The EXODUS Database by wulinqing

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 40

									 THE CAREERS EUROPE DATABASE OF INTERNATIONAL
              CAREERS INFORMATION




            Lesson Plans using the EXODUS database
                            2-5 hours




(The Exodus Database can be found under the icon Careers Abroad on your
computer in the Careers Library)



                                     1
Contents


Introduction                                                           1
Aim                                                                    1
Time required                                                          1
Materials                                                              1
Lesson plan 1 (LP 1) - teachers’ notes                                 2
LP 1 - exercise 1 - worksheet EU & EEA members                         5
LP 1 - exercise 2 – worksheet - 11 most commonly spoken languages      6
LP 1 - exercise 3 – worksheet - What languages are spoken in Europe    7
LP 1 - exercise 4 – worksheet – Should I learn a foreign language ….   8
Lesson plan 2 (LP 2) – teachers’ notes                                 9
LP 2 – exercise 1 – worksheet - European map                           10
LP 2 – exercise 1 – worksheet - answer sheet                           11
LP 2 – exercise 2 – worksheet - Case studies                           12
LP 2 – exercise 3 – worksheet - Imagine that …                         18
Lesson plan 3 (LP 3) – teachers’ notes                                 19
LP 3 – exercise 1 – An introduction to the EXODUS database             19
LP 3 – exercise 2 – A brief overview of EXODUS                         19
LP 3 – exercise 3 – worksheets - EXODUS       research questions       21
LP 3 – exercise 3 answer sheets                                        24
Lesson plan 4 (LP 4) – teachers’ notes                                 27
LP 4 – exercise 1 – worksheet – An imaginary scenario                  28
LP 4 – exercise 2 – Quotations                                         29
Lesson plan 5 (LP5) – Teachers’ notes - A class debate                 31
Lesson plan for 1 hour                                                 32
Lesson plan for 2 hours                                                34
Lesson plan for 3 hours                                                38
Lesson plan for 4 hours                                                38




                                  2
                   The EXODUS Database.
       An Introduction to Living, Studying, Working and
                      Training Overseas.

Introduction:
The EXODUS database is a one-stop CD-rom of information about international
opportunities, for students and young people, including; taking a year out,
studying, working, living, training and volunteering (both short-term and long-
term) in Europe and beyond. EXODUS also includes direct Internet links to
useful sites.


What follows is an example of how EXODUS can be used with students in order
to familiarise them with the database. The lesson plan can be used with Year 9
pupils before making their options or older students. The amount of support can
be varied depending on the age range and abilities of the target group. The
EXODUS programme can be used by various departments such as; careers,
modern foreign languages or geography, either individually or on a cross-
curricular basis.


Aim:
   •   To provide an overview of what is available for young people outside the
       UK.
   •   To encourage young people to consider taking up the overseas
       opportunities available to them.
   •   To encourage young people to consider the benefits of learning a language
       for the enhancement of their career and curriculum vitae.


Time required: 1-5 hours.
Depending on what age and/or ability range the students are there is up to 5
hours work. The lesson plan will be presented as 5 hours divided into 5 one-hour
lessons. The lessons require progressively more independent work, consequently
the last exercises are more suited to older students or students who are able to
work independently. At the end of the full 5-hour lesson plans will be ones
suggested if less time is available, such as one hour, two hours, three hours or
four. The exercises are clear-cut, to allow teachers to pick and choose, in order
to develop their own lessons if needed. Some of the worksheets can also be done
as homework if necessary.


Materials:
   •   EXODUS database networked together with access to the Internet
       University Prospectuses.
   •   Worksheets.
   •   OHP.


                                      1
                         Lesson Plans for 5 hours


Lesson Plan 1 Exercises:

Materials: Worksheets on pages 5, 6, 7 & 8.


Exercise 1 –      List the 15 members of the European Union (EU) plus the
additional 3 that make up the European Economic Area (EEA). (10mins)
Students work alone, in pairs or in small groups and try and complete the table
on page 5 in 5 minutes. Go through the answers as a class. The exercise should
be linked to the fact that UK nationals have the right to live, work, study or
train in any of the countries that are members of the European Union. Similarly
nationals of any of those countries have the right to live, work, study or train in
the UK.


Answers: EU members are:
   1) Austria 2) Belgium 3) Denmark 4) Finland 5) France 6) Germany 7) Greece
   8) Ireland 9) Italy 10) Luxembourg 11) the Netherlands 12) Portugal
   13) Spain 14) Sweden 15) UK

Additional EEA members are:
1) Iceland 2) Liechtenstein 3) Norway

Exercise 2     – What are the most commonly spoken languages in the world?
(10mins)
Students complete the table found on page 6 in 5 minutes. Go through answers.

Answers:
1st – Chinese        1,123 million people
2nd – English        470 million people
3rd – Hindi          418 million people
4th – Spanish        372 million people
5th –Russian         288 million people
6th – Bengali        235 million people
7th – Arabic         235 million people
8th – Portuguese     182 million people
9th – Japanese       125 million people
10th – French        124 million people
11th – German        121 million people

Note: English would be the highest if the countries where English was also an
official language were included.



                                        2
Exercise 3 - What languages are spoken in the following European
Union countries? (10 mins)
The aim of the exercise is to access the students’ knowledge of the languages
spoken in the European Union and to point out that languages are increasingly
important in the world of work as the links between the UK economy and
economies across the world grow ever closer. Students complete the table found
on page 7 in 5 minutes. Go through answers.


Answers:
   1.    Austria - Austrian German
   2.    Belgium - French, Flemish (Dutch), German
   3.    Denmark – Danish
   4.    Finland - Finnish, Swedish
   5.    France – French
   6.    Germany – German
   7.    Greece – Greek
   8.    Ireland - Irish Gaelic, English
   9.    Italy - Italian, German (in some northern parts)
   10.   Luxembourg - French, German, Letzeburgesh
   11.   Netherlands - Dutch, Frisian
   12.   Portugal – Portuguese
   13.   Spain - Castillian (Spanish), Catalan, Gallego and Basque
   14.   Sweden – Swedish
   15.   UK - English, Welsh, Scots Gaelic

  In all the above countries smaller groups use other languages, but the ones
  above are the main ones.


Exercise 4       –Should I learn a language to assist my career? (30 mins)
The exercise can start with a quick class brainstorming session about which
careers it is important to be able to speak another language for.
Following this, it is important to stress that the list that has been produced is a
very narrow list and that being able to speak another language can open many
doors in a wide range of careers.
The students should then be asked to complete the Exercise 4 worksheet
questionnaire on page 8. This section could form the basis of a group discussion
to look at whether the students themselves will be studying a language and the
reasons why they will be or why they have decided against studying a language.
They could then discuss what relevance they see learning a language has for
their own career and whether they would be interested in working abroad.
At the end of the questionnaire, you should point out that any one who has
answered yes to any of the questions should seriously consider studying a



                                         3
language. The point to make is that it is a question of being educated and
trained for a particular job and having language skills. It is important not to
think solely of either studying languages or training for a particular career.
For example, a lawyer, accountant, engineer or builder who can speak another
language will have more career opportunities available to them than a lawyer,
accountant, engineer or builder who cannot speak another language. They will if
they want have the opportunity to work in another country, but more
importantly, their skills will be of value to UK employers. Many organisations in
the UK now need employees with language skills in order to speak to customers
and suppliers in other European countries.




                                      4
Lesson Plan 1 - Exercise 1. List the 15 members of the European Union (EU)
plus the additional 3 that make up the European Economic Area (EEA).

European Union Members                Correct Answers
EU
1.                                    1.

2.                                    2.

3.                                    3.

4.                                    4.

5.                                    5.

6.                                    6.

7.                                    7.

8.                                    8.

9.                                    9.

10.                                   10.

11.                                   11.

12.                                   12.

13.                                   13.

14.                                   14.

15.                                   15.



European Economic Area Members        Correct Answers.
EEA
1.                                    1.

2.                                    2.

3.                                    3.




                                  5
Lesson Plan 1 - Exercise 2
Below is a list of the most commonly spoken languages in the world. Can you put
them in order of most commonly spoken? Write your answers in the Languages
column of the table below.
The 11 most commonly spoken languages:
German, Hindi, Arabic, English, Portuguese, Spanish, Chinese, French, Bengali,
Japanese, Russian



 LANGUAGE/S                                      NUMBER OF PEOPLE

 1st:                                            1,123 million

 2nd:                                            470 million

 3rd:                                            418 million

 4th:                                            372 million

 5th:                                            288 million

 6th:                                            235 million

 7th:                                            235 million

 8th:                                            182 million

 9th:                                            125 million

 10th:                                           124 million

 11th:                                           121 million



Source: Nuffield Languages 2000 Enquiry




                                     6
Lesson Plan 1 - Exercise 3: What languages are spoken in the following
European Union countries?
  Write your answers in the table below.

Country              Language/s spoken
Austria


Belgium


Denmark


Finland


France


Germany


Greece


Ireland


Italy


Luxembourg


Netherlands


Portugal


Spain


Sweden


UK




                                    7
Lesson Plan 1 - Exercise 4: Should I learn a language to assist my Career?
The following questionnaire can help you decide whether it would be a good idea
to study a language.



 OPPORTUNITIES                                                    YES or NO

 A summer job working in a bar on a Greek island.

 Visiting Amsterdam to visit one of your company’s offices.

 A temporary job working in a campsite or hotel in the
 South of France.

 Selling to customers in Paris.

 Working for 2 years in an office of your company in Madrid
 or Milan.

 Meeting with suppliers from Brussels.

 Spending 3-12 months as a part of a UK degree course in
 Sweden.

 Undertaking a period of 2 or 3 weeks voluntary work (or
 longer) in the Czech Republic.

 Travelling in Italy and finding casual work whilst travelling.

 Working as a language assistant teaching English in a school
 in Germany before University.

 Visiting customers across France and Germany.

 Welcoming customers from different European countries
 to the UK.

 Working in Spain for 2 or 3 years.

 Working in ski resorts in bars, restaurants or chalets in
 Austria or Switzerland.




                                       8
Lesson Plan 2 Exercises:

Materials:
  • Worksheet on page 10 (answer sheet is on page 11).
  • Case studies on pages 12 –17 inclusive.
  • Worksheet on page 18.


Exercise 1 -       European map. (15mins)
Students label the countries on the European map (page 10). Probably best to do
in pencil. Go through answers. Could do it on OHP, also answer sheet on page 11.

Answers:
   1) Austria 2) Belgium 3) Denmark 4) Finland 5) France 6) Germany 7) Greece
   8) Iceland 9) Ireland 10) Italy 11) Liechtenstein 12) Luxembourg
   13) the Netherlands 14) Norway 15) Portugal 16) Spain 17) Sweden 18) UK

Exercise 2 –       Case Studies. (25mins)
Read through the case studies (pages 12-17 inclusive) as a class and discuss the
experiences of the placement students. The aim of the case studies is to make
students aware of the range of opportunities that are available to young people.
It is also to provide information about young peoples’ views about their
experiences working and studying in other European countries. It is important
that young people are aware that there are plus points and there are negative
points to studying and working abroad. Need to come to the conclusion that the
key is to be well prepared and have a good knowledge of a foreign language.


Exercise 3 –     Imagine that…   (15mins)
Do the “Imagine that….“ scenario (page 18). Can be done in pairs or small groups.
Discuss feelings and the fact that they would need to think about practical
factors such as: travel arrangements, transport within the area, accommodation,
insurance, healthcare, languages, culture, financial aspects and visas etc.

For the remaining 5 mins explain that the following lesson will be spent using the
EXODUS database designed to research information about study, work (both
paid and voluntary) training and year out opportunities abroad. The package aims
to encourage young people to consider taking up such opportunities and to be
able to see the benefits that can be obtained through learning a foreign
language.




                                      9
        Lesson Plan 2 – Exercise 1: Can you identify the numbered countries
        on the map? They are all countries in the European Union or European
        Economic Area. Write your answers in the table at the bottom.




                      08




                                                                                    04
                                                                     17

                                                       14




                                                      03
                     09

                            18
                                           13
                                                       06
                                      02
1                                7                                        13
                                                 12
2                                8                         11             14
                                 05
3                                9                              01        15
4                                10                                       16
5       15                       11                                       17
                                                       10
                16
6                                12                                       18


                                                                               07




    1                            7                                        13
    2                            8                                        14
    3                            9                                        15
    4                            10                                       16
    5                            11                                       17
    6                            12                                       18



                                            10
      Lesson Plan 2 – Exercise 1: Answer sheet 1: Map of EU/EEA including
      names of Countries




                    08




                                                                                        04
                                                                      17

                                                        14




                                                       03
                   09

                           18
                                          13
                                                        06
                                     02

                                                  12
                                                            11
                                05
                                                                 01



       15
                                                        10
              16



                                                                                  07




1   Austria                     7    Greece                                13   Netherlands

2   Belgium                     8    Iceland                               14   Norway

3   Denmark                     9    Ireland                               15   Portugal

4   Finland                     10   Italy                                 16   Spain

5   France                      11   Liechtenstein                         17   Sweden

6   Germany                     12   Luxembourg                            18   UK




                                             11
Lesson Plan 2 – Exercise 2 - Case Studies
Read through the following case studies of students on work placements
overseas. What are your impressions of their experiences? What do you think is
important to consider and prepare before going on such a placement? Discuss.

Case Study 1: Nick Thompson

Sixth Form Student at Brighouse High School

Work Experience teaching as a language assistant at a primary school up
Uppsala, Sweden.

His Experiences:

Last year on the 23rd of September, I arrived in Sweden not knowing what to
expect of my work experience as a language assistant in a Swedish primary
school.

During my weeklong exchange in Sweden, I spent four of the most enjoyable
days of my life interacting with the most interesting, funny and nicest students
that I have ever met. That first Monday morning when I had to introduce myself
in front of a class of about 20 eleven-year old children, whom I had anticipated
would speak very little English and would not understand a word I was saying,
was the most nerve wracking moment of my life so far.

Then for the whole morning I was given a guided tour of Sverkoskolan (the
school I was based in). During this tour, I was pleasantly surprised to discover
that these children could speak very good and clear English. I was amazed
because at their age, I was proud of learning my times table, whereas they have
been learning a foreign language for nearly three years. When I returned to the
classroom after the tour, I was told that a couple of the children would talk to
me, but in fact the whole class had small conversations with me.

During the week, the children found out that I could not speak a word of
Swedish and so they decided to teach me some of the basics. I did not complain
because it helped them with their English and I was interested in learning
Swedish. Their teaching included 10 children gathered round me, shouting
random words at me all at one time, expecting me to repeat them and
understand them.

At lunch times, I was told I would probably meet up with the other 2 exchange
students and stay in the staff room, but I ended up playing football with the
whole class. For lunch I was dragged to their lunchroom where I was fed normal
primary school lunches and surrounded by even smaller, younger children who
could also speak good English. In the afternoon, I helped them with their Maths



                                     12
work while I learnt Swedish as they gave me pop quizzes on what they had
taught me.

During the four days I was there I helped in lessons such as woodwork, maths
and English, while also conversing with the teachers as they wanted to improve
their English as much as the kids. After lunch on Wednesday, I had the
opportunity to sit in other classes, which although I did not understand the
classes it was a worthwhile experience. Also on the Wednesday, I decided to
stay after school as they had a post school activities club, which gave me the
chance to interact with even more children, which was thoroughly enjoyable.

Before the week had begun, I expected to have learnt a couple of names but I
knew the whole class as I had spoken to them all at one time. On Thursday
lunchtime, I had to unfortunately say goodbye to the children we had met, this
is when I realised that I had really connected with these children and I wished
the trip had lasted longer.

I would have to recommend anyone, with the chance of any trip like this to take
it with both hands, as it will be one of the most enjoyable times of your life.




                                    13
Case Study 2: Domenique White

Hotel and catering Student

Three-month placement working as a hotel receptionist in Madrid.

Her Experiences:

The LEONARDO programme is designed for young people like myself who are
interested in improving their language skills and gaining work experience in
another European country. It provides a once in a lifetime opportunity to
integrate fully into the daily life of your chosen country. It is challenging and
can be hard going, but if you approach the difficulties with a positive attitude,
everything will work out for the best.

I spent three months following the LEONARDO programme in Madrid, choosing
the Hospitality and Catering work experience offer, because I wanted to gain
experience in a hotel reception. Like the majority of my fellow students, I had
some knowledge of Spanish, but I had never followed a language course. That is
why I was particularly interested in the LEONARDO programme: it was the ideal
way to get a formal certificate and to gain work experience.

The way that LEONARDO placements are organised varies from country to
country, depending on the structure of the partner in the host country. In
Madrid, the LEONARDO students are placed with host families. This is brilliant
because we had to speak Spanish all the time, it is also quite daunting as Madrid
is a large city and we were spread geographically across the whole city. I have
friends who have completed the LEONARDO programme in Sevilla and Barcelona
who had quite a different experience.

The language course was gruelling: however it did provide us with the skills we
needed to do our work placements. Writing the portfolio was a time consuming
task, but I am glad to have done it, as I now have a thorough record of my time
in Madrid as a LEONARDO student and a qualification.

The excursions we went on were excellent with a guide who was patient with our
language difficulties and eager to teach us about Madrid and its surroundings.
By the end of the month of classes, we had become a close group making the
transition into work placements quite a jolt.

As for me, I can say that my life in Madrid really started once the work
placement began. After the initial shock of being in a hotel in the centre of the
city, I got into the routine of being there and made the most of my time. I met
up with the other LEONARDO students about once a week. For the rest of the




                                     14
time I was making Spanish pals through the hotel and improving my Spanish on a
daily basis. Within a month I had decided to stay in Madrid.

I have been there almost ten months now and am very settled. The LEONARDO
programme certainly worked for me and is a very rewarding experience. It
helped me establish myself permanently in Madrid.




                                    15
Case Study 3: Julie

Health and Social Care Student

Three-week placement working in a home for the elderly in the Netherlands.

Her experiences:

I knew I was going to work. I was a little nervous about getting to know the
people because of the language and the different environment and how it was
going to affect me, but I felt very positive about the whole experience.

Before we went on work experience we were given a one-day training in basic
healthcare and how to resuscitate patients.

The work experience was excellent. The people were friendly. I could not believe
it. The students in the college were brilliant. Everything they do is similar to
England. The only differences were some items of equipment. I did everything I
had to do. I was like the other members of staff, they trusted me the same. I
had to bath patients by myself – after initial supervision. I learned how to take
blood sugar levels which I had never done before. I fed clients, I took them out
for walks, mopped the floor and many other things.

Communication was no problem and I was lucky in that I had a number of
residents who spoke very good English so the communications barrier was broken
down in that way. However I was also able to communicate across boundaries and
I learned some Dutch during my stay.

I found the staff to be very efficient in their duties and they seemed to care a
lot for the residents. I got on very well with the staff and they took me out for
a lovely meal at the end. I still write to some of them.

We had to be there at eight. This was quite difficult but they expected us to be
punctual. I always managed to get there on time. I never missed a day.

I think it was an excellent experience. I really enjoyed myself. I still miss the
patients. I would recommend this experience to everyone. The Dutch were so
friendly; it was like being on another planet. They were so nice and always
smiling.




                                     16
Case Study 4: Susan Tanner

Studied Business Studies and Economics at a University in Hannover, Germany
for 1 academic year.

Her experiences

My first impression was of surprise. The architecture, the roads and even the
people were different to what I was used to in England, making me slightly
apprehensive about the year ahead.

The biggest difference I found was the methods of study. The most common
form of study was the compulsory lectures. The lecture halls were much larger
and there were a larger range of subjects on offer than back home. Also, in
Germany, students are a lot older – first years are normally 20 or 21 and many
people study for five to seven years, so don’t expect to know many people your
own age.

Whilst in Germany, I missed the dry English sense of humour - until my German
friends really got to know me, I think that they thought I was quite rude. The
Germans are also fanatical about their coffee and tea (I was amazed about the
range of aroma and herbal teas), but I missed my English cup of tea and a
familiar pint of beer – all German beer has a large frothy head on it.

My university accommodation was not like the halls of residence I knew in
Nottingham. I had a very basic room in a flat sharing with two Spaniards and a
Chinese girl. I eventually found a private flat to live in, sharing with five
Germans.

It may sound obvious, but I would stress how important it is to make a real
effort to meet and mix with the locals – especially via University clubs. It is the
only way to get fluent and understand the culture. Although practically every
German I met wanted to practice their English, insist that you speak German
with them – its too easy to be lazy and not make an effort.

I thoroughly enjoyed my year abroad. As well as improving my language, it built
up my confidence and I now have loads of contacts all over Europe. It definitely
breaks down barriers – I am even considering going back to do my Masters in
Germany.




                                      17
Lesson Plan 2 - Exercise 3 - Imagine that…

Imagine that you have been told that you will be going on either a three-month
placement in Madrid or one week as a language assistant in a Swedish school, or
a term in an Italian University.

   1. How would you feel?




   2. What are your immediate thoughts?




   3. What would worry you?




   4. What would excite and interest you?




   5. What would you have to think about and prepare before you left?




   6. Where would you find out the necessary information?




                                    18
Lesson Plan 3 Exercises:

Materials:
  • Questions on pages 21, 22 & 23 (answer sheets on pages 24 & 25).
  • Questionnaire worksheet page 26.
  • EXODUS database.

Exercise 1 - Introduction to EXODUS (5mins)
Explain that the aim of using the EXODUS database is:
   • To provide an overview of the opportunities for young people outside the
       UK, which will give them access to information about international
       openings including: years out, studying, working (both short-term and
       long-term) and living in Europe and beyond.
   • To encourage young people to consider taking up the opportunities
       available to them.
   • To encourage young people to consider the benefits of learning a language
       for the enhancement of their career, curriculum vitae and personal
       development.

Exercise 2 - Brief overview of EXODUS (15mins)
Take a look at each section of EXODUS.

   •   Click - Getting Started – then select from the menu bar on the left -
       Before You Go – Permits and Visas. The article states that British
       citizens can stay in an EU (European Union) country for up to three
       months without a visa or work permit. Longer stays require a residence
       permit.
   •   Read through other sections (Money, Insurance, Health, Languages,
       Culture and Further Reading) just to get an idea of what information is
       available.
   •   Point out the uses of the Home and Back options.
   •   Look at Where in the World option and show that a country can be
       selected either by selecting on the menu or the map.
   •   Look at Travel option on the Home page, select any country and point out
       that information is available on different modes of transport available to
       and within a country and some tourist information. In the Useful
       Addresses option links to websites can often be found.
   •   From the Home menu select Find It option and type in “Working in South
       Africa” and then hit Search. Have a look at the article it brings up.
   •   The Study Resources option from Home menu is for AVCE students, it
       contains more in depth information that is not applicable to younger
       students.
   •   Quit exits the programme at the end of the session.




                                     19
Exercise 3-     EXODUS research questions. (30 mins)
Students work either alone or in pairs and use EXODUS to answer 10 questions
found on pages 21, 22 & 23.

Answers:
1)An exchange scheme allowing students to spend from 3-12 months in another
European University.
2) Many different subjects, e.g. accountancy, history, law. Maths, chemistry etc.
3) French, Flemish (similar to Dutch) or German.
4) Any 2 of the following:
    • IVS (International Voluntary Service)
    • Concordia
    • UNA Exchange
    • The Instituto de la Juventud (Servicio Voluntario Internacional de
       España)
    • Sunseed Trust
    • AIESEC
    • Worldwide Volunteering
5) The LEONARDO programme.
6) Any 3 of the following options:
    • Asking around
    • Leaving contact details with employers
    • Look in publications such as “Summer Jobs Abroad” or “Working your
       Way Around the World”
    • Look in the “Overseas Express” newspaper.
7) Any 2 of the following organisations:
    • BUNAC
    • Camp America
    • CCUSA
    • American Work Experience
8) 3 months.
9) A “Right to Work” document and you have to be legally housed.
10) No.


Exercise 4 –   Questionnaire (10 mins)
Students complete the questionnaire on page 26, which is asking them for
feedback on EXODUS and can be discussed as a class at the end of the session.




                                     20
Lesson Plan 3 - Exercise 3. EXODUS research questions.



Using EXODUS answer the following questions.

   1. What is a SOCRATES-ERASMUS placement?

Click on: Home - Getting Started - Studying Exchanges.




   2. What subjects are available in the SOCRATES-ERASMUS placements in
      Belgium (and other EU countries)?

Click on: Home – Where in the World – Belgium – Study - Studying in
Belgium – European Programmes.




   3. What choice of languages do you need to have a certain amount of ability
      in for the SOCRATES-ERASMUS programme in Belgium?

Click on: Home – Where in the World – Belgium – Study - Studying in
Belgium – European Programmes.




   4. List 2 organisations that can arrange voluntary work placements in Spain.

Click on: Home – Where in the World – Spain – Time Out – Voluntary Work
in Spain – Voluntary Work Opportunities.




                                    21
   5. What programme can provide funding for work experience placements in
      Europe?

Click on: Home – Where in the World – Italy – Work and Training - Training
Opportunities in Italy – Short Term Possibilities.




   6. List 3 ways of finding a summer job in Spain.

Click on: Home – Where in the World -Spain – Time Out – Taking Time Out –
Tourist Industry.




   7. List 2 organisations that can arrange summer work visas in the USA.

Click on: Home – Where in the World – USA – Work and Training – Working
in the United States of America – Visa and Work Permits - scroll down to
the end of the article and select – Taking a Year Out in the United States of
America – Work Programmes and Exchange Schemes.




   8. In Australia what is the maximum time you can work for in any one job on
      a Working Holiday Visa?

Click on: Home – Where in the World – Australia – Taking a Year Out in
Australia – Visas.




                                     22
   9. What would you need to work on Guernsey?

Click on: Home – Where in the World – Channel Islands- Background – The
Channel Islands Guernsey - Working in Guernsey – Employment.




   10. Would you need a visa if you wanted to set up a business on one of the
       Canary Islands?

Click on: Home – Where in the World – Canary Islands – Entry and
Residence.




                                   23
Lesson Plan 3 - Exercise 1. Answers.

   1. What is a SOCRATES-ERASMUS placement?

An exchange scheme allowing students to spend from 3-12 months in another
European University.

   2. What subjects are available in the SOCRATES-ERASMUS placements
      in Belgium (and other EU) countries?

Many different subjects, e.g. accountancy, history, law. Maths, chemistry etc.

   3. What choice of languages do you need to have a certain amount of
      ability in for the SOCRATES-ERASMUS programme in Belgium?

French, Flemish (similar to Dutch) or German.

   4. List 2 organisations that can arrange voluntary work placements in
      Spain.

Any 2 of the following:

   •   IVS (International Voluntary Service)
   •   Concordia
   •   UNA Exchange
   •   The Instituto de la Juventud (Servicio Voluntario Internacional de
       España)
   •   Sunseed Trust
   •   AIESEC
   •   Worldwide Volunteering

   5. What programme can provide funding for work experience placements
      in Europe?

The LEONARDO programme.

   6. List 3 ways of finding a summer job in Spain.

Any 3 of the following options:

   •   Asking around
   •   Leaving contact details with employers
   •   Look in publications such as “Summer Jobs Abroad” or “Working your
       Way Around the World”
   •   Look in the “Overseas Express” newspaper.



                                     24
      7. List 2 organisations that can arrange summer work visas in the USA.

Any 2 of the following organisations:

      •   BUNAC
      •   Camp America
      •   CCUSA
      •   American Work Experience

      8. In Australia what is the maximum time you can work for in any one
         job on a Working Holiday Visa?

3 months.

      9. What would you need to work on Guernsey?

A “Right to Work” document and you have to be legally housed.

      10. Would you need a visa if you wanted to set up a business on one of
          the Canary Islands?

No.




                                        25
Lesson Plan 4 - Exercise 2 - Feedback Questionnaire.



What can the EXODUS database be used for?




Did you find the programme easy to use? Why/Why not?




Was it useful? Why/Why not?




What subjects are you interested in studying?




Where in the world might you be interested in studying or doing work
placement?




Has the EXODUS programme made you realise more than before how useful
learning a foreign language is?




                                    26
Lesson Plan 4 Exercises:

Materials:
  • Worksheet on page 28.
  • EXODUS database.
  • Quotations on pages 29 & 30.


Exercise 1 –    An imaginary scenario. (40mins)
Students decide on either to study or work in a country of their choice and
write about one side of A4 (page 28) using the EXODUS database regarding
what preparations they would need to make before they travelled and what to
expect when they got there.


Exercise 2 –     Quotations. (20mins)
Read or alternatively photocopy onto overhead transparencies the quotations on
pages 29 & 30 and discuss as a class.

Points to discuss could include the fact that UK nationals have the right to live,
work or study in other EU countries without the need of a work permit. This
means that the ability to speak another language will create greater
opportunities in later life. E.g. As UK trade grows within Europe those with
language skills may have the opportunity to travel overseas within their job or
possibly work or live in another country. The number of Euro nationals working in
the UK show that there will be major competition. UK nationals will be at a
disadvantage in tomorrow’s labour market, because many do not speak a foreign
language. Businesses and other organisations need staff with language skills to
work in a variety of different areas not just translation or teaching. Because
people do not realise that, there is a vast shortage of employees with language
ability. It doesn’t really matter what type of work a young person is considering
going into, it is very likely that learning a language will be beneficial and will
probably bring financial rewards. The Socrates-Erasmus programme offers
courses ranging from Accountancy to Zoology, which means you, almost any
subject can be studied in a European institution. The Leonardo da Vinci
programme can arrange work placements overseas. For some reason UK nationals
are three times less likely to make use of these opportunities. Why is this? Are
we too isolated? Do we feel it is not necessary because English is spoken so
frequently worldwide? Or are we simply unaware of the career advantages that
foreign languages provide?

It should be pointed out that there are practical reasons why these programmes
may not be appropriate, e.g. for financial reasons or difficulty adapting to
different cultures. Although living abroad will offer an experience that will
increase confidence and maturity as well as improving foreign language ability.




                                      27
Lesson Plan 4 – Exercise 1. An Imaginary Scenario.

Decide on either to study or work in a country of your choice and write about
one side of A4 regarding what preparations you would need to make before you
travel and what to expect when you get there.




                                   28
Lesson Plan 4 - Exercise 2. Quotations.

Discuss the following quotations:

1. “Every citizen of Europe has the right to work or study
in another member state, but to fully take advantage of
this opportunity knowledge of the host country’s language is
essential.”
Source: Viviane Reading European Commission

2. UK trade to the EU as a proportion of the total has
increased from 35% to 60% since the introduction of the
single European market.
Source: Minister for Further and Higher Education

3. The UK…
Exports more to France than the Commonwealth
Exports more to Germany than the USA
Exports more to Belgium than Japan
Source: UK Secretary of State for Trade

4. 70% of British companies conduct business in other
countries
Source: Survey in Professional Manager Journal

5. Experts believe Britain could double its trade with
Europe, if we could overcome language barriers.
Source: Observer Sept. 2002

6. “Young people from the UK are at a disadvantage in the
recruitment market. The UK workforce suffers from a
chronic shortage of people at all levels with usable language
skills. Companies increasingly need personnel with technical
or professional skills plus another language, and often their
only option is to recruit native speakers of other
languages.”
Source: Nuffield Languages Enquiry



                                    29
7. 15% of UK Nationals can speak another language
fluently.
66% of British people have absolutely no knowledge of any
other language than English.
65% of German Nationals can speak another language to “ a
reasonable level”.
Source: Daily Telegraph Gallup Survey 2000

8. Three times as many young people from EEA countries
visit the UK to study, work or train than vice versa. UK
nationals are missing opportunities.
Source: SOCRATES-ERASMUS Bureau

9. In recent years, the number of students taking:
French ‘A’ level has decreased by 23%
German ‘A’ level had decreased by 10%
Media Studies ‘A’ level has increased by 102%
Business Studies ‘A’ level has increased by 41%
The business and media world needs language skills. In
2001, the number of students studying language courses at
university decreased by 3%.
Source: UCAS

10. 90% of jobs involving languages are in sectors such as
sales, marketing and finance and not in translating and
teaching.
Source: Observer Sept. 2002

11. Secretarial and Clerical Staff with languages can earn
20% extra than those with only English.
Source: The Guardian

12. Graduates with foreign language skills can expect to
earn at least 10% more than those without.
Source: Reed Recruitment 2001




                                30
Lesson Plan 5 Exercise:

Exercise 1 – A debate for and against learning a foreign language. (60 mins)
Divide the class into halves; one half is for learning a foreign language whilst the
other half is against. Allow preparation time followed by a debate.




                                      31
                         Lesson plan for 1 hour

Materials:
  • Exodus database.
  • Worksheets: EXODUS research questions pages 21, 22 & 23. Answer
      sheets are on pages 24 & 25.
  • Imagine that …… on page 18.


Exercise 1 -       Introduction to EXODUS (5mins)
Explain that the aim of using the EXODUS database is:
   • To provide an overview of the opportunities for young people outside the
       UK, which will give them access to information about international
       openings including: years out, studying, working (both short-term and
       long-term) and living in Europe and beyond.
   • To encourage young people to consider taking up the opportunities
       available to them.
   • To encourage young people to consider the benefits of learning a language
       for the enhancement of their career, curriculum vitae and personal
       development.


Exercise 2 -      Brief overview of EXODUS (15mins)
Take a look at each section of EXODUS.

   •   Click - Getting Started – then select from the menu bar on the left -
       Before You Go – Permits and Visas. The article states that British
       citizens can stay in an EU (European Union) country for up to three
       months without a visa or work permit. Longer stays require a residence
       permit.
   •   Read through other sections (Money, Insurance, Health, Languages,
       Culture and Further Reading) just to get an idea of what information is
       available.
   •   Point out the uses of the Home and Back options.
   •   Look at Where in the World option and show that a country can be
       selected either by selecting on the menu or the map.
   •   Look at Travel option on the Home page, select any country and point out
       that information is available on different modes of transport available to
       and within a country and some tourist information. In the Useful
       Addresses option links to websites can often be found.
   •   From the Home menu select Find It option and type in “Working in South
       Africa” and then hit Search. Have a look at the article it brings up.
   •   The Study Resources option from Home menu is for AVCE students, it
       contains more in depth information that is not applicable to younger
       students.
   •   Quit exits the programme at the end of the session.



                                     32
Exercise 3 -     EXODUS research questions. (30 mins)
Students work either alone or in pairs and use EXODUS to answer 10 questions
found on pages 21, 22 & 23.

Answers:
1)An exchange scheme allowing students to spend from 3-12 months in another
European University.
2) Many different subjects, e.g. accountancy, history, law. Maths, chemistry etc.
3) French, Flemish (similar to Dutch) or German.
4) Any 2 of the following:
    • IVS (International Voluntary Service)
    • Concordia
    • UNA Exchange
    • The Instituto de la Juventud (Servicio Voluntario Internacional de
       España)
    • Sunseed Trust
    • AIESEC
    • Worldwide Volunteering
5) The LEONARDO programme.
6) Any 3 of the following options:
    • Asking around
    • Leaving contact details with employers
    • Look in publications such as “Summer Jobs Abroad” or “Working your
       Way Around the World”
    • Look in the “Overseas Express” newspaper.
7) Any 2 of the following organisations:
    • BUNAC
    • Camp America
    • CCUSA
    • American Work Experience
8) 3 months.
9) A “Right to Work” document and you have to be legally housed.
10) No.



Exercise 4 -      Imagine that… (10mins)
Do the “Imagine that….“ scenario (page 18). Can be done in pairs or small groups.
Discuss feelings and the fact that they would need to think about practical
factors such as: travel arrangements, transport within the area, accommodation,
insurance, healthcare, languages, culture, financial aspects and visas etc.




                                     33
                         Lesson plan for 2 hours

1st Hour

Materials:
  • Worksheet for “Should I learn a foreign language to assist my career?”
      on page 8.
  • Case studies on pages 12 – 17 inclusive.
  • Worksheet listing the 18 EU/EEA members on page 5.


Exercise 1     – Should I learn a language to assist my career? (30 mins)
The exercise can start with a quick class brainstorming session about which
careers it is important to be able to speak another language for.
Following this, it is important to stress that the list that has been produced is a
very narrow list and that being able to speak another language can open many
doors in a wide range of careers.
The students should then be asked to complete the Exercise 4 worksheet
questionnaire on page 8. This section could form the basis of a group discussion
to look at whether the students themselves will be studying a language and the
reasons why they will be or why they have decided against studying a language.
They could then discuss what relevance they see learning a language has for
their own career and whether they would be interested in working abroad.
At the end of the questionnaire, you should point out that any one who has
answered yes to any of the questions should seriously consider studying a
language. The point to make is that it is a question of being educated and trained
for a particular job and having language skills. It is important not to think solely
of either studying languages or training for a particular career.
For example, a lawyer, accountant, engineer or builder who can speak another
language will have more career opportunities available to them than a lawyer,
accountant, engineer or builder who cannot speak another language. They will if
they want have the opportunity to work in another country, but more
importantly, their skills will be of value to UK employers. Many organisations in
the UK now need employees with language skills in order to speak to customers
and suppliers in other European countries.


Exercise 2 –    Case Studies. (25mins)
Read through the case studies (pages 12-17 inclusive) as a class and discuss the
experiences of the placement students. The aim of the case studies is to make
students aware of the range of opportunities that are available to young people.
It is also to provide information about young peoples’ views about their
experiences working and studying in other European countries. It is important
that young people are aware that there are plus points and there are negative



                                      34
points to studying and working abroad. Need to come to the conclusion that
the key is to be well prepared and have a good knowledge of a foreign language.


Exercise 3 –      List the 15 members of the European Union (EU) plus the
additional 3 that make up the European Economic Area (EEA). (10mins)
Students work alone, in pairs or in small groups and try and complete the table
on page 5 in 5 minutes. Go through the answers as a class. The exercise should
be linked to the fact that UK nationals have the right to live, work, study or
train in any of the countries that are members of the European Union. Similarly
nationals of any of those countries have the right to live, work, study or train in
the UK.


Answers: EU members are:
   2) Austria 2) Belgium 3) Denmark 4) Finland 5) France 6) Germany 7) Greece
   8) Ireland 9) Italy 10) Luxembourg 11) the Netherlands 12) Portugal
   13) Spain 14) Sweden 15) UK

Additional EEA members are:
1) Iceland 2) Liechtenstein 3) Norway

2nd Hour

   •   Materials:
   •   Exodus database.
   •   Worksheets: EXODUS research questions pages 21, 22 & 23. Answer
       sheets are on pages 24 & 25.
   •   Imagine that …… on page 18.


Exercise 1 -       Introduction to EXODUS (5mins)
Explain that the aim of using the EXODUS database is:
   • To provide an overview of the opportunities for young people outside the
       UK, which will give them access to information about international
       openings including: years out, studying, working (both short-term and
       long-term) and living in Europe and beyond.
   • To encourage young people to consider taking up the opportunities
       available to them.
   • To encourage young people to consider the benefits of learning a language
       for the enhancement of their career, curriculum vitae and personal
       development.


Exercise 2 -      Brief overview of EXODUS (15mins)
Take a look at each section of EXODUS.




                                      35
       •     Click - Getting Started – then select from the menu bar on the left -
             Before You Go – Permits and Visas. The article states that British
           citizens can stay in an EU (European Union) country for up to three
           months without a visa or work permit. Longer stays require a residence
           permit.
   •       Read through other sections (Money, Insurance, Health, Languages,
           Culture and Further Reading) just to get an idea of what information is
           available.
   •       Point out the uses of the Home and Back options.
   •       Look at Where in the World option and show that a country can be
           selected either by selecting on the menu or the map.
   •       Look at Travel option on the Home page, select any country and point out
           that information is available on different modes of transport available to
           and within a country and some tourist information. In the Useful
           Addresses option links to websites can often be found.
   •       From the Home menu select Find It option and type in “Working in South
           Africa” and then hit Search. Have a look at the article it brings up.
   •       The Study Resources option from Home menu is for AVCE students, it
           contains more in depth information that is not applicable to younger
           students.
   •       Quit exits the programme at the end of the session.


Exercise 3-     EXODUS research questions. (30 mins)
Students work either alone or in pairs and use EXODUS to answer 10 questions
found on pages 21, 22 & 23.

Answers:
1)An exchange scheme allowing students to spend from 3-12 months in another
European University.
2) Many different subjects, e.g. accountancy, history, law. Maths, chemistry etc.
3) French, Flemish (similar to Dutch) or German.
4) Any 2 of the following:
    • IVS (International Voluntary Service)
    • Concordia
    • UNA Exchange
    • The Instituto de la Juventud (Servicio Voluntario Internacional de
       España)
    • Sunseed Trust
    • AIESEC
    • Worldwide Volunteering
5) The LEONARDO programme.
6) Any 3 of the following options:
    • Asking around
    • Leaving contact details with employers




                                         36
      • Look in publications such as “Summer Jobs Abroad” or “Working your
      Way Around the World”
    • Look in the “Overseas Express” newspaper.
7) Any 2 of the following organisations:
    • BUNAC
    • Camp America
    • CCUSA
    • American Work Experience
8) 3 months.
9) A “Right to Work” document and you have to be legally housed.
10) No.



Exercise 4 -      Imagine that… (10mins)
Do the “Imagine that….“ scenario (page 18). Can be done in pairs or small groups.
Discuss feelings and the fact that they would need to think about practical
factors such as: travel arrangements, transport within the area, accommodation,
insurance, healthcare, languages, culture, financial aspects and visas etc.




                                     37
                        Lesson plan for 3 hours

1st and 2nd Hours as for 2-hour lesson plan.

3rd Hour

Materials:
  • Quotation sheets on pages 29 & 30.
  • The Imaginary Scenario sheet on page 28.
  • EXODUS database.


Exercise 1 –     Quotations. (20 mins)
Read the quotations on pages 29 & 30 as a class and discuss.


Exercise 2 –    An imaginary scenario. (40mins)
Students decide on either to study or work in a country of their choice and
write about one side of A4 (page 28) using the EXODUS database regarding
what preparations they would need to make before they travelled and what to
expect when they got there.


                         Lesson plan for 4 hours

As for the 5-hour lesson plan minus the 5th hour.




                                     38

								
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