BEA by ashrafp

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									Table of Content

   1.  Introduction
   2.  E-commerce Transaction Solution
   3.  Enterprise Application Integration Strategy
   4.  E-commerce Strategies JAVA/J2EE
   5.  Market Size
   6.  Market Segment
   7.  Pain
   8.  BEA – Application Integration for the e-business era
           - Plan and Provision for success
           - How does BEA solve that pain
   9. BEA Component
   10. Key BEA features and benefits
   11. Analyze
           - product strategies
           - industry alliances
           - intellectual property
           - standardization
           - revenue stream
           - pricing
   12. Conclusion



                             Style: Analyzing a Single Company

                    "BEA Systems and the Application Server Market"

         Application servers, whatever their function, occupy a large chunk of computing
territory between database servers and the end user. First and foremost, application servers
connect database information (usually coming from a database server) and the end-user or
client program (often running in a Web browser). There are many reasons for having an
intermediate player in this connection -- among other things, a desire to decrease the size and
complexity of client programs, the need to cache and control the data flow for better
performance, and a requirement to provide security for both data and user traffic. But that's not
all. In the early days of application servers, it was realized that applications themselves, the
programs people were using to get work done, were becoming bigger and more complex --
both to write and maintain. At the same time, pressure was increasing for applications to share
more of their data and sometimes functionality. More applications were either located on a
network or used networks extensively. It seemed logical to have some kind of program residing
on the network that would help share application capabilities in an organized and efficient way
-- making it easier to write, manage, and maintain the applications.
         The end result of this thinking is what is now called an application server. However,
these servers first appeared in client/server computing and on LANs. At first, they were often
associated with "tiered" applications, when people described the functionality of applications
as two-tiered (database and client program), three-tiered (database, client program, and
application server), or n-tiered (all of the above plus whatever). This was (and still is) a
complex model of application development, and it resisted wide-scale implementation. Then
along came the World Wide Web. The Web is automatically three-tiered (database, client
program, and Web server) and managing data along with application functionality suddenly
became not only an esoteric exercise in better program design, but also a downright necessity.
This vaulted the application server from obscurity to the top of a pedestal, and literally scores
of companies jumped in to develop products.
        According to the latest crop of statistics, the worldwide application server market
bucked all trends and grew 128 percent, reaching almost $2.2 billion in 2000. This comes on
top of 1999's worldwide revenue growth of 110 percent to $957 million. Experts expect this
strong growth to continue through 2005. "It's difficult to overstate the significance of this
growth rate. When a market reaches the level of maturity that the [application server software
platform] ASSP market reached in 1999, annual growth usually slows, not accelerates," said
Steve Garone, IDC's vice president". In addition, Enterprises have overspent about $1 billion
on application server technology solutions since 1998 and it is projected that an additional $2
billion may be wasted between now and 2003.
        BEA Systems and IBM claimed the largest chunk of this still-growing market, with
revenue shares of 18 percent and 15 percent, respectively. Sun trailed in third with 8 percent.
"Survival in the ASSP market requires more than just ASSP products. Vendors need to provide
an e-business platform that includes all the functions necessary to build and deploy e-business
applications, leveraging the ASSP as the foundation layer," Garone said. "BEA and IBM both
understand this requirement.". With more than 40 companies providing ASSP including giants
like IBM, Sun, HP, Oracle, and Microsoft, it is interesting to find a company like BEA at the
top. This is also surprising because BEA is an independent software vendor (ISV) meaning that
it is not involved in manufacturing hardware/servers like IBM and HP nor it is a database
vender like Oracle and Sybase. This means that BEA has, theoretically, less market leverage
against many of its competitors. However, what is clear is that BEA WebLogic is an overall
leader and in pole position within the ASSP market. One of the reasons for BEA's leadership is
its very advanced level of technology. BEA WebLogic Server is very much recognized by the
market and by its customers as a solid technical product. The major market players (database
vendors and manufacturers) consider BEA to be one of their biggest competitors. Further proof
of the vendor's leading position is evidenced by the alliances BEA formed with Vignette in
January 2001 and BroadVision in November 2000.
        The proposal is to study BEA Systems as a company succeeded in a market crowded
with other companies which seemed to be better positioned both in terms of financial resources
and acquisition of know-how and complementary assets. The study will focus on the strategic
business challenges BEA is facing and will cover areas like product strategies, industry
alliances, innovation and intellectual property, and standardization.


        Application servers, whatever their function, occupy a large chunk of computing
territory between database servers and the end user. First and foremost, application servers
connect database information (usually coming from a database server) and the end-user or
client program (often running in a Web browser). There are many reasons for having an
intermediate player in this connection -- among other things, a desire to decrease the size and
complexity of client programs, the need to cache and control the data flow for better
performance, and a requirement to provide security for both data and user traffic. But that's not
all. In the early days of application servers, it was realized that applications themselves, the
programs people were using to get work done, were becoming bigger and more complex --
both to write and maintain. At the same time, pressure was increasing for applications to share
more of their data and sometimes functionality. More applications were either located on a
network or used networks extensively. It seemed logical to have some kind of program residing
on the network that would help share application capabilities in an organized and efficient way
-- making it easier to write, manage, and maintain the applications.



        The end result of this thinking is what is now called an application server. However,
these servers first appeared in client/server computing and on LANs. At first, they were often
associated with "tiered" applications, when people described the functionality of applications
as two-tiered (database and client program), three-tiered (database, client program, and
application server), or n-tiered (all of the above plus whatever). This was (and still is) a
complex model of application development, and it resisted wide-scale implementation. Then
along came the World Wide Web. The Web is automatically three-tiered (database, client
program, and Web server) and managing data along with application functionality suddenly
became not only an esoteric exercise in better program design, but also a downright necessity.
This vaulted the application server from obscurity to the top of a pedestal, and literally scores
of companies jumped in to develop products.



        According to the latest crop of statistics, the worldwide application server market
bucked all trends and grew 128 percent, reaching almost $2.2 billion in 2000. This comes on
top of 1999's worldwide revenue growth of 110 percent to $957 million. Experts expect this
strong growth to continue through 2005. "It's difficult to overstate the significance of this
growth rate. When a market reaches the level of maturity that the [application server software
platform] ASSP market reached in 1999, annual growth usually slows, not accelerates," said
Steve Garone, IDC's vice president". In addition, Enterprises have overspent about $1 billion
on application server technology solutions since 1998 and it is projected that an additional $2
billion may be wasted between now and 2003.

BEA Systems and IBM claimed the largest chunk of this still-growing market, with revenue shares of 18 percent
and 15 percent, respectively. Sun trailed in third with 8 percent.

"Survival in the ASSP market requires more than just ASSP products. Vendors need to provide an e-business
platform that includes all the functions necessary to build and deploy e-business applications, leveraging the ASSP
as the foundation layer," Garone said. "BEA and IBM both understand this requirement.". With more than 40
companies providing ASSP including giants like IBM, Sun, HP, Oracle, and Microsoft, it is interesting to find a
company like BEA at the top. This is also surprising because BEA is an independent software vendor (ISV) meaning
that it is not involved in manufacturing hardware/servers like IBM and HP nor it is a database vender like Oracle
and Sybase. This means that BEA has, theoretically, less market leverage against many of its competitors.
However, what is clear is that BEA WebLogic is an overall leader and in pole position within the ASSP market. One
of the reasons for BEA's leadership is its very advanced level of technology. BEA WebLogic Server is very much
recognized by the market and by its customers as a solid technical product. The major market players (database
vendors and manufacturers) consider BEA to be one of their biggest competitors. Further proof of the vendor's
leading position is evidenced by the alliances BEA formed with Vignette in January 2001 and BroadVision in
November 2000.

        The proposal is to study BEA Systems as a company succeeded in a market crowded
with other companies that seemed to be better positioned both in terms of financial resources
and acquisition of know-how and complementary assets. The study will focus on the strategic
business challenges BEA is facing and will cover areas like product strategies, industry
alliances, innovation and intellectual property, and standardization.



Industry: Software Infrastructure

BEA is a software infrastructure company, not an application provider. The BEA WebLogic
E-Business Platform can be used in any industry, to support any type of business, and to
drive just about any type of application. In short, it is the essential infrastructure for
building an integrated e-business that can reliably service customers and manage
transactions; scale to handle unpredictable levels of growth; personalize services for
customers to win their long-term loyalty; collaborate flexibly with partners, suppliers and
customers; and adapt nimbly to an increasing rate of change.

With the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform™, you can manage transfers of massive
amounts of information and transactions from the Web to the mainframe and back. You
can make different applications coordinate their activities to act like a single, cohesive
business process. And you can build new, custom applications which can be easily
integrated into existing business environments.

Is WebLogic an industry-specific platform? No. It is a platform for building and running an
e-business, no matter what industry you're in. But of course specific industries and
vertical markets have specific needs and challenges, and different applications and
solutions to meet them. As a result, different industries may find certain capabilities of
BEA infrastructure more relevant than others, and tailor the power of the platform to their
particular needs.

In this section, you can browse across various industries, by using the pull-down menus,
to see how different companies are leveraging the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform for
competitive advantage in their particular markets and industries.




BEA Holds #1 Market Share in Deployed J2EE Application Servers and
Nearly 4-to-1 Lead in EJB Application Deployments
Research conducted by leading industry analyst firm META Group shows that BEA holds 37% of the
market for deployed Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) application servers, a figure that is almost 70%
higher than its closest competitor. These results come from a META Group survey of over 200 IT decision-
makers, focused specifically on managers and executives responsible for selecting and deploying J2EE
applications servers.

The META Group survey was designed to determine which J2EE application servers are actually being used
for deployed e-business applications. Separately, the research also looked specifically at the use of J2EE
application servers for applications using Enterprise JavaBeans. Enterprise JavaBean (EJB) deployments
are important because they are typically used for complex, business-critical applications, providing the
essential infrastructure for the business logic, transaction management and database access essential to
large-scale enterprise applications.

The META Group survey revealed the following market share results for the two leading vendors:




Read the report findings.

Survey Methodology

META Group Consulting surveyed Fortune 2000 class enterprises, speaking directly to the IT decision-
makers selecting application server solutions. Research was conducted through telephone interviews with
mid and upper-level IT management and executives. Of those companies surveyed, 53% conduct virtually
all business within the United States; 41% are U.S.-based multi-national companies; and the remaining
6% are U.S. divisions or subsidiaries with headquarters outside of the U.S.




BEA Systems is one of the world’s leading e-business infrastructure software companies.
Put simply, BEA helps business become e-business.

In the Internet age, businesses that are built to last are built for speed — not just in time-
to-market but also in adapting to change and in innovating with every uptick of Internet
time. More than 10,000 companies have chosen the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform™
as the underpinnings of their business to keep them fast-moving, flexible, and future-
proofed. With WebLogic at their core, these businesses turn change into opportunity and
use their agility as a competitive advantage.

Metrics of Success

      BEA is the fastest software company to reach $1 billion in annual revenue.
      BEA has logged 22 straight quarters of record revenue.
      BEA WebLogic® Server is the world's #1 Java application server, according to
       market assessments by analyst firms Giga, IDC and Gartner.
      BEA has more than 1,900 partners, growing by 100 per month.
      BusinessWeek named BEA the Number One Technology Company with the highest
       shareholder return: 884% (June 2000).

BEA has more than 10,000 customers, including:

      100% of the Fortune Global 500 Telecommunications companies
      100% of the Fortune Global 500 Computer/Office Equipment manufacturers
      100% of the Fortune Global 500 Financial Securities and Diversified Financial
       companies
      91% of the Fortune 500 Healthcare/Medicine companies
      Majority of the Fortune 500 Healthcare/Medicine companies
      Majority of the Fortune Global 500 Airline and Delivery Service companies
      Majority of the Fortune Global 500 Commercial Banking companies, including the
       top 9 of the American Banker Top 100
      Majority of the customers on Forbes Super 100, Fortune Global 100, Fortune e-50,
       and Business 2.0 100 lists

"BEA’s technology allows us to become a lot more flexible on a platform that's solid,
cohesive and integrated."


DHL and more than 10,000 other companies are building their e-businesses on the BEA
WebLogic® E-Business Platform. At the core of the platform is the award-winning BEA
WebLogic Server™, the world’s #1 application server and one of the most trusted brands
in e-business. The WebLogic E-Business Platform™ is an integrated suite of infrastructure
products that support high-volume transactions on a global scale, real-time
personalization, business process management, application integration and business
collaboration within and across enterprises, and the ability to create and maintain dynamic
e-markets.

Increasingly, the WebLogic E-Business Platform is the infrastructure of choice for the New
Economy.

Only the BEA WebLogic® E-Business Platform can do it all
   1. Integrate with enterprise systems

BEA WebLogic Integration Product Brief
BEA WebLogic Integration™ is a single platform that delivers application server,
application integration, business process management, and B2B integration functionality
for the enterprise.

Overview

Technology is the enabler of the enterprise-delivering new ways to streamline enterprise
processes, provide value-added services to customers, and enter new markets. The
deployment of custom legacy systems and packaged applications, such as ERP, CRM, and
MRP, provided the first steps towards meeting these requirements-capturing data, adding
value to internally focused business processes, and improving enterprise efficiencies.
The widespread adoption of the Internet and the explosion of Web and wireless
applications-the second major phase of enterprise computing-has provided the
unprecedented ability to extend the value and impact of key enterprise functions with next
generation solutions for customers, internal stakeholders and partners. Now, Web
Services are looming on the horizon of IT strategies and business plans, promising the
next phase of business value via universal, distributed computing. However Web Services
will not exist independently, relying on seamless integration and execution of both
enterprise and Web strategies for success.

Currently, companies are forced to rely on multiple point vendors, proprietary
technologies, and lengthy service engagements to piece together an enterprise solution.
And, more often than not, that solution must be re-implemented with the addition of each
new application. Today's enterprise needs a single solution that can integrate systems,
custom and packaged applications, and enterprise processes, while simplifying the
addition of each new application and system-greatly reducing overall development effort
and cost.

Introducing BEA WebLogic Integration

Designed to speed development and deployment of new applications, minimize the pain of
integration, and reduce the total cost of ownership for IT initiatives, BEA WebLogic
Integration provides a single, enterprise-class platform. This standards-based, "build to
integrate" approach enables companies to develop and deploy new Web and wireless
applications, rapidly integrate them with existing systems, like ERP, CRM and MRP,
streamline complex business processes, and connect with business partners.

Functional Areas

BEA WebLogic Integration consists of four key functional areas that deliver a truly
integrated platform for enterprise computing:

      Application Server - Develop and Grow Your Business with Confidence

       This robust J2EE-certified application server functionality provides the essential
       capabilities and underlying services for enterprise-class Web and wireless
       applications, allowing companies to focus on delivering value-added applications
       and services, not on infrastructure.

      Application Integration - Link Information Systems and New Applications

       An innovative application integration solution based on the J2EE Connector
       Architecture (J2EE CA) quickly bridges the gaps and reduces the costs associated
       with integrating new, Web-based, packaged, and custom applications.

      Business Process Management - Streamline Enterprise Processes and
       Prepare for Change

       A comprehensive business process management functionality enables companies to
       design, execute, and continually optimize complex e-business processes that
       include applications, systems, and human decision-makers, streamlining enterprise
       operations and enabling the flexibility to change as the business dictates.
       B2B Integration - Connect Rapidly with Business Partners and Manage B2B
        Interactions

        Robust B2B integration functionality that provides low barriers to entry for
        partners, protection of existing investments, and a secure, process-focused
        environment for managing relationships and interactions with distributors, retailers,
        suppliers, and other business partners.

Each functional area builds on the other to provide Web Services support that will help
prepare your enterprise for the future of distributed computing today. BEA WebLogic
Integration provides a comprehensive Web Services solution for the enterprise, whether
you are preparing for the future or are currently developing a Web Services strategy.




Figure 1 shows how BEA WebLogic Integration allows the enterprise to seamlessly develop, deploy,
integrate, and extend applications and business processes, including industry-leading support for Web
Services.


Resources

For information about BEA WebLogic Integration and its functional areas, visit:

       BEA WebLogic Integration Application Integration datasheet at:
        www.bea.com/products/weblogic/integration/appintegration_ds.shtml.
       BEA WebLogic Integration Business B2B Integration datasheet at:
        www.bea.com/products/weblogic/integration/b2bintegration_ds.shtml.
       BEA WebLogic Integration Business Process Management datasheet at:
        www.bea.com/products/weblogic/integration/bizprocessmgnt_ds.shtml.
BEA and WebLogic are registered trademarks, and How business becomes e-business, BEA Campaign Manager for
WebLogic, BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform, BEA WebLogic Integration, BEA WebLogic Java Adapter for Mainframe,
BEA WebLogic Personalization Server, BEA WebLogic Portal, and BEA WebLogic Server are trademarks of BEA Systems,
Inc. All other product and company names are trademarks of their respective owners.




    2. Protect existing investments

    3. Interact in powerful new ways with partners and customers




B2B commerce for real-time business benefits

Why is B2B receiving so much attention not only in the IT press, but also in business
journals? While innovative Web-based technologies that provide the backbone for
developing B2B initiatives are certainly news-worthy, it is the quantifiable business
benefits that are the real news: rapid time to market, cost savings, market transparency,
and new customer opportunities, just to name a few.

Whether the discussion centers on Independent Trading Exchanges or Corporate
Exchanges that align a company's suppliers and distributors in a real-time, efficient
trading partner network, B2B is a hot topic for many businesses. For the foreseeable
future, e-market technologies and collaborative commerce business models will keep
attracting companies in droves that wish to continue as market leaders into the next
decade — as well as those who seek to displace the leading competitors who might not be
quite as nimble. In fact, META Group predicts that in the next two years more than 35%
of Global 2000 companies will adopt e-market technologies, growing to more than 65% by
the year 2005.

To stay competitive, companies can no longer rely solely on the strength of their
distribution channels or their ability to develop new products. Whether you're creating a
new business model on the Web or reinvigorating an established industry, the benefits to
be won from B2B collaboration are available now:

       Enterprise efficiencies. Integrated e-markets provide the ability to automate
        strategic purchasing processes, reducing operating costs for you and your trading
        partners.
       Market transparency. Increased visibility into prices and delivery tables enables
        trading partners to negotiate the lowest prices and guarantee product availability.
       New markets and opportunities. By eliminating the constraints of physical
        space, companies can more effectively compete for deals and markets around the
        globe.
       Reduced barriers to entry. Trading partner relationships are no longer
        constrained by monolithic, rigid technologies such as EDI, nor by the high costs of
        entry that they require.
      Stronger B2C relationships. Ultimately, relationships with trading partners
       improve the speed, price, and quality of products and services that you can offer to
       your customers.

Making collaborative B2B commerce a working reality, however, is no easy task. The
technologies you select will have a great impact on the actual benefits you'll see. Crucial
questions to ask when evaluating these technologies include:

      "How do I manage the unique complexities of different trading partners (for
       example, a strategic supplier versus a spot-supplier)?"
      "Will the solution scale to meet large volumes of business transactions that may
       span long periods of time?"
      "Are the barriers to entry low enough for me to achieve a critical mass of trading
       partners?"
      "Who owns my relationship with the e-market and my trading partners — my
       company or the technology provider?"

Introducing BEA WebLogic Integration, the latest addition to the BEA WebLogic E-Business
Platform™. This powerful solution, with its "build to integrate" approach, delivers
application server, application integration, business process management, and B2B
integration functionality for the enterprise.

The B2B Integration capability within BEA WebLogic Integration enables companies to:

      Model and implement complex, real-world B2B relationships
      Integrate trading partners rapidly, and with low barriers to entry
      Customize B2B initiatives to meet the diverse needs of suppliers, buyers, and
       distributors
      Add partners and dynamically change business processes
      Manage complex B2B interactions to meet real business requirements
      Support the needs of varied industries and business models
      Leverage open standards to protect investments in existing technologies




   4. Automate and streamline business processes

   5. Personalize every customer interaction

Turning one-to-one customer interactions into long-lasting relationships

A Web site, with seemingly unlimited content opportunities, will be overwhelming if the
site presents all possibilities to all users the moment they log in. Conversely, it will be
underwhelming if all that wonderful content is buried in thousands of Web pages front-
ended by an inadequate search engine.

At a minimum, personalization is needed to make a site manageable by understanding
visitors' needs based on their roles — for example, presenting the same information in
different ways to e-generation customers, suppliers, and employees. The ultimate goal is
knowing enough about a customer's preferences and needs to intelligently suggest new
services that they can use, such as providing information on a college savings plan when a
new baby is added to a health insurance policy. The result is to turn a series of single
transactions into a series of interactions that leads to an enduring, mutually profitable
relationship. And personalization makes that happen.

Cyber Dialogue found in 1999 that 18.8 million consumers had personalized a Web page,
six times more than two years previously, because doing so saves them time in getting
the specific information and the right products and services that they want. And there are
tremendous benefits for businesses as well. A mid-1999 survey by Rubric, Inc. found that
94% of online shoppers would more likely respond to e-commerce offers that related to
their prior purchases, while 90% said personalized communication and recognition from
sites would increase their likelihood of repeat purchases.

BEA WebLogic Personalization Server and BEA's 360 Degree Customer Lifecycle
management provide the key infrastructure for building durable online customer
relationships, which are essential to reducing customer acquisition costs — because you're
not just trying to get customers to make a one-time purchase, you're trying to win their
long-term loyalty.

   6. Ensure absolute security and customer-controlled privacy

   7. Comply with standards and drive standards development

   8. Enable e-business from anywhere at any time (Mobile Commerce)

Doing business anytime, anywhere

Mobile commerce customers are the executives who want to access business metrics from
the airport, the sales associates who need to check a fact about a customer moments
before meeting with that customer, the moms who want to order groceries from a cell
phone while waiting outside the school, the dads who want to order flowers for the moms
when they suddenly remember an important date while sitting in traffic, the people who
trade stocks and buy books and participate in auctions — in short, everyone who wants to
have the convenience and power of the Net with them at all times.

As mobile commerce expands outwards from the Scandinavian and Asian countries that
are leading the way, it is expanding on the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform.

At its heart is BEA WebLogic Server, the #1 Java application server in the world. It is also
BEA's m-commerce platform, regardless of the wireless architecture you choose. As Bill
Coleman, BEA's chairman and CEO, said recently, "Our mobile commerce strategy is to
provide the infrastructure for development and deployment of both e-commerce and m-
commerce applications on a common platform, the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform. We
support and integrate with all the major emerging standards for mobile Internet services,
including WAP and i-mode."

For a quick example, Fujimic, Inc. of Tokyo, an affiliated company of Fuji Television
Network, Inc., has built its i-mode-based wireless subscription service for content on
demand (called Fuji Televi) on BEA WebLogic Server. "The reliability of BEA WebLogic
Server ensures that we can handle the massive volume of requests that Fuji Televi
subscribers generate — upwards of several million per day," says Tetsuji Osaka, director
of the solution promotion department, Engineering Division, Fujimic Inc.
Infrastructure for Today's E-Business

BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform™ provides the platform for an e-business that can

      Deliver reliable customer service

      Scale to manage growth across the entire chain of commerce

      Capture customer loyalty with personalized services

      Collaborate flexibly with customers, partners, and suppliers

      Adapt nimbly to increasing rates of change

Comprehensive Set of Products and Services

The BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform includes

      Industry-leading BEA WebLogic application servers for rapidly building, deploying,
       and managing e-business applications

      BEA WebLogic Integration™ for developing and deploying applications, integrating
       with enterprise systems, automating business processes, and managing partner
       interactions

      BEA WebLogic Portal™ for personalized point of access of business-critical
       information and processes for employees, customers, and business partners

      BEA WebLogic Commerce Server™ for rapidly developing and adapting e-
       commerce applications

      BEA WebLogic Personalization Server™ for building applications that win and retain
       customers

      BEA Campaign Manager for WebLogic™ for creating highly personalized marketing
       campaigns that stimulate awareness, interest, and action

      A wide range of education, customer support, and consulting services to enable
       businesses to get in the game fast
EDS and BEA Systems Announce Global Alliance to
Streamline Delivery of Best-in-Class E-Business Solutions

Companies Build On Five-Year Relationship, Cooperate on
Marketing and Sales Programs

PLANO, Texas, and SAN JOSE, Calif. — October 1, 2001 — Building on a five-year
relationship, EDS (NYSE: EDS) and BEA Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq: BEAS) today announced
an alliance through which the two companies will develop joint go-to-market strategies for
integrated packages of services and software on the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform™.

EDS' E Solutions line of business uses the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform to build
integrated systems to enable business information and transactions to flow to companies'
employees, customers and partners. Through the new alliance, EDS and BEA will target
Global 1000 companies by cooperating on training, marketing and sales programs
designed to produce additional integrated systems based on the BEA platform.

"EDS relies on BEA and the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform for scalable, enterprise-
wide, mission-critical applications," said Brad Rucker, executive director of EDS
bluesphere, a division of EDS focused on providing interactive Web solutions. "By
formalizing our alliance, we strengthen our ability to bring innovative solutions based on
industry standards to reduce operating costs, fuel revenue growth and boost productivity
for a broad range of customers."

The BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform

The BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform provides a single solution for enterprise and e-
business applications that require commerce, portal, integration and Web Services. It
allows EDS to unify the development, deployment, integration and process management
of enterprise and extended enterprise solutions. To date, EDS has delivered nearly 100
successful applications built on BEA to its customers worldwide, including county, state
and federal government organizations, multinational telecommunications firms and global
financial institutions.

"The development and implementation of great e-business systems often involves a
broader skill set than any single organization can provide, which is why BEA is committed
to partnering with the best companies in the IT industry," said Rauline Ochs, vice
president of worldwide partner initiatives for BEA. "The EDS-BEA alliance broadens the
opportunities for both companies to provide their joint customers with measurable return-
on-investment through the creation or improvement of reliable and cost-effective
solutions."

EDS-BEA Systems Collaboration at Work

EDS and BEA have collaborated on an integrated e-business system called CalWORKS
Information Network (CalWIN). Slated for completion in 2002, the system manages the
delivery of human-services benefits to families in 18 California counties.

Built on the BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform, the system is designed to streamline
service delivery through multiple assistance programs operating within these counties.
Upon its completion, CalWIN will be used by more than 30,000 employees in 777 offices
throughout the state. The new platform enables employees to utilize an automated tool
that increases benefit accuracy and the speed at which services are delivered to more
than 1 million California families. Additionally, the system provides managers with a tool
to increase productivity and efficiency, as well as reduce payment errors and the cost of
program administration.

"The BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform provides solid performance and high availability
to manage the extreme complexity of this mission-critical social services system," said
Dan Gonos, EDS chief technologist for the CalWIN project. "Our work with BEA to forge
agreements for this project has paved the way for the global alliance, which will
streamline future projects requiring enterprise-class transaction processing."

About EDS

EDS, the leading global services company, provides strategy, implementation and hosting
for clients managing the business and technology complexities of the digital economy.
EDS brings together the world's best technologies to address critical client business
imperatives. It helps clients eliminate boundaries, collaborate in new ways, establish their
customers' trust and continuously seek improvement. EDS, with its management
consulting subsidiary, A.T. Kearney, serves the world's leading companies and
governments in 55 countries. EDS reported revenues of $19.2 billion in 2000. The
company's stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE: EDS) and the London
Stock Exchange.

About BEA

BEA Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq: BEAS) is one of the world's leading e-business infrastructure
software companies, with more than 11,000 customers around the world, including the
majority of the Fortune Global 500. BEA and its WebLogic® brand are among the most
trusted names in e-business. Businesses built on the award-winning BEA WebLogic E-
Business Platform™ are reliable, highly scalable, and poised to bring new services to
market quickly. BEA's e-business platform is the de facto standard for more than 2,100
systems integrators, independent software vendors (ISVs) and application service
providers (ASPs) to provide complete solutions that fast-track and future-proof e-
businesses for high growth and profitability.

About Akamai

Akamai is the leading provider of outsourced e-business infrastructure services and
software. These services and software enable companies to reduce the complexity and
cost of deploying and operating a uniform Web infrastructure while ensuring unmatched
performance, reliability, scalability and manageability. Akamai's services give businesses a
distinct competitive advantage and provide an unparalleled Internet experience for their
customers. Akamai's intelligent edge platform for content, streaming media, and
application delivery comprises more than 11,600 servers within over 820 networks in 62
countries. With headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Akamai provides services to
companies worldwide. For information on Delivering a Better InternetSM, visit
www.akamai.com.
BEA and Akamai Team to Enhance Customer Experience by
Optimizing Performance of E-Business Applications

Companies to align offerings for agile e-business infrastructure
through Edge Side Includes (ESI)

San Jose, CA and Cambridge, MA — September 28, 2001 — BEA Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq:
BEAS), one of the world's leading e-business infrastructure software companies, and
Akamai Technologies, Inc. (Nasdaq: AKAM), the leading provider of outsourced e-business
infrastructure services and software, today announced a relationship designed to help e-
businesses reliably deliver Web-based applications while minimizing their infrastructure
requirements.

The BEA WebLogic™ E-Business Platform, a single solution for enterprise and e-business
applications that require commerce, portal, integration and Web Services, will support the
Edge Side Includes (ESI) mark-up language and the Java-based custom tag library for ESI
(JESI). As a result, BEA WebLogic will be able to interoperate with services such as
Akamai's EdgeSuiteSM to simplify the development and deployment of dynamic e-
business applications.

Web-enabled enterprises are increasingly evolving beyond the display of static Web pages
to include dynamically generated content, such as product catalogs, auctions, exchanges,
stock quotes, and personalized content. The creation of this dynamic content places
significant strain on traditional Web site architectures, which hinders performance — which
means that pages download more slowly, the user experience is worsened, and impatient
customers are potentially lost. By incorporating ESI functionality, BEA WebLogic will give
users the flexibility and benefits of distributing the assembly of dynamic content and
applications to Akamai's globally distributed network of nearly 12,000 servers at the
Internet's edge - optimally located near end-users.

"The BEA WebLogic E-Business Platform is a comprehensive solution for creating dynamic
e-business applications that can be delivered with increased speed, performance, and
reliability via Akamai's EdgeSuite service," said Mike Ruffolo, executive vice president,
Akamai. "We're excited to work with industry leaders such as BEA to accelerate the
adoption of ESI and exploit the performance and cost-saving benefits of edge computing."

"BEA has always been a strong, early supporter of emerging standards, and we're pleased
to work with Akamai in support of ESI and JESI for the cost-efficient deployment of
business-critical applications, while complying with open Java-based standards," said Scott
Dietzen, CTO, BEA E-Commerce Server Division. "Furthermore, we believe that supporting
emerging standards-based edge-side applications assembly, such as JESI, with BEA
WebLogic Server™ is a natural extension to the high-performance content caching already
available in WebLogic Server. Using Akamai's global network, customers can take
advantage of in-place infrastructure while delivering top performance of highly dynamic
content and applications."

Recently published as a Worldwide Web Consortium (W3C) Note, ESI is an open mark-up
language and proposed standard created to define Web page fragments, such as stock
quotes and catalog prices, for dynamic aggregation, assembly and delivery at the
Internet's edge - closer to end-users and bypassing the Internet's inherent bottlenecks.
ESI enables companies to develop Web applications once, then choose at deployment time
where the application should be assembled - on the application server, the content
management system or the content delivery network, thus reducing complexity,
development time and deployment costs. ESI for Java (JESI) is a Java-based custom tag
library that allows users to program code in Java and translate it automatically into ESI.
JESI has been accepted by the Java Community Process as JSR 128.

The JESI custom tag library is available for free download from the BEA Web site for its
developer community at http://developer.bea.com/tools/akamai.jsp. For additional
information on ESI and JESI, please visit www.esi.org.

								
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