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					Guide for candidates
and agents


Local Government elections in Northern Ireland
Thursday 5 May 2005
Contents
1    Introduction                                        3

2    Roles and responsibilities - who does what?         5

3    Deadlines - the election timetable                  8

4    Becoming a candidate                                9

5    Getting nominated                                   11

6    The election agent                                  18

7    Other assistance: polling agents, counting agents
     and tellers                                         21

8    During your election campaign                       24

9    Polling day                                         29

10   The count                                           31

11   After the election                                  35

12   Your election expenses                              37

Appendices

1    Miscellaneous documents                             42

2    Contact details for Area Electoral Offices          47

3    Contact details for Deputy Returning Officers/
     Chief Executives                                    49




                                2
1        Introduction
1.1      This guide was produced by the Electoral Office for Northern Ireland and the
         Electoral Commission. It aims to provide practical advice for anyone who
         wants to stand as a candidate at the Local Government General Elections in
         Northern Ireland on 5 May 2005. It covers the whole election process from
         nomination to the declaration of the result. It includes relevant factual material,
         as well as a guide to sources of further information. Standing for election can
         be a complicated business, but we hope that this guide will make it as
         straightforward as possible.

How to use this guide
1.2      This guidance covers each of the main steps towards standing as a candidate
         for election to a District Council. This advice should complement, rather than
         replace or replicate, other sources of information produced by political parties
         or others.

1.3      The advice is provided as a guide to the requirements for candidates and
         agents during the election. It should not be relied on as legally definitive and
         the Electoral Office for Northern Ireland and the Electoral Commission cannot
         accept any responsibility for any errors or omissions, or any act arising from
         them. If candidates or agents have any doubts about a particular point they
         are strongly recommended to consult the appropriate legislation and seek their
         own legal advice.

Statutory references
1.4       References are made in this guide to the legislation which underpins the local
         government election process. The full titles of the Acts and regulations are
         provided below


Abbreviation of Acts

Abbreviation             Full title
ELA 1962                 Electoral Law Act (Northern Ireland) 1962
1972 Order               The Electoral Law (Northern Ireland) Order 1972 – No. 1264 (NI13)
LGA 1972                 The Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 1972
1985 MP Order            The Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Northern Ireland) Order
                         1985 – No. 1208
1985 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) Order 1985 – No. 454
1985 Act                 The Elections (Northern Ireland) Act 1985
1987 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) (Amendment ) Order 1987 – No. 168
EA Act 1989              Elected Authorities (Northern Ireland) Act 1989
1990 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) Amendment Order 1990 – No. 595
1991 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) Amendment Order 1991 – No. 1715
1992 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) Amendment Order 1992 – No. 809
1992 MP Order            The Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Northern Ireland) Order
                         1992 – No. 810
1993 Order               District Electoral Areas (Northern Ireland) Order 1993 – No. 226
1995 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) (Amendment) Order 1995
1995 Regulations         The Local Government Elections (Changes to the Franchise and
                         Qualifications of Members) Regulations 1995 No. 194
1997 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) (Amendment) Order 1997
1998 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) (Amendment) Order 1998
PPERA 2000               Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000
2001 Order               The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) (Amendment) Order 2001

                                             3
Abbreviation   Full title
2002 Order     The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) (Amendment) Order 2002
EF Act 2002    Electoral Fraud (Northern Ireland) Act 2002
2003 Order     The Local Elections (Northern Ireland) (Amendment) Order 2003




                                  4
2      Roles and responsibilities - who does what?
2.1    A number of organisations and individual officers are responsible for various
       aspects of Local Government elections in Northern Ireland. Their respective
       roles and duties are described below.

The Electoral Office for Northern Ireland
2.2    The Electoral Office for Northern Ireland (EONI) is the organisation which
       supports the Chief Electoral Officer in carrying out his statutory
       responsibilities. The EONI consists of a headquarters based in Belfast and
       nine Area Electoral Offices located strategically across Northern Ireland.

2.3    The Chief Electoral Officer (CEO) is appointed by the Secretary of State for
       Northern Ireland under section 14 of the Electoral Law Act (Northern Ireland)
       1962 (as substituted by Article 6 of the Electoral Law (Northern Ireland) Order
       1972). He is an independent officer and is the person who is ultimately
       responsible for the conduct of all elections in Northern Ireland. He acts as the
       sole Returning Officer for all elections in Northern Ireland.

2.4    The Chief Electoral Officer is assisted by staff based at the EONI’s
       headquarters and at nine Area Electoral offices each of which is managed by
       an Area Electoral Officer. Their role is primarily to assist the CEO in duties
       related to managing elections and compiling the register and they act as the
       main point of contact between the Electoral Office and the Deputy Returning
       Officers at Local Government elections in Northern Ireland. They will be
       responsible for recruiting and training staff, arranging polling stations,
       delivering poll cards, approval of absent votes, opening of absent votes,
       preparing polling stationery and equipment and queries on registration and the
       Electoral Identity card. As a candidate you should liaise directly with the
       relevant Area Electoral Office on these matters.

2.5    Contact details for each Area Electoral Office and details of which District
       Council areas they have responsibility for are given in Appendix 2.

2.6    The CEO can be contacted at the EONI headquarters:

       St Anne’s House,
       15 Church Street,
       Belfast BT1 1ER

       Tel: 028 9023 9431
       Email: info@eoni.gov.uk




                                          5
Deputy Returning Officers
2.7    At Local Government elections, the Chief Executives of the Councils are
       appointed as Deputy Returning Officers.           The twenty six DROs are
       responsible to the RO for conducting various aspects of the election within
       their own Council for the relevant number of District Electoral Areas which that
       may cover. DROs will be responsible for taking nominations, printing ballot
       papers, the conduct of the poll, the issue of postal ballot papers and the
       counting of votes. As a candidate you should liaise directly with the DRO and
       his staff on all these matters. The list of Council addresses and names of the
       Chief Executives acting as DROs is shown in Appendix 3.

2.8    It important to note that the Returning Officer, Deputy Returning Officers and
       their staff will act impartially in their dealings with candidates and agents at all
       times during the conduct of the election. All such officers are not accountable
       to the government or local authorities for matters relating to elections, but are
       independent officers answerable to the courts.

2.9    At various stages of the election the RO, a DRO or an Area Electoral Officer
       may also appoint staff to help run the election. Any staff appointed for the
       duration of the election period are under the direction and control of the
       Returning Officer, irrespective of their normal employment. The DRO is
       required to appoint a presiding officer for each polling station in the electoral
       area and may also appoint other staff to assist him in the conduct of the
       election, including:

       •   staff for the issue and receipt of postal votes;
       •   polling clerks;
       •   counting clerks.

2.10   It is important to note that the Returning Officer, Deputy Returning Officers
       and their staff are not responsible for monitoring the conduct of candidates,
       agents and campaigners, and any concerns with regards to the conduct of
       candidates, agents or campaigners should be brought to the attention of the
       police.

The Electoral Commission
2.11   The Electoral Commission is an independent statutory authority established in
       November 2000, following the commencement of the Political Parties,
       Elections and Referendums Act 2000. The Commission is headed by a
       Chairman with four other Commissioners. The Chairman and Commissioners
       do not have connections to any political party and the Commission is not
       accountable to the Government. It reports directly to Parliament through a
       committee chaired by the Speaker of the House of Commons.

2.12   The Commission is responsible for overseeing a number of aspects of
       electoral law – the registration of political parties and third parties, monitoring
       and publication of significant donations to registered political parties and the
       regulation of national party spending on election campaigns. The Commission
       also has a role in promoting voter awareness. However it has no direct role in
       relation to Local Government Elections in Northern Ireland.

2.13   The Commission has primary responsibility for providing advice and
       assistance on electoral matters to all those involved in elections, including
       administrators, political parties and candidates. The first point of contact for

                                            6
       candidates and agents seeking advice and guidance at these elections should
       be the appropriate Deputy Returning Officer or Area Electoral Officer.
       Commission staff may provide general advice on any matter discussed in this
       guide.

2.14   The Electoral Commission (Belfast Office) can be contacted at:

       Seatem House
       28-32 Alfred Street
       BELFAST BT2 8EN

       Tel: 9089 4020
       Email: infonorthernireland@electoralcommission.org.uk

2.15   It should be noted, however, that any such advice will be given as
       guidance only, and should not be relied on as legally definitive.
       Candidates or agents in any doubt on specific points should consult the
       appropriate legislation and seek their own legal advice.




                                        7
3 Deadlines – the election timetable
3.1      Polling day for the Local Government General Election in Northern Ireland in
         2005 is Thursday 5 May 2005. Certain key dates and deadlines are included
         in the election timetable, and are shown in Table 2 below. If no time is
         specified as the deadline for an event or requirement (e.g. noon or 5pm), then
         the deadline will be midnight on that day. Neither the Returning Officer nor the
         Deputy Returning Officer has discretion to extend any deadline.

Election timetable for Local Government General elections, May 2005.

Event                                                       Day
Notice of election:
to be published not later than                              Wednesday 30 March

Deadline for registration of political parties to field
candidates at the election:                                 Wednesday 30 March

Delivery of nomination papers:
between 10am and 5pm on                                     Monday 11 April and Tuesday 12
                                                            April

Last day for notice of appointment of election agents:
not later than 5pm on                                       Tuesday 12 April

Last day for withdrawals of candidature:
not later than 5pm on                                       Tuesday 12 April

Objections to nominations:
Not later than 6pm on                                       Tuesday 12 April

Statement of persons nominated and notice of poll:
as soon as possible after 6pm on                            Tuesday 12 April

Last day for new applications to vote by post or proxy or
to change or cancel an existing
postal vote or proxy vote appointment:*
not later than 5pm on                                       Thursday 14 April

Last day for new applications to vote by post or proxy
due to unforeseen illness or employment:
not later than 5pm on                                       Tuesday 26 April

Last day for notice of appointment of sub-agents, polling
agents and counting agents:
not later than 5pm on                                       Tuesday 3 May

Polling day 7am to 10pm*                                    Thursday 5 May

Count commences:                                            Monday 9 May

Last day for receipt of return of election expenses of      35 days after the day the result of
candidates:                                                 the elections is declared




                                                8
4     Becoming a candidate
4.1   In order to become a candidate for election to a council in Northern Ireland
      you must be sure you are eligible to stand, and then submit a set of
      nomination papers (see section 5, Getting nominated).

Who can be a candidate?
4.2   To be eligible to stand as a candidate for election to a council in Northern
      Ireland, you must on the day you are nominated and, if there is a poll, on the
      day of your election be

      •   at least 21 years old; and
      •   a British citizen or a citizen of the Irish Republic or the Commonwealth, or
          a citizen of another member state of the European Union; and

      in addition you must fulfil one of the following three conditions:

      •   be a local elector for the district of the council in which you are standing;
          or
      •   during the whole of the period of twelve months preceding the day of the
          poll have either occupied as owner or tenant land in that district or have
          resided in that district;
          or
      •   your principal or only place of work during that twelve months has been in
          that district.

4.3   You must also make sure you are not otherwise disqualified from being a
      councillor (see below, Why can’t I be a candidate?).

Why can’t I be a candidate?
4.4   Certain people are disqualified from being elected as a councillor in
      accordance with section 4 of the Local Government Act (Northern Ireland)
      1972. You cannot be a candidate if:

      •   You hold any paid office or other place of profit (not being that of chairman
          or sheriff) in the gift or disposal of that or any other council; or
      •   You have been adjudged bankrupt or have made any composition or
          arrangement with your creditors; or
      •   You are disqualified for being elected or being a councillor under section
          81 or 82; or
      •   You have been found guilty of one or more offences by any court in
          Northern Ireland or elsewhere in the British Islands and sentenced or
          ordered to be imprisoned or detained indefinitely or for three months or
          more without the option of a fine and either of the periods mentioned in
          subsection (3) is current; or
      •   You have within the five years immediately preceding the day of your
          election or at any time subsequent to that day been guilty of any conduct
          which the High Court has by order declared was reprehensible within the
          meaning of section 31; or
      •   Within the five years immediately preceding the day of your election or at
          any time subsequent to that day, a determination has been made by the
          High Court that you have acted in breach of the terms of a declaration


                                          9
             against terrorism as defined in section 7 of the Elected authorities
             (Northern Ireland) Act 1989; or
         •   You are disqualified for being elected or being a councillor either under
             section 6(2) or under any other statutory provision (including a provision
             relating to corrupt or illegal practices).

4.5      It is an offence to consent to being nominated as a candidate for election at a
         local election in more than one district electoral area in the same council area.
         A candidate may, however, if properly qualified, stand as a candidate at
         elections in two or more council areas:



Advice
The full range of disqualifications for candidates is complex, and some exceptions may also
apply. You are advised to consult the relevant legislation to ensure that none of the relevant
disqualifications applies.




                                              10
5          Getting nominated
How do I become a candidate?
5.1        The Notice of Election marks the beginning of the election process. Once it
           has been published, on Wednesday 30 March 2005, you can become a
           candidate. If you are eligible, you will need to complete a set of nomination
           papers, described below, and submit them to the appropriate Deputy
           Returning Officer (DRO) by 5pm on Tuesday 12 April. Nomination papers
           can only be delivered between 10am and 5pm on Monday 11 April and
           Tuesday 12 April 2005.

5.2        Only the candidate, his or her election agent, or the proposer or seconder of
           the candidate may deliver nomination papers to the Deputy Returning Officer.
           This must be done in person at the office designated for the relevant council in
           the Notice of election. It may not be posted, faxed or emailed.

      Advice
      It is recommended that prospective candidates complete and submit nomination
      papers as early as possible. Any nomination papers ruled invalid will have to be
      resubmitted before the closing date.
      Any errors can be corrected more easily if nomination papers are submitted in
      person. However, the Deputy Returning Officer is likely to insist that a new
      nomination paper with correct details must be submitted. The decision is at the
      discretion of the Deputy Returning Officer, and is final.


Form of nomination
5.3        The Deputy Returning Officer for the District Council will supply all the forms
           needed for the nomination of candidates. Each candidate must be nominated
           by a separate nomination paper. Candidates can submit any number of
           nomination papers and will be validly nominated if at least one of the papers is
           valid.

5.4        The nomination paper must contain the candidate’s name and home address
           in full. If he or she is standing as the candidate of a registered political party, a
           description of not more than six words may be included; if he or she is
           standing as an independent candidate, only the word “independent” will be
           included in the description. The details on the nomination paper will be
           reproduced on the statement of persons nominated and, ultimately, the ballot
           paper.

Name

5.5        The form must include your full name, with your surname first. You should not
           use initials:

           e.g.:     Bloggs, Jonathan David

           This exact wording of your name will appear on the ballot paper.

Address

5.6        Your home address must be completed in full, preferably including the
           postcode, and you should not use any abbreviations (e.g. ‘Road’ not ‘Rd’ or

                                                 11
       ‘Street’ not ‘St’). The address must be your current home address, not a
       business address.

Description

5.7    Candidates can give a description which will appear under their name on the
       ballot paper, although it is not compulsory and they can leave the description
       blank. Candidates can use either of two types of description on the ballot
       paper:

       1. Any candidate can use the description ‘Independent’ (this word standing
          alone); or

       2. A description of not more than six words which must be authorised by the
          registered nominating officer of a registered political party. In particular,
          any description which is likely to lead voters to associate the candidate
          with a registered political party must be authorised by that party.
          Candidates wishing to use such a description must supply a valid
          certificate of authorisation with their form of nomination (see Certificate of
          Authorisation below for more details).

5.8    It is important to note that while any candidate can use the description
       ‘Independent’, any other description including the word Independent in
       combination with another word, (eg ‘Independent Ratepayer’ or ‘Anytown
       Independents) must be authorised by the registered nominating officer of that
       registered political party.

5.9    Any authorised description must not exceed six words in length. It is important
       not to exceed the limit, as where the description contains more than six words
       the returning officer will hold the entire nomination paper invalid.

Signatories

5.10   A candidate’s nomination paper must be signed as proposer and seconder by
       two electors registered in the District Electoral Area in which he/she is
       standing. Eight other eligible electors registered to vote in the DEA must also
       sign the nomination papers as assenters.

5.11   It is essential to ensure that the names of the people signing the nomination
       paper appear on the revised register of electors for Northern Ireland published
       on 1 April 2005. The electoral number of each signatory as stated on that
       register must also be entered on the nomination paper. A nomination paper in
       which the electoral number of a subscriber either is incorrect or has been
       omitted is invalid. Each prospective candidate is entitled to receive a copy of
       the register for the District Electoral Area being contested, and should contact
       the relevant DRO for further details (see also section 9, The Campaign).

5.12   It is important to note that electors can only subscribe as many nomination
       papers as there are vacancies in the particular DEA.

Certificate of authorisation
5.13   As noted above, candidates wishing to use a description on the ballot paper
       which would associate them with a registered political party must supply a
       certificate of authorisation issued by or on behalf of the registered nominating
       officer of the party.


                                         12
5.14   The certificate of authorisation must be signed by the registered nominating
       officer or, where issued by someone else on behalf of the nominating officer,
       some evidence of the authority to act is required. It should be delivered to the
       Deputy Returning Officer together with the other papers relating to that
       nomination before 5pm on Tuesday 12 April.

5.15   It is important to note that the description supplied in a candidate’s nomination
       paper must match exactly the description authorised by the relevant registered
       party officer. Where the description on the nomination paper does not
       correspond with that given in the certificate of authorisation, the Deputy
       Returning Officer will hold the entire nomination paper invalid.




                                         13
Sample nomination paper




5.16    In some circumstances it may take several days for nominating officers to
        complete and return certificates of authorisation. Candidates and their agents
        are, therefore, advised to request the certificate well in advance of delivery of
        nomination papers to the Deputy Returning Officer.


                                          14
Request to use emblem on the ballot paper
5.17      If you have been authorised by a political party to use a description on the
          ballot paper, one of the party’s official emblems may be used on the ballot
          paper next to your name. Each registered party can register up to three
          emblems, and they can be viewed or downloaded from The Electoral
          Commission’s website.

5.18      You as candidate should make any request to use a Party Emblem in writing
          on the form provided, and you must deliver it to the Deputy Returning Officer
          together with your other nomination papers before 5pm on Tuesday 12 April
          2005. Your request must include the name of the political party and a paper
          copy of the emblem to be used. You cannot use any variation on a registered
          emblem.


Registering a political party
In order to register a political party, the following information must be submitted to The
Electoral Commission:

•      a correctly completed application form (available via the Commission’s website);
•      a copy of the party’s constitution;
•      a draft financial scheme; and
•      a fee of £150.

There is no requirement for local branches of a party to register independently with the
Commission – a national party’s registration covers all of its branches and sections.

Groups or individuals wishing to register a name for candidates to use at the Local
Government District Council General elections being held on 5 May 2005 must have an
entry on the Register of Political Parties by the last day for publication of notice of election,
Wednesday 30 March 2005. Please note, however, that it may take up to four weeks (20
working days) to process any applications to register as a political party.


Consent to nomination
5.19      In order for your nomination as a candidate to be valid, you must also formally
          give your consent to nomination in writing. The Deputy Returning Officer will
          provide you with the appropriate form.

5.20      The form of consent includes a statement that you are aware of the provisions
          of Section 4 of the Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 1972, which sets
          out the grounds for disqualification from being elected or being a councillor
          (see section 4, Becoming a candidate, for more details on qualifications and
          disqualifications for candidates), and that, to the best of your knowledge, you
          are not disqualified. You must also sign a Declaration against Terrorism.

5.21      You must sign the consent to nomination within one calendar month before
          the last day for delivery of nomination papers (between Saturday 12 March
          and Tuesday 12 April 2005). Your signature must be witnessed, and the
          witness must also sign the form and give their full name and address. At the
          latest, the declaration of consent should be delivered to the DRO with the
          other nomination papers before 5pm on Tuesday 12 April 2005.

5.22      You should make sure that you are aware of the restrictions on consenting to
          being nominated as a candidate in more than one district electoral area,
          discussed in more detail in paragraph 4.5 above.

                                                15
Citizens of the European Union
5.23   If you are a national of a Member State of the European Union (and not a
       Commonwealth citizen or citizen of the Republic of Ireland) and you want to
       stand for election as a councillor in any district council in Northern Ireland, you
       may do so provided that you meet all the normal requirements and are not
       disqualified in any way (see section 4, Becoming a candidate, for more
       details).

Deposit
5.24   There is no deposit to be paid if you are a candidate for these elections.

Inspection and objection to nominations
5.25   Any candidate can attend the proceedings during the time for delivery of
       nomination papers, i.e between 10 am and 5pm on Monday 11 April and
       Tuesday 12 April. A candidate’s election agent and proposer or seconder, are
       also allowed to attend at these proceedings or, where a candidate acts as his
       own election agent, he may name one other person to attend in place of his
       election agent.

5.26   All those entitled to attend at the proceedings during the delivery of nomination
       papers are also entitled to inspect any nominations, and make an objection.
       Any objection to nomination papers must be made during the hours allowed
       for delivery of nomination papers and on the last day (12 April) during the hour
       following (up to 6pm).

If you no longer want to be a candidate
5.27   Once the DRO has accepted your nomination papers, you can still withdraw
       from the election if you deliver a written notice to the DRO before the close of
       nominations at 5pm on Tuesday 12 April 2005. The notice must be signed by
       you, the candidate, and witnessed by one other person.

5.28   If you, as a candidate, are out of Northern Ireland and wish to withdraw,
       special rules apply (see Rule 11(2) of Schedule 5 to the Electoral Law Act
       1962 (as inserted by schedule 1 to the Local Elections (Northern Ireland)
       Order 1985)).

Offence: false statements in nomination papers
5.29   It is a serious offence to include false information relating to the name or
       address of a candidate in nomination papers, or to falsify the signature of an
       elector. If you are found guilty of this offence you may be sentenced to
       imprisonment for up to a year, or face a fine, or both. If you or your agent are
       found guilty of making a false statement in a nomination paper the election
       may be invalidated.




                                          16
Summary
Your nomination papers must be submitted before 5pm on Tuesday 12 April 2005, and
must include:

1.     Form of nomination;
2.     Candidate’s consent to nomination;

 If you are standing as a registered party candidate, you must also include:

3. Certificate of authorisation on behalf of a registered political party (if applicable);
and, if desired,
4. Request to use a registered party’s emblem on the ballot paper; and, if so, a copy on
paper of that emblem.

You must also, if you wish to appoint an election agent, bring:

5. Notice of Appointment of Election Agent (see section 7).


Publication of statement of Persons Nominated

5.30      As soon as possible after 6pm on Tuesday 12 April 2005 the Deputy
          Returning Officer shall prepare and publish a statement of persons nominated
          to stand for election to the District Electoral Area. Where persons no longer
          stand nominated, the Deputy Returning Officer will state the reasons for this.
          Candidates will be listed alphabetically, along with their address, descriptions
          as included on the nomination paper, and names of persons subscribing those
          papers.

5.31      Included in the statement of persons nominated shall be a notice of the poll,
          stating the day and times during which the poll will be taken. The location of
          polling stations will have been made available from the time of the Notice of
          Election.

5.32      The statement of persons nominated can be inspected at the Office of the
          Deputy Returning Officer during normal office hours after the close of
          nominations at 6pm on Tuesday 12 April 2005, until the day before polling day
          - Wednesday 4 May 2005.

Uncontested elections
5.33      If, after any withdrawals, the number of candidates remaining validly
          nominated in a District Electoral Area is less than or equal to the number of
          seats to be filled in the election, those candidates are declared to be elected.

5.34      It is important to note that a candidate who is declared to be elected in an
          uncontested election must still make a declaration as to his or her election
          expenses. (See section 12, Election expenses, for more details.)




                                              17
6     The election agent
6.1   The role of election agent has evolved from the passing of the Corrupt and
      Illegal Practices Prevention Act, 1883 which was designed to combat the
      increasing level of corruption then existing at parliamentary elections. Not only
      did that Act set a limit to the amount of expense a candidate could lawfully
      incur but also required all such expenditure to be under the control and
      responsibility of an election agent.

6.2   A candidate is not required to appoint a separate election agent; if they do not
      make such an appointment, they are deemed to be acting in that role
      themselves. Thus, in this Guide and in electoral legislation, where references
      are made to election agents, they also apply to candidates who have not
      appointed a separate election agent.

6.3   Today there are two main reasons why virtually every candidate appoints a
      separate election agent:

      1. To coordinate and carry out much of the detailed work involved in running
         an election campaign. For a candidate to take on the duties of an election
         agent would significantly reduce the time available for canvassing and
         would increase their workload dramatically in what is already a very busy
         time.

      2. To take responsibility for the financial management of the election
         campaign and for ensuring that the declarations and returns of the
         candidate’s election expenses are properly completed and delivered to the
         appropriate officer (see Section 12, Election expenses, for more details).

6.4   The appointment of an election agent should be considered carefully; a
      candidate’s election may be invalidated if the election agent does not
      promptly and correctly perform his or her duties.

Duties of an election agent
6.5   The primary task of an election agent is to conduct the candidate's election
      campaign as successfully as possible and within the confines of the law, so
      that no liability for any corrupt or illegal practice is incurred.

      The legislation specifically requires the election agent to be solely responsible
      for certain tasks, for example:

      1. to appoint every polling agent, clerk or messenger employed for payment
         on behalf of the candidate;

      2. to hire any committee room;

      3. to pay election expenses; all such must be paid by, or through, the election
         agent except for the limited amount of personal expenses permitted to be
         used by the candidate. All other expenses not authorised by the election
         agent are expressly prohibited;

      4. to ensure that the expenditure in the furtherance of the candidature is not
         in excess of the prescribed maximum amount;



                                        18
       5. to pay only those election expenses which have been received by the
          election agent within 21 days after the result of the election has been
          declared; all other claims received after that date are barred and should
          not be paid. (There are provisions in section 44 of the 1962 Act where
          disputed claims arise but these do not cover late claims.)

       6. to have delivered to the Deputy Returning Officer within 35 days after the
          day on which the result of the election is declared a true and complete
          return of all payments made by the election agent together with all bills,
          receipts and declaration as to election expenses. (Sections 46 and 47 of
          the 1962 Act apply.) (In addition the candidate has to make a declaration
          as to expenses.)

       Additionally there is a duty on the election agent, and indeed the candidate, to
       take all reasonable means of preventing corrupt and illegal practices at the
       election. It is suggested that very careful selection should be made from those
       being considered for appointment as polling agents and other persons working
       on behalf of a candidate. All reasonable means must be taken to ensure that
       all such persons appointed have not, and are unlikely to be, guilty of any
       corrupt or illegal practice. Detailed written instructions should be issued to
       such persons employed in any capacity.

Who can be an election agent?
6.6    Certain people are prohibited from acting as a candidate’s election agent.
       These include:

       •   any officer or clerk appointed under the election rules;
       •   any partner of the above; and
       •   anyone not entitled to vote because of conviction of corrupt or illegal
           practice under RPA1983

6.7    There are no further qualifications for election agents other than they must be
       of legal age. However, it is important to take care in the appointment of an
       election agent, as a candidate will be liable for unauthorised acts by the
       election agent if they are within the scope of his authority. Ideally they should
       be familiar with electoral law, be responsible and capable of exercising the
       necessary control.

Appointing your election agent
6.8    You do not have to appoint an election agent, and you can act as your own
       agent. If you have not appointed someone else as your agent by 5pm on
       Tuesday 12 April 2005 you will assume the duties and responsibilities of the
       election agent as well as being the candidate.

6.9    To appoint an agent, you (or someone acting on your behalf) must declare in
       writing the name and home and office addresses of your election agent to the
       DRO not later than 5pm on Tuesday 12 April 2005. The written declaration
       should be signed by you as the candidate, and by your agent to confirm
       acceptance of the post. Although there is no prescribed form of declaration
       which must be used, the DRO will provide you with a form for convenience.
       An agent may be appointed up to a month before the close of nominations.

6.10   It is important to note that the election agent’s office address must be within
       the District Council area. The agent’s office address will normally be his or her

                                         19
         home address, but may also be that of the local political party office. Where a
         candidate is their own agent, their office address is deemed to be the address
         given on the statement of persons nominated (see section 5, The nomination
         process).

6.11     An election agent can act for two or more candidates but this reduces the
         maximum amount of expenses each such candidate can spend at the election.


Advice
While it is not required by law, it is helpful to provide contact telephone number(s) and email
addresses for the election agent.


6.12     The appointment of an election agent can be revoked by the candidate and a
         new appointment can be made by the same process. Similarly, if an election
         agent dies, a new agent can be appointed. A candidate acting as his or her
         own election agent can also revoke that ‘appointment’ and appoint a new
         agent (up to the close of nominations).




                                              20
7     Other assistance: polling agents, counting
      agents and tellers
7.1   As well as an election agent, individual candidates and agents of registered
      political parties can also appoint people to help on election day in polling
      stations and at the count, although there is no obligation to appoint any such
      assistance. A candidate can also act as his or her own polling or counting
      agent.

7.2   Your polling agents and counting agent are required to maintain the secrecy of
      voting, and they are subject to the important legal requirements relating to
      secrecy under the Electoral Law Act 1962 (as amended) which is reproduced
      in Appendix 1.

7.3   Tellers have no status in electoral law, and are dealt with separately below.

What does a polling agent do?
7.4   The main role of your polling agents is to aid in the detection of personation
      (individuals attempting to vote as another person) in the polling station on
      election day. Additional duties and responsibilities are outlined in section 9,
      Polling day.

7.5   While there is no limit to the number of polling agents you may appoint, only
      one of your polling agents will be allowed into a polling station at any time, but
      each agent may be appointed to attend more than one polling station.

7.6   If you are not going to pay your polling agents, you can appoint them yourself
      as the candidate. Paid polling agents must be appointed formally by your
      election agent. You must notify the DRO in writing of the names and
      addresses of your polling agents, and the polling stations to which they have
      been appointed, no later than Tuesday 3 May 2005.

What does a counting agent do?
7.7   The main role of your counting agent is to observe the verification and/or
      counting processes on behalf of the candidate and make sure that they are
      undertaken in an orderly, accurate and correct manner. Your counting agent
      will not participate directly in the verification or counting processes. Duties and
      responsibilities of counting agents are outlined in section 10, The count.

7.8   You are permitted to appoint one counting agent.

7.9   Either you as candidate or your election agent can appoint your counting
      agent. You must notify the DRO in writing of the names and addresses of your
      counting agent no later than 5 pm on Tuesday 3 May 2005.




                                         21
Agents to attend the issue of postal ballot papers
7.10      Candidates may appoint one or more agents to attend the proceedings at the
          issue of postal ballot papers. Candidates will be given at least 48 hours’ notice
          of the time and place for the issuing of the postal votes and that notice will
          also specify the number of agents each candidate may appoint. The number
          will be determined by the Deputy Returning Officer. The Deputy Returning
          Officer must be notified in writing before the time for the opening of the postal
          voters’ ballot box(es) of the names and addresses of agents so appointed.
          The candidate may act as an agent to attend these proceedings.

7.11      The only people who may be present at the proceedings to issue postal ballot
          papers are:

          •   the Deputy Returning Officer and his clerks;
          •   candidates;
          •   election agents (or a person appointed by a candidate to attend in the
              election agent’s place); and
          •   agents appointed by the candidate to attend the procedures (see above).

7.12      All persons attending the issue of postal ballot papers must be aware of the
          requirement to ensure the secrecy of the proceedings. All those attending
          such proceedings should be given a copy of paragraph 27(4) of Schedule 9
          and Section 111 (2A)(d) of the Electoral Law Act (Northern Ireland)1962 which
          is reproduced in Appendix 1. Any person who is found guilty of breaching the
          requirements set out in paragraph 27(4) may face a fine of up to £5,000, or
          may be imprisoned for up to six months.

Agents to attend opening of postal ballot papers
7.13      Candidates may also appoint one or more agents to attend the proceedings at
          the receipt of postal ballot papers. Candidates will be given at least 48 hours’
          notice of the time and place for the opening of the postal voters’ ballot boxes
          and the envelopes in them, and that notice will also specify the number of
          agents each candidate may appoint. The number will be determined by the
          Deputy Returning Officer. The Deputy Returning officer must be notified in
          writing of the names and addresses of agents so appointed before the time
          for the opening of the postal voters’ ballot box. The candidate may act as an
          agent to attend these proceedings.

Tellers
7.14      Candidates may sometimes use ‘tellers’ to stand outside polling places and
          record the electoral numbers of people who have voted. Tellers have no status
          in electoral law, and they are not allowed to enter the polling place itself. They
          should only concern themselves with the recording of numbers as anything
          else could give rise to allegations of undue influence, which is a corrupt
          practice. In Northern Ireland, tellers are employed very infrequently at
          elections.




                                             22
Checklist
•  Your election agent must be appointed by 5pm on Tuesday 12 April 2005, or you will be
   deemed to act as your own agent.
•  Written notice of the appointment of polling agents and counting agents must be
   delivered to the Deputy Returning Officer by 5pm on Tuesday 3 May 2005.
•  Written notice of the appointment of agents to attend the proceedings at the issue and
   receipt of postal ballot papers must be delivered to the Deputy Returning Officer before
   the specified time for the issue of postal ballot papers or the opening of the postal
   voters’ ballot boxes.




                                            23
8         During your election campaign
8.1       It is important to note the definition of a ‘candidate’ in relation to the provisions
          described below. At a Local Government election, you will become a
          candidate on the date on which you declare or are declared by others, to be a
          candidate or are nominated as a candidate at that election.


 Example

      •   A person declares himself or is declared by others to be a candidate for election on 5
          May 2005. He becomes a candidate.
      •   A person has not been declared by himself or others to be a candidate for election,
          but delivers valid nomination papers to the Deputy Returning Officer on 11 or 12 April
          2005, he becomes a candidate on that date.


Using the electoral register
8.2       As a candidate at a District Council election, you are entitled to a free copy of
          the full electoral register for the District Electoral Area in which you are
          standing as a candidate. You should make your request for a copy of the
          register in writing to the Deputy Returning Officer (see Appendix 3 for
          addresses).

8.3       The register will be supplied to you by the DRO in data form, unless you
          specifically request a paper copy. The register data is provided electronically
          in a CSV (comma-separated values) format.


 Using data in a Comma Separated Values (CSV) format
 CSV files are a simple form of spreadsheet representation which can be read or modified
 with a number of common desktop applications.

 CSV files can be opened using most popular spreadsheet or database applications,
 including Microsoft Excel and Access, and can also be read or modified with any text
 editor or word processing programmes such as Microsoft Word. In particular, CSV files
 can be used with the mail merge function of most word-processing programmes to create
 mailing labels or form letters.


It is important to note that the Electoral Office no longer supplies labels to candidates as
they may be created from the electronic version of the register. Therefore, any candidate
requiring labels will need to obtain their copy of the register in this format.

8.4       The registration data provided will be the register for the District Electoral Area
          which was published on 1 April 2005.

8.5       It is important to note that a number of legal restrictions apply to the use of
          information in the full electoral register. If you have been supplied with a copy
          of the full electoral register for a particular area, you must not:

          •   pass on a copy of the register to any other person;
          •   disclose any information from the register (which is not contained in the
              edited version of the register also published by the EONI); or
          •   make use of any information from the register other than for electoral
              purposes.


                                               24
8.6       You may be required to sign a commitment undertaking to use your copy of
          the register for electoral purposes only. If you are found guilty of breaching
          these conditions you may face a fine of up to £5,000.

8.7       You are entitled to a copy of the lists of the postal and proxy voters for the
          area. These lists will be supplied to you by the local Area Electoral Officer if
          requested in writing and evidence is provided that you are/will be a candidate
          at the election.

Canvassers
8.8       You may want to use canvassers to help with your election campaign. It is
          illegal for you to employ paid canvassers for the purpose of promoting or
          procuring a particular result at an election, either before, during or after the
          election. In addition, you cannot recruit members of police forces, whether
          paid or unpaid, as they are prohibited from acting as canvassers.

Free delivery of election address
8.9       Each candidate is entitled to send one election address (leaflet) to each
          elector free of charge of postage. Your election address must contain material
          relating to the election only, and must not weigh more than two ounces.

8.10      You may only take advantage of this entitlement if you are shown as included
          in the statement of persons nominated published on Tuesday 12 April 2005.
          However, if you want to have your address sent out before that date, you will
          need to give the postal service provider some security, in case you do not
          eventually become nominated.

8.11      Any queries on your entitlement to the delivery of an election address should
          be directed to Beth Compston, Royal Mail Election Co-Ordinator at:

                   Northern Ireland Mail Centre
                   Enterprise Way
                   Newtownabbey
                   BT36 4HQ

                   Tel: 9084 6138
                   Fax: 9084 6189
                   E-Mail: beth.compston@royalmail.com

Other campaign publicity material
8.12      Other campaign publicity material is subject to a number of restrictions under
          electoral law and is also subject to the general civil and criminal law relating to
          published material.

Imprint

8.13      Any printed material or advert in a newspaper or periodical which refers to the
          election or can reasonably be regarded as intended to promote procure the
          election of a candidate (even if it may also have another purpose), must carry
          an imprint giving the name and address of the following people on its face:

          1. the printer of the material;
          2. the publisher of the material

                                             25
8.14   It should be clear who is the printer. The printer might be, for example, the
       same person as the publisher, a local political party, or a separate individual.
       The imprint might look like this:

       e.g.:   Printed by Bloggs and Co Printers, 13 Smith Street, SMITHTOWN,
               SW1P 2HW
               Published by Smithtown Independent Party, 13 Smith Street,
               SMITHTOWN, SW1P 2HW.

       Or:     Printed by Bloggs and Co Printers, 1 Smith Street, SMITHTOWN,
               SW1P 2HW
               Published by John Smith, 12 Smith Terrace, SMITHTOWN, SW1P
               2HW.

8.15   For the purposes of the legal requirement, ‘promoting or procuring’ the
       election of a candidate includes material criticising or disparaging another
       candidate at the election.

8.16   The potential consequences of a breach of this requirement are serious. If you
       or your agent breach the requirement, you may be found guilty of an illegal
       practice and your election may be invalidated. Any other person found guilty of
       breaching this requirement may be fined up to £5,000.

False statements

8.17   It is an offence to make or publish a false statement of fact about the personal
       character or conduct of a candidate in order to affect the return of a candidate
       at an election. You should note that this provision applies both before and
       during an election period, but is subject to the definition of a ‘candidate’, as
       discussed in section 4 Becoming a Candidate and 12 Your election expenses.
       It is also an offence to make a false statement of a candidate’s withdrawal.

8.18   The potential consequences of a breach of this provision are serious. If you or
       your election agent are found guilty of an offence under this provision the
       election may be invalidated. Any other person found guilty of breaching this
       provision may be fined up to £5,000.

Display of advertisements

8.19   The display of all advertising is controlled by the Planning (Control of
       Advertisements) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1992. You should ensure that
       all your election adverts, including any bills, placards and posters, comply with
       the relevant requirements. In particular, remember that no advert should be
       displayed without the permission of the owner of the site or anyone else with
       an interest in the site. Posters and adverts on trunk roads should not interfere
       with or impede traffic or other road users. All your adverts must be removed
       within 14 days after the election. You should also be aware that some local
       authorities exercise tighter regulations with regard to display of advertisements
       on council property e.g. lamp posts.

8.20   It is an offence to pay an elector for displaying your election advertisements,
       unless it is part of their normal business (as an advertising agent, for
       example), and a payment is made in the ordinary course of business.




                                         26
Other restrictions

8.21      Licensed broadcasters in the United Kingdom are not allowed to carry
          advertising which is of a political nature, and candidates should not attempt to
          buy any such television or radio advertising. Broadcasters will offer a number
          of television and radio party election broadcasts to political parties, based on
          previous electoral support.

8.22      You election campaign material will also be subject to general restrictions of
          the criminal law and the law on civil liability, and any material must not contain
          statements or comments which are defamatory. Defamatory comments in a
          written form constitute libel and are liable to serious legal action.

8.23      Under the Public Order (Northern Ireland) Order1987, it is an offence to
          publish or distribute threatening, abusive or insulting material which is
          intended to stir up hatred against a group of persons defined by reference to
          religious belief, colour, race, nationality (including citizenship) or ethnic or
          national origins.

Other offences
8.24      There are a number of other electoral offences specified in the 1962 Act which
          you and your election agent should be aware of. If you or your agent are found
          guilty of a corrupt practice, your election may be invalidated. Bribery, treating ,
          undue influence and personation are common areas of concern.

Bribery

8.25      A person is guilty of the corrupt practice of bribery if:

          •   he or she, directly or indirectly, gives any money or procures any office to
              or for any voter, in order to induce any voter to vote or refrain from voting.

Treating

8.26      A person is guilty of the corrupt practice of treating if:

          •   either before, during or after an election, he or she, directly or indirectly,
              gives or provides (or pays wholly or in part the expense of giving or
              providing) any food, drink, entertainment or provision in order to influence
              any voter to vote or refrain from voting.

Undue influence

8.27      A person is guilty of the corrupt practice of undue influence if:

          •   he or she, directly or indirectly, makes use of or threatens to make use of
              force, violence or restraint, or inflicts or threatens to inflict injury, damage
              or harm in order to induce or compel any voter to vote or refrain from
              voting.

          A person may also be guilty of undue influence if he or she impedes or
          prevents the free exercise of the franchise of an elector.




                                               27
Personation

8.28   A person is guilty of personation at any election if he or she votes or applies
       for a ballot paper as some other person or as proxy for another person
       whether that person is a person whose name appears as an elector in the
       current register, is living or dead or is a fictitious person;

Reporting offences
8.29   Neither the Returning Officer, the Deputy Returning Officer nor the Electoral
       Commission have any discretion to investigate allegations of offences under
       electoral law. If you believe that an offence has been committed, you should
       bring it to the attention of the police.




                                         28
9      Polling day
9.1    Polling day for the Local Government District Elections in Northern Ireland is
       5 May 2005, and polling hours are between 7am and 10pm. Details of the
       locations of polling stations will be confirmed by the Deputy Returning Officer
       in a notice to your election agent soon after publishing the statement of
       persons nominated. This information is also available on the Electoral Office
       website www.electoralofficeni.gov.uk.

Entitlement to attend the polling station
9.2    All candidates and election agents are entitled to visit any polling station in
       their own District Electoral Area (not the entire District Council area) during
       polling day. Your polling agents may also attend only at the polling stations for
       which they have been appointed. Only one of your polling agents is allowed to
       attend each polling station at any time.

Role of your polling agent
9.3    Information on who can and cannot be a polling agent and how to appoint
       them is included in section 7, Other assistance: polling agents, counting
       agents and tellers.

9.4    The main duties and responsibilities of your polling agents on polling day are
       summarised below (please note that the term “polling station” refers to a single
       ballot box):

       •   to be present at a designated polling station immediately before the
           opening of the poll to observe the presiding officer showing the empty
           ballot box prior to sealing;
       •   to detect personation and prevent people voting more than once. Voters
           believed to have committed the offence of personation or who attempt to
           vote more than once should be challenged before they leave the polling
           station. To do this effectively, the polling agent should require the
           presiding officer to put the statutory questions. Polling agents may cause
           the presiding officer to have such a person arrested;
       •   to mark off on their copy of the register of electors those voters who have
           applied for ballot papers. If polling agents leave the polling station during
           the hours of polling their marked copy of the register must be left at that
           polling station in order not to breach the secrecy requirements;
       •   polling agents must not give information to anyone as to who has or has
           not voted, or a person’s electoral number, or the official mark;
       •   generally to ascertain the number of voters throughout the day, and
           gauge ‘how the election is going’;
       •   to report to their election agent/candidate any improper occurrences and
           retain notes for use as evidence if there should be an election petition;
       •   to be present when the presiding officer marks ballot papers at the
           request of electors;
       •   to be present at the close of poll when the various packets of documents
           are sealed. The polling agent may attach their seal to any packets made
           up by the presiding officer, including the ballot box.

9.5    You, as candidate or your election agent can also do any of the things that a
       polling agent is authorised to do. However, just because your polling agent is



                                         29
          entitled to witness various aspects of the polling procedure, the procedure is
          not invalidated if he or she has not witnessed it.

Importance of secrecy
9.6       All those who enter the polling station should be aware of the requirement to
          ensure the secrecy of the ballot. Your polling agents should be given a copy of
          paragraph 27(1) and (3) of Schedule 9 and Section 111 (2A)(d) of the
          Electoral Law Act (Northern Ireland) 1962, which is reproduced in Appendix 1.
          Any person who is found guilty of breaching the requirements set out in
          paragraph 27(1) and (3) may face a fine of up to £5,000, or may be
          imprisoned for up to six months.

Tellers
9.7       As noted in section 7, Other assistance: polling agents, counting agents and
          tellers, candidates or parties sometimes use ‘tellers’ to stand outside polling
          stations and request the electoral numbers of people who have attended the
          polling station. However, tellers have no status in electoral law, and they are
          not allowed to enter the polling place or observe at any polling station.

9.8       Tellers should not hand out election material, or try to influence the way
          someone should vote. They should not ask any voter who they voted for, or
          how they intend to vote. Voters are not required to give any information to
          tellers, and they should not be pressed if they refuse to answer. Tellers should
          not give the impression that the information they request is required for official
          purposes or that they have any formal or legal role in the electoral process.

9.9       Tellers have not been used by candidates to any extent in Northern Ireland.
          However, if candidates are intending to deploy tellers, they should contact the
          Electoral Commission, who will supply them with a copy of guidance notes
          issued by the Home Office in 1991.

General
9.10      Voters must not in any way be impeded or obstructed on their way into
          or out of the polling station or polling place.

9.11      It is the presiding officer’s duty to keep order at the polling station, and he or
          she may order the removal of any person from the polling station. However, in
          exercising this duty, the presiding officer must not prevent a voter who is
          otherwise entitled from casting his or her vote.




                                             30
10     The count
Time and location of count
10.1   The counting of ballot papers for the election will take place from 9am on
       Monday 9 May 2005 and shall continue until all vacant seats are filled. The
       Deputy Returning Officer will write to all appointed counting agents with details
       of the exact time and location of the appropriate count.

Secrecy
10.2   Again, it is important to note that all those attending the counting of ballot
       papers, including the receipt of postal ballot papers, should be aware of the
       requirement to ensure the secrecy of the ballot. All those attending the count
       should be given a copy of paragraph 27 (2) of Schedule 9 and Section
       111(2A)(d) of the Electoral Law Act (Northern Ireland) 1962 which is
       reproduced in Appendix 1. Any person who is found guilty of breaching the
       requirements set out in paragraph 27(2) may face a fine of up to £5,000, or
       may be imprisoned for up to six months.

Postal votes
10.3   As envelopes containing postal ballot papers are returned to the Deputy
       Returning Officer at either his main office or at the office of the relevant Area
       Electoral Officer up to the close of the poll, they will be placed unopened into
       one or more postal voters’ ballot boxes. While at least one ballot box must be
       retained until the close of poll, any other boxes and postal ballot envelopes
       contained within them may be opened beforehand. The Deputy Returning
       Officer must give at least 48 hours advance notice of the time and place for
       the opening of any postal voters’ ballot box. The opening of the postal votes
       will be organised by the Area Electoral Officers – see details of the areas
       covered by each Area Electoral Office at Appendix 2. Those entitled to attend
       at the opening of postal voters’ ballot boxes and witness proceedings are:

       •   the candidate;
       •   the election agent, or anyone authorised by the candidate to attend in
           place of his or her election agent;
       •   one or more agents appointed by the candidate to attend at the opening of
           postal voters’ ballot boxes as authorised by the Deputy Returning Officer
           for the District Electoral Area;
       •   the Returning Officer or an officer of the EONI appointed by him; and
       •   the Deputy Returning Officer for the District Council.

10.4   All valid postal votes will be taken to the count venue, and will be mixed with
       the contents of at least one other ballot box at the count before being counted
       in the normal manner, as detailed below.

Count procedure
10.5   The following people are entitled to attend the count:

       •   the Returning Officer or an officer of the EONI appointed by him;
       •   the Deputy Returning Officer and his staff;
       •   the candidates
       •   election agents;

                                         31
        •   appointed counting agents : and
        •   constables on duty

10.6    The RO may also permit other people to attend the count at his or her
        discretion, but is not obliged to do so. The decision of the RO as to who may
        attend the count is final.

10.7    As noted in section 7 Polling agents, counting agents and tellers, one counting
        agent may be appointed by each candidate.

10.8    The duties of your counting agent can be summarised as follows:

        •   to maintain and aid in maintaining the secrecy requirements;
        •   to be present at all stages of the count;
        •   to oversee the counting process and see that it is undertaken in an
            orderly, accurate and correct manner;
        •   to draw to the attention of the counting assistants any bad or doubtful
            ballot papers and to defend every ballot paper given for their candidate to
            which objection is taken. However, counting agents are not permitted to
            handle ballot papers unless explicitly authorised to do so by the DRO;
        •   to require the DRO to mark on a rejected ballot paper the words ‘rejection
            objected to’ if they object to the decision of the Deputy Returning Officer –
            usually, this would only happen in the absence of an appointed election
            agent.
        •   At the close of the count, when the Deputy Returning Officer seals the
            sacks of ballot papers and other material, to add their seals, if they should
            so wish.

10.9    The DRO must give all counting agents reasonable facilities for overseeing
        the proceedings at the count and fulfilling the various duties described above.
        In particular, the counting agents should be able to verify that the ballot
        papers are rightly sorted between the candidates. Either you or your election
        agent are also entitled to do anything which your counting agent is authorised
        to do, and you should be given the same facilities as a counting agent. Again,
        it is important to note that proceedings at the count are not invalidated if any
        person entitled to attend is not present.

The counting system
10.10   The Single Transferable Vote (STV) system is a complex one; candidates are
        advised to consult the relevant legislation for more detail on how District
        Council seats are allocated.

First stage
10.11   A ‘stage of the count’ is interpreted as one of the following:

        1. The process of determining the first preference vote for each candidate;
        2. The transfer of a surplus of a candidate deemed to be elected;
        3. The exclusion of one or more candidates at any given time.

10.12   The Deputy Returning Officer shall sort the ballot papers into parcels
        according to the candidates for whom the first preference votes are given. The
        numbers of first preference votes given to each candidate shall then be
        recorded, along with the total number of valid ballot papers.


                                           32
10.13    The total number of valid ballot papers will then be divided by a number
         exceeding by one the number of members to be elected to that District
         Electoral Area. The quota, ie the number of votes sufficient to secure the
         election of a candidate, will be equal to this number, increased by one. Any
         fractions in calculating the quota are disregarded.

10.14    At any stage in the count, where the total number of votes for a candidate
         equals or exceeds the quota, the candidate in question will be deemed to be
         elected.


Calculating the quota
The quota (Q) can be calculated as follows:

         Q=       Total number of valid ballot papers in a constituency y + 1
                 Number of members to be elected to that constituency + 1




Subsequent stages
10.15    Where the first preference votes for any candidate exceeds the quota, all
         ballot papers on which first preference votes are given for that candidate will
         be sorted into sub-parcels, grouped according to the next available preference
         given on those papers for any continuing candidate. Where no further
         preference is given, these papers will be grouped as a sub-parcel of non-
         transferable votes.

10.16    Each sub-parcel of ballot papers will then be transferred to the candidate for
         whom the next available preference has been given on those papers. The
         value of these votes, the ‘transfer value’ will be calculated so that their total
         value is not greater than the surplus of the elected candidate. The total
         number of votes for each remaining candidate is recalculated, and where the
         number of votes for any candidate exceeds the quota, the candidate in
         question will be deemed to be elected.

10.17    This process is repeated in a series of stages, continuing until all surplus
         papers have been transferred. If one or more vacancies remain to be filled,
         candidates with the least votes are excluded in turn, and consequential
         surpluses are transferred as they arise until the desired number of candidates
         has been deemed to be elected.

10.18    On the exclusion of a candidate, or transfer of a consequential surplus, any
         candidate attaining or exceeding the quota is deemed to be elected. Each
         transfer of a surplus or exclusion of a candidate constitutes a further stage in
         the count.

10.19    Candidates and agents are strongly advised to consult the relevant legislation
         for more detail about the vote transfer system.




                                              33
Last vacancies
10.20   Although the attainment of the quota secures election, it is not essential for
        election. Indeed, if many papers have become non-transferable, it may not be
        possible for each of the desired number of candidates to attain the quota.

10.21   If at any stage, as the result of a proposed exclusion of one or more
        candidates, the number of continuing candidates would equal the number of
        places remaining unfilled, then such continuing candidates are deemed
        elected and the proposed exclusion is not effected.

Re-count
10.22   On completion of each stage of the count, the DRO shall, before proceeding
        with the next stage, inform all the candidates and their election agents of his
        intention, subject to a request for a recount, to proceed to the next stage.
        Candidates or their election agents may request the DRO to recount the last
        completed stage before proceeding to the next stage. The DRO is obliged to
        conduct one re-count if requested, but may refuse further re-counts. Only the
        most recent completed stage can be recounted.

Declaration of result
10.23   As soon as possible after the conclusive stage in the counting, the Deputy
        Returning Officer will declare the names of those who have been elected, and
        the order in which they were elected. He or she will also give public notice of
        the number of first preference votes for all candidates, any transfer of votes,
        and the total number of votes for each candidate at each stage in the count at
        which such transfer took place.




                                          34
11      After the election
Election petitions
11.1    The outcome of a District Council election can only be challenged by the issue
        of an election petition. The grounds for a petition are:

        •   that the successful candidate was disqualified at the time of the election;
        •   that the successful candidate was not duly elected;
        •   that the election was invalidated due to general corruption;
        •   that the election was invalidated due to the employment of a corrupt
            agent; or
        •   that the election process was so planned as to make it untenable.

11.2    An election petition can be issued by:

        •   someone alleging themselves to have been a candidate at the election; or
        •   four or more persons who voted or were entitled to vote at the election.

11.3    The successful candidate must be a respondent to the petition, and if the
        petition complains of the conduct of the Chief Electoral Officer or his staff
        during the election, the Chief Electoral Officer must also be a respondent.

11.4    The petition must be issued within 21 days after the day the election is held.

Form of petition

11.5    The petition itself should follow the form prescribed by the Election Petition
        Rules 1960, and the following information must be included:

        •   the capacity in which the petitioner or petitioners are acting;
        •   the date and result of the election in question;
        •   the grounds on which relief is sought; and
        •   the relief claimed.

11.6    The petition must be signed by each petitioner personally, and three copies
        must be left at the relevant office. In Northern Ireland, election petitions should
        be sent to:

        The Clerk of the Crown
        Royal Courts of Justice
        Chichester Street
        Belfast
        BT1 3JF

        Tel: 028 9072 4699

        The Clerk of the Crown can also provide detailed information on the processes
        to be followed in issuing an electoral petition.

Costs

11.7    In addition to the fees payable on issue of an election petition, security for
        costs must be agreed and lodged with the relevant authority.


                                           35
Advice
Litigation of any type in the High Court should not to be embarked upon lightly and it is
advisable to take specialised legal advice before pursuing this course of action.




                                           36
12     Your election expenses
12.1   We have provided below some guidance on candidates’ election expenses.
       More comprehensive core guidance can be downloaded from the Electoral
       Commission’s website although this is not specific to this election.

12.2   Candidates are required to submit an election expenses return, and must not
       exceed the specified limit for expenses. It is important to note that the
       definition of a ‘candidate’ described in section 8, During your election
       campaign, also applies in relation to the provisions described below.

Definition of election expenses
12.3   Election expenses are any expenses incurred on goods, services, property or
       facilities used for the purpose of your election after the date on which you
       become a candidate (see below). Included within this definition are expenses
       incurred in the prejudicing of another candidate’s electoral prospects.

12.4   You will become a candidate on the date on which you declare, or are
       declared by others, to be a candidate or are nominated as a candidate at that
       election. It is important to note that this definition applies whether the
       expenses were incurred before or after the date on which you become a
       candidate. This means, for example, that if you incur expenses in printing and
       stockpiling leaflets or envelopes before you become a candidate, but use them
       subsequently for your campaign, those costs must be declared as election
       expenses.

Calculation of maximum amount
12.5   For a candidate at a Local Government Election the maximum amount of
       expenses is £600.00 plus an additional 5p for every entry in the register of
       electors (the register published on 1 April 2005).

12.6   Where there are two or more joint candidates the maximum amount of
       expenses shall
         • for each of two joint candidates be reduced by one-fourth; or
         • if there are more than two joint candidates by one-third.

12.7   A candidate shall be deemed to be a joint candidate where two or more
       candidates appoint the same election agent or employ or use the services of
       the same polling agents, clerks or messengers, or hire or use the same
       committee rooms for the election or publish a joint address or joint circular or
       notice at the election.

Payments
12.8   Payments relating to your election expenses must, in most instances, be paid
       for by the candidate’s election agent. The following exceptions apply:

       •   election expenses (e.g. postage) which may be paid for by any person
           authorised by the election agent to incur them (subject to an agreed
           maximum limit);
       •   expenses paid for by you, the candidate, before your election agent was
           appointed;
       •   expenses incurred before you became a candidate;

                                         37
        •   expenses incurred other than for the purposes of the election but then
            coming to constitute election expenses due to their subsequent use for
            that purpose (e.g. a computer);
        •   expenses incurred by a person authorised by the election agent under
            Section 41. Returns and declarations of all such expenditure are required
            to be submitted by the person authorised by the agent within 21 days of
            the day after the result of the election is declared.

12.9    Deadlines for sending in and paying claims are also regulated. Every claim
        against a candidate or his election agent in respect of an election expense
        must be received by the election agent no later than 21 days after the day on
        which the result of the election is declared. Claims received after this date will
        be barred and must not be paid (unless a court order is obtained granting
        leave to pay them). All claims must be paid no later than 28 days after the day
        on which the result of the election is declared.

Form of return
12.10   Each election agent must deliver to the Deputy Returning Officer a return as to
        their candidate’s election expenses within 35 days of the day after the result of
        the election is declared. It is important to note that a return must be submitted
        even if no expenses have been incurred. Copies of expenses return forms and
        accompanying guidance are available from DROs.

12.11   The return requires statements of:

        •   all election expenses paid by the election agent;
        •   expenses incurred before an election agent was appointed;
        •   petty and personal expenses;
        •   expenses incurred by a person authorised by the election agent;
        •   any disputed and/or unpaid claims;
        •   declarations of value in relation to items purchased for purposes other
            than the election but subsequently used for that purpose;
        •   any monies or securities received by the election agent from the candidate
            or any other person for the purposes of election expenses and the name
            of every person from whom they have been received.

12.12   Bills or receipts to support all recorded items of expenditure should
        accompany the return (except where the amount is less than £20).

Personal expenses
12.13   Individual candidates can also incur ‘personal expenses’. Personal expenses
        are any expenses incurred on a candidate’s travel, accommodation and
        subsistence (in relation to his election).

12.14   Common examples of personal expenses may include:

        •   train tickets from the candidate’s home within the electoral region;
        •   petrol costs for journeys between the candidate’s home and areas in
            which she is campaigning;
        •   hotel bills for overnight stays in the electoral region;
        •   meals.

12.15   Personal expenses do not include:


                                           38
        •   postage;
        •   stationery;
        •   petrol costs for journeys within the electoral area.

There is no statutory limit on candidates’ personal election expenses.

Declarations
12.16   All election expenses returns must be accompanied by a declaration made by
        the election agent. Each candidate is also required to submit a declaration,
        either at the time the return is delivered to the Deputy Returning Officer or
        within seven days after the day on which the expenses return and the agent’s
        declaration are delivered. If the candidate acts as their own election agent
        there is no need to submit an agent’s declaration, but the candidate’s
        declaration should be amended to indicate that they acted as their own agent.




                                           39
Deadlines
12.17    Statutory deadlines which apply to the declaration and return of election
         expenses are calculated from the day on which the result of the election is
         declared, and the relevant dates are shown below.

Deadlines for the declaration and return of election expenses for candidates at Local
Government elections in Northern Ireland, May 2005

Event                                                            Day
All claims for payment to be received by the election agent:
- if election result is declared on Monday 9 May                 Monday 30 May
- if election result is declared on Tuesday 10 May               Tuesday 31 May




All payments in respect of election expenses must be made
no later than:
- if election result is declared on Monday 9 May                 Monday 6 June
- if election result is declared on Tuesday 10 May               Tuesday 7 June

Last day for the receipt of return of election expenses and
election agent’s declarations:
- if election result is declared on Monday 9 May                 Monday 13 June
- if election result is declared on Tuesday 10 May               Tuesday 14 June

Deadline for receipt of candidate’s declaration as to election
expenses:                                                        within 7 days after the delivery
                                                                 of the agent’s declaration

Last day for publication of time and place for inspection of
returns and declarations as to election expenses:
- if election result is declared on Monday 9 May                 Thursday 23 June
- if election result is declared on Tuesday 10 May               Friday 24 June



Offences
12.18    The Electoral Law Act 1962 specifies a number of offences which are illegal
         practices when committed by a candidate or election agent:

         •    Failure to submit a true return as to a candidate’s election expenses within
              the specified time and in the prescribed format.
         •    Failure to submit a declaration to accompany a return as to election
              expenses within the specified time and in the prescribed format.
         •    Knowingly paying for or incurring any election expense in excess of the
              statutory maximum.

12.19    Additionally, an election agent commits an illegal practice if he or she:

         •    pays a claim, or claims, received by the election agent after the specified
              time of 21 days after the day of the election result was declared, or makes
              a payment later than 28 days after the day the election result has been
              declared.

12.20    Further, any candidate and/or election agent who makes a false declaration as
         to election expenses is guilty of a corrupt practice. These illegal and corrupt
         practices are both an offence under criminal law and an act that has

                                               40
        consequences in relation to electoral law. A candidate or election agent found
        guilty of an illegal practice on summary conviction is liable to a fine not
        exceeding level five on the standard scale. A candidate or election agent
        found guilty of a corrupt practice is liable to a term of imprisonment, or a fine,
        or both.

12.21   If a candidate who has been elected is found by an election court to be
        personally guilty, or guilty by any of his agents, of a corrupt or illegal practice
        his election shall be void.




                                           41
Appendix 1 – Miscellaneous documents
The following documents are referred to in this guidance:

•   Secrecy requirements
•   Guidance for tellers




                                          42
Secrecy requirements
The requirements in paragraph 28 of the Electoral Law Act (Northern Ireland) 1962
help to maintain the secrecy of the ballot. They apply to all candidates, election agents
and polling agents, and to every person attending at the count. Paragraph 27 of the
Ninth Schedule is reproduced below in full for use by candidates, election agents,
polling and counting agents.

Requirement of secrecy

27. (1)   A person attending at or admitted to a polling station in any capacity at an
          election shall be guilty of an electoral offence if before the poll is closed he
          communicates to any other person any information as to:

          (a)   the name of any elector or proxy who has or has not applied for a ballot
                paper or voted at a polling station; or

          (b)   the number on the register of any elector who, or whose proxy, has or
                has not applied for a ballot paper or voted at a polling station; or

          (c)   the official mark.

(2)       Any person attending in any capacity at the count at any election shall be
          guilty of an electoral offence if he:

          (a)   ascertains or attempts to ascertain at the count the number on the back
                of any ballot paper; or

          (b)   at any time communicates any information obtained at the count as to
                the candidate for whom any vote is given on any particular ballot paper.

(3)       A person shall be guilty of an electoral offence if he:

          (a)   interferes with or attempts to interfere with a voter when recording his
                vote; or

          (b)   otherwise obtains or attempts to obtain in a polling station information as
                to the candidate for whom a voter in that station is about to vote or has
                voted; or

          (c)   communicate at any time to any person any information obtained in a
                poling station as to the candidate for whom a voter in that station is
                about to vote or has voted, or as to the number on the back of the ballot
                paper issued to a voter at that station; or

          (d)   directly or indirectly induces a voter to display his ballot paper after he
                has marked it so as to make known to any person the name of the
                candidate for whom he has or has not voted; or

          (e)   being a person permitted, on making a declaration of secrecy, to remain
                with a blind voter while the presiding officer records his vote,
                communicates at any time to any person any information as to the
                candidate for whom that voter intends to vote or has voted, or as to the
                number on the back of the ballot paper issued for use of that voter.

(4)       Any person attending the proceedings in connection with the issue or receipt
          of ballot papers for persons voting by post shall be guilty of an electoral
          offence if he:
                                              43
        (a)    communicates, before the poll is closed, to any person any information
               obtained at those proceedings as to the official mark; or

        (b)    except for some purpose authorised by law, communicate to any person
               at any time information obtained at those proceedings as to the number
               on the back of the ballot paper sent to any person; or

        (c)    except for some purpose authorised by law, attempt to ascertain at the
               proceedings in connection with the receipt of ballot papers the number
               on the back of any ballot paper; or

        (d)    attempts to ascertain at the proceedings in connection with the receipt of
               the ballot papers the candidate for whom any vote is given in any
               particular ballot paper or communicates any information with respect
               thereto obtained at those proceedings.

A person guilty of an electoral offence at a local election shall be liable on summary
conviction to a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale or to imprisonment for a
term not exceeding 6 months.




                                           44
Guidance for tellers
Tellers at polling stations: notes for the guidance of Returning
Officers, candidates and election agents
Introduction

1.   It is common practice for candidates at elections to appoint ‘tellers or ‘checkers’ to
     stand outside polling stations and identify electors who have voted. This is a well
     established practice, but the activities of tellers can sometimes be confusing or
     even intimidating so far as the voters are concerned, and can lead to complaints
     and disputes.

2.   The purpose of these guidance notes is to help ensure that the activities of tellers
     remain within the bounds of what is acceptable. The guidance is not mandatory,
     but following it will be of benefit to all concerned: candidates, agents, Deputy
     Returning Officers (DRO), presiding officers, the voters and tellers themselves.

The legal position

3.   Tellers have no status so far as electoral law is concerned. They should not be
     confused with polling agents, whose appointment and duties are prescribed in the
     Representation of the People Acts. Tellers, unlike polling agents, are not among
     the categories of people admitted to the polling station.

Tellers’ activities

4.   Tellers must not give the impression that they are employed by the DRO. Tellers
     should concern themselves only with checking who has voted. Anything else could
     give rise to allegations of undue influence or simply antagonise voters. In
     particular, tellers must not hand out election material or otherwise try to influence
     the way someone will vote. Nor should they ask voters who they intend to vote for
     or how they have voted.

5.   The usual means of telling is to ask voters for their poll card or electoral number. If
     a voter does not have a poll card, then they may be asked to give their name and
     address. Voters should not be approached until after they have left the polling
     station or be asked to re-enter it to ascertain their electoral number. In any event,
     tellers must not in any way impede or obstruct voters on their way into or out of the
     polling station or the building in which it is situated.

6.   Tellers should bear in mind that voters are not obliged to hand over their poll card
     or comply with any request for information. If they decline, they must not be
     pressed. No impression should be given that the information must be provided for
     official purposes.

Tellers’ location

7.   The polling station is the self-contained area containing the polling booths, ballot
     box and the presiding officer’s and poll clerk’s desks. Where a polling station
     consists of one room only, tellers will not under any circumstances be permitted to
     locate themselves in the same room which contains the ballot box. Tellers must not
     enter the polling station under any circumstances except for the lawful purpose of
     casting their own vote, voting as a proxy or accompanying a voter with disabilities.

8.   Tellers should normally remain outside the building in which the polling station is
     situated. At the presiding officer’s discretion, they may be allowed inside the
                                             45
     building (but not the polling station) in bad weather if this is practicable, provided
     they do not position themselves in such a way that the secrecy of the ballot might
     be compromised. Tellers must comply with any instructions as to their location
     given by the presiding officer or DRO.

Wearing of rosettes

9.   At the DRO’s discretion, there may be no objection to tellers wearing coloured
     rosettes in order to make it clear to voters that they are party workers and not
     polling station officials.

Liaison with the Deputy Returning Officer

10. These notes should be read in conjunction with any guidance or instructions given
     by the DRO. It is recommended that the DRO and the candidates and their agents
     should liaise at an early stage on the subject of tellers, particularly as to their
     location with respect to particular polling stations.




                                            46
Appendix 2
Contact details for Area Electoral Offices

       Ballymoney Area Electoral Office
       9(A) Linenhall Street
       Ballymoney
       BT53 6DP

       Telephone: 028 9044 6688
       Fax: 028 2766 8663

       Responsible for the area covered by Ballymena District Council, Ballymoney
       District Council, Moyle District Council, Magherafelt District Council,
       Cookstown District Council and the District Electoral Area of Torrent in the
       Dungannon District Council area.

       Banbridge Area Electoral Office
       52 Bridge Street
       Banbridge
       BT32 3JU.

       Telephone: 028 9044 6688
       Fax: 028 4062 9766

       Responsible for the area covered by Craigavon District Council, Armagh
       District Council, Banbridge District Council, Newry and Mourne City Council,
       Lisburn City Council with the exception of part of the District Electoral Area of
       Dunmurry Cross (for wards 1927-1930 see Belfast Area Electoral Office ) and
       Down District Council with the exception of part of the District Electoral Area of
       Rowallane (for wards 1801,1802,1806 see Newtownards Area Electoral
       Office)

       Belfast Area Electoral Office
       6-10 William Street
       Belfast
       BT1 1PR.

       Telephone: 028 9044 6688
       Fax: 028 9024 8689

       Responsible for the area covered by Belfast City Council, Castlereagh
       Borough Council with the exception of wards 2501-2505 in the District
       Electoral Area of Castlereagh East and 2509, 2520 and 2521 in the District
       electoral Area of Castlereagh South (see also Newtownards Area Electoral
       Office) and the following parts of Newtownabbey Borough council -Part of the
       District Electoral Area of Macedon, wards 2121-2125 (see also
       Newtownabbey Area Electoral Office) and Part of the District Electoral Area of
       Dunmurry Cross, wards 1927-1930 (see also Banbridge Area Electoral Office)

       Londonderry Area Electoral Office
       Embassy Building
       2nd Floor
       3 Strand Road
       Londonderry BT48 7BH

       Telephone: 028 9044 6688
                                          47
Fax: 028 7136 6074

Responsible for Derry City Council, Limavady Borough Council and Coleraine
Borough Council Areas.

Newtownabbey Area Electoral Office
3(A) Portland Avenue
Newtownabbey
BT36 5EY

Telephone: 028 9044 6688
Fax: 028 9084 2130

Responsible for the area covered by Antrim Borough Council, Larne Borough
Council, Carrickfergus Borough council and Newtownabbey Borough Council
except for the wards 2121-2125 in the Macedon District Electoral Area (see
Belfast Area Electoral Office)

Newtownards Area Electoral Office
2(B) Regent Street
Newtownards
BT23 4LH

Telephone: 028 9044 6688
Fax: 028 9182 8387

Responsible for the area covered by Ards Borough Council, North Down
Borough Council, wards 1801, 1802 and 1806 in the District Electoral Area of
Rowallane in Down District Council (see also Banbridge Area Electoral Office),
Wards 2501-2505 in the District Electoral Area of Castlereagh East and Wards
2509, 2520 and 2521 in the District Electoral Area of Castlereagh South in the
Castlereagh Borough Council Area (see also Belfast Area Electoral Office).

Omagh Area Electoral Office
21 Kevlin Avenue
Omagh
BT78 1ER

Telephone: 028 9044 6688
Fax: 028 8224 8905

Responsible for the area covered by Fermanagh District Council, Omagh
District Council, Strabane District Council and the following District Electoral
Areas of Dungannon Borough Council - Blackwater, Clogher Valley,
Dungannon Town (District Electoral Area of Torrent see Ballymoney Area
Electoral Office).




                                  48
Appendix 3
Contact details for Deputy Returning Officers/Chief Executives
      Tony McGurk
      Derry City Council
      98 Strand Road
      LONDONDERRY
      BT48 7NN

      Telephone: 028 7136 5151
      Fax: 028 7136 8536

      John K Stevenson
      Limavady Borough Council
      7 Connell Street
      LIMAVADY
      BT49 0HA

      Telephone: 028 7772 2226
      Fax: 028 7772 2010

      Wavell T Moore
      Coleraine Borough Council
      66 Portstewart Road
      COLERAINE
      BT52 1EY

      Telephone: 028 7034 7034
      Fax: 028 7034 7026

      John Dempsey
      Ballymoney Borough Council
      14 Charles Street
      BALLYMONEY
      BT53 6DZ

      Telephone: 028 2766 0200
      Fax: 028 2766 0222

      Richard Lewis
      Moyle District Council
      Sheskburn House
      7 Mary Street
      BALLYCASTLE
      BT54 6QH

      Telephone: 028 2076 2225
      Fax: 028 2076 2515

      Colm McGarry
      Larne Borough Council
      Smiley Buildings
      Victoria Road
      LARNE
      BT40 1RU

      Telephone: 028 2827 2313
                                   49
Fax: 028 2826 0660

Mervyn Rankin
Ballymena Borough Council
80 Galgorm Road
BALLYMENA
BT42 1AB

Telephone: 028 2566 0300
Fax: 028 2566 0400

John A McLaughlin
Magherafelt District Council
50 Ballyronan Road
MAGHERAFELT
BT45 6EN

Telephone: 028 7939 7979
Fax: 028 7939 7980

Michael McGuckin
Cookstown District Council
Burn Road
COOKSTOWN
BT80 8DT

Telephone: 028 8676 2205
Fax: 028 8676 4360

Philip Faithfull
Strabane District Council
47 Derry Road
STRABANE
BT82 8DY

Telephone: 028 7138 2204
Fax: 028 7138 1348

Danny McSorley
Omagh District Council
The Grange
Mountjoy Road
OMAGH
BT79 7BL

Telephone: 028 8224 5321
Fax: 028 8224 3888

Rodney Connor
Fermanagh District Council
The Town Hall
ENNISKILLEN
BT74 7BA

Telephone: 028 6632 5050
Fax: 028 6632 2024

Willaim J Beattie
Dungannon & South Tyrone Borough Council
                               50
Circular Road
DUNGANNON
BT71 6DT

Telephone: 028 8772 5311
Fax: 028 8772 0368

Francis Rock
Craigavon Borough Council
PO Box 66
Lakeview Road
CRAIGAVON
BT64 1AL

Telephone: 028 3831 2400
Fax: 028 3831 2444

Victor Brownlees
Armagh City and District Council
The Palace Demesne
ARMAGH
BT60 4EL

Telephone: 028 3752 9600
Fax: 028 3752 9601

Thomas McCall
Newry & Mourne District Council
O'Hagan House
Monaghan Row
NEWRY
BT35 8DL

Telephone: 028 3031 3031
Fax: 028 3031 3077

Robert Gilmore
Banbridge District Council
Downshire Road
BANBRIDGE
BT32 3JY

Telephone: 028 4066 0600
Fax: 028 4066 0601

John McGrillen
Down District Council
24 Strangford Road
DOWNPATRICK
BT30 6SR

Telephone: 028 4461 0800
Fax: 028 4461 0801

Norman Davidson
Lisburn City Council
Lagan Valley Island
1 The Island
LISBURN
                              51
BT27 4RL

Telephone: 028 9250 9250
Fax: 028 9250 9257

David McCammick
Antrim Borough Council
The Steeple
ANTRIM
BT41 1BJ

Telephone: 028 9446 3113
Fax: 028 9446 4469

Norman Dunn
Newtownabbey Borough Council
Mossley Mill
NEWTOWNABBEY
BT36 5QA

Telephone: 028 9034 0000
Fax: 028 9034 0200

Alan A C Cardwell
Carrickfergus Borough Council
Town Hall
CARRICKFERGUS
BT38 7DL

Telephone: 028 9335 1604
Fax: 028 9336 6676

Trevor Polley
North Down Borough Council
The Castle
BANGOR
BT20 4BT

Telephone: 028 9127 0371
Fax: 028 9127 1370

Ashley Boreland
Ards Borough Council
2 Church Street
NEWTOWNARDS
BT23 4AP

Telephone: 028 9182 4000
Fax: 028 9181 9628

Adrian Donaldson
Castlereagh Borough Council
1 Bradford Court
Upper Galwally
BELFAST
BT8 6RB

Telephone: 028 9049 4500
Fax: 028 9049 4515
                                52
Peter McNaney
Belfast City Council
City Hall
BELFAST
BT1 5GS

Telephone: 028 9032 0202
Fax: 028 9043 8075




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