Docstoc

faq

Document Sample
faq Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                           Draft 



                              
                              
                              
                              
                              
                              
                Frequently Asked Questions 
                     Race to the Top 
                      North Carolina 
                              
                              
                              
                              
                       10/22/2010 
                              
                              
                              
                              
  
 
 

FAQs – Race to the Top in NC            Page 1 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                               
      Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                                                                          Draft 


To access information found in the table of contents, click on the appropriate section below.  
Contents 
Section A: Submission of LEA Plans ................................................................................................ 4  
   A.1  Timeline for Submission....................................................................................................... 4  
   A.2 Technical Assistance for Developing Plan............................................................................. 5 
   A.3 Plan Documents .................................................................................................................... 6  
   A.4 Submitting the DSW.............................................................................................................. 6  
   A.5 Signatures for the DSW......................................................................................................... 6  
   A.6 Changing the DSW ................................................................................................................ 6  
   A.7 Late LEA Plans ....................................................................................................................... 6  
Section B: LEA and School Participation ......................................................................................... 6  
   B.1 LEA Participation ................................................................................................................... 6  
   B.2 Requirements for Schools ..................................................................................................... 7  
Section C: Implementation ............................................................................................................. 7  
   C.1 Implementation Timeline...................................................................................................... 7  
Section D: Reporting ....................................................................................................................... 7  
   D.1 Reports.................................................................................................................................. 7 
Section E: RttT Budgets................................................................................................................... 8  
   E.1 Allocation Determination ...................................................................................................... 8  
   E.2 Release of Funds.................................................................................................................... 8  
   E.3 Allocating Funding Across Years:........................................................................................... 8  
   E.5 Administrative Costs: ............................................................................................................ 9  
   E.6 Indirect Costs:........................................................................................................................ 9  
   E.7 Personnel Costs: .................................................................................................................... 9  
   E.8 State Budget (50%):............................................................................................................... 9  
   E.10 Funding Reallocation:.......................................................................................................... 9  
   E.11 Other Funding Sources........................................................................................................ 9  
   E.12 Allowable Purchases............................................................................................................ 9  
   E.13 Supplanting........................................................................................................................ 10  
   E.14 Budgeting by Initiative ...................................................................................................... 10  
   E.15 Managing RttT Funds ........................................................................................................ 10  
   E.16 Funding Splits: ................................................................................................................... 10  
  E.17 Pre‐award Costs: ............................................................................................................... 10  
FAQs – Race to the Top in NC                        Page 2 of 23                            Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                                         
          Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                                                                         Draft 


    E.18 Sustainability ..................................................................................................................... 10  
    E. 19 Revising Budget Categories .............................................................................................. 11  
Section F: NC Education Cloud (RttT Section A2) ......................................................................... 11 
    F.1 Definition of NC Education Cloud........................................................................................ 11  
    F.2 Timeline for Development and Implementation: ............................................................... 11 
    F.3 Additional Information and FAQs........................................................................................ 12  
Section G: Standards and Assessments (RttT Section B3) ............................................................ 12 
    G.1 Online Assessments ............................................................................................................ 12  
Section H: Data to Support Instruction (RttT Section C)............................................................... 12 
    H.1 Instructional Improvement System .................................................................................... 12  
Section I: Great Teachers and Leaders (RttT Section D) ............................................................... 14 
    I.1 Definition of Growth: ........................................................................................................... 14  
    I.2 Student Achievement and Teacher Effectiveness................................................................ 14 
    I.3 Reporting Teacher and Principal Effectiveness:................................................................... 14 
    I.4 Teacher Effectiveness and Non‐Tested Areas:..................................................................... 14 
    I.5 Partnerships with Universities: ............................................................................................ 15  
    I.6 Measuring and Incorporating Growth: ................................................................................ 15  
    I.7 Professional Development: .................................................................................................. 15  
Section J: Turning Around Lowest Achieving Schools (RttT Section E2)....................................... 16 
    J.1 Intervention Models: ........................................................................................................... 16  
    J.2 Turnaround: ......................................................................................................................... 16  
    J‐3.  Restart Model: ................................................................................................................... 17  
    J.4 School Closure...................................................................................................................... 17  
    J.5 Transformation Model:........................................................................................................ 17  
    J.6 Lowest Achieving Schools .................................................................................................... 22  
 




FAQs – Race to the Top in NC                                   Page 3 of 23                         Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                                         
          Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                                  Draft 



Section A: Submission of LEA Plans 
A.1  Timeline for Submission: What are the key dates surrounding LEA/Charter 
Detailed Scope of Work submissions for Race to the Top(RttT)?  
 
Submission Date:   
LEA/Charter’s Detailed Scope of Work (DSW) must be submitted to DPI by 5:00 pm on 
November 8. See below for information about how to submit the proposal. DPI must submit 
approved LEA plans and the State plan to the US Department of Education by November 22.  
 
Regional Meetings for LEAs/Charters: Meetings will be held in each region to provide technical 
assistance to LEA Race to the Top teams. Please reserve the date on your calendar.  
REGION     DATE           LOCATION                     ADDRESS                      HOTEL 
                   College of Albemarle,                                  Holiday Inn Express or 
            20‐                               1208 North Road 
     1             Small Business Center                                  Hampton Inn, Elizabeth 
            Oct                               Street, Elizabeth City 
                   (Rm. FC121 ABC)                                        City 
                   James Sprunt 
            22‐                               Hwy. 11 South,              Holiday Inn Express, 
     2             Community College 
            Oct                               Kenansville, 28349          Wallace 
                   (Williams Bldg.) 
            14‐                               7208 Falls of the 
     3             NCSBA Bldg.                                            N/A 
            Oct                               Neuse, Raleigh 
                   Cumberland Co.                                         Wingate, 910‐826‐9200 ‐ 
            11‐                               396 Elementary Dr, 
     4             Schools, Education                                     Courtyard Marriott, 
            Oct                               Fayetteville 
                   Resource Center                                        910‐ 487‐5557 
            15‐                               6205 Ramada Drive, 
     5             Village Inn, Clemmons                                  Village Inn, Clemmons 
            Oct                               Clemmons, NC 27012 
                    UNC‐Charlotte, 
            12‐ Barnhardt Student             9201 University City        *see below for hotels 
     6 
            Oct  Activity Center, The         Blvd., Charlotte            offering state rates 
                    Salons 
            18‐ Holiday Inn Express ‐         1700 Winkler Street,        Holiday Inn Express – 336‐
     7 
            Oct  Wilkesboro                   Wilkesboro, 28697           838‐1800 
                    AB Tech Community 
            26‐                               1459 Sandhill Road,  
     8              College, Enka Campus,                                 Holiday Inn ‐ 828‐665‐2161 
            Oct                               Enka, 28728 
                    Haynes Center 
    *Charlotte Hotels                                                 
    Drury Inn & Suites University ‐ 704‐593‐0700       Holiday Inn University ‐ 704‐547‐0999
    333 W. WT Harris Blvd., Charlotte 28262            8520 University Executive Park, Charlotte, 
    Hilton University ‐ 704‐547‐7444                   28262         
    8629 JM Keyes Dr., Charlotte 28262 
 
 

FAQs – Race to the Top in NC                 Page 4 of 23               Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                    
          Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                                Draft 


Regional Meeting Times for LEAs 
Please see www.ncpublicschools.org/rttt for up‐to‐date information about Regional meeting 
times. LEAs/Charters should bring a team of people who will work to develop the Detailed 
Scope of Work. Representatives might include a financial person, those heading LEA initiatives, 
curriculum representatives, and someone from the local teacher organization.  
 
A.2 Technical Assistance for Developing Plan: How can I get assistance with 
preparing my Plan? Where can I get more information?  
   •    Website: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/rttt/ 
   Documents with information for LEAs/Charters include:  
          o LEA/Charter Guidance on Objectives 
          o Summary of State and LEA/Charter Objectives and Initiatives 
          o LEA/Charter Detailed Scope of Work Template 
          o Frequently Asked Questions: Race to the Top in NC 
          o NC Race to the Top Application 
          o NC’s Lowest‐Achieving Schools ‐ List 
          o Estimated LEA/Charter School RttT Allocations 
          o Instructional Improvement System Powerpoint Added 10/21/10 
          o NC Education Cloud Information and FAQs Added 10/21/10 
        
   • Email Address: LEAs/Charters can send questions to RacetotheTop@dpi.state.nc.us.  
        
   • Contact Information: For specific questions and information, LEAs may also direct 
       questions to their Regional Leads. They will answer your questions or direct you to 
       someone who can provide more detailed information. Regional Leads are listed below.  
       
      Region            Contact Person               Email Address         Phone Number 
   Regional Lead 
                      Maria Pitre‐Martin       mpitre@dpi.state.nc.us       919‐835‐6127 
    Coordinator 
       Region 1      Tamara Berman‐Ishee             tishee@dpi.state.nc.us     252‐646‐0777 
                                                         sbroome@ 
       Region 2         Sherry Broome                                           910‐616‐3199 
                                                        dpi.state.nc.us
       Region 3            Rob Hines             rhines@dpi.state.nc.us         919‐807‐3244 

       Region 4         Priscilla Maynor       pmaynor@dpi.state.nc.us          919‐215‐5809 

       Region 5           Elissa Brown          ebrown@dpi.state.nc.us          919‐807‐3987 

       Region 6         Carolyn Means           cmeans@dpi.state.nc.us          704‐458‐6280 

    Region 7 & 8         Bobby Ashley           bashley@dpi.state.nc.us         828‐406‐1633 

FAQs – Race to the Top in NC               Page 5 of 23                Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                  
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                             Draft 


A.3 Plan Documents: What documents do LEAs/Charters need to submit to DPI?   
LEAs/Charters need to submit the Detailed Scope of Work (DSW) document, which is an excel 
file. LEAs/Charters will include information about their plans and budgets in this document.  
 
A.4 Submitting the DSW: Where and how should LEAs/Charters submit the DSW?  
You must submit your completed DSW to NC DPI no later than 5:00 p.m. on Monday, November 8, 
2010 by emailing the following documents to NC DPI at RacetotheTop@dpi.state.nc.us:  
    •     Completed DSW Excel file. Please title the file as: RttT LEA/Charter DSW ‐ <Your 
        LEA/Charter Name>.  
 
Note:  Please put “RttT LEA/Charter DSW ‐ <Your LEA/Charter Name>” in the subject line of 
your email.  
 
If you have questions or concerns about how to submit or want to confirm that your 
information is received, please contact NCDPI at RacetotheTop@dpi.state.nc.us. We encourage 
you to work with your NC DPI Regional Lead for any support that you need in planning and 
completing your DSW. You can find additional information and resources on the NC DPI RttT 
website (www.ncpublicschools.org/rttt/).  
 
A.5 Signatures for the DSW: What signatures are required for the DSW?  
The DSW requires that the LEA/Charter provide the names and titles of the members of the 
RttT planning and advisory team. However, signatures of members of the team are not 
required.  The Planning and Advisory Contacts sheet contains a space for any of these members 
to sign the plan to indicate support. This is not required, but it does demonstrate the broader 
commitment of your local team.  
 
A.6 Changing the DSW: Are LEAs/Charters permitted to change their DSW throughout 
the implementation of RttT?  
Yes. In fact, DPI would be surprised if an LEA/Charter did not have to adjust their plans 
throughout the process. DPI is putting together a process and guidance for LEAs/Charters to use 
when adjusting the DSW.  
 
A.7 Late LEA Plans: What happens if my LEA does not turn their DSW in by November 
8, 2010? Added 10/21/10 
They will not be funded and the funds will be redistributed to those who did submit the plans 
on schedule.  


Section B: LEA and School Participation 
B.1 LEA Participation:  
•   Are LEAs/Charters required to participate in Race to the Top?  
    No, LEAs and Charter schools are not required to participate. In order to receive RttT funds, 
    LEAs/Charters must submit an acceptable plan for implementing all “required activities” 
FAQs – Race to the Top in NC               Page 6 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                  
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                                Draft 


    (see Required Activities worksheet in Detailed Scope of Work template; and “LEAs/Charters 
    will…” in Guidance documents).  LEAs/Charters who do not agree to implement all 
    “required” activities will be considered to be not participating and will not receive RttT 
    funds.  
              
•   Are LEAs/Charters required to participate in all activities?  
    In order to receive Race to the Top funds, a LEA/Charter must participate in all required 
    activities. The LEA/Charter may select to implement any or none of the ‘optional’ activities 
    (see Optional Activities worksheet in Detailed Scope of Work template; and “LEAs/Charters 
    may…” in Guidance documents).  
 
B.2 Requirements for Schools: Is the LEA required to implement activities in all 
schools?  
Required activities must be implemented in all schools for which the activity is relevant. For 
optional activities, an LEA may propose implementation in only select schools. LEAs may 
propose to implement some required activities in only select schools, if they have a strong 
justification to do so. This can be negotiated with DPI through the Detailed Scope of Work.  


Section C: Implementation 
C.1 Implementation Timeline: What is the timeline for implementing Race to the 
Top?  
LEAs may begin implementing activities immediately, though funds will not be released until 
their plans are approved by DPI and the US Department of Education (USED). Race to the Top 
provides funds for four years, through the 2013 – 14 school year.  


Section D: Reporting 
D.1 Reports:  
•   How will LEAs/Charters report on deliverables?  
    DPI will release template documents soon for LEAs/Charters to use for reporting. The types 
    of reporting documents may include progress documents, year‐end documents, DSW 
    revisions and changes, annual budget projections, end of grant reports, etc.  
•   How will LEAs/Charters report expenditures?  
    Like all other federal programs, PRC(s) will be established for each of the pertinent 
    initiatives outlined in the State RttT application. LEAs and charter schools will report their 
    expenditures monthly through their normal UERS processes. 
•   Will RttT financial reporting requirements for expenditures be similar to ARRA 
    reporting?  
    Yes. Like the quarterly 1512 reporting, expenditures and positions will be reported to the 
    federal government. Through the PRC(s), we will do the reporting like all other ARRA funds 
    distributed by the DPI.  

FAQs – Race to the Top in NC                Page 7 of 23              Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                   
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                                Draft 


    Section E: RttT Budgets 
    E.1 Allocation Determination:  
     
    • How were LEA allocations derived?  
       The US Department of Education directed states to distribute funding based on the 2009‐10 
       Title I appropriations (regular and ARRA).   
     
       To determine each LEA’s and Charter school’s allocation, you total the two Statewide 
       allocations (2009‐10 regular and ARRA) and divide each receiving LEA and Charter's total for 
       that year by the grand total (2009‐10 regular and ARRA) for all LEAs and Charters.  The 
       resulting % of the total will be the exact same percent that will be applied to the 
       LEA/Charter 50% portion of the RttT grant to determine the RttT allocation for an LEA or 
       Charter. 
 
        Each participating LEA /Charter will receive 3 numbers: 
           (1) % of the LEA/Charter allocation that will go to the individual LEA/Charter 
           (2) The amount each LEA/Charter is to contribute to the technology infrastructure 
           (3) The net appropriation available to the LEA/Charter for the four years (#1 minus #2) 
 
        The percent of Title I funds each LEA/Charter will receive has been posted to the DPI 
        website (www.ncpublicschools.org/rttt/). We will be sharing the RttT allocations once we 
        receive the grant award from the Federal Government. 
     
    •   Does every school within an LEA have to be Title I eligible to benefit from Race to 
        the Top?  
        No, funding is applied based on the Title I fund distribution, but these funds can be used 
        across the school district receiving them. 
     
    •   Over what duration of time are the Title I funds to be spent?  
        Allocations are for the four‐year period of the RttT grant.  
     
    E.2 Release of Funds: When will money be released to LEAs/Charters?  
    Funds will be released to DPI on September 30. An appropriate portion (based on the submitted 
    and approved budget) will be released immediately upon USED’s approval of the State and 
    LEA/Charter plan and Detailed Scope of Work. DPI expects to be able to release funds to LEAs in 
    late November or early December.  
     
    E.3 Allocating Funding Across Years:  
    • Are LEAs required to spread funding over multiple years? 
        Funding will be spread across all four years of the grant. The LEA will determine how much 
        to expend in each year.  
     
    • Can any unexpended balance the first year be carried over to the next year?  
        Yes. Funds unexpended can be carried over to the next grant year. 
    FAQs – Race to the Top in NC               Page 8 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                     
           Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                            Draft 


•   Can money be carried over to a fifth year? 
    No.  The RttT funds are expected to be available until August 31, 2014. 
 
E.5 Administrative Costs: Is there a cap on administrative costs? 
No; however, LEAs/Charters are encouraged to keep administrative costs to a minimum.  
 
E.6 Indirect Costs: May LEAs charge indirect costs?   
Yes. LEAs may budget and charge indirect costs to RttT under their currently approved indirect 
cost rate to be adjusted annually consistent with the changes to the rate as approved by the 
Department of Education.  
 
E.7 Personnel Costs: Is there a maximum and/or recommended percentage that can 
be dedicated to Personnel costs? 
No. The amount budgeted for personnel should be allocable, reasonable, necessary, and 
allowable consistent with OMB Circular A‐87. These costs should not be classroom teachers, or 
non‐certified related (custodians, bus drivers, etc...).  Positions hired under the RttT programs 
should be associated with initiatives selected and outlined in your Detailed Scope of Work. 
 
E.8 State Budget (50%): Will LEAs/Charters receive money from the state’s 50% of 
the budget? 
All LEAs/Charters will benefit from the initiatives and tools developed from the State’s funds. 
Some funds will be indirectly allocated to LEAs/Charters or targeted to specific high‐need 
schools within LEAs/Charters.  
 
E.10 Funding Reallocation: If LEAs/Charters select not to participate, do not submit a 
final Detailed Scope of Work, or do not receive approval, is their allocation divided 
up amongst remaining participating districts?  
Yes. If LEAs/Charters do not participate, their allocations will be divided up amongst 
participating districts.  
 
E.11 Other Funding Sources: Do RttT projects have to be paid with RttT funds, 
or can LEAs/Charters combine funding sources?  
LEAs are encouraged to use other funding sources, including state, federal, or local, to 
supplement RttT funds in order to complete all required and optional activities. If an 
LEA/charter uses all of its RttT money in year one, the LEA/charter will be required to use 
another source of funds to support initiatives described in its Detailed Scope of Work during the 
remaining three years.  
 
E.12 Allowable Purchases: Updated 10/21/10 
• Can technology hardware be bought with Race to the Top funds (for example, 
     increasing server capacity, computers, iPads and other infrastructure)? 
     Yes. LEAs/Charters may purchase hardware if needed to expand or create an educational 
     opportunity linked to a Race to the Top initiative.  Examples of valid purchases might 
     include a laptop cart or other devices to use in delivering benchmark or interim online 
FAQs – Race to the Top in NC              Page 9 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                 
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                               Draft 


     assessments, or for completing teacher evaluations online. Each LEAs/Charter should 
     provide a justification for any such expenditure in its Detailed Scope of Work. 
• Can I pay for substitutes to cover classrooms when teachers are participating in 
     professional development?  
     Yes. In addition, LEAs can use RttT funds to provide stipends for teachers to attend PD 
     during the summer or evenings and to reimburse for travel expenses, as appropriate.  
      
• Can I pay for non­technology related materials?  
     Yes, as long as you have a justification for how these materials relate to the NC plan for RttT 
     and the four pillars of the grant.  
      
E.13 Supplanting: What is meant by supplanting? 
Supplanting, or the replacement of state funds with federal funds, is not prohibited under the 
Race to the Top guidelines. However, RttT funds are not to be used to supplant funding for 
basic school operations (other fund sources, including EduJobs and SFSF may be used for this 
purpose.)  RttT expenditures must be either for a new program or an enhancement or 
expansion of an existing, proven program that is aligned with the RttT initiatives. Exceptions 
may be made if significant justification exists and the expenditure is directly related to a RttT 
initiative.  
 
E.14 Budgeting by Initiative: How will LEAs/Charters budget for RttT activities?  
LEAs/Charters will provide a budget for each required activity and any optional activity they 
plan to implement for RttT. In the Detailed Scope of Work document, LEAs/Charters must detail 
plans and budgets by each of the required LEA activities (see the Detailed Scope of Work 
document and Instructions for more information).  
 
E.15 Managing RttT Funds: How should LEAs/Charters categorize and manage RttT 
funds?  
DPI’s Financial and Business Services Area will establish 14 new PRCs for capturing RttT 
expenditures. Otherwise, the State will manage RttT budgets through the same process used to 
manage other federal grants.  
 
E.16 Funding Splits: Are RTTT funds 100% ARRA funds that are fully awarded as S 
project, or are they split between A and S projects like the School Improvement 
Grant funds?  
RTTT funds are 100% ARRA and are not split. Also, expenditures of RttT funds must comply with 
the OERI Management Directives, especially as related to purchases of goods and services. The 
directives are found at http://www.ncrecovery.gov/Compliance/OERIDirectives.aspx . 
 
E.17 Pre­award Costs: Are pre­award costs allowed? 
Yes. Identify in your budget costs that are anticipated to be charged as pre‐award costs to the 
grant.  LEAs may charge expenditures back to cost incurred August 24, 2010. 
 
E.18 Sustainability: Must RttT initiatives be sustained once the grant is gone?  
FAQs – Race to the Top in NC               Page 10 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                   
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                                  Draft 


Please note, the main focus of the RttT funding is to accelerate the infrastructure change 
necessary for sustained growth; RttT is about creating capacity that will live on beyond the four‐
year grant period.  Accordingly, funding must be expended for non‐recurring activities or for 
activities for which other recurring funding has been identified. Specific initiatives funded with 
RttT dollars do not necessarily have to continue, however, once the grant funding ends.  
 
E. 19 Revising Budget Categories: Are LEAs permitted to move money from one 
budget category to another?  
Yes. However, they will be required to submit a narrative that connects the amendment to their 
Detailed Scope of Work. Guidance about the process for making changes to budgets and the 
DSW are forthcoming.  


Section F: NC Education Cloud (RttT Section A2) 
F.1 Definition of NC Education Cloud: What is the NC Education Cloud?  
North Carolina proposed a “cloud computing” approach, which involves moving technology 
resources to centralized servers and then rapidly delivering what is needed, when it is needed, 
to individual devices, ranging from desktop computers to smart phones. This state‐of‐the‐art 
approach is used by technology leaders such as Amazon, Google, and IBM to provide Internet‐
based services and software. 
 
The NC Education Cloud will provide a highly reliable, cost‐effective, server‐based infrastructure 
that will support PK‐12 education statewide. This initiative will involve transitioning statewide 
from individual, LEA‐hosted server infrastructures to this centralized, cloud‐hosted 
infrastructure as a service. The primary objective of the NC Education Cloud is to provide a 
world‐class technology infrastructure as a foundational component of the NC education 
enterprise. Benefits of the NC Cloud include:  
    •   Reduced overall cost, with a significant savings once the transition to the Education 
        Cloud is complete; 
    •   Decreased technical support staffing requirements at the LEA level; 
    •   Equity of access to computing and storage resources; 
    •   Efficient scaling according to aggregate NC PK‐12 usage requirements; 
    •   Consistently high availability, reliability, and performance; 
    •   A common infrastructure platform to support emerging data systems; 
    •   Ability to provide statewide access to core technology applications; 
    •   Improved security; and 
    •   Sustainable and predictable operational cost. 
 

F.2 Timeline for Development and Implementation:  
When do you envision the technology cloud being fully operational statewide? 

FAQs – Race to the Top in NC               Page 11 of 23                 Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                    
        Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                             Draft 


The NC Education Cloud will be implemented in phases. DPI estimates that it will be fully 
operational by the end of the four‐year grant period, if not sooner.  
 
The NC Education Cloud will take a minimum of six months to plan. The migration of LEAs into 
the NC Education Cloud will be done in phases over two to three years.  
 
F.3 Additional Information and FAQs: Where can I find additional information 
about the NC Education Cloud? Added 10/21/2010 
Please find additional information about the NC Education Cloud and FAQs by clicking the 
following link NC Education Cloud Information. Or, access the website at: 
http://it.ncwiseowl.org/blog/One.aspx?portalId=11753536


Section G: Standards and Assessments (RttT Section B3) 
Information to be added as available.  
 
G.1 Online Assessments:  
• When will the State move to online ONLY assessments? Added 10/21/2010 
    North Carolina intends to move to online only assessments in the 2014 – 2015 school year. 
    This is consistent with the timeline the SMARTER Balanced Consortium is using for 
    implementing shared assessments to test students on the Common Core Standards.  
 
    Prior to 2014, the State will transition several courses to online only assessments, beginning 
    with English II for the 2012 – 2013 school year. LEAs are encouraged to begin implementing 
    at least one course assessment online beginning as soon as possible in order to help 
    students and schools plan for this transition.  
 
• What can I do to ready my LEA for online assessment? Added 10/21/2010 
    LEAs who have met the ‘required’ activities for RttT are encouraged to use RttT funds to 
    purchase hardware and make investments in school connectivity. For guidance on the types 
    of purchases an LEA might make, please see: 
    http://it.ncwiseowl.org/blog/One.aspx?portalId=11753536


Section H: Data to Support Instruction (RttT Section C) 
H.1 Instructional Improvement System (IIS): (See Powerpoint on RttT page for 
additional information on the IIS: http://dpi.state.nc.us/rttt/district/  Added 10/20/10) 
• How does the US Department of Education define an Instructional Improvement 
    System (IIS)?  
    The USED defines an Instructional Improvement Systems as:  
       Technology‐based  tools  and  other  strategies  that  provide  teachers,  principals,  and 
       administrators  with  meaningful  support  and  actionable  data  to  systemically  manage 
       continuous instructional improvement, including such activities as:  
       • instructional planning;  
FAQs – Race to the Top in NC             Page 12 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                  
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                                    Draft 


        •   gathering  information  (e.g.,  through  formative  assessments  (as  defined  in  this 
            notice), interim assessments (as defined in this notice), summative assessments, and 
            looking at student work and other student data);  
        • analyzing  information  with  the  support  of  rapid‐time  (as  defined  in  this  notice) 
            reporting;  
        • using  this  information  to  inform  decisions  on  appropriate  next  instructional  steps; 
            and  
        • evaluating the effectiveness of the actions taken.  
        Such systems promote collaborative problem‐solving and action planning; they may also 
        integrate  instructional  data  with  student‐level  data  such  as  attendance,  discipline, 
        grades,  credit  accumulation,  and  student  survey  results  to  provide  early  warning 
        indicators of a student’s risk of educational failure. 
     
•   How is formative assessment defined?  
    For Race to the Top, USED defines formative assessment as:  
        Assessment  questions,  tools,  and  processes  that  are  embedded  in  instruction  and  are 
        used  by  teachers  and  students  to  provide  timely  feedback  for  purposes  of  adjusting 
        instruction to improve learning.  
         
•   How is benchmark or interim assessments defined?  
    For Race to the Top, USED defines benchmark or interim assessments as:  
        Assessments  that  are  given  at  regular  and  specified  intervals  throughout  the  school 
        year, are designed to evaluate students’ knowledge and skills relative to a specific set of 
        academic standards, and produce results that can be aggregated (e.g., by course, grade 
        level,  school,  or  LEA)  in  order  to  inform  teachers  and  administrators  at  the  student, 
        classroom, school, and LEA levels. 
 
•   What formative and benchmark tools will the State provide for LEAs/Charters?  
    The State will provide to LEAs/Charters an online, web‐based Instructional Improvement 
    System, which will include tools to create formative and benchmark/interim assessments.  
     
•   What is the vision for the NC Instructional Improvement System?  
    NC’s ISS will include online tools, to be hosted in the NC Education Cloud to assess students 
    using formative, benchmark/interim, and summative assessments. The system will have a 
    data dashboard, through which teachers and administrators can look at student data in a 
    way to allow them to enhance their instruction. Other tools that will be provided through 
    the system are to be determined.  
     
•   Will the State develop benchmark tests like ClassScape? Added 10/21/2010 
    At this point in time, the State envisions the Curriculum Monitoring tool and Daily 
    Assessment tool to be primarily an item bank with a test generator for LEAs and teachers to 
    use to create formative and benchmark assessments. At this point in time, there is no plan 
    to create and distribute actual assessments. However, the IIS is still in the ‘visioning’ 

FAQs – Race to the Top in NC                 Page 13 of 23               Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                      
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                              Draft 


    process, and tests could be developed in later years if there was interest from a significant 
    number of LEAs.  
 
•   What will the State pay for and what will the LEAs pay for regarding the 
    Instructional Improvement System? Added 10/21/2010 
    During the four years of the RttT grant, DPI does not expect LEAs to incur a significant, if 
    any, costs related to the basic statewide Instructional Improvement System. After the grant 
    period, the cost to support the system will likely be shared by the State and LEAs. LEAs cost 
    after the grant period will vary and will likely be based upon the number of users and the 
    services to which LEAs subscribe.  


Section I: Great Teachers and Leaders (RttT Section D) 
 

I.1 Definition of Growth: How does North Carolina and USED define growth?   
In the Race to the Top guidance, USED defined growth as “the change in student achievement 
between two or more points in time.” For Race to the Top, the State will establish an Educator 
Effectiveness Workgroup. The workgroup will consider an interim process to measure student 
growth during the 2010‐ 2011 school year. The Workgroup will develop a long‐term formula for 
measuring student growth and defining teacher effectiveness.  
 
I.2 Student Achievement and Teacher Effectiveness:  
• Will student achievement be used in teacher evaluations as a way to measure 
    teacher effectiveness?  
    Yes. Teacher evaluations and teacher effectiveness will be determined in part by a student’s 
    growth over the course of time.  How North Carolina will specifically define teacher 
    effectiveness has yet to be determined, though we know that student achievement and 
    growth information will be only a part of this determination.  
     
I.3 Reporting Teacher and Principal Effectiveness: How will North Carolina report on 
effective teachers and principals?  
The US Department of Education requires the State to report on the percentage of teachers and 
principals who are rated across each level of the Teacher/Principal Evaluation Instrument. The 
State will report the percentages of teachers at the school, LEA, and State level. Percentages of 
principals at who score at each level of the scale will be reported by LEA and by State.  
*Please note, teacher and principal information will not be reported for any individual.  
 
I.4 Teacher Effectiveness and Non­Tested Areas: How will teachers in non­tested 
grades, subjects, and positions be assessed to determine effectiveness?  
There are two phases in which LEAs will be required to measure growth for teachers. During the 
2010 – 2012 school years, the LEAs will have flexibility in how they gather growth information. 
During this time, the State Educator Evaluation Workgroup will be evaluating options and 
planning how to best collect and use growth information in tested and non‐tested areas (more 
guidance on this process and 2010‐12 requirements will be distributed in December 2010).  
 
FAQs – Race to the Top in NC              Page 14 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                  
        Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                             Draft 


Once the Workgroup has finalized their plans, they will share them with the LEAs. The State will 
then implement common requirements for measuring growth, beginning in the 2012 – 2013 
school year.  

I.5 Partnerships with Universities:  
• Can LEAs/Charters use RttT funds to support the expansion of partnerships with 
     non­UNC system higher education institutions?  
     Yes, as long as the work is aligned with a Race to the Top initiative.  

I.6 Measuring and Incorporating Growth: 
• Will LEAs be required to use growth to evaluate teachers during the 2010 – 11 
     school year?  
    LEAs will be required to measure growth of students for every teacher in every subject in 
    the 2010 – 11 school year. The growth will be incorporated into the new Teacher Evaluation 
    System. Exactly how this will happen has yet to be determined. DPI is pulling together 
    workgroups, including people throughout the State, to discuss the best way to do this. 
    Guidance about this topic will be released by the end of December.  
 
I.7 Professional Development: 
• How will teachers take advantage of the many professional development 
    opportunities provided by the State through Race to the Top?  
    LEAs will need to develop a plan that will work for their schools and teachers to provide 
    opportunities for teachers to take advantage of these sessions. LEAs may use RttT funds to 
    pay for substitutes or provide stipends for teachers to attend sessions. In addition, DPI 
    anticipates offering opportunities both online and in‐person. Therefore, not all sessions will 
    require travel or time away from the classroom. LEAs may consider providing incentives for 
    teachers to participate during the summer, evenings, or weekends.  
 
• For professional development, which pieces will the State organize and fund and 
    for which pieces will LEAs assume the costs? Added 10/21/10 
    The State will develop and/or purchase online and face‐to‐face professional development 
    modules to be shared with educators. The primary responsibility of the LEAs will be to make 
    sure educators have access to the professional development and to support the training 
    within their district and schools. For example, the LEA might use funds to pay for substitute 
    teachers while teachers are in training. Or, LEAs might provide stipends to teachers who 
    attend an online training and subsequent discussion group at the school on an evening or 
    weekend.  
 
I.8 Teach for America: Is the state using state money to bring in more TFA teachers? 
Or, are LEAs encouraged to use their funds for this? Added 10/21/10 
The amount in the State portion is for expansion in the northeast.  LEAs can use their portion of 
the funds for this purpose. 
 


FAQs – Race to the Top in NC              Page 15 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                  
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                              Draft 


I.9 Alternative Certification: Will the State develop additional routes for alternative 
certification? Added 10/21/10 
The State legislature has requested that the DPI continue to evaluate alternative certification 
options.  We are looking at various alternatives. 


Section J: Turning Around Lowest Achieving Schools (RttT Section E2) 
J.1 Intervention Models: What are the four intervention models for low­achieving 
schools?  
Turnaround, Restart, School Closure, and Transformation 

J.2 Turnaround:  
•   What are the required elements of a turnaround model? 
    A turnaround model is one in which an LEA must do the following: 
    (1) Replace the principal and grant the principal sufficient operational flexibility (including 
        in staffing, calendars/time, and budgeting) to implement fully a comprehensive 
        approach in order to substantially improve student achievement outcomes and increase 
        high school graduation rates; 
    (2) Using locally adopted competencies to measure the effectiveness of staff who can work 
        within the turnaround environment to meet the needs of students,  
            (A) Screen all existing staff and rehire no more than 50 percent; and  
            (B) Select new staff; 
    (3) Implement such strategies as financial incentives, increased opportunities for promotion 
        and career growth, and more flexible work conditions that are designed to recruit, 
        place, and retain staff with the skills necessary to meet the needs of the students in the 
        turnaround school;  
    (4) Provide staff ongoing, high‐quality job‐embedded professional development that is 
        aligned with the school’s comprehensive instructional program and designed with 
        school staff to ensure that they are equipped to facilitate effective teaching and learning 
        and have the capacity to successfully implement school reform strategies;  
    (5) Adopt a new governance structure, which may include, but is not limited to, requiring 
        the school to report to a new “turnaround office” in the LEA or SEA, hire a “turnaround 
        leader” who reports directly to the Superintendent or Chief Academic Officer, or enter 
        into a multi‐year contract with the LEA or SEA to obtain added flexibility in exchange for 
        greater accountability; 
    (6) Use data to identify and implement an instructional program that is research‐based and 
        vertically aligned from one grade to the next as well as aligned with State academic 
        standards; 
    (7) Promote the continuous use of student data (such as from formative, interim, and 
        summative assessments) to inform and differentiate instruction in order to meet the 
        academic needs of individual students; 

FAQs – Race to the Top in NC              Page 16 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                  
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                               Draft 


    (8) Establish schedules and implement strategies that provide increased learning time;  
    (9) Provide appropriate social‐emotional and community‐oriented services and supports for 
        students. 
         
•     In addition to the required elements, what optional elements may also be a part 
      of a turnaround model? 
      In addition to the required elements, an LEA implementing a turnaround model may also 
      implement other strategies, such as a new school model or any of the required and 
      permissible activities under the transformation intervention model described in the final 
      requirements.  It could also, for example, replace a comprehensive high school with one 
      that focuses on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).  The key is that 
      these actions would be taken within the framework of the turnaround model and would be 
      in addition to, not instead of, the actions that are required as part of a turnaround model.    
       
J­3.  Restart Model: What is the definition of a restart model? 
    A restart model is one in which an LEA converts a school or closes and reopens a school 
    under a charter school operator, a charter management organization (CMO), or an education 
    management organization (EMO) that has been selected through a rigorous review process.  
    A restart model must enroll, within the grades it serves, any former student who wishes to 
    attend the school (see C‐6).  
     
 J.4 School Closure: What is the definition of “school closure”? 
    School closure occurs when an LEA closes a school and enrolls the students who attended 
    that school in other schools in the LEA that are higher achieving.  These other schools should 
    be within reasonable proximity to the closed school and may include, but are not limited to, 
    charter schools or new schools for which achievement data are not yet available. 
 
J.5 Transformation Model: 
• With respect to elements of the transformation model that are the same as 
      elements of the turnaround model, do the definitions and other guidance that 
      apply to those elements as they relate to the turnaround model also apply to 
      those elements as they relate to the transformation model? 
      Yes. For example, the strategies that are used to recruit, place, and retain staff with the 
      skills necessary to meet the needs of students in a turnaround model may be the same 
      strategies that are used to recruit, place, and retain staff with the skills necessary to meet 
      the needs of students in a transformation model. For questions about any terms or 
      strategies that appear in both the transformation model and the turnaround model, please 
      refer to the turnaround model section of this FAQ. 
 
• Which activities related to developing and increasing teacher and school leader 
      effectiveness are required for an LEA implementing a transformation model? 
      An LEA implementing a transformation model must: 


FAQs – Race to the Top in NC               Page 17 of 23              Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                   
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                             Draft 


    (1) Replace the principal who led the school prior to commencement of the transformation 
        model; 
    (2) Use rigorous, transparent, and equitable evaluation systems for teachers and principals 
        that —  
            (a) Take into account data on student growth as a significant factor as well as other 
                factors, such as multiple observation‐based assessments of performance and 
                ongoing collections of professional practice reflective of student achievement 
                and increased high school graduation rates; and 
            (b) Are designed and developed with teacher and principal involvement; 
    (3) Identify and reward school leaders, teachers, and other staff who, in implementing this 
        model, have increased student achievement and high school graduation rates and 
        identify and remove those who, after ample opportunities have been provided for them 
        to improve their professional practice, have not done so; 
    (4) Provide staff ongoing, high‐quality, job‐embedded professional development that is 
        aligned with the school’s comprehensive instructional program and designed with 
        school staff to ensure they are equipped to facilitate effective teaching and learning and 
        have the capacity to successfully implement school reform strategies; and 
    (5) Implement such strategies as financial incentives, increased opportunities for promotion 
        and career growth, and more flexible work conditions that are designed to recruit, 
        place, and retain staff with the skills necessary to meet the needs of the students in a 
        transformation model. 
     
•   Must the principal and teachers involved in the development and design of the 
    evaluation system be the principal and teachers in the school in which the 
    transformation model is being implemented? 
    No.  The requirement for teacher and principal evaluation systems that “are designed and 
    developed with teacher and principal involvement” refers more generally to involvement by 
    teachers and principals within the LEA using such systems, and may or may not include 
    teachers and principals in a school implementing the transformation model. 
 
•   In the final USED RttT requirements, an LEA implementing the transformation 
    model must remove staff “who, after ample opportunities have been provided for 
    them to improve their professional practice, have not done so.”  Does an LEA have 
    discretion to determine the appropriate number of such opportunities that must 
    be provided and what are some examples of such “opportunities” to improve? 
    In general, LEAs have flexibility to determine both the type and number of opportunities for 
    staff to improve their professional practice before they are removed from a school 
    implementing the transformation model.  Examples of such opportunities include 
    professional development in such areas as differentiated instruction and using data to 
    improve instruction, mentoring or partnering with a master teacher, or increased time for 
    collaboration designed to improve instruction.  


FAQs – Race to the Top in NC              Page 18 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                  
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                            Draft 


•   In addition to the required activities, what other activities related to developing 
    and increasing teacher and school leader effectiveness may an LEA undertake as 
    part of its implementation of a transformation model? 
    In addition to the required activities for a transformation model, an LEA may also 
    implement other strategies to develop teachers’ and school leaders’ effectiveness, such as: 
        (1)  Providing additional compensation to attract and retain staff with the skills 
            necessary to meet the needs of students in a transformation school; 
        (2) Instituting a system for measuring changes in instructional practices resulting from 
            professional development; or 
        (3) Ensuring that the school is not required to accept a teacher without the mutual 
            consent of the teacher and principal, regardless of the teacher’s seniority. 
    LEAs also have flexibility to develop and implement their own strategies, as part of their 
    efforts to successfully implement the transformation model, to increase the effectiveness of 
    teachers and school leaders.  Any such strategies must be in addition to those that are 
    required as part of this model. 
     
•   How does the optional activity of “providing additional compensation to attract 
    and retain” certain staff differ from the requirement to implement strategies 
    designed to recruit, place, and retain certain staff? 
    There are a wide range of compensation‐based incentives that an LEA might use as part of a 
    transformation model.  Such incentives are just one example of strategies that might be 
    adopted to recruit, place, and retain staff with the skills needed to implement the 
    transformation model.  The more specific emphasis on additional compensation in the 
    permissible strategies was intended to encourage LEAs to think more broadly about how 
    additional compensation can contribute to teacher effectiveness.  

•   Which activities related to comprehensive instructional reform strategies are 
    required as part of the implementation of a transformation model? 
    An LEA implementing a transformation model must: 
            (1) Use data to identify and implement an instructional program that is research‐
                based and vertically aligned from one grade to the next as well as aligned with 
                State academic standards; and  
            (2) Promote the continuous use of student data (such as from formative, interim, 
                and summative assessments) in order to inform and differentiate instruction to 
                meet the academic needs of individual students.  
             
•   In addition to the required activities, what other activities related to 
    comprehensive instructional reform strategies may an LEA undertake as part of 
    its implementation of a transformation model? 
    In addition to the required activities for a transformation model, an LEA may also 
    implement other comprehensive instructional reform strategies, such as: 


FAQs – Race to the Top in NC              Page 19 of 23            Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                 
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                            Draft 


               (1) Conducting periodic reviews to ensure that the curriculum is being 
                   implemented with fidelity, is having the intended impact on student 
                   achievement, and is modified if ineffective; 
               (2) Implementing a schoolwide “response‐to‐intervention” model;  
               (3) Providing additional supports and professional development to teachers and 
                   principals in order to implement effective strategies to support students with 
                   disabilities in the least restrictive environment and to ensure that limited 
                   English proficient students acquire language skills to master academic 
                   content; 
               (4) Using and integrating technology‐based supports and interventions as part of 
                   the instructional program; and 
               (5) In secondary schools— 
                   (a) Increasing rigor by offering opportunities for students to enroll in 
                       advanced coursework, early‐college high schools, dual enrollment 
                       programs, or thematic learning academies that prepare students for 
                       college and careers, including by providing appropriate supports designed 
                       to ensure that low‐achieving students can take advantage of these 
                       programs and coursework; 
                   (b) Improving student transition from middle to high school through summer 
                       transition programs or freshman academies;  
                   (c) Increasing graduation rates through, for example, credit recovery 
                       programs, re‐engagement strategies, smaller learning communities, 
                       competency‐based instruction and performance‐based assessments, and 
                       acceleration of basic reading and mathematics skills; or 
                   (d) Establishing early‐warning systems to identify students who may be at 
                       risk of failing to achieve to high standards or to graduate. 
                        
•   What activities related to increasing learning time and creating community­
    oriented schools are required for implementation of a transformation model? 
    An LEA implementing a transformation model must: 
           (1) Establish schedules and strategies that provide increased learning time; and 
           (2) Provide ongoing mechanisms for family and community engagement. 
            
•  What is meant by the phrase “family and community engagement” and what are 
   some examples of ongoing mechanisms for family and community engagement?   
   In general, family and community engagement means strategies to increase the 
   involvement and contributions, in both school‐based and home‐based settings, of parents 
   and community partners that are designed to support classroom instruction and increase 
   student achievement.  Examples of mechanisms that can encourage family and community 
   engagement include the establishment of organized parent groups, holding public meetings 
   involving parents and community members to review school performance and help develop 
   school improvement plans, using surveys to gauge parent and community satisfaction and 
FAQs – Race to the Top in NC            Page 20 of 23          Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                 
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                               Draft 


    support for local public schools, implementing complaint procedures for families, 
    coordinating with local social and health service providers to help meet family needs, and 
    parent education classes (including GED, adult literacy, and ESL programs). 

•   In addition to the required activities, what other activities related to increasing 
    learning time and creating community­oriented schools may an LEA undertake as 
    part of its implementation of a transformation model? 
    In addition to the required activities for a transformation model, an LEA may also 
    implement other strategies to extend learning time and create community‐oriented 
    schools, such as: 
            (1) Partnering with parents and parent organizations, faith‐ and community‐based 
                organizations, health clinics, other State or local agencies, and others to create 
                safe school environments that meet students’ social, emotional, and health 
                needs; 
            (2) Extending or restructuring the school day so as to add time for such strategies as 
                advisory periods that build relationships between students, faculty, and other 
                school staff; 
            (3) Implementing approaches to improve school climate and discipline, such as 
                implementing a system of positive behavioral supports or taking steps to 
                eliminate bullying and student harassment; or 
            (4) Expanding the school program to offer full‐day kindergarten or pre‐kindergarten. 
                
•   How does the optional activity of extending or restructuring the school day to add 
    time for strategies that build relationships between students, faculty, and other 
    school staff differ from the requirement to provide increased learning time? 
    Extra time or opportunities for teachers and other school staff to create and build 
    relationships with students can provide the encouragement and incentive that many 
    students need to work hard and stay in school.  Such opportunities may be created through 
    a wide variety of extra‐curricular activities as well as structural changes, such as dividing 
    large incoming classes into smaller theme‐based teams with individual advisers.  However, 
    such activities do not directly lead to increased learning time, which is more closely focused 
    on increasing the number of instructional minutes in the school day or days in the school 
    year. 
     
•   What activities related to providing operational flexibility and sustained support 
    are required for implementation of a transformation model? 
    An LEA implementing a transformation model must: 
           (1) Give the school sufficient operational flexibility (such as staffing, calendars/time, 
               and budgeting) to implement fully a comprehensive approach to substantially 
               improve student achievement outcomes and increase high school graduation 
               rates; and 



FAQs – Race to the Top in NC               Page 21 of 23              Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                   
        Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                             Draft 


           (2) Ensure that the school receives ongoing, intensive technical assistance and 
               related support from the LEA, the SEA, or a designated external lead partner 
               organization (such as a school turnaround organization or an EMO). 
 
•   Must an LEA implementing the transformation model in a school give the school 
    operational flexibility in the specific areas of staffing, calendars/time, and 
    budgeting?  
    No.  The areas of operational flexibility mentioned in this requirement are merely examples 
    of the types of operational flexibility an LEA might give to a school implementing the 
    transformation model.  An LEA is not obligated to give a school implementing the 
    transformation model operational flexibility in these particular areas, so long as it provides 
    the school sufficient operational flexibility to implement fully a comprehensive approach to 
    substantially improve student achievement outcomes and increase high school graduation 
    rates. 
 
•   In addition to the required activities, what other activities related to providing 
    operational flexibility and sustained support may an LEA undertake as part of its 
    implementation of a transformation model? 
    In addition to the required activities for a transformation model, an LEA may also 
    implement other strategies to provide operational flexibility and sustained support, such as: 
            (1) Allowing the school to be run under a new governance arrangement, such as a 
                turnaround division within the LEA or SEA; or 
            (2) Implementing a per‐pupil school‐based budget formula that is weighted based 
                on student needs. 
 
J.6 Lowest Achieving Schools:  
• What are NC’s Lowest­Achieving Schools?  
    For Race to the Top, North Carolina defines Lowest‐Achieving as:  
    • Lowest 5% of conventional elementary, middle, and high schools based on 2009‐10 
        Performance Composite and grade span (Elementary‐66 schools, Middle‐23 schools, 
        High‐23 schools), AND/OR 
    • Conventional high schools with a 4‐year cohort graduation rate below 60% in 2009‐10 
        and either 2008‐09 or 2007‐08 (9 Schools). 
         
• When will the State reassess to determine the Lowest Achieving Schools?       
    Added 10/21/2010 
 
    For Race to the Top, the State will use the 2009 – 2010 data to identify the Lowest 
    Achieving Schools to be served through Race to the Top. Those schools will be served for all 
    four years of the RttT grant cycle. Lowest Achieving Schools will not be reassessed during 
    this time period.  
     
    The Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools as defined by the School Improvement Grants 
    will be monitored annually. School Improvement Funds are renewable for up to a three year 
FAQs – Race to the Top in NC              Page 22 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                  
       Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 
                                                                                            Draft 


   period. Each LEA receiving SIG funds for Tier I and Tier II schools must annually report on 
   the progress of meeting its goals. DPI will review required reports on an annual basis to 
   determine if the LEAs School Improvement Grant requires revision. For LEAs with schools 
   not meeting annual goals as described in the initial application, the LEA must revise the 
   implementation plan outlining specific steps that will be taken to ensure the success of 
   selected interventions. Revisions and budget amendments along with annual progress 
   reports will be reviewed to determine if the LEA's SIG funds will be renewed. 




FAQs – Race to the Top in NC             Page 23 of 23             Version 6: 10/22/2010 
                                                 
      Please note, this document will be updated as more information is made available. 

				
DOCUMENT INFO