Humanity

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					                                         International University of Sarajevo
                                         Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences



                                             Course Syllabus


Semester                       Fall 2009                       Course Code                    SPS 102
Course title                   Humanity and Society I          Course prerequisite(s)         None
Course Level                   Freshman Course                 Course corequisite(s)          None
Contact hours                  3 hours lecturing and 2         ECTS credit                    6
                               hours tutorials



                                              Academic Staff Specifics
            Name                Office Number and Location             Office Hours                  E-mail Address
    Dr. Muhidin Mulalic                      F-7                 Monday 9:00-11:00 AM             mmulalic@ius.edu.ba

Prerequisites by topics:
    1. Communication ability
    2. Historical knowledge up to 1500
    3. Knowledge of basic geographical and historical concepts related to modern history


Course description:
This is an introductory course in the history of civilization from 1500 CE to the contemporary time. Among the topics to
be considered are: the Renaissance and the Reformation; the expansion of Europe; the origins of the modern state; the
Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; origins of the French Revolution; Industrial Age and imperialism;
Marxism; the World Wars; the Russian and Chinese Revolutions; the Cold War; colonization and the Third World;
intellectual and cultural developments; civil rights, civil liberties, and democracy worldwide in the late twentieth century.


Aims of the Course (Course Objectives)
       To develop students understanding of key historical terms and concepts

       To develop student’s understanding of the development of the modern world.

       To enable students to gain a chronological survey of the development of humanity.

       To enriches student’s understanding of the major historical periods and major developments in arts, architecture,
        religion, culture and science.

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        To enable student’s understanding of political, economic, social, religious and cultural aspects of the modern
         world

        To use past historical experience and enable students to understand globalized world community.



Course Learning Objectives:
After finishing the course successfully, the IUS student shall be able to:
        explain and use basic historical terms and concepts
        relate historical concepts to different courses
        use historical knowledge in understanding arts, architecture, religion, culture and science
        develop historical, analytical and comparative skills
        interpret the historical events and concepts


Textbook(s):
Craig, Graham, Kagan, Ozment, Turner, The Heritage of World Civilization. Pearson, 2007.
Perry Chase, et. al. Western Civilization: Ideas, Politics and Society. 6th ed., New York: Houghton Mifflin Company,
2000.


Assessment methods:
Presentations, group activities, consultations, quizzes, exams and take-home exams


Grading policy


          Participation and Attendance                           10%
          Quizzes 2x                                             10%
          Presentation                                           10%
          Group Project                                          10%
          Midterm Examination                                     20%
          Final Examination                                       40%
          Total                                                   100%


Course Academic Calendar – Teaching Time-table


   Week                              Basic and support                               Homework/reports and their
                                      material to be                                        due dates
                                          covered
     1        Introduction to the Course
                  • Course Overview
                  • Overview of History of Civilization to 1500 CE




                                                               2
2   The Renaissance: Transition to the Modern Age [CH. 15]
       • Italy: Birthplace of the Renaissance
       • The Renaissance Outlook: Humanism and Secular Politics
       • Renaissance Art
       • The Spread of the Renaissance
       • The Renaissance and the Modern Age
3   The Reformation: Shattering of Christianity [CH. 16]
       •   The Medieval Church in Crisis
       •   The Lutheran Revolt
       •   The Spread of the Reformation
       •   The Catholic Response
       •   The Reformation and the Modern Age
4   European Expansion: Economic and Social Transformations
    [CH. 16 and 18]
        • European Expansion
        • The Price Revolution
        • The Expansion of Agriculture
        • The Expansion of Trade and Industry
        • The Growth of Capitalism
        • Economic and Social Transformations
5   The Rise of Sovereignty: Transition to the Modern State [CH.
    20]
        • Monarchs and Elites as State Builders
        • The Rise and Fall of Hapsburg Spain
        • The Growth of French Power
        • Constitutionalism in England
        • The Netherlands, the Holy Roman Empire, Austria and
           Russia
6   The Scientific Revolution: The Mechanical Universe and Its
    Implications [CH. 22]
       • Medieval Cosmology
       • A New View of Nature
       • The Newtonian Synthesis: Experiment, Mathematics and
            Theory
       • Biology, Medicine and Chemistry
       • Major Proponents of the Modern Science
7   The Age of Enlightenment: Reason and Reform [CH. 22]
       • The Formation of a Public and Secular Culture
       • The Science of Religion
       • Political, Social and Economic Thought
       • The American Revolution and its Implications
8   The French Revolution: Affirmation of Liberty [CH. 23]
       • The Old Regime
       • The Modern State 1789-91
       • The Radical Stage 1792-94
       • Napoleon: Subverter and Preserver of the Revolution
       • Europe, 1815-1848: Revolution and Counterrevolution
       • Europe after The Congress of Vienna: 1815-1914




                                              3
     9       The Industrial Revolution: The Transformation of Society
             [CH. 20]
                • The Origins of the Industrial Age
                • Society Transformed
                • Industrialism in Perspective
     10      Thought and Culture in the Nineteenth Century Europe [CH.
             24 and 25]
                 • Romanticism and German Idealism; Conservatism and
                     Liberalism
                 • Radicalism and Democracy; Socialism and Nationalism
                 • Positivism and Darwinism; Marxism, Anarchism and
                     Feminism
     11      Western Imperialism: Global Dominance [CH. 29]
                • New Imperialism
                • European Domination of Asia, Africa and Latin America
                • The Legacy of Imperialism
     12      World War I: The West in Despair [CH. 29]
     13      An Era of Totalitarianism [CH. 30]
                • The Nature of Totalitarianism
                • The Nature of Fascism
                • The Rise of Fascism in Italy and Germany
     14      World War II: Western Civilization in the Balance [CH. 31
             and 32]
                • The Aftermath of World War I
                • The Nazi Blitzkrieg
                • The Turn of the Tide
                • The Legacy of World War II
     15      Brief Overview of Africa, Far East, The Middle East and Latin
             America from 1500-Present [ch. 19; ch. 21; ch. 26; ch. 27; ch.
             28; ch. 33 and ch. 34.
     16


Expected workload:
On average students need to spend 3 hours of study and preparation per week.


Attendance policy:
Students are expected to attend all classes and participate in discussions in class. Attendance is mandatory (at least 70%).
Students who exceed the limits without a medical or emergency excuse acceptable to and approved by the Dean of the
relevant faculty shall not be allowed to take the final examination and shall receive a mark of zero for the course.


Prepared by: Dr. Muhidin Mulalic
Last Updated: October, 2009




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