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Pest and Disease Vectors Database Website by mikeholy

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									               Pest and Disease Vectors Database & Website



                                 End of year report (draft)




                             Report to the Heritage Council

                                    (Author: Liam Lysaght)

                                      December 2010




End of project report to the Heritage Council, December 2010 (draft)   1
1. OBJECTIVE OF THE PROJECT

The objective of the project is the establishment of a consolidated national Invertebrate Pest and
Disease Vector databases accessible through a website providing up-to-date information and
distribution maps.

This database will provide information for the assessment of the current and potential risk of vector-
borne diseases and for the assessment of the potential for pest outbreaks in Ireland. This risk has
increased significantly in recent years, and will continue to do so, as a consequence of climate
change.


2. BACKGROUND TO THE PROJECT

The number of invertebrate-borne diseases has been increasing in Ireland in recent years due to a
number of factors including climate change, animal movements between countries, and increased
holidaying abroad (Figure 1). Invertebrate pests also appear to be on the increase and can have large
economic impacts especially in the tourism and agricultural sectors.




Figure 1: Number of malaria notifications, Ireland 1982-2007 (Health Protection Surveillance Centre)


Despite the obvious economic and health importance of invertebrate pests and disease vectors,
there is no central co-ordination for information on these animals. The establishment of a
consolidated national Invertebrate Pest and Disease Vector database at the National Biodiversity
Data Centre accessible through a dedicated website and online information portal was identified as
a service that the Centre could provide to the animal and human health sector.

The data will be of relevance to the tracking and management of many diseases, which are currently
of importance in European for both human and animal health, including: African horse sickness, Blue
Tongue virus, Malaria, Lyme disease, Tick-borne encephalitis, Dengue fever, Equine infectious
anaemia (swamp fever), Leishmania, Avian malaria. The benefits of this project should be far
reaching providing high quality up-to-date information for risk assessments for farm and forest
managers, for public health officers, for veterinary surgeons, and for the general public.


 End of project report to the Heritage Council, December 2010 (draft)                         2
3. KEY DELIVERABLES

The key deliverables as part of this project are reported upon below.


Deliverable 1. Creation of a National Mosquito Database.

The Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of Ireland database has been compiled as a digital database and
made available on the Centre’s mapping system, Biodiversity Maps. It contains 253 records of 18
species, spanning the period from 1823 to 1991.


Table 1: List of the species, with number of individual records shown in parentheses, contained in
the Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of Ireland database.

Aedes cantans (5 records)                             Anopheles maculipennis agg. sensu.lato. (13 records)
Aedes caspius (1 records)                             Anopheles plumbeus (11 records)
Aedes cinereus (4 records)                            Coquillettidia richiardii (3 records)
Aedes detritus (19 records)                           Culex pipiens (78 records)
Aedes dorsalis (2 records)                            Culiseta alaskaensis (1 records)
Aedes punctor (2 records)                             Culiseta annulata (46 records)
Aedes rusticus (13 records)                           Culiseta litorea (5 records)
Anopheles algeriensis (1 records)                     Culiseta morsitans (10 records)
Anopheles claviger (37 records)                       Culiseta subochrea (2 records)




Figure 2: Map showing the distribution of records in the Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of Ireland
database. (Taken from Biodiversity Maps)




 End of project report to the Heritage Council, December 2010 (draft)                               3
Deliverable 2. Creation of a National Flea Database

The Fleas (Siphonaptera) of Ireland database has been compiled as a digital database and made
available on the Centre’s mapping system, Biodiversity Maps. The database contains 2398 records of
44 species, spanning the period 1892 to 2006.


Table 2: List of the species, with number of individual records shown in parentheses, contained in
the Fleas (Siphonaptera) of Ireland database.

Amalaraeus penicilliger subsp. mustelae (6)                      Dasypsyllus (Dasypsyllus) gallinulae subsp. gallinulae (149)
Archaeopsylla erinacei subsp. erinacei (70)                      Doratopsylla dasycnema subsp. dasycnema (44)
Callopsylla (Orneacus) waterstoni (8)                            Echidnophaga gallinacea (1)
Ceratophyllus (Ceratophyllus) farreni subsp. farreni (33)        Frontopsylla (Orfrontia) laeta (9)
Ceratophyllus (Ceratophyllus) gallinae (139 )                    Hystrichopsylla talpae subsp. talpae (98)
Ceratophyllus (Ceratophyllus) hirundinis (41)                    Ischnopsyllus (Hexactenopsylla) hexactenus (33)
Ceratophyllus (Ceratophyllus) rossittensis subsp.                Ischnopsyllus (Ischnopsyllus) elongatus (3)
                                                          (1)
rossittensis                                                     Ischnopsyllus (Ischnopsyllus) intermedius (29)
Ceratophyllus (Ceratophyllus) rusticus (47 )                     Ischnopsyllus (Ischnopsyllus) octactenus (47)
Ceratophyllus (Ceratophyllus) styx subsp. jordani (58)           Ischnopsyllus (Ischnopsyllus) simplex subsp. simplex (4)
Ceratophyllus (Ceratophyllus) styx subsp. styx (2)               Leptopsylla (Leptopsylla) segnis (39)
Ceratophyllus (Ceratophyllus) vagabundus subsp. insularis (19)   Nosopsyllus (Nosopsyllus) fasciatus (147)
Ceratophyllus (Emmareus) borealis (9)                            Nycteridopsylla longiceps (6)
Ceratophyllus (Emmareus) chasteli (3)                            Orchopeas howardi subsp. howardi (3)
Ceratophyllus (Emmareus) columbae (4)                            Ornithopsylla laetitiae (4)
Ceratophyllus (Emmareus) garei (28)                              Palaeopsylla soricis subsp. soricis (21)
Ceratophyllus (Monopsyllus) sciurorum subsp. sciurorum (51)      Paraceras melis subsp. melis (90)
Ctenocephalides canis (92)                                       Pulex (Pulex) irritans (268)
Ctenocephalides felis subsp. felis (45)                          Rhadinopsylla (Actenophthalmus) pentacantha (8)
Ctenophthalmus (1)                                               Spilopsyllus cuniculi (170)
Ctenophthalmus (Ctenophthalmus) (275)                            Typhloceras poppei subsp. poppei (26)
Ctenophthalmus (Ctenophthalmus) nobilis subsp. nobilis (106)     Xenopsylla (1 )
Ctenophthalmus (Ctenophthalmus) nobilis subsp. vulgaris (160)




Figure 3: Map showing the distribution of records in the Fleas (Siphonaptera) of Ireland database.
(Taken from Biodiversity Maps)




 End of project report to the Heritage Council, December 2010 (draft)                                                    4
Deliverable 3. Production of a website on Irish invertebrate pests and disease vectors

A website Pest and Disease Vectors has been created as one of the Centre’s subsites, but has not yet
been released to the public (Figure 4). The website presents information on, and serves as, a portal
to information on pest and disease vectors in Ireland. It also provides information on some of the
many diseases that can be transmitted by biological vectors. The website presents a national
overview map of the known distribution of all mosquitoes, fleas, leatherjackets (craneflies) and
micro-moths and enables detailed querying of the individual species-specific records for these
taxonomic groups, and for the land snail, Galba truncatula, vector of liver fluke. The diseases
associated with each vectors is also indicated. Links are also provided to the websites of the main
organisations dealing with disease control in Ireland and internationally.

As this is the first of the Centre’s thematic projects which is intended to provide a data service to a
sector outside the environmental sector, a decision was taken that before the website was launched
the Centre would meet with key agencies in Ireland to discuss its content, and see if the
presentational format could better suit their needed. To date, discussions have been held with the
Department of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries and the Forest Service. Both organisations are
generally supportive of the initiative, and there is an agreement between the Centre and the Dept.
of A.F.F. regarding exchange of information on notifiable species under EU legislation.


Figure 4: A screen grab of the home page of the Pest and Disease Vectors website.




 End of project report to the Heritage Council, December 2010 (draft)                          5
Deliverable 4. Creation of a National Lice Database

The Lice (Phthiraptera) of Ireland database has been compiled as a digital database. It contains
records of 126 species dating from 1832 to 2003, and includes information on their hosts. This
database has been compiled and is ready for loading on the Centre’s mapping system, Biodiversity
Maps. The dataset will be loaded to the system before the end of 2010. The geographic spread of
the records is presented in the DMAP generated map (Figure 5).


Figure 5: A map showing the distribution of records contained within the Lice (Phthiraptera) of
Ireland database.
                     Lice of Ireland




Acknowledgements

The National Biodiversity Data Centre is grateful to the Heritage Council who has provided all the
funding for this project. The Centre is grateful for the large body of work completed by Ms Stefanie
Fleischer, Research Officer in creating the digitised national datasets, and produced the website
content.




 End of project report to the Heritage Council, December 2010 (draft)                        6
End of project report to the Heritage Council, December 2010 (draft)   7

								
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