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									          Securing Canada’s
        Competitive Position
Tourism Industry Association of Canada
               Business Plan 2009-2012
                            Messages from the Chair and from the President




Chair’s Message
The past year has presented Canada’s tourism sector with a series of structural and economic challenges
which are having a significant effect on our industry and the 200,000 businesses who depend on it.
I am confident that as tourism faces these challenges, we will not only survive this downturn, but we will
emerge stronger on the other side. We are a resilient industry with industrious entrepreneurs, and our re-
sourcefulness and ingenuity will unquestionably help lead us through this difficult period and into a new
era of prosperity.
In addition to being an advocate for Canada’s $74.7 billion tourism industry, TIAC seeks to provide leader-
                ship in addressing the economic, environmental and regulatory concerns that its mem-
                bership faces. In turn, the commitment and engagement of TIAC’s membership is es-
                sential if we are to continue to build on our success and reinforce our standing as a vital
                economic engine for Canada.


                Stan Cook
                Chair, 2009-10 Board of Directors
                Tourism Industry Association of Canada



President’s Message
On behalf of the Tourism Industry Association of Canada, I am pleased to present the 2009-2012 Business
Plan, which highlights the Association’s activities over the past year, and outlines the initiatives that are
planned over the following three years.
As we move forward through the trying times ahead, TIAC will continue to respect the three principles
that have guided our decision making for the past seven years. They are our three R’s: Relevant, Respon-
sive and Return-on-investment.
                 TIAC is committed to remaining engaged and responsive to its membership’s needs, and
                 innovative in its approach to lobbying, advocacy, communications and events manage-
                 ment.
                 The achievements of the past year speak to this level of performance, and the stated ob-
                 jectives in the Business Plan demonstrate TIAC’s ongoing commitment to ensuring that
                 the tourism sector in Canada reaches its full potential.
                 Randy Williams
                 President and CEO
                 Tourism Industry Association of Canada




                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                      3
                                                                                                                      Table of Contents




Messages froM The Chair and froM The PresidenT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
overview: TiaC objeCTives for 2009-2012. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
   Advocacy and Lobbying Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
   Research Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   Communications and Public Relations Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   Membership Development Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
   Event Management Objectives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
abouT The TourisM assoCiaTion of Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Canada’s TourisM seCTor aT a glanCe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
siTuaTion analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
   Stimulus Investments in Tourism – More than $800 million . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
PoliCy PosiTions and aCTiviTies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
   Reducing the structural costs of aviation and improving airlift to Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
   Marketing Canada as a Destination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
   Investing in Border Infrastructure, Staffing, Technology and New Traveller Identification                                                                    20
   Staffing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
objeCTives and sTraTegy: advoCaCy and lobbying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
   Influencing the Government Agenda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
   Regular Communication with Parliament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
   Consultations with Other Decision Makers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
   Consultations with Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
   Working to Create a Competitive and Sustainable Sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
objeCTives and sTraTegy: researCh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
objeCTives & sTraTegy:CoMMuniCaTions & PubliC relaTions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
   Media and Public Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
   Communications to Members and Stakeholders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
   Communications to Decision Makers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
objeCTives & sTraTegy: MeMbershiP develoPMenT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
objeCTives & sTraTegy: evenT ManageMenT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
   Rendez-vous Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
   Canada’s Tourism Leadership Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
   Canada-e-Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
   Summit on Sustainability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
   GoMedia Canada Marketplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
aPPendix a: TiaC sTaff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
aPPendix b: 2008-2009 board of direCTors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

                                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                                                          5
                                          overview: TiaC objectives for 2009-2012




    The following is a complete list of the objectives for the Tourism Industry Association of Canada in each
    of the respective departments. For more information on the context and rationale for these objectives,
    please refer to the specific sections as indicated below.


    advocacy and lobbying objectives
    For more information on TIAC’s Advocacy and Lobbying Objectives, please see page 29.
       1. In the spring of 2010, TIAC will hold its second Tourism Policy Symposium in Ottawa
       2. TIAC will meet on a one-on-one basis with between 10-15 Members of Parliament, Ministers and/
          or ministerial exempt staff (Chiefs of Staff, Senior Policy Advisors etc.) during the next Parliamen-
          tary Session (2009-2010).
       3. TIAC will continue to liaise with the all-party Parliamentary Tourism Caucus, currently under the
          chairmanship of Greg Rickford MP (Conservative: Kenora) and will endeavour to hold 2 Caucus
          events by June of 2010.
       4. TIAC will disseminate and distribute, on a partnership basis, the Green Your Business: Toolkit for
          Tourism Operators to a cross-section of tourism and travel businesses and destinations in Canada
          by August 31, 2010.
       5. During 2010, TIAC will prepare a business plan for vetting and approving receptive Canadian tour
          operators who will be participating in hosting inbound group leisure travel from China, on the as-
          sumption that an Approved Destination Status agreement is granted to Canada in the near future.
       6. TIAC will submit to a “sustainability” or “green” audit in 2009-10 in order to ensure that our Otta-
          wa-based operations are being conducted in as efficient an environmental manner as possible.
       7. TIAC will work to develop by December 31, 2010 an overall, balanced “scorecard” measuring the
          health of Canada’s tourism industry on a variety of indices including financial health, economic
          impact, brand health, and the degree to which the industry is united around common objectives.
       8. TIAC will assist Industry Canada, the lead federal tourism agency, with creating a ”whole of gov-
          ernment” or horizontally-driven approach to drive tourism policy – in particular, the recently an-
          nounced National Tourism Strategy – across line departments and agencies in Ottawa by Novem-
          ber 30, 2009.
       9. Through its advocacy activities, stakeholder outreach, coalition development and public position-
          ing, TIAC will strive to foster a cohesive and aligned national tourism & travel industry, able to
          unite around important goals and objectives by May 31, 2010.
       10. TIAC will endeavour to provide guidance to the industry and our membership on the critical
           economic factors that define and shape the economic environment in which we plan/market our
           product offerings and destinations by October 31, 2010.
       11. TIAC in conjunction with Citizenship and Immigration Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency
           and the Canadian Tourism Commission, will create an expert advisory panel to discuss visa issu-
           ance and other travel matters for certain priority emerging inbound markets by April 1, 2010.



6                                      Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                            Overview: TIAC Objectives for 2009-2012




research objectives
For more information on TIAC’s Research Objectives, please see page 32.
   1. TIAC will work in partnership with Deloitte to frame and conclude a research study that will exam-
      ine in comparative international context the non-airport rent-related costs of aviation in Canada,
      i.e. other on-balance sheet costs facing airlines, airports and tour operators by the fall of 2009.
      This would include costs associated with the Air Travellers Security Charge, fuel excise taxes, NAV
      Canada fees and other relevant levies imposed on aviation users, both individual and corporate.
   2. By the Spring of 2010, TIAC will create an on-line portal within our website of all of the relevant
      and cutting-edge research, data and general information pertaining to tourism, travel, transporta-
      tion and attractions in Canada. This action will help TIAC to fulfill its role as a “clearinghouse” for
      important new data and research which illustrates the latest facets, trends and realities of tourism
      in this country.
   3. TIAC will continue, on an as-needed basis, to conduct business condition and opinion surveys of
      TIAC’s membership in order to derive business intelligence insights and to inform our advocacy,
      policy analysis and outreach vocations. This is consistent with TIAC’s effort to continue to func-
      tion as a member-driven organization.
   4. TIAC will create a “schematic tree” or organizational chart of all of the private and public entities
      involved in representational, lobbying or destination marketing functions within the Canadian tour-
      ism industry by June 1, 2010.
   5. TIAC will support and undertake research and analysis that serves the overarching goal of por-
      traying tourism as a key economic driver, revenue generator and employment provider in this
      country, on a par with Canada’s traditional resource and manufacturing sectors.


Communications and Public relations objectives
For more information on TIAC’s Communications and Public Relations Objectives, please see page 33.
   1. TIAC will provide members of the media with an Update Report on Canada’s Tourism Competitive-
      ness by November, 2009.
   2. To highlight the issues facing the tourism sector to the general public, TIAC will exceed 100 media
      hits between June 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010.
   3. TIAC will raise the profile of Tourism Week in Canada by exceeding 50 media hits on the activities
      undertaken by TIAC and its members.
   4. TIAC will revamp and re-launch its core website, www.tiac.travel, by January 30, 2011.
   5. TIAC will re-launch www.tourismmatters.travel as an ongoing advocacy-centered website for mem-
      bers, media and stakeholders.
   6. TIAC will publish 40 issues of TIAC Talk between September 1, 2009 and August 31, 2010.
   7. TIAC will raise the profile of tangible member benefits by including relevant information on these
      programs in the TIAC Talk newsletter.
   8. TIAC will create and deliver a minimum of two “tourism news” newsletters to Members of Parlia-
      ment and relevant public servants by June 30, 2010.
   9. TIAC will create an internal Election Preparedness Plan which outlines the advocacy and communi-
      cations initiatives the organization will take in the event of a federal election.

                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                      7
          Overview: TIAC Objectives for 2009-2012



       10. TIAC will create an Annual Report which outlines the accomplishments over the past year in time
           for the Annual General Meeting in November, 2010.


    Membership development objectives
    For more information on TIAC’s Membership Development Objectives, please see page 37.
    TIAC will increase the total number of full members by a minimum 5% per fiscal year between 2009-2012.
       1. TIAC will continue to utilize a formal exit process around non-renewing members. This process
          includes a closing/exiting survey, which will be used during the annual review of the membership
          program.
       2. TIAC will continue to promote .travel as the solution to growing frustration among online users
          and act as a resource for those seeking approval for registering their proper domain names.
       3. TIAC will increase the number of valuable Affinity Partner programs by a minimum of 2 each year.
          These partners will offer TIAC members exclusive benefits.


    event Management objectives
    For more information on TIAC’s Event Management Objectives, please see page 40.
       1. The Events Team will apply best practices in the delivery of all events and special events.
       2. The Events Team will green its events by implementing practices contained in the Green Your Busi-
          ness: Toolkit for Tourism Operators and Green Meeting Industry Council.

    rendez-vous Canada
       1. TIAC will implement a training certification program for all new Rendez-vous Canada seller del-
          egates for RVC 2010.
       2. TIAC will introduce webinars on “How to RVC” for sellers and buyers focusing on how to maximize
          appointments and use of the on-line appointment scheduling for RVC 2010.
       3. TIAC will re-develop and change the format and presentation of the “How to RVC” session pre-
          sented on-site for RVC 2010.
       4. TIAC will develop a Rendez-vous Canada marketing plan for buyer recruitment in collaboration
          with the Canadian Tourism Commission and the provinces / territories for RVC 2010.




8                                      Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                            Overview: TIAC Objectives for 2009-2012



   5. TIAC will develop a “new product” promotion or recognition program for Rendez-vous Canada, to
      enable buyers to recognize these products for RVC 2010.
   6. TIAC will continue to negotiate favourable and attractive rates with airlines, rail service providers
      and hotels to provide additional service(s) to delegates attending Rendez-vous Canada 2010.
   7. TIAC in collaboration with the Canadian Tourism Commission and the provinces / territories will
      work together to achieve the highest international buyer attendance for RVC 2010.

Canada’s Tourism leadership summit
   1. TIAC will incorporate the ideas generated at Canada’s Tourism Leadership Summit into its annual
      business plan, by August 31 each year.
   2. TIAC will assess the viability of webcasting and / or digital recording of selected session at Cana-
      da’s Tourism Leadership Summit 2009 and launch service to members in 2010.
   3. TIAC will develop a marketing plan and strategy for Canada’s Tourism Leadership Summit 2009.
   4. TIAC will increase attendance to 350 at Canada’s Tourism Leadership Summit 2009, and maintain a
      minimum of 10% increase in attendance in 2010 and 2011.

Canada-e-Connect
   1. TIAC will develop a marketing plan and strategy for CEC 2010.
   2. TIAC will increase attendance to 300 at CEC 2010, and maintain a minimum of 10% increase in at-
      tendance in 2011 and 2012.
   3. TIAC will increase sponsorship revenue and broaden supporters beyond / outside of TIAC’s mem-
      bership base for CEC 2010 by developing a sponsorship package that targets emerging industries.

summit on sustainability
   1. TIAC will launch and produce the 1st Annual Summit on Sustainability in 2010 which will attract at
      least 200 delegates and be financially sustainable.
   2. TIAC will develop a marketing plan and strategy for SOS 2010.

go Media Canada Marketplace
   1. TIAC will work with the Canadian Tourism Commission to have its mandate renewed to manage
      and produce GoMedia Canada Marketplace for a minimum of two years (2010 and 2011).




                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                    9
                                             about the Tourism association of Canada




     Founded in 1930 to encourage the development of tourism in Canada, today the Tourism Industry Asso-
     ciation of Canada serves as the leading national private-sector advocate for this $74.7 billion sector, repre-
     senting the interests of the tourism business community nation-wide. It successfully influences govern-
     ment thinking and action on behalf of Canadian tourism businesses, promoting positive measures that
     help the sector grow and prosper.
     TIAC’s membership reflects partnerships among all industries of the sector, as well as provincial, territo-
     rial and regional tourism associations, enabling the association to address the full range of issues facing
     Canadian tourism.


     vision
     TIAC’s Board of Directors has confirmed a series of “ends” as its vision for the Canadian tourism sector:


     1.   The Tourism industry association of Canada exists so that tourism is a strong, competitive,
          sustainable growth industry
     This End is further interpreted to include, but not limited to:
          1. Government agenda is conducive to a growing and sustainable tourism industry.
          2. A national tourism strategy is implemented and reviewed annually in collaboration with private
             industry that addresses the competitive challenges Canada faces as an international destination.
          3. There is an effective advocate for tourism interests to media, businesses and public – beyond the
             government lobbying responsibilities.
          4. There is a national clearinghouse, repository or “go-to centre” for tourism issues.
          5. There is significant growth in the tourism industry in Canada.
          6. Value for membership investment.


     2.   government agenda is conducive to a growing and sustainable tourism industry
     This end is further interpreted to include, but not limited to:
          1. A legislative and regulatory environment at all levels conducive to a growing and sustainable tour-
             ism industry.
             1. 1.   Enhanced transportation systems that allow growth of the tourism sector.
                     1. 1. 1. The transportation system within Canada’s high volume corridors offers visitors
                              seamless inter-modal travel options.
                     1. 1. 2. International air transportation to Canada offers enough capacity to increase
                              Canada’s international markets.
             1. 2.   Inter-provincial trade barriers do not impact on the travel and tourism industry.
             1. 3.   Travel to Canada is traveller friendly and efficient.


10                                         Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                  TIAC's Vision: Board of Directors ends



                1. 3. 1. The Canadian border is welcoming; enabling efficient flow of visitors; and with clear
                         communications of required documentation, that meet the principles of affordabil-
                         ity and accessibility.
                1. 3. 2. The process to access a visa for entry into Canada is efficiently administered to al-
                         low timely and fair processing of applicants.
        1. 4.   The Federal Government’s Speech from the Throne mentions the tourism sector.
     2. Government programs are conducive to a growing and sustainable tourism industry.
        2. 1.   All three levels of government invest a fair and reasonable amount in tourism marketing in
                partnership with the tourism industry.
        2. 2.   All three levels of government invest on an ongoing basis in tourism product development
                (on occasion with private sector interests) and infrastructure.
        2. 3.   Tourism is recognized as a valued and leading sector of the Canadian economy and is
                treated as such by the government.
     3. Provincial/territorial associations have support for their advocacy efforts.
     4. To maintain the appointment of a senior ‘tourism’ official in Parliament.


3.   a national tourism strategy is implemented and reviewed annually in collaboration with pri-
     vate industry that addresses the competitive challenges Canada faces as an international desti-
     nation
This end is further interpreted to include, but not limited to:
     1. Canada has a national tourism strategy that has been developed by industry in partnership with
        the provincial and federal governments.
        1. 1.   There is an annual review of the National Tourism Strategy and a report on progress made
                and adjustments required.
        1. 2.   The National Tourism Strategy addresses competitive areas identified in TIAC’s 2008 Report
                on Canada’s Tourism Competitiveness, namely:
                  • air access and costs
                  • border policy and infrastructure
                  • Approved Destination Status with China
                  • inter-modal transportation
                  • human resources and foreign workers
                  • marketing Canada
                  • sustainability and climate change
     2. Canada is seen as a world leader in tourism environmental practices and sustainable develop-
        ment. Canada’s rich outdoor and nature-based tourism experiences are being enjoyed to their full
        potential.
     3. Canada is viewed as a “tourism centre of excellence” for its application of technology, innovation,
        tourism services and human resource development programs.
     4. Canada’s tourism marketing model is recognized as a leader in the world.
     5. Tourism careers are sought after and respected.



                                      Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                     11
            TIAC's Vision: Board of Directors ends



     4.   There is an effective advocate for tourism interests to media, businesses and public – beyond
          the government lobbying responsibilities
     This end is further interpreted to include, but not limited to:
          1. The public, media and other industries are aware of the value of tourism to the economy and to
             quality of life.
             1. 1.   The business and economy of travel and tourism is discussed regularly in the public media.
             1. 2.   Tourism interests are represented “at the table” with other industries when planning and
                     consultation with stakeholders, like land use, is undertaken.
          2. Access to financing and investment opportunities that meet the needs of the tourism sector exist.


     5.   There is a national clearinghouse, repository or “go-to centre” for tourism issues
     This end is further interpreted to include, but not limited to:
          1. There is a conduit and forum for information about tourism issues among government, industries
             and members.
          2. Research enabling businesses to plan future directions exists.
             2. 1.   Primary research exists which provides analysis and support for all issues identified in
                     TIAC’s 2008 Report on Canada’s Tourism Competitiveness.
             2. 2.   Thorough analytic reports exist on specific and the most pressing issues impacting tourism
                     competitiveness to support a lobbying effort.
          3. The roles of associations serving tourism operator interests are clearly understood by the industry.


     6.   There is significant growth in the tourism industry in Canada
     This end is further interpreted to include, but not limited to:
          1. The tourism sector reaches $75 billion* by December 31, 2010.
             1. 1.   The number of overnight arrivals to Canada reaches 24 million* by 2010.
             1. 2.   The average length of stay for overnight arrivals from the U.S. is 4.5* and other interna-
                     tional stays are 16* by 2010.
             1. 3.   The number of tourism businesses in Canada reaches 225,000* by 2010.
             1. 4.   Rendez-vous Canada international buyer attendance reaches its highest level in 2010.
             1. 5.   The “Canada” brand is top of mind for international travellers from our primary markets in
                     2010.
             1. 6.   Canada hosts one of the best Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games ever held.
     * Each of these numbers was originally sourced from Statistics Canada and will be reviewed against Statis-
     tics Canada’s reporting for 2010. Dollars are reported in 2010 value.




12                                        Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                  TIAC's Vision: Board of Directors ends



7.   value for membership investment
This end is further interpreted to include, but not limited to:
     1. Members are engaged in the activities of the organization.
     2. Members participate and contribute to the public policy formation of the organization.
     3. Meaningful networking opportunities exist for the industry to share and learn from each other.
     4. Members are proud to be part of a growing and vibrant national tourism association.




                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                13
                                                  Canada's Tourism sector at a glance




     a diverse sector
          • There are more than 180,000 tourism-related businesses in Canada, operating in five key sub-
            sectors: accommodations; food and beverage services; recreation and entertainment; transpor-
            tation; and travel services.
          • While the tourism industry includes large national and multinational companies, the majority of
            its businesses are small- and medium-sized enterprises.
     a Key Contributor to the Canadian economy
          • Tourism in 2008 is a $74.7 billion industry, making it bigger than the fishery, forestry and agricul-
            ture industries combined.
          • In 2008, $15.7 billion in tourism expenditures (21%) were by foreign travellers, making tourism
            an important export industry. Domestic travel expenditures on tourism commodities reached
            $59.1 billion in 2008.
          • Tourism GDP was $30.3 billion in 2008, an increase from $19.5 billion in 1998. Tourism activity
            represents 2% of Canada’s GDP.
     an international destination
          • Almost 27.4 million non-residents travelled to Canada in 2008, a 9.7% decrease over 2007, due
            largely to a decline in U.S. visitation.
          • Since 2001, inbound travel from the U.S. has fallen 52.7%, from 42.9 million person-trips to 22.6
            million, hitting levels not seen since the 1970s.
          • The UN World Tourism Organization lists Canada as the 15th most popular international tourist
            destination in the world.
          • International tourist receipts totalled over $15.5 billion U.S. in 2007.
     a source of government revenue
          • Governments earned 27.8 cents in revenue per dollar of tourism spending in Canada in 2007.
          • Tourism spending generated over $19.6 billion in government tax revenues in 2007.
     a Major employer
          • According to Statistics Canada, tourism industries accounted for 1.8 million jobs in 2008, 17%
            more than in 1998, and about 10% of the workforce overall.
          • Over 525,000 jobs in the tourism sector can be directly attributed to tourism demand. A fur-
            ther 1.1 million jobs depend on tourism.
     accommodations
          • In 2008, there were 8,356 accommodation properties in Canada featuring 446,318 rooms.
          • Canadian hotel properties saw an average occupancy rate of 63% in 2008, resulting in revenues
            of $18.8 billion. However, occupancy rates across Canada dropped by 3.8% to 52.4% in the first
            quarter of 2009 compared with the same period in 2008.
     Travel
          • Total demand for passenger air and rail transportation reached $15.3 billion in 2008.
          • In the World Economic Forum’s Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report 2009, Canada ranked
            98 out of 130 countries on the index of Ticket Taxes & Airport Charges.


14                                     Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                              situation analysis




With the onset of the worldwide financial crisis in the fall of 2008, the global travel and tourism industry
has faced significant challenges over the past year.
While global tourism demand increased last year, with international tourist arrivals growing by 2% to
reach 924 million, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) warned that demand slowed
significantly through the later months of the year under the influence of an extremely volatile world econ-
omy. The second half of 2008 saw growth come to a standstill with the number of international arrivals
declining slightly, a trend which the UNWTO expects to continue in 2009. The Organization initially stated
its expectations for growth in international tourism this year to be in the range of 0% to a 2% decline. In
June of 2009, those numbers were revised downwards, with the UNWTO now stating it expects a decline
between 6% and 8%.
With the financial difficulties being particularly acute in the United States, these challenges have had a
heightened impact on Canada’s tourism sector. The American manufacturing sector in particular has been
hit hard over the past year, with several key states near the U.S.-Canada border seeing the largest job
losses in recent memory. As a result, families and individuals have sought to cut back on vacation plans,
staying closer to home. For 2008, the total number of overnight trips by Americans to Canada declined
by 7%.
A recent survey by the United States Tour Operators Association (USTOA) showed that over 40% of Ameri-
cans polled intended to stay closer to home while travelling this year. A Deloitte study from April 2009
found that 50% of those who indicated that they intended to travel this summer would spend less on
meals and accommodations, while 46% said they would take fewer trips, and 45% noted that they would
reduce the length of their trips.
Meanwhile, companies facing stagnation or negative growth are increasingly looking to reduce opera-
tional costs, notably in the areas of business travel and meetings. A recent survey of meeting planners
by Ypartnership, the Professional Convention Management Association, and American Express found that
44% of those polled expected to plan fewer off-site meetings in 2009 and 2010 than last year, while 47%
expected their event numbers to stay roughly on par with the previous year. Almost all of those polled
(90%) pointed to the economic downturn as the primary reason for these declines. As a result, significant
numbers of respondents planned to increase their use of travel alternatives, such as webinars (54%), tele-
conferencing (48%), and video-conferencing (30%).
While the economic downturn is having a significant effect on tourism, it is not the singular reason for
the declines in visitation. New requirements for travel documents for land and sea entry into Canada as a
result of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative will certainly have an impact, as will the relative strength
of Canada’s currency. The Canadian dollar has traded within a dime of even par with the American green-
back for most of the past year, exacerbating the already declining levels of visitation from the U.S..
A number of other unforeseen factors may also impact on Canada’s inbound tourism numbers for this
year. The global outbreak of the H1N1 virus, primarily localized in North America, has contributed to
some uncertainty in terms of visitation, in particular from Asia. Also, new visa requirements will impact
on inbound visitation from Mexico, a market which had seen significant growth in recent years. (In 2008,
more than 257,000 Mexicans visited Canada, an increase of 11% over the previous year)




                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                       15
           Situation Analysis




     stimulus investments in Tourism – More than $800 million
     While there was much bad news over the past year, a new commitment on the part of the federal govern-
     ment has helped to defray some of the impact of the external factors pushing Canada’s tourism prospects
     downwards.
     In January, 2009, TIAC welcomed the announcement in the federal budget of a number of key funding ini-
     tiatives worth more than $800 million to help support the competitiveness of Canada’s tourism and travel
     sector.
     Among the funding initiatives for the tourism sector announced in the federal budget were:


           • $40 million over two years to the Canadian Tourism Commission ($20 million for domestic mar-
             keting and $20 million for emerging markets)
           • $100 million for marquee festivals and events over two years
           • $150 million for Canada’s national parks system over two years ($75 million for visitor facilities
             and $75 million for national historic sites)
           • $407 million for improvements to passenger rail service in the Montreal to Toronto corridor
             operated by VIA Rail
           • Additional funding of projects which will assist in the development of vital tourism infrastructure
           • $24 million over two years for cruise ship tourism
           • $60 million over two years for local and community cultural and heritage institutions (i.e. the-
             atres and museums)
           • $140 million over five years for Northern Economic Development, a substantial portion of which
             will be directed towards tourism projects


     The government’s investments in Canada’s tourism sector addressed several longstanding competitive-
     ness issues facing the industry. In addition, Prime Minister Stephen Harper made a commitment at a June
     4, 2009 meeting with tourism industry leaders to coordinate the efforts of several government depart-
     ments and the industry at large through a Federal Tourism Strategy. Such an integrated strategy may well
     offer Canada’s tourism sector an unprecedented opportunity to work with the government to alleviate
     some of the structural and institutional competitiveness disadvantages, and will allow TIAC and its mem-
     bers to engage the government in a more profound commitment to tourism as an economic engine.




16                                      Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                          Policy Positions and activities




As the Situation Analysis has pointed out, Canada’s visitor economy is traversing troubled waters with
inbound visitation from our largest traditional market, the United States, dropping to levels not seen since
the 1970s and our travel deficit of $12.6 billion continuing to deteriorate. Airline load factors, hotel oc-
cupancy rates, convention and meeting attendance, and operator yields are all down and the short term
outlook for Canadian travel businesses is not at all rosy.
In this challenging business environment, TIAC looks to continue its relevance with its membership and
the industry by taking up those policy areas that can most beneficially impact their bottom lines. These
members are both mid- and larger-size corporate entities and small, family-owned businesses, some situ-
ated in well-established urban centres and others in more remote, regional locations. All, though, depend
on a healthy demand curve and a set of input costs that are predictable and manageable.
While the severity of the current downturn changes somewhat the order of our priorities, there remains
continuity to the key policy positions and “asks” which TIAC puts forward as part of its advocacy and gov-
ernment affairs agenda. Much of what the association has been talking about and highlighting over the
past several years has begun to get traction within the corridors of government and it would be unwise to
abandon these things altogether at this stage. The research, empirical evidence and momentum behind
some of our policy positions continues to grow and gain legitimacy which government decision-makers
are, in turn, increasingly forced to recognize. The Report on Canada’s Tourism Competitiveness, issued
in June of 2008, has crystallized this effort and components of TIAC’s policy agenda are now regarded
by many in the public service and political circles as key outstanding challenges that require resolution if
Canada is to thrive as a travel destination.
At present, TIAC has identified eight policy areas where it believes ongoing efforts are required to bring
about positive change. They are:
      • Reducing the structural costs of aviation and improving airlift to Canada
      • Reviewing the investment and manner in which Canada markets itself as a destination
      • Investing in border infrastructure, staffing, technology, visa requirements/processing and new
        traveller identification
      • Securing an Approved Destination Status agreement from China for inbound group leisure travel
      • Instituting policies, programs and incentives to foster the adoption of sustainable tourism prac-
        tices by Canadian tourism businesses, operators and destinations
      • Improving our Human Resources planning and policies
      • Promoting inter-modal transport options and High Speed Rail in Canada
      • Supporting Cultural and Heritage events as drivers of visitation
It is TIAC’s objective that all of the above issues will be addressed in the Federal Tourism Strategy.




                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                    17
           Policy Positions and Activities




     reducing the structural costs of aviation and improving airlift to Canada

     aviation Costs
     The attractiveness and competitiveness of Canada as a travel and tourism destination is greatly affected
     by the myriad tax, infrastructure, regulatory and cost-recovery policies that successive Canadian govern-
     ments have developed and implemented for the aviation sector. As a result, TIAC believes that there are
     deep-seated, structural and longer-term problems facing the air transport sector that have their roots in
     federal public policy towards air transport. This is perhaps most starkly illustrated in the major financial
     challenges presently confronting Canada’s air transport sector for the second time in six years.
     Historically, the aviation sector’s role as an economic driver and enabler has never been publicly acknowl-
     edged or understood by the public authorities in Canada. As a result, earlier this year, major U.S. cruise
     ship companies withdrew Alaskan cruise embarkations from Vancouver and relocated them to Seattle
     citing, amongst other things, the high costs of air travel to Canada. It is worth reminding ourselves that
     Canada is both a geographically large country and a long-haul destination. Our future as a tourist des-
     tination therefore relies heavily on airline transportation. Yet the costs of both getting here and moving
     around once here remain sizable hindrances to leisure and business travellers alike.
     Since the federal government decided to vacate the travel and transportation field in the mid-1990s, a
     variety of user-pay policies and economic rents have proliferated. Whether they are ground lease rents,
     excise taxes on fuel, air traveller security charges or air navigation and control fees, all of the on-balance
     sheet costs facing aviation companies, airports and tour operators have grown exorbitantly and unsus-
     tainably. In fact, the businesses that make up the aviation sector have seen an estimated just under $1
     billion siphoned off annually by the federal government in the form of taxes, fees, levies and rents. These
     various charges hamper our global competitiveness and inhibit our ability to reinvest. They have led a
     number of international organizations such as the International Air Transport Association and the World
     Economic Forum to publicly lament the high fixed costs that attend to the aviation business in Canada
     and that act as a deterrent to its viability.
     In June of 2009, TIAC organized in conjunction with five other organizations a Travel and Tourism Advo-
     cacy Day on Parliament Hill, which had a central focus on aviation. In our policy brochure, we called for
     both a recognition of the fact that air travel is an enabler and driver of the economic prosperity of Can-
     ada, and for the formation of a joint public-private sector taskforce to work towards an “Aviation White
     Paper” which might provoke a public discussion about the critical role that aviation and tourism will play
     in the Canada of the twenty-first century. It is suggested that this government/industry taskforce might
     begin with a root and branch analysis of the cost structure facing airlines, airports, tour operators and
     others in the Canadian travel sector. As a preliminary step, TIAC is working with Deloitte on a research
     project to itemize all of the non-airport rent-related costs that combine to make Canada such an expen-
     sive aviation destination.

     air service agreements and access to Canada
     International air access is key to the development of Canada’s tourism industry. As TIAC’s Flight Plan for
     Tourism (2003) puts it, air access plays an important role in the development and expansion of tourism
     products across the country as it provides for new markets and a broader traveller audience and increases
     Canada’s competitiveness within the tourism industry internationally. TIAC supports the Blue Sky Interna-
     tional Air Transportation Policy announced by the government in 2006. TIAC believes the federal govern-
     ment should be proactive in negotiating liberalized bilateral air transport agreements with major potential
     traffic generating and high value added tourism-source countries. In doing so, it should acknowledge
     the interests of both traditional connecting/network carriers and those whose business model is based

18                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                         Policy Positions and Activities



on point-to-point services. When determining negotiating priorities for new bilateral air service agree-
ments and open skies agreements, the federal government should consult with a wide range of aviation
and tourism stakeholders including airlines, airports, tour operators, provincial and destination marketing
organizations, national and provincial tourism industry associations, chambers of commerce, boards of
trade, and local community representatives. The reality is that source markets for visitors to Canada are
changing. Future growth may not necessarily come from Europe and North America but from the curi-
ous, less-travelled nascent middle classes in South America, Eastern Europe and Asia. Canadian tourism
business owners & operators are quick to recognize and capitalize on promising new inbound markets
but critically must have a say in new airlift decisions from the earliest stages.
TIAC fully supports the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Air Transport Agreement that was pub-
licly announced in December of 2008. The EU Council of Transport Ministers approved the agreement on
March 30, 2009. Once fully implemented, the Canada-EU agreement will benefit travellers by providing
more choices in terms of destinations, flights and routes, more direct services, and the potential for lower
fares. In essence, the Agreement with the 27 countries of the EU provides for increased traffic rights,
initially allowing for unrestricted direct services (on an airline’s own aircraft or that of another carrier)
between Canada and the EU, without any limitations on the number of flights operated or the prices to be
offered. More such agreements, perhaps resulting eventually in Common Aviation Area Agreements with
Europe or even Asia, consisting of a complete exchange of full traffic rights, would be beneficial to the
Canadian tourism industry. While progress between the EU and the U.S. on a comprehensive air transport
agreement is held up, there may be competitive benefits for the Canadian tourism industry in the short-
to medium-term as Europeans find it relatively easier to travel within Canada.
TIAC supports the measure that was approved in the 2009 Budget Implementation Bill calling for foreign
ownership limits in Canadian carriers to be raised to 49%. This measure will provide for greater access to
foreign capital although there is an element of ministerial discretion remaining. Clearly TIAC believes that
it is only reasonable that foreign aviation regimes such as the EU and U.S. would make reciprocal regu-
latory change to their foreign ownership regimes in order to facilitate investment and equity swaps by
Canadian companies contemplating investments in their national carriers. The Canadian Transportation
Agency will hold consultations with the industry before developing regulations and guidelines to imple-
ment this government policy.
In terms of rights of establishment, presently forbidden under Canadian law, TIAC believes that making
a legislative change to allow 100% foreign-owned carriers to set up and serve Canadian domestic points
makes sense for our industry providing a number of conditions are met. Such “Canada only” airlines
may be foreign owned/controlled but must operate on a level playing field with Canadian carriers, hiring
Canadian workers, using Canadian goods and services, complying with Canadian regulations and paying
Canadian taxes. Once again, there would also have to be an assurance of reciprocal rights of establish-
ment for Canadian aviation interests seeking overseas opportunities to invest.


Marketing Canada as a destination
TIAC recently convened and chaired a tourism industry think tank on the subject of how Canada markets
itself as a tourism destination domestically and internationally. Among the topics discussed were: the
process used in collaborating between organizations/jurisdictions; the marketing planning cycles; roles
and responsibilities; opportunities for increased effectiveness and efficiency; and measuring success.
Although TIAC does not have an explicit marketing vocation or role itself, it did raise the question of the
coherence of our overall national marketing effort in the Report on Canada’s Tourism Competitiveness
in June of 2008. The think tank is an effort on the association’s part to facilitate a strategic discussion
among key national, provincial and regional/destination marketing organizations on how the domestic
and overseas promotional effort might be improved.


                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                      19
           Policy Positions and Activities



     One of the key findings of the think tank was that there are too many independent brand messages in
     various target markets – what some described as the “brand salad.” At times, there may be numerous
     organizations doing marketing, all honing in on the same potential traveller and running the risk of can-
     nibalizing each other. Another concern heard was that the fast pace of technological change means that
     marketing entities must subtly calibrate their message in different media in order to keep apace with the
     cutting edge, technologically literate consumer. A further point raised by think tank participants was the
     contemporary reality that advertising and promotional campaigns must be highly segmented to go after
     different market niches. They must be, in other words, “micro” campaigns, very focused, short-term and
     very target-specific.
     TIAC and the Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) were tasked with a number of the follow-up items aris-
     ing from the think tank. These items feature in the Advocacy Objectives section of this document and will
     be progressed in the next two years. Specifically, TIAC undertakes to:
           • Create a balanced scorecard for Canada’s tourism industry to measure, over time, the health of
             the industry, including financial health, brand health, collaboration and economic impact;
           • Help to foster a cohesive and aligned tourism industry coalition to lobby for tourism as a prior-
             ity;
           • Create a compelling business case that positions tourism as a key economic driver to govern-
             ment; and
           • Hold government accountable to a “whole-of-government” approach in which each relevant
             federal department integrates a portion of the tourism agenda into its activities.


     Investing in Border Infrastructure, Staffing, Technology and New Traveller
     Identification
     There is a general consensus that the Canada-U.S. border has thickened considerably in recent years to
     the detriment of legitimate business and leisure travellers. This has been recognized by the Canadian
     Chamber of Commerce in their June 2009 report Finding the Balance: Shared Border of the Future. As the
     Chamber report notes, “while Europe moves towards a more integrated border environment, our borders
     are moving in the opposite direction and we are consistently eroding the competitive advantage created
     by the Canada-U.S. free trade agreement of 1989 and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)
     of 1994.” Security considerations post 9-11 have triumphed over the free movement of people with the
     result that many people in both Canada and the United States have cut back on their discretionary travel.
     The border is now widely seen as cumbersome, bureaucratic and expensive to traverse. This has been
     compounded more recently by the final implementation of the land and sea rules of the Western Hemi-
     sphere Travel Initiative on June 1, 2009 which requires all individuals (re)entering the United States by
     vehicle or ferry to possess a passport or other WHTI-compliant document. This follows the implementa-
     tion of the WHTI rule for the air mode in January of 2007.
     While other factors have also been at work such as spiralling gas prices and fluctuating currency exchange
     rates, the transaction costs associated with the border have put a real chill on cross border same-day and
     overnight travel. The latest numbers from Statistics Canada provide eloquent testimony to this. Between
     2008 and 2007, total inbound travel from the United States fell -12.0% to 22.6 million visitors. Overnight
     travel over the same period from the U.S. fell -6.6% to 12.4 million visitors. Same-day travel over this
     period fell -17.9% to 10.1 million visitors. Since 2001, inbound travel from the U.S. has fallen 52.7%, from
     42.9 million person-trips to 22.6 million, hitting levels not seen since the 1970s. In the first quarter of
     2009, travel spending by Americans in Canada hit an 11-year low. With U.S. expenditure in Canada drop-
     ping and the purchases made by Canadians visiting the U.S. growing, the travel account deficit with the


20                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                         Policy Positions and Activities



U.S. has been continually widening. The preliminary deficit number for 2008 is -$8.8 billion up from -$6.9
billion in 2007.
TIAC and other border stakeholders have made repeated representations on these issues and, of late, we
have had a receptive audience. Most recently, in March of 2009 Randy Williams, TIAC’s President and CEO
appeared before the House Standing Committee on International Trade, which was conducting hearings
on Canada-U.S. border issues. The point was forcefully made to the Committee that the drop in visitation
from the U.S. means fewer bookings, fewer patrons and less stability. It means that those from the tradi-
tional pool of travellers who used to make trips across the border are either not coming to Canada, or are
staying for shorter periods of time. It means that small- and medium-sized enterprises – the life-blood of
the Canadian tourism sector – are forced to do more with less to remain competitive. In their final report,
the Committee found common cause with TIAC’s position. The Committee noted that by implementing
a number of policies, regulation and initiatives aimed at addressing safety and security concerns in that
country, American border policies “are gradually transforming the Canada-U.S. border from a series of rel-
atively seamless crossing points to a genuine impediment to the free flow of goods, services and people.”
The government has generally been sympathetic and attentive to the problems resulting from the col-
lapse in the U.S. inbound market, although, as the Chamber report notes, more remains to be done.
While it is evident that the government cannot compel Americans to travel, their recipe to deal with issues
on our side of the border falls into four general areas: infrastructure investments, staffing, technological
fixes and new traveller identification documents.

infrastructure investments
As has been pointed out before, TIAC believes the travel industry needs physical enhancements and in-
vestments at border crossings including approach highways/roads, bridges, tunnels, inspection plazas and
dedicated NEXUS, EDL/EIC, PASS, FAST, C-TPAT and Certificate of Indian Status card lanes to expedite pre-
approved, frequent travellers. Much of our highway and border infrastructure was built in the 1950s and
‘60s and needs upgrading if it is to cope with the contemporary realities of high vehicular traffic, two-way
economic integration, security imperatives, safety concerns, pollution abatement, and risks of illegal entry
and smuggling.
In the Federal Budget of 2009 and in several announcements since then, a number of infrastructure
investments were made which will enhance the movement of people at selected border crossings, in the
national passenger rail system and at locations where considerable tourism activity takes place.
Much of the relevant investment from a tourism perspective has taken place under the aegis of the Gate-
ways and Border Crossings Fund (GBCF) administered by Transport Canada. In terms of federal bridges,
the government has announced investments totalling $76.5 million at several of the busiest U.S.-Canada
border crossings. The Blue Water Bridge plaza in Sarnia is the recipient of $13.5 million in federal support.
The Peace Bridge plaza in Fort Erie will receive $1 million. The Queenston-Lewiston Bridge in Niagara
Falls will receive a total contribution of $62 million from the Canadian government. These investments
should help to reduce traffic congestion and facilitate border crossings.
Other investments made by the GBCF include:
      • $10 million in the Lacolle Border Crossing facility consisting of investments in the Customs plaza;
      • $87.5 million to twin Route 1 in New Brunswick between Moncton and the border town of St.
        Stephen;
      • $42.5 million in improvements to Highway 75 between Winnipeg and the border crossing at
        Emerson, Manitoba; and



                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                      21
           Policy Positions and Activities



           • A $400 million federal contribution for an access road leading to the new Windsor-Detroit cross-
             ing
     A critical investment for visitors to one of our iconic national parks is the funding devoted to twinning the
     segment of the Trans-Canada highway located within Banff National Park. In the 2009 federal budget the
     government announced $130 million on a cash basis to Parks Canada to complete the last phase of this
     project which will twin a section of the highway from Lake Louise Village to the border with British Co-
     lumbia. The investment will also provide for the construction of critical migratory routes for wildlife which
     must traverse the highway.
     Budget 2009 also identified $80 million for the Canada Border Services Agency for accelerated infra-
     structure projects, of which $70 million has been allocated to the expansion and modernization of four
     border facilities. Expected to be completed by 2011–12, these infrastructure improvements will support
     the Agency by improving the commercial examination capacity at the port of entry in Prescott, Ontario, as
     well as at the Kingsgate, Pacific Highway and Huntingdon ports of entry (all in British Columbia). Expe-
     diting commercial vehicle (truck) inspections has a corollary benefit for passenger traffic which is well
     known.
     Another important infrastructure investment for the movement of people, including tourists, is the $407
     million on a cash basis given to VIA Rail Canada to undertake infrastructure and other capital improve-
     ments. Particular emphasis will be placed on investments in the Montreal to Toronto corridor to permit
     higher train frequencies and enhance on-time performance. Funding will also be used to modernize VIA
     Rail’s fleet of locomotives and passenger cars.
     The industry supports these measures because infrastructure renewal is a critical priority for the travel and
     tourism industries as it ensures that the clearance and movement of people will occur in a safe, modern,
     efficient, and environmentally sustainable manner.


     Staffing
     It is clear that the CBSA role is to ensure that the border remains open and allows for the free move-
     ment of legitimate people and goods. Minimizing unnecessary delays and improving border clearance
     processes will contribute to a strong Canadian economy through the tourism and business sectors. The
     industry attaches great importance to well-trained, professional, and courteous border staff that provides
     a welcoming first point of contact with Canada for leisure and business travellers.
     The industry concurs with much of the analysis and the set of recommendations pertaining to staffing
     and hours of services at border crossings contained in the Canadian Chamber of Commerce’s report,
     Finding the Balance: Shared Border of the Future, to which TIAC contributed. The industry remains pre-
     occupied with the fact that not all border booths are open during peak leisure travel times resulting in
     lengthy wait times for visitors or returning Canadians. This may well be a factor in deterring some visitors
     from coming here. Lengthy queues also create air quality and emissions issues which we should strive to
     avoid. Hence, the industry believes that increasing staffing levels during peak operation periods is es-
     sential. Secondly, it is imperative that we develop a state-of-the-art wait time and traveller information
     system. Effectively monitoring and communicating wait time data will help to create staffing models, allo-
     cate border resources, improve security and facilitate trade and commerce. Advanced electronic traveller
     information systems that can flag congestion ahead, suggest alternative routes/crossings or alert travel-
     lers to rest stops in the vicinity, is another necessary investment that should be undertaken by provincial
     and federal governments. In a digital, mobile and wireless era, advanced destinations such as Canada
     should strive to provide real-time information in a variety of media formats to travellers.
     Senator Colin Kenny has suggested that CBSA needs to hire an additional 2,300 more staff. We are
     pleased to note that CBSA has gradually begun to train and hire new officers and we hope this marks a

22                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                          Policy Positions and Activities



permanent commitment to manage peak demands at major border crossings as we go forward. Appro-
priate allocation of staff and resources in the run up to and during the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Win-
ter Games is especially critical if visitors to the Games and the world’s media are to leave with a positive
impression of Canada. We also endorse the Chamber’s recommendation that CBSA should consider hir-
ing part-time and seasonal workers at their border crossings – such as retired border or law enforcement
officers – who could handle paperwork and other non-security related work, allowing the active officers to
work in the field.

Technology
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology is now widely seen as a way to enhance screening of
travellers and reduce border delays and wait times. Embedded chips on trusted traveller documents are
read by vicinity readers. In the process, the RFID technology transmits a number with no personally iden-
tifiable information included to a secure government database which then provides border officers with
relevant information about the passenger entering Canada and the United States. The RFID technology
eliminates several steps in the processing of vehicle occupants as the passenger’s information appears
on the officers screen automatically as the vehicle approaches the border. The U.S. is relying extensively
on this technology at their major land crossings. In 2007-08, CBSA processed 69.9 million people at land
ports of entry. Subject to ensuring that the risks of privacy violations are eliminated, the industry believes
that the Canadian government should embrace this technology for its potential to drastically reduce in-
spection and wait times and that it should be implemented at all major border crossings.

New Traveller Identification documents
As the U.S. passport possession rate is only 28% and the Canadian rate 53%, the industry recognizes that
there is a demonstrable need for additional trusted traveller documents that are WHTI compliant. Follow-
ing lengthy consultations with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, State Department and Customs
and Border Patrol, the Canadian tourism industry was pleased to note that NEXUS and FAST cards, PASS
(People Access Security Service), EDLs (Enhanced Driver’s Licences), EICs (Enhanced Identification Cards)
and Secure Certificate of Indian Status, are deemed, along with the passport, acceptable under the WHTI
regime. Many of these cards have the virtue of being affordable, wallet-sized, RFID-equipped documents
that may facilitate efficient and secure cross-border travel. As the Canadian Chamber has noted, each of
these cards have different benefits and should be marketed to the right traveller group.
      • Passports are for people that have international travel interests and are acceptable in all modes
        and all countries,
      • FAST cards are for truck drivers,
      • NEXUS cards are for frequent Canada-U.S. travellers and business users and are acceptable in all
        modes,
      • EDLs, EICs and PASS (U.S. citizens only) cards are for casual travellers and tourists; they are only
        acceptable at land and sea ports of entry (not the air mode) and only within Canada and the U.S.
EDLs are available in the provinces of British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec. EICs are available in the
provinces of British Columbia and Manitoba. In the United States, Washington, Michigan, Vermont and
New York have begun issuing EDLs. Over one million PASS cards have been issued to U.S. citizens. The
U.S. Department of Homeland Security has recently been authorized to create 20 mobile enrolment teams
to collect passport card and passport applications in States with a land or maritime border and lowers the
fee for those applying for a passport card or passport through mobile enrolment units. There are over



                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                      23
           Policy Positions and Activities



     300,000 NEXUS cards currently in circulation; 228,000 held by Canadians and 87,000 held by Americans.
     The industry would like to see enrolment in NEXUS eventually reach one million cardholders.
     The industry is eager to see a critical mass of passports and other compliant documents in circulation and
     commends those provinces and states that have been early adopters and proponents of the new card
     technology. TIAC will continue to work with Passport Canada and CBSA to promote awareness of the new
     cards to tourism operators and communities. Further, we and others have called for a broader and more
     universal acceptance of EDLs, EICs and PASS cards in all modes of transportation – including air travel –
     across the Canada-U.S. border. Finally, the industry, along with the Canadian public, has clearly stated its
     desire to see the duration of Canadian passports extended from five to ten years. TIAC endorses this as a
     sensible and cost-saving measure for Canadian families.

     securing an approved destination status agreement with China
     A competitive Canadian tourism sector must be present in all of the world’s major travel markets offering
     products that consist of both group tour packages and components that appeal to the FIT leisure market.
     According to the World Tourism Organization, China will become one of the top 3 outbound tourism mar-
     kets in the world by 2020, producing some 100 million outbound tourists. As the Chinese economy has
     grown, so too has the appetite for travel, and in particular long-haul tourism, among its nascent middle
     class. In 2008, Canada experienced 298,000 arrivals from China, up from 272,000 in 2007. This figure is
     broken-down to 166,000 travellers from mainland China and 132,000 from Hong Kong. Thus, while these
     numbers suggest that Canada is benefitting from healthy, double-digit growth in Chinese business travel
     and people visiting friends and relatives (VFR), we are still unable to market to the group or tour market.
     This is because Canada has yet to secure and implement an Approved Destination Status (ADS) agree-
     ment with China. Such an agreement would allow Chinese citizens to more easily obtain tourist visas to
     travel to Canada for leisure purposes, allows Canada to actively market its tourism products in China and
     authorizes Chinese travel agencies to market and promote leisure group tours for travel in Canada. Ac-
     cording to the Chinese National Tourism Administration, as of February 2009, China had signed agree-
     ments with 137 countries and territories to allow tour group travel from China. There are more than 800
     travel agencies in China with the license to sell outbound group tours to ADS-approved destinations.
     On December 11, 2007, the United States signed an agreement with China granting them Approved Des-
     tination Status. With each passing month, business relationships are being developed between Chinese
     and American tourism operators, and new travel patterns and itineraries are being shaped. The danger is
     that the U.S. brand identity will take root strongly in China before Canada has a chance to engage in mar-
     keting and promotional efforts. China is Canada’s second-largest trade partner, and there is no question-
     ing the impact that trade with China is having on the Canadian economy as a whole. The securing of ADS
     from China is an important objective for the Canadian tourism industry and we urge the federal govern-
     ment to engage in a broad-based diplomatic effort to secure this designation at the earliest moment pos-
     sible. A Prime Ministerial led official delegation to China is perhaps an essential step at this point.

     fostering the adoption of sustainable tourism practices by Canadian tourism businesses,
     operators and destinations
     TIAC continues to take a leadership role in urging Canadian tourism businesses, operators and destina-
     tions to adopt practices and measures that will promote the overall sustainability of our industry. To a
     certain degree, Canada is playing catch up in terms of making our destination a more genuinely sustain-
     able one. As the Travel and Tourism Competitive Index (2009) produced by the World Economic Forum
     put it: “Canada’s results with regard to environmental sustainability are mixed, resulting in a middling
     rank of 46 in this pillar.” The industry has an incentive to improve its performance in this regard. There is
     a rise in media attention to the issue of sustainability within tourism and especially to the impacts of air

24                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                          Policy Positions and Activities



travel. Earlier this year (2009), Phocuswright Inc. found that nearly one-third of U.S. travellers would pay
premiums for green travel, but these more discerning travellers are looking for practices that go beyond
cursory measures. This corroborates other consumer opinion research suggesting a willingness to pay a
premium for green travel products & experiences but, at the same time, confirms the existence of scep-
ticism about green-washing and deceptive marketing. In response, tour operators, travel agents, and
online travel distribution companies want to feature genuinely sustainable travel product.
Recognizing the growing market appetite for these kinds of experiences and the fact that other destina-
tions have been burnishing their green credentials in the global marketplace, TIAC has been working
diligently on this file in the past year. Canada has some intrinsic strengths in this regard; in particular, the
iconic and much venerated status of our national parks, our abundant wildlife, and the aesthetic beauty
of our landscape. And, according to the CTC, 81% of visitors harbour the belief that Canada is an envi-
ronmentally friendly country. The industry though believes that more must be done. In late 2008, TIAC
released its Green Your Business Toolkit for Tourism Operators, a practical guide developed in conjunction
with Parks Canada and the Canadian Tourism Commission. The Toolkit focuses on practical, cost-effective
environmental business practices as they represent the “low hanging fruit” for small and medium sized
enterprises, the backbone of our industry. Already, the Toolkit has been picked up by a number of ju-
risdictions and by several tourism programs in colleges across Canada adapting it for use as the basis of
courses on sustainability. The Toolkit built on earlier, high-level TIAC efforts. In 1992, TIAC developed
a Code of Ethics in partnership with many stakeholders. In 2001, the association signed a collaborative
accord with Parks Canada which enshrined a commitment to stewardship of natural resources & special
places. Based on stakeholder feedback, the Code of Ethics was updated in 2005 in collaboration with the
CTC and Parks Canada. It urges our industry to show leadership in sustainable tourism and to mitigate
undesirable environmental impacts.
Having developed a Code of Ethics and a Toolkit for the industry, TIAC is now working on the develop-
ment of a national tourism certification or accreditation program so that we can foster the adoption of
common benchmarks or standards of sustainability by businesses, operators and destinations. Ultimately
this will be about certifying individual businesses and branding Canada as a whole as a green and sustain-
able tourism destination, a strategy that can potentially be deployed by the CTC in its promotional and
marketing efforts overseas. TIAC with the support of Parks Canada have created a Canadian Sustainable
Tourism Advisory Council (CSTAC) consisting of experts and leaders in sustainable tourism both in Canada
and internationally. It had its first meeting in April of 2009 and will meet again in September 2009. In
addition to discussing the relevance of the Global Sustainable Tourism Criteria to Canada, the participants
discussed individual business certification, a quality assurance designation and other elements.
In 2010, TIAC will also hold its first Summit on Sustainability (SOS) in Toronto. The premise is to take the
sustainability agenda out of the TIAC Leadership Summit and put it in its own arena. As envisaged, it will
be an annual summit where operators, leaders and thinkers come together in plenary sessions and work-
shops to discuss how the tourism industry can become better environmental, economic and social stew-
ards.

improving our human resources Planning and Policies
In 2008, a total of 1.8 million people were employed in the tourism sector in Canada, which represents
10% of all employment in the country. The largest industry group in the tourism sector is food and
beverage services, which employs 793,380 people. In 2007, the number of jobs in tourism industries
increased 3.4%, while the number of jobs economy-wide was up only 2.1%. Twenty-three per cent of
tourism employees were born outside Canada. Thirty-three per cent of workers are between the ages
of 15 and 24 (compared to 15% for the Canadian workforce as a whole) which demonstrates the tour-
ism industry’s reliance on young people. The weekly hours worked in tourism industries averaged 29.8


                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                        25
           Policy Positions and Activities



     hours in 2007, which reflects the high proportion of part-time jobs found in tourism industries. In 2007,
     average compensation for tourism industry jobs was $18.33/hour, an increase of 5.1% from one year
     earlier. Hourly compensation in the tourism sector increased at a faster pace than the economy overall.
     Notwithstanding current economic conditions, labour shortages for the tourism sector in the medium to
     long term will continue to be a challenge. By 2025, the potential labour shortage for the tourism sector is
     projected to balloon to nearly 257,000 jobs.
     This snapshot provided by the Canadian Tourism Human Resources Council (CTHRC) illustrates some of
     the salient features of our industry, especially its part-time labour force and the looming labour shortages
     facing the sector. At a time of robust international competition and a heightened emphasis on customer
     care and service standards, especially from Asian destinations, it is important that Canadian tourism and
     hospitality businesses recruit, hire, train and retain the best staff they can. For many visitors, the quality
     and professionalism of the service staff they encounter can mean the difference between a memorable
     and a mediocre experience. The industry and TIAC are eager to see the attainment of high and exact-
     ing standards of service from everyone from front office hotel staff, to chefs, sommeliers and waiters, to
     in-cabin flight crew, on board attendants, and guide & expedition leaders. As the best tourism and travel
     companies – both small and large – know, people are the key to repeat business. This is especially true in
     the growing niche markets of tourism such as specialty cuisine and wineries, boutique hotels, back-coun-
     try hiking and skiing, spa and wellness centres, and ecotourism where the presence of well qualified and
     attentive personnel is a critical part of the guest’s experience.
     TIAC believes there are three specific areas in the HR area that require more policy attention within the
     federal government: immigration, productivity, and attraction/retention.
     In spite of the current economic slowdown, and higher unemployment rates, labour shortages are still
     being experienced in tourism industries in some parts of the country. As the economy recovers, these
     shortages will increase, mainly because of declining birth rates and fewer workforce entrants. The Cana-
     dian economy will rely more and more heavily on immigration to fill existing jobs and new jobs created
     by growth. The tourism industry encourages the federal and provincial governments to put immigration
     policies in place that will bring in both permanent and temporary foreign workers to fill identified gaps, at
     all skill levels, as they are needed, and with a minimum of red tape.
     The federal government has made a significant investment in the emerit system of occupational stan-
     dards, training, and professional certification for the tourism industry. In the very competitive global
     tourism environment, it will be important to increase productivity and the ability to attract and retain
     competent individuals to work in the industry. The federal tourism strategy should focus on assisting the
     industry to use the emerit system effectively and on ways to work with provincial governments to provide
     the incentives to train to emerit standards.
     Another potential avenue to address the ongoing labour shortage is to increase incentives for under-rep-
     resented labour pools (aboriginals, recent immigrants, people with disabilities, and retirees) to work in the
     tourism sector. This can be done by:
           • Increasing accessibility to the workplace;
           • Educating employers about opportunities to work with these groups;
           • Encouraging business and government to work together to address seasonal and regional chal-
             lenges; and
           • Providing perks such as flexible hours and access to the tourism product to older workers who
             may be restricted in terms of the amount of income they can earn.
     Finally, while training delivery is in the hands of the provinces, a mechanism should be developed to co-
     ordinate training efforts across provinces/territories.


26                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                         Policy Positions and Activities



Promoting inter-modal transport options and high speed rail (hsr) in Canada
The infrastructure and border-related investments outlined earlier in this document are much needed and
welcomed by the tourism industry. However, it remains true that we need more connectivity or “inter-mo-
dality” between the different transportation systems and networks that exist in Canada as largely inde-
pendent infrastructures. Travellers want and expect to be able to move seamlessly from one mode to an-
other and this is increasingly becoming the norm in the rest of the developed world, especially in Europe
and Japan. The industry expects that government will establish policy and financial incentives to promote
the inter-modal character of our transportation system in the years to come. The first air-urban transit rail
link will open at Vancouver International Airport in the autumn of 2009, connecting YVR to Richmond and
downtown Vancouver. The industry believes it is time to build more such rail links to our major national
airports and where appropriate to improve the connectedness of ports and motor coach stations.
The industry supports the study currently being funded by the governments of Canada, Quebec and
Ontario to update a raft of studies made during the last 20 years on the cost and issues surrounding
proposed high-speed train service in the Ontario-Quebec corridor. The HSR study is envisaged to al-
low governments to better understand the scope of the proposed project, its environmental impacts and
benefits, the potential level of demand and the cost issues. Many in the industry have been vocal in their
belief that investing in an intercity high speed transportation system is the right choice. Corridors such as
Calgary-Edmonton and Quebec City-Windsor are home to more than 50 per cent of Canadians and their
population density equals that of some European and Asian countries where HSR has become the norm.
The industry believes that HSR could help to address two of our most pressing issues today – global
warming and the global recession. The infrastructure investment in such a corridor would stimulate
shovel-in-the-ground economic activity and job creation, while a new HSR service would help to mitigate
passenger vehicle and aircraft emissions in short-haul markets (i.e. city pairs of less than 600 kilometres
in distance). There is also the added impetus for HSR coming from the new Obama Administration in the
United States. President Obama has outlined an HSR strategy that focuses on 10 rail corridors that slice
through regional population centers across the United States. Each state would compete for a chunk of
the $8 billion in stimulus money that will be distributed to rail projects in the next two years. Another $1
billion will follow over the next five years. Funds will be awarded according to each state’s plan to de-
velop and improve the rail corridors. Obama extolled the merits of a system that, in his words, reduces
travel times and increases mobility, reduces congestion and boosts productivity, and reduces destructive
emissions and creates jobs.
No less compelling is the tourism argument. The development of high speed rail would add a different
dimension to Canadian rail tourism and tourism in general; it would assist in depicting Canada as a mod-
ern and advanced country. Planned intelligently, HSR would facilitate passenger inter-modal connectivity
while affording tourists concerned about the impact of their travel on the environment with a sustainable
travel choice. TIAC will closely monitor developments on this file such as the HSR conference planned by
Railway Association of Canada to be held in November of 2009.
On another rail-related file, TIAC has been active recently in pushing for an exemption in the border clear-
ance service charges levied by CBSA on a second daily Amtrak passenger train from Portland, Oregon
to Vancouver B.C. In July of 2009 the Public Safety minister awarded a temporary exemption to the rail
service beginning immediately and running until the conclusion of the Winter Olympic and Paralympic
Games in March of 2010. It is hoped that on the basis of a committed clientele and favourable ridership
numbers this decision will be made permanent at a later date. The temporary decision will benefit both
tourists coming to B.C. prior to, during and after the Games and tourism operators in the Lower Mainland
region of B.C.




                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                      27
           Policy Positions and Activities



     supporting Cultural and heritage events as drivers of visitation
     There is little doubt that Canada’s numerous festivals, events, seasonal celebrations etc. have become sig-
     nificant attractions for Canadians and visitors alike. Many have a regional or ethnic character that helps to
     showcase the vibrant and diverse mosaic of Canadian life. Large marquee events are already significant
     drivers of visitation and tourist expenditure but many have lost important corporate backing and spon-
     sorship during the last year because of the recession. Likewise, smaller, mid-size events have often lacked
     a marketing strategy or sufficient international renown to garner visitors from other parts of Canada or
     overseas. These events have potential to attract greater numbers of visitors thereby putting “heads in
     beds” and stimulating the local retail and visitor economy. The industry has long recognized that this
     type of animation and programming is critical to the execution of destination marketing strategies de-
     signed to bring travellers to Canada. Furthermore, Canada faces stringent international competition from
     governments in countries which substantially underwrite cultural and festival programming because they
     are cognizant of the tourist dollars that are in play.
     As the recession had deepened, a growing number of events have reported the lessening or ending of
     corporate funding thereby jeopardizing the event itself or limiting its appeal to local audiences only. TIAC
     has supported the concept of a public fund that would provide transitional or backstop funding to those
     larger marquee events that have suffered a sudden loss of corporate backing and also to those second
     tier events that are looking to enhance their appeal or attractiveness to visitors. The key point is that
     festivals and events must have a real ability to drive enhanced visitation and spending to their local or
     regional destination. To this end the industry has supported the budget measure that saw $100 million
     allocated over two years for marquee festivals and events that promote tourism. The Marquee Tourism
     Events Program (MTEP) defines a marquee event as an annually recurring word-class event that is well
     established and has a long-standing tradition of programming and management excellence. A marquee
     event generates significant levels of tourism and aims to attract a significant amount of international me-
     dia attention to Canada as a tourism destination. A number of thresholds and criteria apply that relate to
     minimum overall attendance; minimum percentage of attendees that are tourists; minimum cash operat-
     ing budget; and minimum number of years event/organization has been in existence.
     While the goals and parameters of the program are well-intentioned and designed to ensure that Canada
     can compete at least partially internationally, there are voices in the industry which TIAC recognizes that
     are seeking a more balanced allocation of funds to smaller and newer events. The industry recognizes
     that communities in less well-traveled or remote areas also have strong and legitimate aspirations to de-
     velop their local tourism industries. TIAC will work to ensure that the MTEP criteria are amended in future
     so that new and innovative cultural and festival programming outside of established venues might qualify.
     Overall though, the MTEP provides vital financial support to a sector whose contribution to the economy
     is often overlooked or undervalued by conventional commentators.
     All of these above policy and issue areas will feature in the next iteration of TIAC’s Tourism Policy Sympo-
     sium which will be held in the Spring of 2010 in Ottawa.




28                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                         objectives and strategy: advocacy and lobbying




The Tourism Industry Association of Canada’s primary role is to be Canada’s national tourism advocate.
As an organization, TIAC’s activities in other areas such as communications, research, membership devel-
opment, event management and corporate development support this primary role.


Influencing the Government Agenda
The Government’s perception and recognition of the tourism sector can positively or negatively affect our
sector’s growth and viability. Public policy, fiscal decisions and the enactment of regulations all impact
the profitability and health of our industry.
TIAC’s core purpose is to ensure that the Government recognizes tourism as a legitimate, viable, and valu-
able industry for Canada as we move forward in the twenty-first century. Through various means, TIAC
will engage the federal government to influence policy changes that will benefit the sector’s competitive-
ness. As such, TIAC will undertake the following:
       TiaC will assist industry Canada, the lead federal tourism agency, with creating a
       “whole of government” or horizontally-driven approach to drive tourism policy – in
       particular, the recently announced national Tourism strategy – across line depart-
       ments and agencies in ottawa by november 30, 2009.
       Through its advocacy activities, stakeholder outreach, coalition development and
       public positioning, TiaC will strive to foster a cohesive and aligned national tourism
       & travel industry, able to unite around important goals and objectives by May 31,
       2010.
       The Tourism industry association of Canada, in conjunction with Citizenship and
       immigration Canada, the Canada border services agency and the Canadian Tourism
       Commission, will create an expert advisory panel to discuss visa issuance and other
       travel matters for certain priority emerging inbound markets by april 1, 2010.


regular Communication with Parliament
Members of Parliament are inundated with information on a variety of issues and topics relevant to
numerous different industries. It is important for the tourism sector to keep MPs apprised of the most
recent sectoral developments, relevant facts, figures and trends, and current challenges. This will enable
MPs to be better informed when addressing issues in Parliamentary Committee meetings, their own Party
meetings, and in dealings with their constituents and the media.
It is important for TIAC to meet regularly with MPs, Ministers, and Ministerial exempt staff and therefore
TIAC will arrange meetings continually with these key influencers within the federal government. Ensuring
an ongoing dialogue will maintain positive relationships and open communication between TIAC and the
federal government.
       The Tourism industry association of Canada will meet on a one-on-one basis with
       between 10-15 Members of Parliament, Ministers and/or ministerial exempt staff
       (Chiefs of staff, senior Policy advisors etc.) during the next Parliamentary session
       (2009-2010).


                                   Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                    29
           Objectives and Strategy: Advocacy and Lobbying



     The Parliamentary Tourism Caucus has been successful in generating discussion amongst MPs who have
     a specific interest in the tourism sector. TIAC will continue to engage the Tourism Caucus by working with
     the Parliamentary Tourism Caucus Chair to host specific events on issues or topics that merit closer exami-
     nation by Members of Parliament. Therefore:
            TiaC will continue to liaise with the all-party Parliamentary Tourism Caucus, cur-
            rently under the chairmanship of greg rickford, MP (Conservative: Kenora) and will
            endeavour to hold 2 Caucus events by june of 2010.


     Consultations with other decision Makers
     In addition to keeping members of Parliament and other elected officials informed on the issues affect-
     ing the tourism sector, it is important that senior officials within the federal government departments who
     have a stake in tourism are kept in the loop on how their respective departments fit into the larger tour-
     ism picture.
     Towards this end, TIAC held the First Annual Tourism Policy Symposium in Ottawa on April 10, 2008. It
     was a successful event with approximately 100 public and private sector representatives in attendance.
     The policy issues raised provoked stimulating discussion amongst the participants. Given this initial suc-
     cess, TIAC will undertake the following:
            in the spring of 2010, TiaC will hold its second Tourism Policy symposium in ottawa.


     Consultations with industry
     TIAC values its communication and input from members and the industry-at-large. It is important for
     TIAC to remain informed of the challenges and issues confronting the sector. The information received
     from those involved in the day-to-day business operations of the industry itself is critical to forming ap-
     propriate and timely policy responses to the gamut of issues tourism faces. As such, TIAC will undertake
     the following:
            TiaC will work to develop by december 31, 2010 an overall, balanced “scorecard”
            measuring the health of Canada’s tourism industry on a variety of indices including
            financial health, economic impact, brand health, and the degree to which the indus-
            try is united around common objectives.
            TiaC will endeavour to provide guidance to the industry and our membership on the
            critical economic factors that define and shape the economic environment in which
            we plan/market our product offerings and destinations by october 31, 2010.
     With regards to the specific and pressing issue of achieving Approved Destination Status from China, TIAC
     will undertake the following in order to help facilitate the process of achieving this status:
            during 2010, TiaC will prepare a business plan for vetting and approving receptive
            Canadian tour operators who will be participating in hosting inbound group leisure
            travel from China, on the assumption that an approved destination status agree-
            ment is granted to Canada in the near future.


     working to Create a Competitive and sustainable sector
     The challenge posed by climate change is a very real one and has implications for every sector of the
     Canadian economy, and the tourism sector is no exception.



30                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                    Objectives and Strategy: Advocacy and Lobbying



Despite our reputation, it is an exaggeration to suggest that Canada is uniformly clean, green, and pris-
tine. Our weak environmental performance has been noted recently by the World Economic Forum’s
(WEF) Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report 2008, which in particular ranked Canada 119 of 130
countries in terms of controlling carbon dioxide emissions.
To demonstrate leadership in this area and to assist its membership in reaching the goal of a greener and
more sustainable enterprise, TIAC will undertake the following:
       TiaC will disseminate and distribute, on a partnership basis, the Green Your Business:
       Toolkit for Tourism Operators to a cross-section of tourism and travel businesses and
       destinations in Canada by august 31, 2010.
       TiaC will submit to a “sustainability” or “green” audit in 2009-10 in order to ensure
       that our Ottawa-based operations are being conducted in as efficient an environ-
       mental manner as possible.




                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                  31
                                                       objectives and strategy: research




     The Tourism Industry Association of Canada recognizes that research is an important part of the Asso-
     ciation’s advocacy and lobbying activities. Providing decision-makers, the media and the general public
     with relevant, accurate and compelling data on the trends and realities facing the tourism sector is a vital
     aspect of the work that TIAC does.
     TIAC offers a variety of primary and secondary research capabilities. Wherever possible, TIAC will endea-
     vour to partner with other tourism organizations or generate sponsorships for research projects. Good
     public policy should be informed by sound research and hence TIAC will continue to enhance its data
     gathering capability, survey methodology, and analytical rigor to bring value-added to the government
     and public affairs work that it undertakes.
     To this end, TIAC will undertake the following:
            TiaC will work in partnership with deloitte to frame and conclude a research study
            that will examine in comparative international context the non-airport rent-related
            costs of aviation in Canada, i.e. other on-balance sheet costs facing airlines, airports
            and tour operators by the fall of 2009. This would include costs associated with the
            air Travellers security Charge, fuel excise taxes, nav Canada fees and other relevant
            levies imposed on aviation users, both individual and corporate.
            by the spring of 2010, TiaC will create an on-line portal within our website of all of
            the relevant and cutting-edge research, data and general information pertaining to
            tourism, travel, transportation and attractions in Canada. This action will help TiaC
            to fulfill its role as a “clearinghouse” for important new data and research which il-
            lustrates the latest facets, trends and realities of tourism in this country.
            TiaC will continue, on an as-needed basis, to conduct business condition and opinion
            surveys of TiaC’s membership in order to derive business intelligence insights and to
            inform our advocacy, policy analysis and outreach vocations. This is consistent with
            TiaC’s effort to continue to function as a member-driven organization.
            TiaC will create a “schematic tree” or organizational chart of all of the private and
            public entities involved in representational, lobbying or destination marketing func-
            tions within the Canadian tourism industry by june 1, 2010.
            TiaC will support and undertake research and analysis that serves the overarching
            goal of portraying tourism as a key economic driver, revenue generator and employ-
            ment provider in this country, on a par with Canada’s traditional resource and manu-
            facturing sectors.




32                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                           objectives & strategy:
                                                Communications & Public relations



Communicating TIAC’s activities and events and highlighting the important contribution that tourism
makes to Canada’s economic and social well being are essential aspects of the work that TIAC undertakes
annually.
The initiatives carried out by the Communications team serve to enhance the public profile of the tourism
sector and TIAC itself. A strategic communications approach that appropriately reflects and successfully
supports TIAC’s public affairs and event management objectives reinforces the association’s credibility
with government and other stakeholders and strengthens its ability to lobby successfully.
TIAC’s communications initiatives are always undertaken with a view towards addressing the priorities of
the membership. Maintaining an open line of communications with members also provides the organi-
zation with the ability to obtain sector input on policy positions, as well as feedback on TIAC events and
activities in the interest of continuous improvement.
Underlying TIAC’s communications activities are a number of key messages that reflect the ends estab-
lished by its Board of Directors.


Media and Public relations
TIAC is the voice of tourism in Canada, and the go-to source for informed comment and background in-
formation when members of the print and electronic media wish to receive comment and perspective on
the broad issues that impact on the tourism sector.
With the release of The Report on Canada’s Tourism Competitiveness in June of 2008, TIAC was able to
bring a great many general interest reporters up to speed with the full breadth of issue impacting on
Canada’s tourism sector. As such:
       TiaC will provide members of the media with an update report on Canada’s Tourism
       Competitiveness by november, 2009.
In addition to generating media interest and stories, TIAC has begun to tabulate and evaluate the cover-
age of Canada’s tourism sector. By establishing a baseline level of coverage, TIAC is now able to assess
its standing in terms of the quantitative and qualitative state of its public and media profile. As such, we
propose the following objective:
       To highlight the issues facing the tourism sector to the general public, TiaC will ex-
       ceed 100 media hits between june 1, 2009 and june 30, 2010

Tourism week in Canada
Tourism Week in Canada celebrations continue to grow as more provincial/territorial and regional tour-
ism organizations take on new initiatives to educate the public about the economic and social benefits of
tourism.
TIAC will continue to build on the success of Tourism Week in Canada and strengthen its awareness-
building capacity. While TIAC has been successful at targeting Members of Parliament and some media
outlets, the association must do more to engage and educate the general public with undiluted national
tourism messaging. To this end, TIAC suggests the following objective:


                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                    33
           Objectives & Strategy: Communications & Pub. Relations



            TIAC will raise the profile of Tourism Week in Canada by exceeding 50 media hits on
            the activities undertaken by TiaC and its members.


     Communications to Members and stakeholders

     www.tiac.travel
     TIAC’s website (www.tiac.travel) is the central repository for information and publications produced by the
     TIAC, and serves as an important portal for data, research and analysis on Canada’s tourism sector.
     Since the website’s launch, it has seen tremendous expansion and user needs have evolved. As such, the
     association has identified a variety of additional functions that it must be able to perform in a variety of
     activity areas including advocacy, sponsorship and membership development.
     The website must also be able to deliver messaging to different audiences, including members, the media
     and the general public. As such:
            TiaC will revamp and re-launch its core website, www.tiac.travel, by january 30,
            2011.
            TiaC will re-launch www.tourismmatters.travel as an ongoing advocacy-centered
            website for members, media and stakeholders.

     TIAC Talk and other Publications
     TIAC Talk is the organization’s most valuable member communications tool. Distributed to approximately
     4000 members and affiliated members, the electronic newsletter allows the Association the opportunity
     to keep members abreast of TIAC activities as well as the events that impact on the industry in general.
     In order to provide our members with the information they need, when they need it and in a format that
     is manageable and convenient, TIAC proposes the following two objectives with regard to the TIAC Talk
     newsletter:
            TiaC will publish 40 issues of TiaC Talk between september 1, 2009 and august 31,
            2010.
            TIAC will raise the profile of tangible member benefits by including relevant infor-
            mation on these programs in the TIAC Talk newsletter.
     In addition to the regular communication with members through the electronic newsletter, it is also im-
     portant to provide members with a summation of the work that TIAC has done over the past year. Such
     an Annual Report will help to highlight the achievements of the organization, and will offer clear evidence
     for members of the value of their membership in TIAC. Therefore:
            TiaC will create an annual report which outlines the accomplishments over the past
            year in time for the annual general Meeting in november, 2010.


     Communications to decision Makers
     To further TIAC’s advocacy and lobbying agenda, it is crucial that decision makers are apprised of the is-
     sues that affect the industry.
     While this is often done through the TIAC’s effective direct lobbying of Members of Parliament, their staff
     and the senior executives within government departments, an ongoing source of information to these im-

34                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                            Objectives & Strategy: Communications & Pub. Relations



portant stakeholders is a must to ensure that they are constantly reminded of the impact that the tourism
industry has on their constituents.
To this end, will produce a newsletter specifically targeted toward this audience. As such, TIAC suggests
the following objectives:
       TiaC will create and deliver a minimum of two “tourism news” newsletters to Mem-
       bers of Parliament and relevant public servants by june 30, 2010.
       TiaC will create an internal election Preparedness Plan which outlines the advocacy
       and communications initiatives the organization will take in the event of a federal
       election.




                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                  35
                              objectives & strategy: Membership development




     The Tourism Industry Association of Canada ensures that all of its activities reflect the “Three R’s” – they
     must be Relevant, Responsive and provide a Return on members’ investment in the organization. While
     this section of the business plan lays out targets that are specific to membership development, all of the
     objectives outlined in this plan support the goal of providing value to TIAC members.
     The benefits of belonging to TIAC are enhanced by a range of features that increase the value to both full
     members and affiliated members. The following are some features and the objectives associated with
     their future advancements.

     full Membership
     Full members are individuals, businesses, and tourism organizations that register directly with TIAC and
     pay associated annual fees. They make up the association’s core constituency and receive full access to
     member benefits, including:
           • Regular e-communications and sector updates;
           • The opportunity to promote member businesses in a special section of TIAC Talk;
           •   Networking opportunities at sector events;
           • Reduced registration fees for events such as Canada’s Tourism Leadership Summit, Canada e-
             Connect and Summit on Sustainability
           • Exclusive invitations to members-only events such as TIAC’s annual Tourism Day on Parliament
             Hill;
           • Priority consideration in the awarding of TIAC supplier contracts;
           • .TRAVEL authentication services.
           • Opportunity to run for a position on the Board of Directors
           • Access to research
           • Opportunity to participate in research (i.e. Circles of Influence and other ad-hoc committees)
           • Affinity Partner discounts (i.e. Global Payments)
     TIAC’s success is reflected in its ability to retain and recruit full members. To this end, TIAC will endeavour
     in the coming year to meet the following objectives:
            The Tourism industry association of Canada will increase the total number of full
            members by a minimum 5% per fiscal year between 2009-2012.
            The Tourism industry association of Canada will continue to utilize a formal exit pro-
            cess around non-renewing members. This process includes a closing/exiting survey,
            which will be used during the annual review of the membership program.




36                                        Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                    Objectives & Strategy: Membership Development

                         objectives & strategy: Membership development
sustaining Membership
In 2009, TIAC introduced a new and improved Sustaining Membership program. The program offers
members a 10% reduction in dues and a promise of now fee increase, should they commit to being a
member for a 3-yr term with advance payment. A total potential savings of up to 25% is possible.

individual Membership
TIAC has offered individual memberships for some time to members of the tourism sector who wish to
support TIAC’s activities and who wish to take advantage of the member benefits offered by the Associa-
tion. However, this level of membership has not been used by many within the industry. As such, TIAC
will in the coming year endeavour to meet the following objective:
       TiaC will highlight the individual Membership to potential members.

Affiliated membership Program (AMP)
TIAC’s Affiliated Membership Program (AMP), introduced in March 2003, is open to any sector stakeholder
who is already a full member of TIAC as well as a parent organization that has individual tourism business-
es as members and that will offer its own members the opportunity to join TIAC as affiliated members.
In effect, the AMP program enables TIAC to represent a much broader range of tourism stakeholders,
extending its reach and increasing its influence with the federal government. It also allows for the devel-
opment of a national database of tourism businesses that will improve the sector’s research and commu-
nication capabilities. Features of an affiliated membership include:
      • Regular e-communications and sector updates;
      • Participation in TIAC research and survey programs; and,
      • Exposure to the media and the public as an affiliated member of TIAC
As TIAC continues to improve its full- and affiliated-membership programs, the association is actively
recruiting partners that are able to offer a benefit to the members. The following are two current TIAC
programs that play a significant role in promoting the development and sophistication of the tourism sec-
tor in Canada.

.Travel authentication
On behalf of Tralliance, the .travel registry, TIAC gathers eligibility data from organizations and individuals
applying for a .travel name and reviews it for accuracy in order to ensure that registrants are a recognized
part of the tourism and travel community. TIAC has assisted in the registration of thousands of .travel do-
main names, and is working with the Canadian Tourism Commission to protect place names for Canadian
tourism organizations and businesses so they cannot be claimed by organizations operating on behalf of
destinations that bear the same name in other countries.
       TiaC will continue to promote .travel as the solution to growing frustration among
       online users and act as a resource for those seeking approval for registering their
       proper domain names.




                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                       37
           Objectives & Strategy: Membership Development



     global Payments
     In 2008-09 TIAC formed a partnership with a credit card processing company, Global Payments. Through
     this partnership, Global Payments provides interested TIAC members with reliable, secure and state-of-
     the-art payment processing solutions at a low rate (1.73% on VISA and MasterCard products), as well as
     access to a broad range of feature-rich Point of Sale (POS) devices.
            In addition to these benefits, TIAC is aiming to increase the number of valuable Af-
            finity Partner programs by a minimum of 2 each year. These partners will offer TIAC
            members exclusive benefits.

     TiaC national awards for Tourism excellence presented by The Globe and Mail
     In 2009, TIAC has increased the number of awards from 13 to 15 with the addition of two new awards, fo-
     cused on achievement in online marketing. The two award categories were added as a result of acquiring
     the Canada-e-Connect conference from the Canadian Tourism Commission. Rather than have two sepa-
     rate award programs, TIAC has decided to incorporate the two award categories associated with Canada
     e-Connect as part of the National Awards for Tourism Excellence.
     In 2009, for the first time, Air Canada has supported travel for the NATE finalists and recipients of the
     TIAC/Parks Canada Sustainable Tourism Scholarships, providing them with transportation to attend the
     event.
     The 2009 TIAC National Awards for Tourism Excellence presented by The Globe and Mail consist of 15
     individual awards:
           • Air Canada Business of the Year Award – Single-Unit
           • Hilton Family of Hotels Canada Business of the Year Award – Multiple-Unit
           • Delta Hotels & Resorts New Business of the Year Award
           • Deloitte Innovator of the Year Award
           • Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide Inc. Corporate Partner of the Year Award
           • Tourism Toronto Travel Media Award
           • VIA Rail Canada Volunteer of the Year Award
           • Fairmont Hotels & Resorts Marketing Campaign of the Year Award
           • Metro Toronto Convention Centre Event of the Year Award
           • CTHRC Award for Excellence in Human Resources Development
           • InterContinental Hotels Group Employee of the Year Award
           • Parks Canada Sustainable Tourism Award
           • WestJet Online Marketing Campaign of the Year Award
           • Pacrim Hospitality Services Inc. Online Innovation Award
           • Canadian Travel Press Lifetime Achievement Award
     The Tourism Industry Association of Canada attracts considerable partnership interest by creating a mea-
     surable return on investment for potential sponsors. Events and properties associated with TIAC, includ-
     ing Rendez-vous Canada, GoMedia Canada Marketplace, Canada’s Tourism Leadership Summit, Tourism
     Week in Canada, the TIAC National Awards for Tourism Excellence presented by The Globe and Mail,

38                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                             objectives & strategy: Corporate development




the Business Of Tourism Supplement in the Globe and Mail during Tourism Week in Canada, Summit on
Sustainability, Canada-e-Connect and the Canadian Tourism Hall of Fame provide an effective platform for
organizations to promote and further develop the business they conduct to the sector.
In turn, sponsorship makes it possible to offset the cost of events organized for the benefit of the tourism
sector and to increase their value to participants, as well as to augment TIAC’s revenues from membership
and other sources in order to increase its effectiveness as Canada’s national tourism advocate. In 2008-
09, the association continued to build on its relationships with partners and sponsors, both within and
beyond the tourism sector.
TIAC’s Corporate Development objectives reflect a comprehensive, coordinated approach that has in-
creased revenue associated with event sponsorships.

sponsorship value
TIAC is committed to ensuring that all of its partners and sponsors receive maximum value for their in-
volvement with the association.
TIAC continues to provide a post-event package that is sent to sponsors after each event containing the
following: a reconciliation of benefits received; photos of their sponsored event(s); copies of printed mate-
rials containing their logo; and a thank you letter.

sponsorship expansion
In 2008-09, TIAC increased the number of events it managed in-house, which in turn increased the num-
ber of sponsorship opportunities available.

strategic Partnerships
TIAC continues to develop comprehensive, long-term partnerships that provide a framework for achieving
its strategic objectives and enhanced tourism sector relationships and benefits. Current strategic partners
include: Air Canada, Canadian Tourism Commission, Deloitte, The Globe and Mail, and Parks Canada.
TIAC would like to take this opportunity to thank all of its strategic partners and sponsors for their contin-
ued support of tourism in Canada.




                                     Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                      39
                                         objectives & strategy: event Management




     Events play an essential role in the ongoing development of the Tourism Industry Association of Canada.
     In addition to TIAC’s signature events such as Canada’s Tourism Leadership Summit, the Association is
     also a key partner in the development of several of Canada’s most important events for the tourism sec-
     tor, including the annual Rendez-vous Canada marketplace.
     The demonstrated leadership and success in the execution of events allows the organization to undertake
     activities throughout the year, and exemplifies the commitment to excellence that is TIAC’s hallmark. To
     further highlight this excellence, in the coming year TIAC will undertake the following objectives:
            The events Team will apply best practices in the delivery of all events and special
            events.
            The events Team will green its events by implementing practices contained in the
            Green Your Business: Toolkit for Tourism Operators and green Meeting industry
            Council.


     rendez-vous Canada
     Rendez-vous Canada represents one element of the strong and growing partnership that exists between
     TIAC and Canada’s national tourism marketing agency, the Canadian Tourism Commission. This part-
     nership acknowledges the critical roles that both sector development and destination marketing play in
     Canada’s tourism success, and the complimentary but equally important mandates of Canada’s national
     tourism advocate and its national tourism marketing agency.
     TIAC’s role in organizing RVC contributes both to the event’s success and reflects TIAC’s effectiveness on
     behalf of the Canadian tourism sector. Sector-led management ensures that the event incorporates stra-
     tegic direction by stakeholders and draws on the entrepreneurial spirit of Canadian tourism businesses.
     To build on this ongoing success story, TIAC will undertake the following objectives pertaining to RVC:
            TIAC will implement a training certification program for all new Rendez-vous Canada
            seller delegates for rvC 2010.
            TiaC will introduce webinars on “how to rvC” for sellers and buyers focusing on
            how to maximize appointments and use of the on-line appointment scheduling for
            rvC 2010.
            TiaC will re-develop and change the format and presentation of the “how to rvC”
            session presented on-site for rvC 2010.
            TiaC will develop a rendez-vous Canada marketing plan for buyer recruitment in
            collaboration with the Canadian Tourism Commission and the provinces / territories
            for rvC 2010.
            TiaC will develop a “new product” promotion or recognition program for rendez-
            vous Canada, to enable buyers to recognize these products for rvC 2010.
            TiaC will continue to negotiate favourable and attractive rates with airlines, rail
            service providers and hotels to provide additional service(s) to delegates attending
            rendez-vous Canada 2010.


40                                      Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                           Objectives & Strategy: Event Management



       TiaC, in collaboration with the Canadian Tourism Commission and the provinces /
       territories will work together to achieve the highest international buyer attendance
       for rvC 2010.


Canada’s Tourism leadership summit
Canada’s Tourism Leadership Summit, organized by TIAC each fall, is the country’s premier national tour-
ism conference. The Summit provides an important opportunity for tourism leaders and stakeholders
from across Canada to plan for future success by obtaining the most up-to-date information on new
opportunities and emerging challenges for the sector. It is also a vital opportunity for the industry to
network, and provides TIAC with a key venue in which to further the Association’s communications goals,
both within and beyond the sector.
In order to plan for future successful Summits, TIAC will undertake to meet the following objectives:
       TiaC will incorporate the ideas generated at Canada’s Tourism leadership summit
       into its annual business plan, by august 31 each year.
       TiaC will assess the viability of webcasting and / or digital recording of selected ses-
       sion at Canada’s Tourism leadership summit 2009 and launch service to members in
       2010.
       TiaC will develop a marketing plan and strategy for Canada’s Tourism leadership
       summit.
       TiaC will increase attendance to 350 at Canada’s Tourism leadership summit 2009,
       and maintain a minimum of 10% increase in attendance in 2010 and 2011.


Canada-e-Connect
After assuming stewardship of Canada-e-Connect in 2008, TIAC’s inaugural edition of the event was held
in January 2009, and was a significant success.
Canada-e-Connect provides delegates with fresh intelligence on the most relevant topics, including e-
distribution and e-marketing strategies; social media marketing and e-communities; mobile marketing
strategies; technology for small businesses; e-business strategies; analytics; and strategic blogging.
Canada-e-Connect will deliver valuable insight as well as opportunities for networking for executive and
management-level delegates, including Presidents and CEOs, as well as VPs, Directors and Managers in
sales, marketing, communications and web development at tourism and marketing enterprises. Propri-
etors and managers of small and medium-sized tourism businesses will also find much of value in these
sessions.
To further develop and improve this event, TIAC will undertake the following:
       TiaC will develop a marketing plan and strategy for CeC 2010.
       TiaC will increase attendance to 300 at CeC 2010, and maintain a minimum of 10%
       increase in attendance in 2011 and 2012.
       TiaC will increase sponsorship revenue and broaden supporters beyond / outside
       of TiaC’s membership base for CeC 2010 by developing a sponsorship package that
       targets emerging industries.




                                    Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                 41
           Objectives & Strategy: Event Management




     summit on sustainability
     The Summit on Sustainability is a new TIAC initiative, intended to provide tourism operators with practical
     tools, tips and strategies to green their businesses, operations, attractions or destinations. This event will
     provide a useful set of prescriptions and tools to allow TIAC members to tap into what is becoming the
     fastest growing segment of tourism and travel in the world.
     To this end, TIAC suggests the following objectives:
            TiaC will launch and produce the 1st annual summit on sustainability in 2010 which
            will attract at least 200 delegates and be financially sustainable.
            TiaC will develop a marketing plan and strategy for sos 2010.


     goMedia Canada Marketplace
     Managed for the Canadian Tourism Commission, GoMedia Canada Marketplace (GMCM) brings top tour-
     ism and travel journalists from across Canada and around the world to meet one-on-one with industry
     representatives and provides a firsthand experience with some of the incredible tourism products that
     Canada has to offer. In the coming year, TIAC will undertake the following objective with regards to this
     event:
            TiaC will work with the Canadian Tourism Commission to have its mandate renewed
            to manage and produce goMedia Canada Marketplace for a minimum of two years
            (2010 and 2011).




42                                       Tourism Industry Association of Canada
                                                                       appendix a: TiaC staff




         randy williams
         President & Chief Executive Officer
         613-238-8765
         rwilliams@tiac.travel




administration & finance
         lisa smirle                            denise séguin                        stefanie van duynhoven
         Chief Financial Officer                Executive Assistant to               Administrative Support
         613-238-9339                           the President and Board              613-288-5748
         lsmirle@tiac.travel                    Secretary                            svanduynhoven@tiac.travel
                                                613-238-9339
                                                dseguin@tiac.travel

advocacy & government relations                                             business development
         Christopher jones                      Catherine sadler                     andrea labelle
         Vice President,                        Manager, Research                    Director, Business
         Public Affairs                         613-238-6378                         Development
         613-238-7557                           csadler@tiac.travel                  613-688-1454
         cjones@tiac.travel                                                          alabelle@tiac.travel


Communications & Public relations
         Kevin desjardins                       david lauer                          Melissa Michaud
         Director,                              Manager,                             Translator
         Communications                         Communications                       613-288-5747
         613-238-6251                           613-238-9400                         mmichaud@tiac.travel
         kdesjardins@tiac.travel                dlauer@tiac.travel


event Management
         Ken ross                               jennifer Taylor                      allison Paiano
         Director, Event                        Manager, Events                      Manager, Event
         Operations                             902-698-0984                         Logistics
         613-238-3885                           jtaylor@tiac.travel                  613-238-9487
         kross@tiac.travel                                                           apaiano@tiac.travel



         Christa allevato                       Lisa Griffin
         Manager, Delegate Ser-                 Event Coordinator
         vices                                  613-688-1468
         613-238-6926                           lgriffin@tiac.travel
         callevato@tiac.travel



                                   Securing Canada’s Competitive Position                                        43
                                              appendix b: 2008-2009 board of directors



     Chair:                                                       vice-Chair:

                  stan Cook jr.                                                 julie Canning
                  President,                                                    President & CEO,
                  Stan Cook Sea Kayak Adventures                                Banff Lake Louise Tourism




     directors:

                  Patti balsillie                          Patrice basille                        duncan bureau
                  P. Balsillie Consulting                  Executive Vice-President               VP, Sales & Airline
                                                           & General Manager,                     Partnerships, & VP,
                                                           Brookstreet Hotel                      WestJet Vacations,
                                                                                                  WestJet




                  john dunn                                stephen foster                         jim fraser
                  Executive Vice-President,                Senior Vice-President,                 Vice President, Marketing
                  Tourisme Montréal                        Operations, Starwood                   and Planning, Brewster
                                                           Hotels & Resorts                       Inc.
                                                           Worldwide Inc.




                  richard innes                            roger jamieson                         Ken lambert
                  President, Brain                         President, Kilmory Resort              Vice-President, Sales and
                  Trust Marketing &                                                               Marketing, Delta Hotels
                  Communications                                                                  & Resorts




                  gopal rao                                Kevan ridgeway                         barry smith
                  Regional Vice-President,                 President & CEO,                       President & CEO
                  Sales and Marketing,                     Vancouver, Coast &                     Metro Toronto
                  Canada, InterContinental                 Mountains Tourism                      Convention Centre
                  Hotels Group                             Region




                  nancy stibbard                           denis vandal
                  President/Owner,                         Director, Marketing
                  Capilano Group of                        Communications, Air
                  Companies                                Canada




44                                            Tourism Industry Association of Canada

								
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