme early having
            successfully completed 60 Level 7 credits will normally be untitled.

          NOTE: Clarification on the use of titles UCPD/UCCE (and Related Awards) and the
                Management and Administration of those awards within the University is
                included as Appendix A.

5.3       Accreditation of Prior (Experiential) Learning [APEL]
          [See also Section D3: Accreditation of Prior Learning]

          As part of its “Lifelong Learning” agenda, the University wishes to actively encourage
          students who have successfully completed an HE award (at the University or another
          Institution) to progress to a further programme of study.

          Progression within the University is therefore encouraged and supported on the
          following basis:

           That, in order to qualify for any academic award of the University, a student
            entering a programme “with advanced standing”3 [see Table 6: Maximum Credit

3
  The term “advanced standing” refers to a situation where either an individual student or groups of students are admitted to a
programme of study with exemption from some part of that programme. For individual students “advanced standing” may be
agreed via AP(E)L procedures whereby a student‟s prior knowledge, whether acquired through study (certificated) or through
experience, can be recognised in terms of credits [see Section D3: Accreditation of Prior Learning for details of AP(E)L
procedures]. For categories or groups of students “advanced standing” may be agreed:
    Via a proposal made in programme documentation at the time of approval
    Via the process of articulation leading to admission with “advanced standing” as defined in Section E (Collaborative
     Provision) of the Quality Handbook

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                                              SECTION D1-CREDIT ACCUMULATION & MODULAR SCHEME FRAMEWORK
  Claims below] must study and successfully complete:

  either: at least 25% of the award for which (s)he is registered
  or:     at least 60 credits of study (at the highest level associated with the award)

  whichever is the greatest

 Credit awarded in recognition of prior achievement of another academic
  qualification will normally be given towards awards at a higher level than that for
  which credit is being sought e.g. students who have successfully completed an
  HND award can be given credit towards a degree in a related area, and similarly
  students holding a Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma can be given
  credit towards a Masters level award in the same or related field.

  Students who have successfully completed an award at a particular level may,
  under certain circumstances, be able to receive credit for that achievement
  towards another qualification at the same (or even a lower) level, but the
  circumstances under which such credit was being awarded would need to be very
  carefully articulated and approved by the relevant SASC e.g. a “non-graduate”
  student who has successfully completed a Postgraduate Diploma may possibly be
  able to receive credit for that study towards an honours degree, if there is clear
  evidence of prior achievement of the learning outcomes of some of the modules
  within the degree programme.

  Credit for prior experiential or certificated learning will NOT normally be granted in
  relation to UCCE/UCPD/UCPCE/UCPPD awards, except in cases where the
  credit studied forms part of a defined UCPD or UCCE award. In such cases, 10
  credits may be claimed.

 Only in exceptional circumstances can the APEL procedures be used to
  allow credit to be granted towards a postgraduate award for academic
  achievement at undergraduate level.

 Once a student has been offered and accepted an award at a particular level,
  progression to a programme at a higher level is not automatic and will normally be
  the subject of an admissions decision. For example, due to the overall profile of
  experience and academic attainment associated with some of the University‟s
  Postgraduate awards it is not automatic that a student who registers for,
  completes and is awarded a PgC can progress immediately to a PgD within that
  field.




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        Candidates may be permitted to make claims for credit against awards for which they
        are registered as follows:

                              TABLE 6: MAXIMUM CREDIT CLAIMS
                      Award                       Maximum Credit Available
          UCFS                                                None
          UCPD or UCCE                                   normally none4
          UCAPD or UCACE                                    30 credits
          CertEd                                            60 credits
          CertHE                                            60 credits
          HNC                                               60 credits
          HND                          180 credits (including no more than 60 at Level 5)
          DipHE                        180 credits (including no more than 60 at Level 5)
          Graduate Conversion
                                                              None
          Diploma in Psychology
          Foundation Degree            180 credits (including no more than 60 at Level 5)
          Degree                                 240 credits at Levels 4 and 5
          Professional Graduate
                                              see specific programme document
          Certificate [ProfGradCert]
          Degree with Honours          300 credits (including no more than 60 at Level 6)
          PgCE                                              60 credits
          UCPPD or UCPCE                                      None
          PgC                                               30 credits
          PgD                                               60 credits
          Masters                                          120 credits
          Professional Practitioner
                                              see specific programme document
          Qualification
          Professional Doctorate              see specific programme document

        NOTE:

         in the case of DipHE, degree and degree with honours awards, the maximum
          credit awarded for claims based predominantly on experiential learning would
          normally be capped at 120 credits less than the total credit requirement for
          the award, and credit would not normally be awarded towards the
          project/dissertation at the final stage of a degree or degree with honours
          programme

         claims for credit which relate to HNC/D awards should be made on a unit-by-unit
          basis by students providing a portfolio of evidence of prior achievement of the
          specified learning outcomes of the HNC/D units (modules) concerned

         in the case of HND, a minimum of 60 credits at Level 5 must be achieved via
          study of Teesside University approved modules

         for claims against a whole Masters award, based predominantly on experiential
          learning, the maximum credit awarded would not, normally, be more than 80
          credits, and credit would not normally be awarded towards the advanced
          independent work (project/dissertation) at the Masters stage



4
  Normally credit claims will not be accepted towards UCPD or UCCE awards unless the credit studied forms part
of a defined UCPD or UCCE award. In such cases, 10 credits may be claimed.
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       Accreditation of Prior Learning [APL] Certified or Experiential requirements for
        Professional Doctorate awards must be clearly specified at the programme
        approval stage.

       existing credits may be re-used for a new award, providing the student studies
        and acquires at least an additional 60 credits for any such new award.

5.4   Pro Rata Credit

      The University has adopted a modular structure in which modules are normally 20
      credit or multiples thereof. Students are expected to enrol on a module and to
      attempt to gain the specified number of credits for that module. Whilst there is some
      flexibility in the design of delivery patterns, many such modules will run over the
      course of one academic year.

      There may be circumstances in which students are not able to study with the
      University for a whole academic year and where they do not need the full number of
      credits that would be gained by completion of the module. An example would be
      exchange students from semesterised institutions attending Teesside for their first
      semester, leaving in February and needing to transfer back to their home institution
      with an appropriate number of credits. In some cases, the needs of individual
      students may be met via a learning contract.

      In the case of groups of students, Schools may make provision for those students to
      leave the University part-way through the delivery of a module or modules, having
      taken a summative assessment(s) designed to allow them to acquire the requisite
      number of credits. Such students must be provided with an opportunity for
      reassessment if appropriate.

      Any such proposals should be approved at a SASC normally in advance of the
      academic year concerned, using the SASC Pro Rata Credit Proposal Form [see
      Appendix B]. The SASC will need to agree the reasons for the proposal, the nature
      and timing of any proposed summative assessment, the number of credits, the
      processes for moderation of proposed assessments and results (including External
      Examiner scrutiny) and the process for reporting results to Module Boards.

      Schools should identify a list of persons who may bring such proposals to SASCs but
      in all cases, the proposal must be agreed by the Module Leader and the Section
      Leader.

      Following approval at SASC, the Secretary should notify the Academic Registry of
      the SASC‟s decision, so that appropriate SITS action may be taken. This will then be
      confirmed to Schools by the Academic Registry.

      Any approved proposal will be valid for one year only and will lapse at the end of that
      year unless re-approved. The intention is to ensure that there is no accumulation of
      such modules over time with the associated potential for confusion and uncertainty.

      SASCs may find it useful to designate a meeting in the annual cycle where
      consideration of pro rata credit proposals is a standing item.




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                                           Section D1– Credit Accumulation & Modular Scheme Framework



                                                                                     Appendix A




          CLARIFICATION OF THE USE OF TITLES UCPD/UCCE
      (AND RELATED AWARD TITLES) AND THE MANAGEMENT AND
     ADMINISTRATION OF THOSE AWARDS WITHIN THE UNIVERSITY


1.   TITLES

     The titles University Certificate in Professional Development [UCPD] and University
     Certificate in Advanced Professional Development [UCAPD] should only be used to
     describe programmes of learning, involving at least 20 and 60 undergraduate credits
     of learning respectively, and 20 at Level 7 for University Certificate in Postgraduate
     Professional Development [UCPPD], which have a clear vocational focus upon
     personal professional development within one academic subject area/field of study or
     2 appropriately linked subject areas/fields of study.

     The titles University Certificate in Continuing Education [UCCE] and University
     Certificate in Advanced Continuing Education [UCACE] should be used to describe
     ALL other flexible programmes of learning involving at least 20 and 60 credits of
     learning respectively, i.e. programmes of learning which either span 2 or more fields
     of unrelated study or which, despite their academic coherence, would not normally be
     seen as qualifying as „professional development‟.

2.   MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

     All UCPD/UCAPD/UCPPD awards will have a clear subject underpinning and will be
     administered, delivered, assessed and quality assured, by the relevant School.

     UCPD/UCAPD/UCPPD awards will be approved, in principle, by the relevant School
     Academic Standards Committee [SASC], subject to final ratification of the title by the
     Portfolio Development Policy Committee [PDPC].

     Individual Schools may choose to either:

      approve a range of individual UCPD/UCAPD/UCPPD awards
     or
      approve one or more UCPD/UCAPD/UCPPD “frameworks”

     UCPD/UCAPD/UCPPD awards may only be made to students in respect of
     programmes which have been approved by a SASC prior to the students enrolling
     on the programme.

     UCCE/UCACE awards undertaken by individual students are not subject to any
     formal programme approval process, but UCCE/UCACE awards which are to be
     offered on a cohort basis should be approved by the appropriate SASC.




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                                            Section D1– Credit Accumulation & Modular Scheme Framework




       All subject based modules contributing to UCPD/UCAPD/UCPPD and
       UCCE/UCACE awards will be delivered by the appropriate School and the
       performance of students in those modules will be considered by the relevant Module
       Assessment Board within that School.

       All UCPD/UCAPD/UCPPD/UCCE/UCACE awards will be awarded at Award Boards
       within relevant Schools. All University Certificate modules must go through a Module
       Assessment Board, even if no External Examiner is present.

       External Examiners are not appointed for undergraduate awards of 60 credits or less
       and postgraduate awards of less then 60 credits, unless required by Professional,
       Statutory & Regulatory Bodies.


NOTE: The procedure for approval of UC Award Titles is outlined in Section B: Portfolio
      Development Planning Handbook and the programme approval process is
      outlined in Section C1: Approval & Review of Programmes Handbook.




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                                               Section D1– Credit Accumulation & Modular Scheme Framework



                                                                                         Appendix B




                            School of …………………………………


              SCHOOL ACADEMIC STANDARDS COMMITTEE [SASC]
                       PRO RATA CREDIT PROPOSAL
              (to be forwarded to the Chair of the SASC for submission to SASC)

                           ACADEMIC YEAR 20___ TO 20___


1.                 Title
     Module
                   Code
2.   Students to which pro
     rata credit will be applied
3.   Reasons for the proposal

4.   Proposed Summative
     Assessment Mechanism
     Timing of such
5.
     Assessment
     Number of credits to be
6.
     awarded
7.   Process for moderation
     and External Examiner
     scrutiny
     Process for confirming
8.   achievement of the
     credits
9.   We confirm our support for the proposal as outlined above:

     Signed: ……………………………………………….. Date: ……………………………..
                 Module Leader
     Name: ……………………………………………………………………………….…………..
                                            (please print)

     Signed: ……………………………………………….. Date: ……………………………..
                 Section Leader
     Name: ……………………………………………………………………………….…………..
                                            (please print)
10. Approved by SASC:                        YES                                    NO
    Date of SASC Meeting:
    SASC Minute Ref:

     Signed: ……………………………………………………..…………………………………...
                      Chair/Secretary of SASC


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                                           Section D1– Credit Accumulation & Modular Scheme Framework



                                                                                     Appendix C




                          GENERIC MRes FRAMEWORK

1.   STRUCTURE

     All newly proposed Master in Research [MRes] degrees would be expected to follow
     the basic structure depicted in the table below. The initial 60 credits will form a
     taught induction period. At least 60 of the remaining 120 credits must be devoted to
     a research project, with the remaining credits being research-focused training.
     Modules may be delivered concurrently. The taught modules may be drawn from
     existing Masters‟ provision, including generic and discipline-focused training. The
     discipline-focused training and research project topic should reflect the subject area
     named in the MRes degree, e.g. Environmental Sciences. New proposals should
     consider how the MRes programme meets the requirements of the Researcher
     Development Statement.

     Applicants should, normally, have an Honours degree (at least 2.1) in an appropriate
     related discipline, or an equivalent relevant qualification/experience.

                               UNIVERSITY MRes FRAMEWORK
                                 Induction: Generic
                                                        Research
                                   and Discipline-                                      Research
                                                    Training/Research
                                   Specific Taught                                       Project
                                                      Project Set Up
                                      Modules
       Minimum Number of                                                                   60
                                           60                         60
        Credits at Level 7                                                             (minimum)
              Stage                                   PgD                                MRes

2.   ASSESMENT

     For taught modules, it is expected that assessment will be linked to the students‟
     PDP, including forms of assessment linked to approved modules. The research
     project will be assessed via dissertation (and other means as appropriate to the type
     of project). Students can exit upon successful completion of PgD modules. All
     elements of the programme will be overseen by Masters Progression & Award
     Boards.

3.   PROGRESSION TO PhD

     The MRes is designed to prepare students for progression onto a PhD programme.
     The MRes can ensure that prospective students are well prepared to move efficiently
     and effectively onto a research degree programme, but students will be expected to
     satisfy normal requirements for entry onto a PhD programme.




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