Language Assessment Templates by lkx18630

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									     Developing Language Proficiency
     through Assessment in
     French as a Second Language




A collaborative professional development project of the Edmonton
Regional Learning Consortium (ERLC) the Alberta Assessment
Consortium (AAC), and the Institute for Innovation in Second
Language Education (IISLE) in Edmonton Public Schools
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        Who are you?


Introduce yourself, and tell us:

   school/ jurisdiction
   grade level of FSL you teach
   something you hope to get out of this
    workshop




                                            2
Agenda
1.   Workshop goals

2.   The big picture

3.   A current snapshot

4.   Role of curricular documents

5.   Principles & purposes of assessment

6.   Assessment strategies & tools

7.   Future directions


                                           3
                                                        p.
Workshop Goals

   Strengthen understanding of the overarching goal
    of FSL Program of Studies

   Reflect on current assessment practices and
    explore new assessment strategies

   Discuss and explore how assessment can be used
    to achieve functional language proficiency, using
    Alberta curricular documents

   Select assessment tools and strategies for use in
    the FSL classroom



                                                         4
The Big Picture: What is it?

   Examine the photo puzzles at your
    table.
   How many can you identify?




                                        5
What does it mean?

   What is the forest? What is both the
    forest and the trees of:
       French as a Second Language
       Classroom assessment
       Language proficiency




                                       6
The Big Picture for FSL:
Building Language Proficiency

Language Proficiency
 What someone can do in a language



Proficiency assessment
 “assessment of what someone can
  do/knows in relation to the
  application of the subject in the real
  world.” (Council of Europe)

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What‟s happening in assessment?
Assessment in FSL for Term ___
                                    List language
                                     assessment tasks
                                     that you typically
                                     use to gather
                                     information for
                                     FSL in a term.
                                    Snowball time!




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 What‟s happening in assessment?
Tally the data in your group. Which language
skills do the language assessments fit best
with?

    Oral production    Oral interaction

      Listening          Reading
    comprehension     comprehension

            Written production



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√ Proficiency Checkpoint

   Look at the assessment strategies
    listed

   Which of these reflect a real-life
    application of language use?




                                         10
The „front matter‟… matters!
THE OVERARCHING GOAL of the FSL Program of
Studies

“The overarching goal of this program of
studies, then, is to develop students who are
sufficiently competent in French so that they
can function in the language and culture
outside the confines of the classroom.”

           p.8, French as a Second Language

           Nine-year Program of Studies (Grades 4-12)
                                                   11
The Big Picture for FSL:
Building Language Proficiency

Language Proficiency
 What someone can do in a language



Proficiency assessment
 “assessment of what someone can
  do/knows in relation to the
  application of the subject in the real
  world.” (Council of Europe)

                                       12
FSL Program of Studies

   General outcomes

   Specific outcomes




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General Outcomes

   Communication

   Language

   Culture

   Language Learning Strategies


                                   14
Specific Outcomes

   the details of what students must know
    and be able to do at each grade

   exit outcomes




                                             15
Car Metaphor

Driver: Communication

Front seat passenger: Language

Passenger: Culture

Passenger: Language Learning
     Strategies

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What‟s new?
                  Program
                  Articulation
                  Documents
                 grade 4-6
                 grade 7-9
                 grade 10-12




                                 17
Why a Program Articulation
document?
   Provides a new focus on Communicative
    Targets (language functions) while still
    addressing existing general and specific
    outcomes

   Assists teachers to interpret the Program
    of Studies document to ensure the
    development of language proficiency




                                                18
Focus on Communicative Targets &
Overarching Goal

   What do the overarching goal and
    the Communicative Targets have in
    common?




                                        19
                                               .
Think about…

Because students        then as a teacher, I
need to . . .           need to . . .
•function in French
outside the classroom




                                                   20
Linking curriculum to assessment

   We‟ve done lots of thinking about
    the FSL curricular documents…

   Now what about assessment?




                                        21
Principles and Purposes of
Assessment


Establishing a Framework for
Classroom Assessment




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The Key Visual . . .

a framework for classroom assessment




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Agenda
1.   Workshop goals

2.   The big picture

3.   A current snapshot

4.   Role of curricular documents

5.   Principles & purposes of assessment

6.   Assessment strategies & tools

7.   Future directions


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Pause Café




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Assessment Strategies vs.
Assessment Tools

   Assessment Strategies are how you
    gather information to find out what
    the students can do in French
    (e.g. observation)


   Assessment Tools are what you use
    to record that information
    (e.g. observational checklist)


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Assessment Strategies to build
language proficiency

How do we gather evidence of
learning?




                                 32
Examples of Assessment Strategies

   Observations
   Self-reflection
   Peer Coaching
   Teacher Feedback
   Performance Tasks/Projects
   Assignments
   Tests


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Assessment Strategies
   Review the FSL tasks (with Communicative
    Targets) on the handout.

   Discuss your choices with an elbow partner

   Debrief as a large group




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To build language proficiency…
   Which types of assessment strategies
    help students build French language
    proficiency?

   Which types of assessment strategies
    may have less impact on French language
    proficiency?

   Which assessment strategies focus on
    about what students can DO in French
    rather than just what they know about
    French.

                                            35
Assessment Strategies
A balanced assessment plan is essential
to gather evidence of the range of
learning within our curriculum.




                                    36
Flashback!
   think about your most memorable
    language assessment experience as a
    student
   rate it on a scale of 1 to 10 (10 is high)
   line out
   talk to the person next to you in the line
   If your experience was positive, what
    made it so?
   If your experience was negative, what
    could have improved it?


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Language Performance
  Assessment Tasks




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Why are performance assessment
tasks so teacher-friendly?
    Performance assessment tasks are great for FSL because
    they:

   Address a number of outcomes at the same time
   Allow students to demonstrate what they can do in French
    in a tangible way
   Engage students in learning over an extended period of
    time
   Help to generate a grade (generally)
   Naturally incorporate assessment for learning strategies,
    even if they are used for assessment of learning




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What is a performance assessment task?

   a meaningful, real-life task that
    enables students to demonstrate
    what they know and can do in
    situations like those they will
    encounter outside the classroom as
    well as in situations that simulate
    how people do their work



                                          40
Authentic language

   What does real-life, authentic
    language use mean?

   What is “authentic” mean to the
    students?




                                      41
Authentic, or not?


   Find someone in the room you have
    not yet worked with.

   Determine if each of the FSL
    scenarios on your handout are
    authentic…or not.


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Debrief




          43
Snowball fight revisited




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Points to Ponder

. . . culminating [assessment]
performances should be occasions
of pleasure.
                            Gardner (2000)

  We don‟t mark students while
   they are learning
              Alberta Assessment Consortium



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                                    p.

      ‘Made in Alberta’
 Language Assessment Tasks
Free Shopping on the AAC
website!
www.aac.ab.ca → Performance
Assessment Materials → Assessment
Material → Second Languages →
French as a Second Language



                                     46
Evaluation Tools
Where and how do we record our
observations and evaluations of student
learning?




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Evaluation Tools

   Evaluation tools are where and how
    we record our observations and
    evaluations of student learning.




                                     48
Evaluation Tools Jigsaw


   Review your sample evaluation tool
    with your group

   For each tool identify:
       key characteristics
       advantages/disadvantages in an FSL
        classroom
       if it helps improve students‟ French
        language proficiency.

                                               49
Descriptive Feedback

   Uses only specific, descriptive,
    written (or oral) feedback

   Needs no letter grades, percentage,
    number rankings




                                       50
Checklist

   Uses “yes/not yet” descriptors

   Comment column is optional




                                     51
Rating Scale

   Frequency, consistency or
    independence of occurrence

   Comment column is optional




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Rubric

   Describes levels of quality

   Provides a „word picture‟ of what
    student work at each level „looks
    like‟




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A note about rubrics for FSL

   First criteria statement(s) focus on
    message (making meaning)

   Beware the „double dip‟

   Be sure expectations are reasonable
    for curricular and cognitive level


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      ‘Made in Alberta’
 Assessment Feedback Tasks
www.aac.ab.ca → Tools and Templates
→ Feedback Tools and Templates

**Make sure you have your username and
password!



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“I Can” statements

   I Can statements are frequently
    used by teachers to help strengthen
    instruction and assessment




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Creating great FSL I Can statements

   Tie it to curriculum
   Reflect communicative intent,
    rather than discrete grammatical
    skills or vocabulary areas
   Use student-friendly language
   Use to frame instruction and
    assessment


                                       57
Think about…

   Look at the „I Can‟ statements on
    your handout.

   Do each fit the criteria for great „I
    Can‟ statements?




                                            58
Developing I Can statements

   Look at the AAC language task,
    developed by FSL teachers.

   What do you think the „I Can‟
    statements should be for this task?

   How should the „I Can‟ statements
    be used?

                                          59
I Can statements are international!




                                  60
Future directions in language
assessment

   Common European Framework of
    Reference (CEFR)

   European Language Portfolio (ELP)




                                        61
Common European Framework of
Reference (CEFR)




The Council of Europe developed
 the CEFR to provide descriptions of
 language proficiency at different
 levels
www.coe.int/portfolio

                                       62
Common European Framework of
Reference (CEFR)


   Describes levels of proficiency in
    language skill areas: oral production,
    oral interaction, written production,
    listening, reading

   Is the basis for the European
    Language Portfolio (ELP)



                                         63
European Language Portfolio (ELP)




   The European Language Portfolio
    (ELP) is a means of recording and
    reflecting on skills and experiences
    in different languages, acquired in
    school or outside.

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How does this „fit‟ with Alberta?

   Promotes self-reflection through “I
    can” statements

   Focuses on language proficiency
    (rather than deficiency)

   Task-based language learning


                                          65
                                                        p.
Workshop Goals

   Strengthen understanding of the overarching goal
    of FSL Program of Studies

   Reflect on current assessment practices and
    explore new assessment strategies

   Discuss and explore how assessment can be used
    to achieve functional language proficiency, using
    Alberta curricular documents

   Select assessment tools and strategies for use in
    the FSL classroom



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       Thank you for your participation.

     We invite you to complete an evaluation form.




A collaborative professional development project of the Edmonton
Regional Learning Consortium (ERLC) the Alberta Assessment
Consortium (AAC), and the Institute for Innovation in Second
Language Education (IISLE) in Edmonton Public Schools
                                                                   67

								
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