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					172 School of Architecture




School of Architecture
Stephen R. Lee, AIA, LEED AP, Interim Head
Office: CFA 201




The mission of the School of Architecture is to educate outstanding       Third Year
professionals with design creativity, social responsibility, global                    Fall                                                Units
environmental vision, historical perspective, and technical               48-300       Architecture Design Studio: Site                      18
excellence. Our comprehensive curriculum and the accomplishments          48-312       Site Engineering and Foundations                        6
of our expert faculty fully reflect this dedication.                      48-315       Environment I: Climate and Energy                       9
                                                                          48-xxx       Architectural History II                                9
Bachelor of Architecture Program                                          xx-xxx       University Elective                                     9
The Bachelor of Architecture Program is five years in length
and is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting                                                                            51
Board (NAAB)*. The program provides preparation for a required                         Spring
architectural internship, then entry into the practice of architecture.   48-305       Architecture Design Studio: Advanced Construction     18
The curriculum consists of courses centered around an Integrated          48-351       Human Factors in Architecture                          9
Design Studio Sequence with foci in seven areas: Integrated               48-xxx       Architectural History III                              9
Architectural Design Studios, Fundamental University Courses and          48-xxx       Architecture Elective                                  9
Electives, History, Drawing and Digital Media, Building Technology,       xx-xxx       University Elective                                    9
Environmental Technology, and Professional Practice. All required
courses in the first two years must be taken and passed before                                                                               54
a student may enter the third year. A minimum of 494 units is             Fourth Year
required for graduation.                                                               Fall                                                Units
                                                                          48-400       Architecture Design Studio: Occupancy                 18
*In the United States, most registration boards require a degree
                                                                          48-410       Environment II: Acoustics and Light                     6
from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite
                                                                          48-412       Environment III: Mechanical Systems                     9
for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB)
                                                                          48-452       Real Estate Design and Development                      9
which is the sole agency authorized to accredit US professional
                                                                          48-xxx       Architecture Elective                                   9
degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types of degrees:
the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture and the
                                                                                                                                             51
Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a six-year, three-
                                                                                       Spring
year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of
                                                                          48-405       Architecture Design Studio: Systems Integration       18
conformance with the established educational standards. Masters
                                                                          48-415       Advanced Building Systems                              6
degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate
                                                                          48-xxx       Architecture Elective                                  9
degree and a professional graduate degree, that when earned
                                                                          xx-xxx       University Elective                                    9
sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education.
                                                                          xx-xxx       University Elective                                    9
However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized
as an accredited degree. (National Architecture Accrediting Board
                                                                                                                                             51
Conditions and Procedures 2004)
                                                                          Fifth Year
Curriculum                                                                48-500
                                                                                       Fall
                                                                                       Architecture Design Studio: The Urban Lab
                                                                                                                                           Units
                                                                                                                                             18
First Year                                                                48-497       Thesis Preparation (optional)                           3
             Fall                                               Units     48-550       Issues of Practice                                      9
48-100       Architecture Design Studio: Foundation I             12      48-453       Urban Design Theory and Practice                        9
48-120       Introduction to Digital Media I                        9     48-xxx       Architecture Elective                                   9
48-130       Architectural Drawing I: A Tactile Foundation          6
21-114       Calculus for Architecture (mini 2)                     5                                                                        48
64-100       Critical Histories of the Arts                         9                  Spring
or                                                                        48-505       Studio X                                              18
76-101       Interpretation and Argument                            9     48-551       Ethics and Decision Making in Architecture             9
99-101x      Computing @ Carnegie Mellon                            3     48-xxx       Architecture Elective                                  9
                                                                          xx-xxx       University Elective                                    9
                                                                  44
             Spring
                                                                                                                                             45
48-105       Architecture Design Studio: Foundation II            12
48-115       Physics for Architecture                              9
48-125       Introduction to Digital Media II                      6
48-135       Architectural Drawing II: Appearance                  9      Fundamental University Courses
76-101       Interpretation and Argument                           9      (4 lecture courses)
or                                                                        A significant set of university courses in mathematics, physical
64-100       Critical Histories of the Arts                         9     sciences, social sciences, writing, and history are prerequisite to the
                                                                          School’s own offerings. Beyond the preparation in fundamentals
                                                                  45
                                                                          that these courses provide, this early emphasis upon core university
Second Year                                                               course work allows for transfer to other departments within the
             Fall                                               Units
                                                                          College and University following the first several semesters of the
48-200       Architecture Design Studio: Composition              18
                                                                          student’s studies.
48-210       Statics                                                9
48-230       Architectural Drawing III: Perspective                 9
                                                                          21-114       Calculus for Architecture
48-240       Architecture History I: Historical Survey of World
                                                                          64-100       Critical Histories of the Arts
             Architecture and Urbanism                              9
                                                                          76-101       Interpretation and Argument
xx-xxx       University Elective                                    9
                                                                          99-10x       Computing @ Carnegie Mellon
                                                                  54
                                                                          Integrated Design Studios
             Spring
                                                                          (10 Studios)
48-205       Architecture Design Studio: Materials                18
                                                                          Architectural design studios compose the core of the undergraduate
48-215       Materials and Assemblies                              9
                                                                          curriculum. The ten studios are organized around a sequence
48-217       Structures                                            9
                                                                          of semester topics that are the focus of the design projects. In
48-xxx       Architecture Elective                                 9
                                                                          sequence, these topics are: form, space, composition, materials,
xx-xxx       University Elective                                   9
                                                                          site construction, occupancy, systems integration, and urban
                                                                  54      design. Studio X is intended to allow for study abroad, thesis,
                                                                                                                    School of Architecture      173




or interdisciplinary studies. As an integrated sequence, requisite        design studios and for more advanced subsequent science and
courses work in conjunction with specific studios to provide students     technology electives. Courses build one upon the other and provide
with the necessary knowledge base to successfully resolve their           technical knowledge for application in the design studio as well
design projects. Design studios are taught using a team approach,         as providing foundations for more in-depth study and minors in
with a common lecture series and a set of related exercises for each      associated fields.
studio level. Faculty members are practicing architects, scholars, as     48-115       Physics for Architecture
well as academic researchers bringing a diverse set of perspectives       48-210       Statics
to the studio environment. Studio spaces are provided to all              48-215       Materials and Assemblies
students, with the first, second and third year studios located in        48-217       Structures
Margaret Morrison Hall. Fourth and fifth year studios are located on      48-312       Site Engineering and Foundations
the second floor of the College of Fine Arts Building. Studios provide
a faculty to student ratio of 1:12.                                       Technology: Environment/Sustainability
48-100       Architecture Design Studio: Foundation I                     (4 courses)
48-105       Architecture Design Studio: Foundation II                    The School sets environmental education as one of its highest
48-200       Architecture Design Studio: Composition                      priorities. The goal of this sequence is to provide a thorough
48-205       Architecture Design Studio: Materials                        foundation of technical knowledge coupled with a creative design
48-300       Architecture Design Studio: Site                             inquiry, which allows students to effectively address serious
48-305       Architecture Design Studio: Advanced Construction            environmental challenges. The courses address issues raised
48-400       Architecture Design Studio: Occupancy                        by concerns over the ecological responsiveness of buildings to
48-405       Architecture Design Studio: Systems Integration              context, energy effectiveness, and healthy building design for global
48-500       Architecture Design Studio: The Urban Lab                    environmental sustainability while considering the opportunities of
48-505       Studio X                                                     human differences related to the psychology of the individual, the
                                                                          sociology of groups, ergonomics, ADA codes & standards and indoor
History                                                                   environmental quality including acoustic, visual, air and thermal
(1+3 courses)                                                             quality of spaces designed for human habitation.
In addition to Critical Histories of the Arts, taken during the first     48-315        Environment I: Climate and Energy
year, three core courses in architectural history are required for the    48-410        Environment II: Acoustics and Light
Bachelor of Architecture degree. All second year students must            48-412        Environment III: Mechanical Systems
complete the Historical Survey of World Architecture & Urbanism,          48-415        Advanced Building Systems
which focuses on the major monuments of western civilization, as
well as highlighting non-western and vernacular traditions. Two           Professional Practice, Ethics, Management
additional core courses on the history of architecture are required.      (5 courses)
These two courses must be taken within the School of Architecture         Architecture is a multifaceted field of practice, existing within
and must have been designated as satisfying the core requirements.        dynamic social, organizational, economic, professional, and
The core architectural history courses consider more specific             cognitive contexts. The goal of this sequence is to educate
topics and are intended to provide students with advanced skills in       design professionals with expertise in: programming and diverse
investigating architecture from the historical perspectives of culture,   design decision making processes, multi-disciplinary team design
society, politics, religion, economics, theory, and/or technology.        processes, methods of professional practice in urban design
These courses are also intended to develop research and writing           and architecture, management and documentation, facilities
skills. It is highly recommended that the two additional core history     management including field diagnostics and post occupancy
requirements be completed prior to the fifth year.                        evaluation, real property management and overriding questions of
In addition to the three core architectural history courses,              ethics in practice.
elective courses on additional topics of architectural history may        48-315       Human Factors in Architecture
also be taken. With approval of the specific electives, students          48-452       Real Estate Design and Development
completing four additional nine-unit architectural history and theory     48-453       Urban Design Theory and Practice
courses beyond the three required may graduate with a minor in            48-550       Issues of Practice
Architectural History.                                                    48-551       Ethics and Decision Making in Architecture
64-100        Critical Histories of the Arts
48-240        Architectural History I:Historical Survey of World
              Architecture and Urbanism                                   School Electives (6 Courses)
48-xxx        Architectural History                                       A minimum of six school electives is required for the Bachelor of
48-xxx        Architectural History                                       Architecture degree. The general goal of the school electives is to
                                                                          build knowledge of architecture within the broad context of society;
Drawing and Media                                                         specifically, in light of economic, social, technological, political, and
(5 courses)                                                               cultural forces. A more specific goal is to build in-depth knowledge
Drawing and modeling both by hand and with the computer are               and skill in an area of interest to the student.
core skills for developing powers of observation, the ability to
think in three dimensions, and are fundamental in communicating           University Electives (7 courses)
architectural ideas. Computational skills, including the use of           The school considers elective courses to be crucial for the
programs specializing in digital representation, in combination           intellectual breadth of an architect as a citizen in contemporary
with traditional skills of representation are stressed in courses         society. In this spirit, the School urges its students to use these
throughout the curriculum.                                                courses as an opportunity to take advantage of the unique
Drawing, media representation, and model making are primary               strengths of Carnegie Mellon University and to develop ties to other
topics of both first year studios and are associated with five            disciplines.
other specific courses: Introduction to Digital Media I and II,
Architectural Drawing I and II in the first year, and Architectural
Drawing III in the second year. Thereafter students may elect to          Dual Degrees
take further drawing and media courses during years three, four and
                                                                          Students in the School of Architecture can pursue a dual degree
five in fulfillment of the school elective requirements.
                                                                          program in the Tepper School of Business’ undergraduate business
48-120         Introduction to Digital Media I
                                                                          program, Engineering at Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT),
48-125         Introduction to Digital Media II
                                                                          History in Humanities & Social Sciences (H&SS), and Industrial
48-130         Architectural Drawing I: A Tactile Foundation
                                                                          Design in the School of Design. Other dual degree programs are
48-135         Architectural Drawing II: Understanding Appearance
                                                                          possible and encouraged.
48-230         Architectural Drawing III: Perspective

Technology: Building, Materials, and Structures                           Minors in Other Disciplines
(5 courses)                                                               Minors may be earned in many of the Departments or Schools
The School sees technical knowledge as design knowledge and
                                                                          on campus. Generally, a student must take six courses within a
places major emphasis on understanding the state-of-the-art and
                                                                          specific department or concentration to receive a minor. Students
major innovations in building structure, enclosure, mechanical,
                                                                          interested in minors must contact the school or department of
lighting, and interior systems. The goal of the Structures and
                                                                          interest to determine specific requirements or prerequisites. Since
Building sequence is to offer a rigorous introduction to science
                                                                          students of architecture are required to take seven electives in other
fundamentals, to provide a systematic and comprehensive
                                                                          departments, students can easily complete a minor without adding
introduction into the major fields of building science and technology,
                                                                          additional coursework to their curriculum
and to provide a solid technical foundation both for architectural
174 School of Architecture




Minors in Architecture                                                   the cross–diciplinary nature of sustainable design and is designed
                                                                         to meet the unique needs of those with prior experience in design
Undergraduate students in architecture can also qualify to earn          and construction fields such as architecture, landscape architecture,
two minors within the subject of architecture. These are the Minor       engineering, construction, project design, and ecology. The
in Architectural History and the Minor in Building Science. The          program culminates with a project in which students must apply
Minor in Architectural History is intended for those candidates who      the knowledge they have acquired to realistic problems, using the
want particular depth in this area. It is earned by applying all         appropriate analytical and modeling skills.
three school electives and four university electives to courses in
architectural history. The Minor in Building Science is intended for
those degree candidates seeking in depth knowledge in the area           Masters of Science in Architecture-Engineering Construction
of architectural science and for those who are interested in gaining     Management
advanced placement in the M.S. programs offered by the School in
                                                                         The Masters of Science (MS) program in Architecture-Engineering
the areas of Building Performance and Sustainable Design.
                                                                         Construction Management is offered jointly with the Department
                                                                         of Civil Engineering and aims to prepare building delivery
                                                                         professionals – civil engineers, construction planners, facility
5 + 1 Masters Degree Options                                             managers, developers, architects, planners, landscape architects,
                                                                         interior designers, and other building consultants for careers in the
The School of Architecture offers a unique opportunity to                management of design, construction, maintenance, and used of
undergraduate students who wish to pursue a Masters degree in an         facilities. By focusing on the decision making process, the program
architecture-related field. Undergraduate students may begin taking      educates professional in ways to positively impact economic,
graduate-level courses in their 4th and 5th year of study. This allows   environmental, and ethical concerns inherent in the delivery of
students to graduate with a Masters degree in only one additional        construction projects.
year of study beyond their 5-year undergraduate program.


Masters of Science in Computational Design                               Student Advising
The Master of Science (MS) program in Computational Design               At the end of every semester, the faculty reviews each student’s
is designed primarily for practitioners in the building industry         progress in all courses. Reviews during the first year are intended
who wish to broaden their knowledge about state-of-the-art               to determine a student’s capabilities in relation to the study of
computer approaches and applications to the architectural and            architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, and the School works
building sciences and for individuals who wish to pursue research        with each student to ensure placement within the university if
careers in these areas. The program covers, in depth, a range of         a change is desired. Subsequent reviews monitor and ensure
computational design issues and culminates with a project in which       continued progress in all sequences of the program.
students are asked to apply the knowledge thy have acquired to
                                                                         Students are urged to meet with the Senior Academic Advisor to
realistic problems.
                                                                         review their academic progress and plans before each semester.
                                                                         Such meetings are important to take full advantage of elective
                                                                         possibilities within the curriculum, but they are equally important
Masters of Science in Building Performance and Diagnostics               as an opportunity for discussion of long-term career goals. It is
The Master of Science (MS) program specialized in Building               the policy of the School of Architecture that no student with a QPA
Performance and Diagnostics is intended for practitioners, researches    below 3.0 from the previous semester will be permitted to overload.
and educators in architecture and the building industry who wish to      Students should also check their progress using the online academic
be leaders in advanced building technologies and their performance.      audit (https://acis.as.cmu.edu/gale2/audit/degreeaudit.html)
The program covers, in depth, knowledge concerning state-of-the-
art approaches to building systems integration and total building
performance. The program culminates with a project in which
students must apply the knowledge they have acquired to realistic
                                                                         Scholarships and Awards
problems, using the appropriate analytical and modeling skills.          The School of Architecture provides a number of scholarship and
                                                                         traveling fellowship opportunities to outstanding students. These
                                                                         opportunities include: Stewart L. Brown Award, Gindroz Prize,
Masters of Urban Design                                                  Ferguson Jacobs Prize in Architecture, Perkins Eastman Shanghai
The 12–month post–professional Masters of Urban Design                   Summer Internship, Myres & Lubetz Internship Fund, and the Lewis
program prepares graduates for craeers using design to address           Altenhoff Award.
environmental, economic, social, and cultural issues affecting
the contemporary metropolis critically. Studios explore strategies       Students who are eligible to participate in the School’s Fourth-
for sustainable development in a variety of settings including the       Year Design Awards Competition have the opportunity to compete
shrinking postindustrial city, the suburban periphery, and the           for the following six prizes: John Knox Shear Memorial Traveling
rapidly urbanizing region. Pittsburgh-based studios emphasize            Scholarship, Louis F. Valentour Traveling Scholarship Fund, Richard
citizen engagement and participatory design, exploring problems          M. Gensert Memorial Scholarship, and the Jan P. Junge Memorial
of urban neighborhood revitalization, infrastructure development         Scholarship.
and suburban transformation, in partnership with the Remaking
Cities Institute. The capstone studio, which includes a research trip,
explores issues of sustainability in the context of an international
                                                                         Study Abroad and Summer Abroad
city undergoing growth. The studio sequence is supported by
core courses in urban history and theory, geographic analysis,
                                                                         Program
sustainable community development and real estate.                       The School of Architecture conducts an officially recognized
                                                                         exchange program for fourth year students to study abroad at:
                                                                         the EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland; ITESM in Monterrey, Mexico;
Masters of Science of Tangible Interaction Design                        the National University of Singapore and the Henry van de Velde
                                                                         Institute in Antwerp, Belgium. Students are welcome to seek out
The Master of Tangible Interaction Design (mTID) is designed
                                                                         other study abroad opportunities where course work is equivalent
primarily for those with a background to acquire the technical skills
                                                                         to studies at CMU to a maximum of 45 transfer units per semester.
to realize embedded computing designs, and those with computer
                                                                         Students present study abroad plans to the School for review at
science and engineering backgrounds to apply their knowledge in
                                                                         the beginning of the third year. To receive credit for courses taken
design. The program includes coursework in software, electronics,
                                                                         abroad, the student must have a C or better (not C-) in the course
and fabrication techniques for building working prototypes of
                                                                         and have an official translated transcript sent to the School of
tangible embedded interactive systems.
                                                                         Architecture. Studio work conducted abroad must be presented to
                                                                         the School Head and Studio Coordinator for approval.
Masters of Science in Sustainable Design                                 In addition, the School offers a study-abroad program each
                                                                         summer. The locations of these programs vary from year to year.
The M.S. in Sustainable Design program builds on the expertise
                                                                         Recent offerings have included the Czech Republic, Austria, the
within our world-renowned research center, the Center for Building
                                                                         Netherlands, China, Rome, Barcelona, and the Middle East. Students
Performance and Diagnostics, to provide an integrated education
                                                                         entering their fourth and fifth years of the Bachelor of Architecture
intended to prepare its graduates for careers that will reshape the
                                                                         program are eligible to apply.
built environment in a sustainable fashion. The program addresses
                                                                                                             School of Architecture   175




Summer Courses                                                         JONATHAN KLINE, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MFA, Penn State
                                                                       University; Carnegie Mellon 2002 —
Students can receive credit for passing comparable courses at other
                                                                       RAMESH KRISHNAMURTI, Professor — PhD; Carnegie Mellon 1989 —
institutions with advanced approval from the School. A Transfer
Credit Evaluation form must be completed prior to enrollment at the    KRISTEN KURLAND, Teaching Professor — BArch, University of
other institution for a course to be considered for transfer.          Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon 1996 —
                                                                       KHEE POH LAM, RIBA, Professor — PhD, Carnegie Mellon University;
                                                                       Carnegie Mellon 2003 —

Faculty                                                                STEPHEN LEE, AIA, Interim Head — MArch, Carnegie Mellon
                                                                       University; Carnegie Mellon 1985 —
OMER AKIN, RA, Professor — PhD, Carnegie Mellon University;
                                                                       LAURA LEE, Professor, — MArch, University of Michigan; Carnegie
Carnegie Mellon 1973 —
                                                                       Mellon 1989 —
DAVID ARCHER, CBPD Engineering Consultant — PhD; Carnegie
                                                                       DAVID LEWIS, Teaching Professor Emeritus; Carnegie Mellon —
Mellon 1991 —
                                                                       CINDY LIMAURO, Professor, Drama — MFA in Lighting Design,
MARYLOU ARSCOTT, RIBA, Adjunct Associate Professor; Carnegie
                                                                       Florida State University; Carnegie Mellon 1987 —
Mellon 2007 —
                                                                       VIVIAN LOFTNESS, FAIA, University Professor — MArch, MIT;
MARTIN AURAND, Sr. Architecture Librarian/Archivist — MLIS,
                                                                       Carnegie Mellon 1981 —
University of Pittsburgh; Carnegie Mellon 1987 —
                                                                       ARTHUR LUBETz, AIA, Adjunct Professor — BArch, Carnegie Mellon
AzIzAN AzIz, Senior Researcher, CBPD — MS Building Performance
                                                                       University; Carnegie Mellon 1988 —
& Diagnostics, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 1997 —
                                                                       JENNIFER LUCCHINO, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MArch,
WALTER BOYKOWYCz, AIA, Adjunct Professor — MArch, Carnegie
                                                                       Rice University; Carnegie Mellon 2003 —
Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 1969 —
                                                                       DUTCH MACDONALD, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — BArch,
TERESA BUCCO, RA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MArch, North
                                                                       Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 2006 —
Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon 2002 —
                                                                       GERRY MATTERN, P Eng, Adjunct Professor; Carnegie Mellon 1982 —
LEE CALISTI, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — BArch, Kent State
University; Carnegie Mellon 2002 —                                     CHRISTINE MONDOR, AIA, Associate Professor in Practice — BArch,
                                                                       Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 1999 —
JOE COOHILL, Adjunct Assistant Professor — PhD, Oxford; Carnegie
Mellon 2007 —                                                          JASON MORRIS, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MArch, IIT;
                                                                       Carnegie Mellon 2005 —
DOUG COOPER, Andrew Mellon Professor — BArch, Carnegie Mellon
University; Carnegie Mellon 1976 —                                     IRVING OPPENHEIM, P Eng, Professor — PhD, Cambridge; Carnegie
                                                                       Mellon 1972 —
DALE CLIFFORD, Assistant Professor Gerard Damiani, AIA, Adjunct
Professor of Practice — BArch, Syracuse University ; Carnegie Mellon   MARK PASNICK, Caste Visiting Assistant Professor 2008— MDesS,
1996 —                                                                 Harvard University; Carnegie Mellon —
GERARD DAMIANI, AIA, Adjunct Professor of Practice— BArch,             MATTHEW PLECITY, RLA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MArch ,
Syracuse University ; Carnegie Mellon 1996 —                           Virginia Tech; Carnegie Mellon 2006 —
JEFFREY DAVIS, AIA, Adjunct Associate Professor — BS Architecture,     ROBERT REID, P Eng, Adjunct Assistant Professor — PhD, Carnegie
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Carnegie Mellon 1996 —       Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 1987 —
KEN DOYNO, AIA, Adjunct Associate Professor — BArch, Carnegie          LUIS RICO-GUTIERREz, Director, Remaking Cities Institute — MS
Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 1991 —                              Building Performance, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon
                                                                       2001 —
SARAH DRAKE, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MArch, North
Carolina State University; Carnegie Mellon 2003 —                      PAUL ROSENBLATT, AIA, Adjunct Associate Professor — MArch, Yale;
                                                                       Carnegie Mellon 1987 —
JOHN EBERHARD, Professor Emeritus, — M.S., Industrial
Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Carnegie            CHARLES ROSENBLUM, Adjunct Assistant Professor — , University of
Mellon 1989 —                                                          Virginia; Carnegie Mellon 2000 —
JEREMY FICCA, AIA, Assistant Professor — MArch, Harvard;               DAN ROTHSCHILD, AIA, Adjunct Associate Professor — MArch, Yale;
Carnegie Mellon 2007 —                                                 Carnegie Mellon 2003 —
MATT FINEOUT, AIA, Adjunct Associate Professor — MArch, Southern       RAMI EL SAMAHY, Assistant Teaching Professor — MArch, Harvard
California Institute of Architecture ; Carnegie Mellon 2001 —          Universtiy; Carnegie Mellon 2006 —
ERIC FISHER, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MArch, Harvard;        DIANE SHAW, Associate Professor — PhD, University of California -
Carnegie Mellon 2001 —                                                 Berkeley; Carnegie Mellon 1996 —
JOHN FOLAN, T. Fitzgibbon Visiting Professor 2008— MArch,              SCOTT SMITH, Director, Architecture Shop — MFA, Cranbrook;
University of Pennsylvania; Carnegie Mellon 2008 —                     Carnegie Mellon 1984 —
PABLO GARCIA, Assistant Professor — MArch, Princeton; Carnegie         KENT SUHRBIER, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — BArch,
Mellon 2008 —                                                          Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 2000 —
KEVIN GANNON, AIA, Adjunct Associate Professor — MArch, Yale;          FRANCESCA TORELLO, Adjunct Assistant Professor — PhD,
Carnegie Mellon 1996 —                                                 Politecnico Torino; Carnegie Mellon 2007 —
MARK GROSS, Professor — PhD, MIT; Carnegie Mellon 2004 —               SPIKE WOLFF, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MArch, SCI-Arc;
                                                                       Carnegie Mellon 2003 —
KAI GUTSCHOW, Associate Professor — PhD, Columbia; Carnegie
Mellon 1998 —
VOLKER HARTKOPF, Professor, Director CBPD — PhD, University of         RESEARCHERS
Stuttgart; Carnegie Mellon 1972 —
                                                                       DAVID ARCHER, CBPD Engineering Consultant — PhD; Carnegie
DELBERT HIGHLANDS, Professor Emeritus — MArch, Carnegie                Mellon 1991 —
Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 1985 —
                                                                       AzIzAN AzIz, Senior Researcher, CBPD — MS Building Performance
ERIK HOKANSON, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — BArch, Kansas        & Diagnostics, Carnegie Mellon University; Carnegie Mellon 1997 —
State University; Carnegie Mellon 2006 —
KELLY HUTzELL, Assistant Teaching Professor — MS Architecture
and Urban Design, Columbia; Carnegie Mellon 2005 —
JEFFREY KING, AIA, Adjunct Assistant Professor — MArch, Tulane;
Carnegie Mellon 2004 —

				
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