CIC ON LIFEBOAT LAUNCHING ARRANGEMENTS – PARIS MOU GUIDANCE by hkksew3563rd

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									     INSTRUCTIONS TO SURVEYORS – INSPECTION POLICY Chapter 7.3

           LIFEBOAT LAUNCHING ARRANGEMENTS – GUIDANCE


1. Introduction

In 1986, on-load release hooks for lifeboats and rescue boats were made
mandatory by SOLAS, in response to Norway’s worst offshore accident in March
1980. The “Alexander Kielland” platform capsized in the Ekofisk field in the North
Sea, killing 123 of the 212 persons on board. Some deaths in this accident were
attributed to the fact that the lifeboat had no means of release when the weight of
the lifeboat was on the hooks and falls. Therefore, on-load release systems were
seen to offer benefits.

Since 1986 when the IMO requirement for all new ships to be fitted with on-load
release systems came into force, there have been a number of serious accidents
during drills, testing, servicing and maintenance.

Many of these accidents were attributed to lack of maintenance, poor design or
inadequate training. Failures of equipment can result in the premature opening
of the on-load hook mechanism, causing the lifeboat to fall from the davits
unexpectedly even with three safety interlocks provided for in the design
arrangements.

A report by the UK Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) in 2001 drew
attention to the dangers of on-load release mechanisms.1

The Study found that a root cause of many of the accidents was the over-
complicated design of the lifeboat launch system and its component parts, which
in turn required extensive training to operate. It also found that personnel
incurred many risks. It identified that training, repair and maintenance
procedures fell short of what was necessary, and that there were extensive
problems with manufacture, construction, maintenance and operation.


A number of current designs of on-load release hooks can be described as
unstable, in that they are designed to open under the effect of the lifeboat’s own
weight and often need to be held closed by the operating mechanism. This
means that any defects or faults in the operating mechanism, errors by the
crew or incorrect resetting of the hook after being previously operated can
result in premature release.




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2.         Purpose

The purpose of these instructions is to provide guidance during inspections to
ensure that lifeboats and associated launching arrangements are well
maintained, that the crew are aware of the maintenance requirements and of the
dangers of launching and recovering lifeboats .

Note that SOLAS Ch III, Section IV Regulation 34 makes reference to the Life
Saving Appliances Code. Chapter VI, Paragraph 6.1.1.4 of the Code states that
“Each launching appliance shall be so constructed that only a minimum amount
of routine maintenance is necessary. All parts requiring regular maintenance by
the ship's crew shall be readily accessible and easily maintained.”
It is not expected that a full lifeboat drill be conducted during every inspection,
although it will be necessary to lower at least one boat to some extent to check
the davit and brake operation.



3.         Detention

Surveyors should use their professional judgement to determine whether
the ship should be considered for detention.



4.         Areas to cover during an inspection

The areas to cover are arranged as follows:

Paragraphs 4.2 – 4.5               Maintenance and Records

Paragraphs 4.6 – 4.9               Operational Safety

Paragraphs 4.10 – 4.16             On-Load Releases

Paragraphs 4.17 – 4.19             Davits and Winches

Paragraph 4.20                     Drill



4.1        Does the ship have davit launched lifeboats?

These instructions are mainly applicable to ships with davit launched lifeboats.

Ships which have freefall lifeboats or are less than 85m and not carrying lifeboats
generally do not have on-load release mechanisms and are not considered here.


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Rescue boat launching and release arrangements also are not included.

In the case of passenger ships it may be possible that there is more than one
type of release mechanism fitted. Each type should be verified.



4.2  Do records indicate that lifeboats have been launched and
manoeuvred in the water in accordance with SOLAS requirements?

 Title                          SOLAS 06 Amend / III / Reg. 19 Emergency training and drills

 For Ships Constructed          From 01-07-2008

 Retroactive                    Retroactive Requirement for Existing Ships.

 Note                           Paragraph 3.3.4 enters into force on 1 July 2008.




Regulation19.3.3 Abandon ship drills

3.3.3 Except as provided in paragraphs 3.3.4 and 3.3.5, each lifeboat shall be
launched, and manoeuvred in the water by its assigned operating crew, at least
once every three months during an abandon ship drill.

If the master cannot prove this by showing a record in the log book, the surveyor
should consider carrying out an abandon ship drill including lowering, launching
and manoeuvring in the water.

Requirements for free-fall lifeboats

Title                    SOLAS 06 Amend / III / Reg. 19 Emergency training and drills
For Ships Constructed    From 1-7-2008
Retroactive              Retroactive Requirement for Existing Ships.
Note                     Paragraph 3.3.4 enters into force on 1 July 2008.


3.3.4 In the case of a lifeboat arranged for free-fall launching, at least once every
three months during an abandon ship drill the crew shall board the lifeboat,
properly secure themselves in their seats and commence launch procedures up
to but not including the actual release of the lifeboat (i.e., the release hook shall
not be released). The lifeboat shall then either be free-fall launched with only the
required operating crew on board, or lowered into the water by means of the
secondary means of launching with or without the operating crew on board. In
both cases the lifeboat shall thereafter be manoeuvred in the water by the
operating crew. At intervals of not more than six months, the lifeboat shall either
be launched by free-fall with only the operating crew on board, or simulated


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launching shall be carried out in accordance with the guidelines developed by the
Organization - Measures to prevent accidents with lifeboats (MSC.1/Circ.1206).
3.3.5 The Administration may allow ships operating on short international
voyages not to launch the lifeboats on one side if their berthing arrangements in
port and their trading patterns do not permit launching of lifeboats on that side.
However, all such lifeboats shall be lowered at least once every three months
and launched at least annually.


4.3   Do records indicate that the 1.1 load dynamic tests of the winch
brake have been carried out?
                                  SOLAS 06 Amend / III / Reg. 20 Operational readiness, maintenance and
 Title
                                  inspections

 For Ships Constructed            From 01-07-2008

 Retroactive                      Retroactive Requirement for Existing Ships.

 Note                             Paragraphs amended by Res.MSC.216(82) enter into force on 1 July 2008.



Regulation 20.11 Periodic servicing of launching appliances and on-load release
gear

11.1 Launching appliances shall be:

           .1 maintained in accordance with instructions for on-board maintenance as
           required by regulation 36;

           .2 subject to a thorough examination at the annual surveys required by
           regulations I/7 or I/8, as applicable; and

           .3 upon completion of the examination referred to in .2 subjected to a
           dynamic test of the winch brake at maximum lowering speed. The load to
           be applied shall be the mass of the survival craft or rescue boat without
           persons on board, except that, at intervals not exceeding five years, the
           test shall be carried out with a proof load equal to 1.1 times the weight of
           the survival craft or rescue boat and its full complement of persons and
           equipment.


The master should be able to provide records that this test has been conducted
within the last 5 years. This test is witnessed by the flag/RO and there should be
some form of certificate on-board stating the date of the test and the weight used.
The certificate is normally issued by the company carrying out the test The test is
witnessed by a surveyor from the RO/class and will usually endorse the
certificate which is sufficient. The company carrying out the test should be
approved. Companies who are members of ILAMA can be checked on the
ILAMA website www.ilama.org

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INTERNATIONAL LIFE-SAVING MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box 952, Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex. BN43 6AP, England
Tel: + 44 (0) 1273 454187 Fax: + 44 (0) 1273 454260 Email: admin@ilama.org
If the master cannot prove this then it will have to be assumed that this has not
been carried out.

The surveyor could consider detention to ensure that this is carried out before
departure. The boats should not be lowered with personnel on board until this
test has been conducted.

Some owners/crews show concern at carrying out this test as they feel it is
overstressing the equipment, however the 1.1 dynamic test is a realistic test of
what loading the equipment may be subjected to in a real emergency, e.g. a fully
loaded boat being lowered and abruptly stopped on the manual brake for some
reason, possibly something in the water beneath.


4.4   Do records indicate that the launching arrangements (falls, lifeboats,
on-load release and davits) are regularly maintained? SOLAS III/Reg20
                                SOLAS 06 Amend / III / Reg. 20 Operational readiness, maintenance and
 Title
                                inspections

 For Ships Constructed          From 01-07-2008

 Retroactive                    Retroactive Requirement for Existing Ships.

 Note                           Paragraphs amended by Res.MSC.216(82) enter into force on 1 July 2008.



Regulation 20.1 This regulation applies to all ships. The requirements of
paragraphs 3.2, 3.3 and 6.2 shall be complied with, as far as is practicable, on
ships constructed before 1 July 1986.

Regulation 20.4 Maintenance of falls
Falls used in launching shall be inspected periodically* with special regard for
areas passing through sheaves, and renewed when necessary due to
deterioration of the falls or at intervals of not more than 5 years, whichever is the
earlier.

* Refer to Measures to prevent accidents with lifeboats (MSC.1/Circ.1206).

Regulation 20.6 Weekly inspection
The following tests and inspections shall be carried out weekly and a report of the
inspection shall be entered in the log-book:
       .1 all survival craft, rescue boats and launching appliances shall be
       visually inspected to ensure that they are ready for use. The inspection
       shall include, but is not limited to, the condition of hooks, their attachment



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           to the lifeboat and the on-load release gear being properly and completely
           reset;

           .2 all engines in lifeboats and rescue boats shall be run for a total period of
           not less than 3 min, provided the ambient temperature is above the
           minimum temperature required for starting and running the engine. During
           this period of time, it should be demonstrated that the gear box and gear
           box train are engaging satisfactorily. If the special characteristics of an
           outboard motor fitted to a rescue boat would not allow it to be run other
           than with its propeller submerged for a period of 3 min, a suitable water
           supply may be provided. In special cases, the Administration may waive
           this requirement for ships constructed before 1 July 1986

           .3 lifeboats, except free-fall lifeboats, on cargo ships shall be moved from
           their stowed position, without any persons on board, to the extent
           necessary to demonstrate satisfactory operation of launching appliances,
           if weather and sea conditions so allow; and

           .4 the general emergency alarm shall be tested.

Regulation 20.7 Monthly inspection

7.1 All lifeboats, except free-fall lifeboats, shall be turned out from their stowed
position, without any persons on board if weather and sea conditions so allow.

7.2 Inspection of the life-saving appliances, including lifeboat equipment, shall be
carried out monthly using the checklist required by regulation 36.1 to ensure that
they are complete and in good order. A report of the inspection shall be entered
in the log-book.

The master should be able to show proof of regular maintenance of the LSA in
particular the lifeboats and their launching appliances, SOLAS requires that the
weekly and monthly inspection is recorded in the log book. This need not
necessarily be the official log book but could be a separate LSA log book or could
be computerised planned maintenance records as per the SMS.
Note that falls are no longer end for ended.

If the master cannot show proof of regular maintenance then this should be
recorded as a deficiency and considered for possible detention. It will depend
what the surveyor finds when inspecting the lifeboat and launching
arrangements. The surveyor should consider carrying out an abandon ship drill.




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4.5    Are the means of attaching the lifeboat hook assemblies to the
lifeboat in a satisfactory condition?

This area tends to be neglected during SEC surveys and the surveyor should
have a good look at the attachment points looking for signs of wastage, particular
in areas where moisture can accumulate, e.g. through deck openings and bilges,
the keel shoe being particularly prone to wastage. If there is any concern that the
strength of material is impaired due to wastage then flag/RO/class should be
consulted, generally 10% wastage is acceptable. Any repairs need to be certified.
Repairs carried out by the crew are not acceptable and in no case are “doublers”
acceptable.
If necessary a 1.1 load dynamic test may need to be carried out. This should be
carried out anyway in case of repairs. Any area of concern should be recorded as
a deficiency and possible detention. The boat(s) should not be lowered with any
personnel on board. If there is any concern then the surveyor should consider
detention as this is a serious deficiency.



4.6    Have the hazards associated with the launching and recovery of
lifeboats been identified (ISM)?

The master should be able to show the procedure for launching and recovering
lifeboats as covered by the SMS. The surveyor may be provided with evidence of
this in fleet circulars, memos or written procedures within the ISM on-board SMS.
If the master can show no documentary evidence of this then this should be
recorded as an ISM deficiency, Development of Plans for Shipboard Operations.
Sections 1.2.2 and 10.3 of the Code are also relevant.

It would be expected that the procedures developed should mitigate the potential
hazards identified in MSC.1/Circ.1206:

           i.     failure of on-load release mechanism;
           ii.    inadvertent operation of on-load release mechanism;
           iii.   inadequate maintenance of lifeboats, davits and launching
                  equipment;
           iv.    communication failures;
           v.     lack of familiarity with lifeboats, davits, equipment and
                  associated controls;
           vi.    unsafe practices during lifeboat drills and inspections; and
           vii.   design faults other than on-load release mechanisms.



4.7    Are there any procedures or instructions implemented on-board
relating to the hazards identified in paragraph 5?

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See notes in paragraph 4.6 above.


4.8   Are all key personnel familiar with the procedures for the launch and
recovery of lifeboats?

Refer to MSC.1/Circ.1206 and any documentation given in support of paragraphs
4.5 and 4.6. Also, it should be expected that procedures should be laid down in
the vessel’s SMS and manufacturers’ instructions should be available.

Key personnel on board should be familiar with MSC.1/Circ.1205 & 1206 as
applicable. Key personnel would be considered those involved in the operation
and maintenance of lifeboats as per the muster list.

As with all the relevant circulars and in accordance with ISM 1.2.3, applicable
codes, guidelines and standards recommended by the Organization,
Administrations, classification societies and maritime industry organizations
should be taken into account.

If there is any concern that key personnel are not familiar with launching and
recovery of lifeboats, this is a serious matter as it could be putting lives at risk.
The surveyor should consider detention, until such time training has been carried
out and that key personnel are aware of the dangers and the operation of the
equipment.


4.9   Is the crew familiar with relevant IMO documentation and guidance
including MSC Circulars 1205, 1206 and 1207?

MSC/Circ.1205, 206 and 1207 are not compulsory documents, however crew
members with responsibility for maintenance and operation of launching
appliances should be familiar with the issues contained in them. It would not be
expected that a crew member would know from memory the title of the MSC
circulars and everything contained in them.



4.10       Are on-load releases fitted?

The requirement for on-load release mechanisms was for ships built on or after
01/07/86 and was part of the SOLAS 83 amendments. Thus it will be important
for the surveyor to check the keel laying date of the ship. On-load releases may
not fitted due to age of the ship. Note however that some ships built before
01/07/86 may be fitted with on-load release. If there were problems with the on-
load release it would not be a defence by the master/owner to say that the ship
does not require them therefore they do not need to work. LSA Code Chapter IV,
paragraph 4.4.7.6 makes reference to the requirements of on-load release

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mechanisms. It should be stated on the lifeboat certificate whether the lifeboat is
fitted with on-load release mechanism.


4.11 Can the ships crew describe an understanding of the operation of the
on-load release, including interlocks as appropriate?

It is recommended that this be determined by questions to a relevant crew
member that is involved with the lifeboats before the lifeboat is lowered or
launched and in a manner which DOES NOT require the gear to be operated. A
line of questioning should be taken which focuses on how the gear prevents an
accidental release during recovery of the boat, including the principles of
mechanical protection (interlock) and how the mechanism is reset. Questioning
should be primarily directed at ships staff who are assigned duties relating to the
launching and recovery of the lifeboats and the operation of the on- load release
gear as they should have a very good knowledge of the system in order to fulfil
these functions. It is important to establish that the relevant crew have an
understanding of the system rather than just being able to describe it.
The surveyor may also refer to the operating and resetting instructions within the
boat (see also paragraph 4.12 below.)
If there is concern that the key crew members do not understand the operation of
the on-load release mechanism, again this is a serious issue and lives may be
put at risk.


4.12 Are clear operating instructions for use of the on-load release, in the
working language of the ship, provided with a suitably worded warning
notice?

For ships built after 01/07/86 and before 01/07/98 (before the LSA Code) SOLAS
Chapter III applies and makes no specific reference to colour coding, for example
one manufacturer may use “red” to indicate a safe hook while another may use
“green”. There was also no specific requirement for operating instructions,
however the surveyor should expect to see them under the ISM procedures.

The LSA Code became mandatory from 01/07/98 and the code applies to ships
with a keel laid after 1-7-1998. The LSA Code 4.4.7.6.2.2 states: “on-load
release capability shall release the lifeboat with a load on the hooks. This release
shall be so arranged as to release the lifeboat under any conditions of loading
from no load with the lifeboat waterborne to a load of 1.1 times the total mass of
the ,lifeboat when loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment. This
release capability shall be adequately protected against accidental or premature
use. Adequate protection shall include special mechanical protection not normally
required for off-load release, in addition to a danger sign. To prevent a premature
on-load release, on-load operation of the mechanism should require a deliberate
and sustained action by the operator.


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LSA Code 4.4.7.6.3 states: “to prevent an accidental release during recovery of
the boat, unless the hook is completely reset, either the hook shall not be able to
support any load, or the handle or safety pins shall not be able to be returned to
the reset (closed) position without excessive force. Additional danger signs shall
be posted at each hook station to alert crew members to the proper method of
resetting”

Finally, LSA Code 4.4.7.6.5 states: “clear operating instructions shall be provided
with a suitably worded warning notice using colour coding, pictograms, and/or
symbols as necessary for clarity. If colour coding is used, green shall indicate a
properly reset hook and red shall indicate danger of improper or incorrect
setting.”


4.13 Is the release mechanism designed so that crew members in the
lifeboat can clearly observe when the release mechanism is properly and
completely reset and ready for lifting?

For ships keel laid after 01/07/86 but before 01/07/98 there was no requirement
for this in the design.

For ships keel laid after 1-7-1998 until 1-7-2008, the LSA Code 4.4.7.6.2.2 states
“an on-load release capability which will release the lifeboat with a load on the
hooks. This release shall be so arranged as to release the lifeboat under any
conditions of loading from no load with the lifeboat waterborne to a load of 1.1
times the total mass of the lifeboat when loaded with its full complement of
persons and equipment. This release capability shall be adequately protected
against accidental or premature use. Adequate protection shall include special
mechanical protection not normally required for off-load release, in addition to a
danger sign. To prevent an accidental release during recovery of the boat, the
mechanical protection (interlock) should only engage when the release
mechanism is properly and completely reset. To prevent a premature on-load
release, on-load operation of the release mechanism should require a deliberate
and sustained action by the operator. The release mechanism shall be so
designed that crew members in the lifeboat can clearly observe when the release
mechanism is properly and completely reset and ready for lifting. Clear operating
instructions should be provided with a suitably worded warning notice”

For ships keel laid after 1-07-2008, the LSA Code 4.7.6.4 states: “the release
mechanism shall be so designed and installed that crew members from inside the
lifeboat can clearly determine when the system is ready for lifting by:

.4.1 directly observing that the movable hook portion or the hook portion that
locks the movable hook portion in place is properly and completely reset at each
hook; or


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.4.2 observing a non-adjustable indicator that confirms that the mechanism that
locks the movable hook portion in place is properly and completely reset at each
hook; or
.4.3 easily operating a mechanical indicator that confirms that the mechanism
that locks the movable hook in place is properly and completely reset at each
hook.


4.14 Is the release control clearly marked in a colour that contrasts with its
surroundings?




The surveyor should confirm this requirement which applies to all on-load release
gear. E.g. a red handle against a white background


4.15 Does it appear that the hooks and release arrangements, including
any interlocks, are correctly set?

The surveyor should visually inspect the arrangements within the lifeboat and
that the operating handle is in the correct position, any locking pins to prevent in
advertent release should be in place. Are the hooks themselves in the locked
position and it is it obvious to tell this by some form of indication e.g. a pointer in
a green sector.

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4.16 Does it appear that the lifeboat on-load release mechanisms are in
satisfactory condition?

The surveyor should check each hook assembly and look for signs of corrosion
or damage, is there evidence of lubrication, usually by grease nipples, does it
appear that the lubrication is getting through to the required area. Check that any
operating cables are in good condition with no signs of fraying and that the outer
sheath is in tact, the plastic may become brittle with time and crack, this could
lead to ingress of moisture and possible internal corrosion which may not be
obvious.



4.17 Does it appear that the davits and winches are in satisfactory
condition?

The surveyor should be satisfied that the davit mountings are in good condition
and that there is no wastage of the holding down bolts, a surveyor’s hammer
would be useful to check this, very often the nuts/boltheads are well painted but
corrosion is taking place in inaccessible areas. Look along the length of the
davits to ensure they are not twisted and check to see if they have been repaired
in the past. If so were the repairs approved by flag/RO/class. Check for general
corrosion.
On the winches check that the wires are well greased and evenly stowed on the
drum, check for any signs of oil leaks from the winch. Note some fall wires may
be self greasing. Note also the fixed end connection whether socket and wedge
or the use of bulldog grips, make sure they are fitted correctly.


4.18 Do all the sheaves and other moving parts, including limit switches,
operate correctly?

LSA Code 6.1.2.7 states “Where davit arms are recovered by power, safety
devices shall be fitted which will automatically cut off the power before the davit
arms reach the stops in order to prevent overstressing the falls or davits, unless
the motor is designed to prevent such overstressing.”

The surveyor would expect to see the “cut out” mechanism working, this could be
done when the davits are first started to be lowered by asking the crew to start
winding in the davits and manually operate the limit switches one at a time and
witness the motor cut out.

During the lowering of the boat the surveyor should observe the operation of all
moving parts ensuring that the sheaves run freely, are well greased no sign of

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damage, also the fall wires are well maintained and greased, no signs of fraying,
also check the boat the fore and aft falls lower evenly i.e. keeping the boat level.


4.19 Is the centrifugal winch brake operating satisfactorily in “freefall”
mode and the manual brake automatically reapplying upon release?

The winch comprises a manual brake and a centrifugal brake which maintains a
constant lowering speed, this is based on the formula from the LSA Code:
6.1.2.8 The speed at which the fully loaded survival craft or rescue boat is
lowered to the water shall not be less than that obtained from the formula:

S = 0.4 + 0.02 H
where

S is the lowering speed in metres per second and

H is the height in metres from the davit head to the waterline with the ship at the
lightest sea-going condition.

Thus for a height of say 10 metres the lowering speed should not less than 0.6
m/s which equates to approximately 2 km/hour.
6.1.2.10 The maximum lowering speed shall be established by the Administration
having regard to the design of the survival craft or rescue boat, the protection of
its occupants from excessive forces, and the strength of the launching
arrangements taking into account inertia forces during an emergency stop.
Means shall be incorporated in the appliance to ensure that this speed is not
exceeded.

6.1.2.11 Every launching appliance shall be fitted with brakes capable of stopping
the descent of the survival craft or rescue boat and holding it securely when
loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment; brake pads shall,
where necessary, be protected from water and oil.

6.1.2.12 Manual brakes shall be so arranged that the brake is always applied
unless the operator, or a mechanism activated by the operator, holds the brake
control in the "off" position. (i.e. “deadmans” brake concept).


The surveyor is expected to time the descent to ensure that neither it is not too
fast nor too slow which may indicate a problem with the centrifugal brake, most
commonly oil leaking past the seal on to the pads causing excessive speed.




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The manual brake can be tested by allowing the boat to descend at maximum
speed and then rapidly applying the manual brake. The boat should stop and not
move again until the brake is released.
If the surveyor has any concerns regarding the operation of the brake
mechanism, this should be considered as a serious matter and detention may be
warranted, no personnel should be allowed in the boat unless it is stowed with
gripes rigged.

A simple brake test would be to request the crew to wind in the falls using the
manual winding handle (making sure the motor cannot start) until the fall wires
become taut, if the manual brake is working then the fall wires should remain
taut, if they slacken off it is an indication that the brake is not holding and further
testing would be necessary.
In some situations it may not be possible to lower a boat for operational reasons,
e.g. bunkering, weather, terminal restriction.



4.20       If conducted, was a drill performed satisfactorily?

Should a drill be conducted, refer the Master to MSC/Circ.1206 and make it clear
to the Master that any drill or operation will be conducted under his/her control,
it is important that the surveyor does not get involved in carrying out the drill. If a
boat drill is to be undertaken while observing, ask the ship’s Master to explain the
intended approach. If it is intended to lower the boat with the operating crew on
board, ask the Master to have the boat lowered to near the water level and raised
back to the embarkation level with no person on board first. Check the operation
of the davit limit switches during this operation, if not done already as apart of
4.18. During the initial lowering operation ask for the brake to be applied at
maximum lowering speed to check its operation.
If the master intends to hoist a boat fitted with on-load releases with crew on
board then ask how he intends to ensure that the hooks are correctly reset and
cannot accidentally release during the hoisting operation (answer paragraphs 4.5
& 4.13 affirmatively before allowing this operation).
For conducting a drill refer to Chapter 15 of these instructions on conducting
operational drills during an inspection and also PSCC instruction 41/2008/065

If the surveyor has concerns as to the standard of the drill then detention should
be considered until the surveyor is satisfied that the crew meet an acceptable
standard.




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References

1. UK Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB( - Safety Study – Review of
   Lifeboat and Launching Systems’ Accidents 2001 (www.maib.gov.uk).

2. MSC.1/Circ.1205 26 May 2006 Guidelines for developing operation and
   maintenance manuals for lifeboat systems.

3. MSC.1/Circ.1206 26 May 2006 Measures to prevent accidents with lifeboats.

4. MSC.1/Circ.1207 26 May 2006 Early implementation of SOLAS Regulation
   III/19.3.3.4.

5. PSCC Instruction 41/2008/06.




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List of do’s;

     •     Explain your program to the Captain and crew involved.
     •     Ensure you have enough time to conduct the inspection.
     •     Be prepared, consult SIRENAC/SIAS and CERS/SVD in advance.
     •     Collect Load test, type approval, Manual and lifeboat certificate at the
           beginning of the inspection.
     •     Consult Manuals and instructions, including training manual.
     •     Consult colleagues when it doubt.
     •     Try to do the inspection with 2 surveyor’s, especially on older ships.
     •     Always perform a thorough visual inspection of the whole system.
     •     Check the last lifeboat launching date.
     •     Check if key personnel available.
     •     Ask the Captain to delegate the functions.
     •     Make sure that the Captain knows that he is in charge.
     •     Always do a brake test before lowering the lifeboat.
     •     Identify the specific tasks from crew involved.
     •     Verify if falls fit on the sheaves.
     •     Stop the drill if anything looks as though it is going wrong or does go
           wrong.



List of don’ts;

    •      Do not assume that the paperwork is always correct.
    •      Do not operate the equipment yourselves.
    •      Do not put the crew under undue pressure.
    •      Do not continue if the crew is not familiar with the system.
    •      Do not measure the time spent during the drill (i.e. 10 minutes for cargo
           ship and 30 minutes for a passenger ship as per SOLAS).
    •      Do not act as a “paper” auditor.
    •      Do not lower the boat with the crew inside.
    •      Do not make suggestions to those in charge of the operation.
    •      Do not take control.
    •      Do not force the master to do something unsafe or to carry out an
           operation that he/she considers unsafe.
    •      Do not enter lifeboat unless it is safe and secure.
    •      Do not participate in the drill.
    •      Do not request any operational tests or impose physical demands which,
           in the judgement of the master, could jeopardise the safety of the ship,
           crew, passengers or cargo.




18 Aug09
                                         Page 16 of 16

								
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