IT PROJECT GOVERNANCE GUIDE P1133 ITGG NNA V1 2 — 04 24 06 UCLA Office of Information Technology UC

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IT PROJECT GOVERNANCE GUIDE P1133 ITGG NNA V1 2 — 04 24 06 UCLA Office of Information Technology UC Powered By Docstoc
					IT PROJECT GOVERNANCE
         GUIDE

             P1133-ITGG-NNA

             V1.2 — 04/24/06




   UCLA Office of Information Technology
                                              UCLA IT GOVERNANCE



                                               TABLE OF CONTENTS

1     IT GOVERNANCE OVERVIEW ............................................................................................... 1
    1.1     STEP 1- PROJECT IDENTIFICATION.......................................................................................... 1
    1.2     STEP 2 - PROJECT CLASSIFICATION ........................................................................................ 2
    1.3     STEP 3 IT PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT ..................................................................... 3
    1.4     STEPS 4-5 IT PROJECT GOVERNANCE CONFIGURATION ........................................................ 3
2     PROJECT CLASSIFICATION WORKSHEET ....................................................................... 4
3     GOVERNANCE PROCESS TRIGGERS .................................................................................. 7
4     IT GOVERNANCE ARRANGEMENTS MATRIX.................................................................. 8
5     IT GOVERNANCE PROCESS FRAMEWORK ...................................................................... 9
6     IT GOVERNANCE PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM ............................................................... 10




IP1133-PDG-NNA V1.2                                      04/24/06                                                      PAGE i
                           UCLA IT GOVERNANCE




                             REVISION HISTORY

03/09/2006   Version 1.0                 First Draft
03/23/2006   Version 1.1                 Second Draft
04/24/2006   Version 1.2                 Third Draft
IT PROJECT GOVERNANCE GUIDE



    1 IT GOVERNANCE OVERVIEW
This document provides an overview of the IT Project Governance process at UCLA. IT Governance
comprises of the leadership, organizational structures, and processes to ensure that UCLA’s IT
capabilities continue to sustain and extend its strategies and objectives.

The UCLA IT Governance structure specifies the decision rights and accountability framework to
encourage desirable behavior in using IT to further the University’s mission. This desirable behavior is
characterized by:

    •   Integration of IT strategic planning with campus strategic planning
    •   Appropriate accountability for IT initiatives
    •   Transparency - IT plans and investments are made visible beyond their origination point
        (subject to the application of some defined thresholds).
    •   Adoption of a broad campus-wide view
    •   A willingness to share and use IT best practices across the UCLA community
    •   Entrepreneurial spirit and creativity in applying IT
    •   Participants understanding the value of the governance process and actively participating in it

The overall IT Project governance process flow is shown in Figure 1. A larger version of this diagram
may be found on page 10 of this guide. The overall process is broken down in six major steps and
these are described in broad terms in this section. The remaining sections of this document provide
more specific guidance on certain key aspects of the governance process.




Figure 1 IT Governance Process Overview

1.1 Step 1- Project Identification
The first step in the IT Governance process is the identification of those IT Projects across the campus
that may have significant impact on the campus in terms of outside funding requirements,
technological integration, deployment impact, and project management needs.
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A major source of information for this step is the identification of such projects through the annual
campus strategic planning process. In addition, some projects may arise on an ad hoc basis in response
to emergent needs. It is neither necessary nor practical for all IT Projects to pass through the entire IT
Governance Process described in this guide. The intent of the governance process is to apply good
judgment and to focus attention and resources only on those projects that truly require it and that have
the greatest impact on the campus.
The primary means of making this judgment is human interaction. Thus this process step requires
dialog and discussion between OIT, ITMG and other stakeholders to make an initial assessment on
what projects to pass through the process and what projects to filter out.
Key questions asked at this stage are:
    •   Does project need outside funding?
    •   How is project aligned with strategic direction?
    •   What is the project motivation (is there a legal mandate?)
    •   What is the end user impact of the project?
    •   Is there a reason to fast track the project?
    •   Will the project be controversial?
Based on this initial assessment some projects will move on through the process to Step 2 for further
governance consideration, some will be deemed to not require any further IT Governance, and some
will be “fast tracked” through the process.
It is important to note that this step does not constitute the official approval of a project, it simply
decides if a project should move through a more rigorous governance process. Project approvals
remain with the Executive Sponsors of an IT project.

1.2 Step 2 - Project Classification
A one to two page “Project Bio” is created by OIT for every project that enters this process step. The
Project Bio is compiled through discussions with the Project Sponsor and the Project Manager. The
Project Bio is a brief synopsis of the purpose and scope of the intended project. It captures the basic
data that is required to classify the project for governance purposes.
Project classification is an integral part of the governance process. The purpose of project
classification is threefold:
    1. Clearly and objectively identify projects that are likely to have a major impact on the campus.
    2. Enable the IT Governance process to be scaled appropriately to the magnitude and impact of a
       particular IT project.
    3. Aid in IT risk management.
By dividing IT projects in this way the “80/20 principle” can be employed to apply a more flexible
governance process that focuses time and attention on major projects that have the largest impact on
the campus as whole. Other projects may then be routed through less rigorous and rapid paths in the
governance process according to their level of risk and impact.
Such an approach begs the question: “What constitutes a major project?” A Project Classification
Worksheet (Page 4) is used to help Project Sponsors, Project Managers and OIT to answer this
question in a consistent manner.
The Project Classification worksheet consists of a series of questions in three categories:
                                     UCLA IT GOVERNANCE


    •   Project Management Complexity
    •   IT Solution Complexity
    •   Deployment Complexity
These questions should be answered in a project classification meeting between the Project Manager,
the Project Sponsor and an OIT director (with other participants as required). As a guideline this
meeting should require no more than one hour. Although the worksheet uses a simple scoring
mechanism to encourage discussion, the classification process should not be an empirical exercise.
The worksheet is intended as an aid and guide for the project classification discussion. Ultimately the
combined knowledge and experience of the participants should determine the appropriate Project
Class that makes sense. The resultant project classification is then used to steer the project through the
governance process.
Class 1 Projects are considered to be low risk and do not need to continue any further in the
governance process. They can therefore proceed normally.
Class 2-5 Projects move on to Step 3.

1.3 Step 3 IT Project Portfolio Management
Project Classes 2-5 are added to the Campus IT Portfolio. The Campus IT Portfolio is a strategic
inventory of IT project information maintained by OIT for planning and IT Governance purposes.
Although individual projects in the IT Portfolio may be managed by specific divisions, the IT Portfolio
provides overall visibility to Executive leadership of the key IT investments the campus is
undertaking.
Class 2 projects are simply recorded in the IT Portfolio for general information and monitoring
purposes. No further IT Governance is required for this class of project beyond the normal
accountability and responsibility of the unit or division that is sponsoring the project. Status
information on Class 3-5 projects is updated by OIT as the projects progress through their life cycle.

1.4 Steps 4-5 IT Project Governance Configuration
As mentioned earlier, project classification is used to scale the governance process appropriately for
the project at hand. In steps 4-5 a specific governance path is determined for the project. This
governance configuration is determined by key “triggers” or characteristics of each project (Page 7).
For example, if in the classification process the IT solution complexity of a project is considered to be
high (H) or Very High (V) this will trigger the need for a Technical Assessment by OIT/CSG. If the
end user scope of impact is deemed to be High (H) then the project should be reviewed by OIT/ITPB
for alignment with campus direction & policy.
OIT will then use this governance configuration to steer the process through the appropriate IT
governance path in terms of committees, review, endorsement and executive approvals.




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2 PROJECT CLASSIFICATION WORKSHEET
The Project Classification Worksheet is designed to be used within the UCLA IT Governance process.
It is a tool to encourage a frank and open discussion of the potential impact of a planned IT project on
the campus and how that project might be properly routed through the IT Governance process.




Risk Factor Descriptions/Questions
PROJECT MANAGEMENT COMPLEXITY
1. Team Size (# of people)
        Total number of project team members who will be developing the solution, excluding the
        Project Manager.
2. # of Units Involved
        Total number of distinct organizational units within or outside UCLA that must be managed
        and coordinated to provide requirements for the project.
3. Development Effort Hrs
        Total estimated solution development effort hours that will be spent by the team excluding
        project management time.
4. Duration
        The estimated total elapsed calendar time required to complete the project.
                                     UCLA IT GOVERNANCE


IT SOLUTION COMPLEXITY
5. Technology/Technique/Process
        What is the knowledge, skills and expertise of the project team in employing the chosen
        technologies, techniques, methods and processes to be used on the project?
6. Product Maturity (If purchased)
        If software packages or commercial software products are to be included the solution, what is
        the general maturity of these products and their usage within other institutions of higher
        education?
7. Solution Complexity
        What is the level of technical complexity of the solution?
8. System Interface Profile
        What is the complexity of the required system interfaces for the solution in terms of the
        number software interfaces that need to be developed?
9. IT Architectural Impact
        What is the architectural impact of the solution in terms of how it will fit with IT Architectural
        standards (data, applications and technology), and coexist and integrate with other
        applications?
10. Maintainability
        What is the degree of complexity of maintaining the application in terms of the level of
        technical skills required and the specific availability of those skills to UCLA?
DEPLOYMENT COMPLEXITY
11. Process Impact
        What is the implementation scope, boundaries and expected degree of change on academic or
        administrative processes?
12. End User scope of impact
        What is the implementation impact in terms of the range and types of campus personnel
        affected?
13. Project Profile
        What is the degree of acceptance and readiness level of the affected user constituency for the
        solution?
14. Project Motivation
        To what degree is the project being driven by an external mandate from the Federal, State or
        UCOP level?
Project Budget
        The total estimated development costs for the project (hardware, software, facilities, and
        people).
Ongoing Cost
        The estimated average annual maintenance cost for the application. This should include
        regular hardware and software upgrades and maintenance, hosting fees, and vendor support.


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Project Class
   The assigned project class (High – 5 to Low – 1) based on overall scoring and the group
   discussion.
                                   UCLA IT GOVERNANCE


   3 GOVERNANCE PROCESS TRIGGERS
The Governance Process Triggers worksheet below maps the results of project classification (Risk
Factor ratings) against the recommended Governance Actions that need to be taken. The entries in the
Process Steps column are cross references to the IT Process Governance Framework Diagram on
page 9.




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       4 IT GOVERNANCE ARRANGEMENTS MATRIX
The IT Governance Arrangements Matrix below describes who is empowered to make decisions about
specific aspects of IT Projects.
The matrix maps the decision rights of the various Governance Entities (Committees, Stakeholders
and IT groups) against a set of mutually exclusive IT Governance Decision Domains1. The IT
Governance Decision Domains serve to separate project IT decisions into categories for Strategic
Direction and Policy, Application Needs, common IT Infrastructure needs and IT Investments.




Figure 2 IT Governance Arrangements Matrix


Descriptions of the Governance Entities may be found on the OIT website
(http://www.oit.ucla.edu/it_governance.htm).




1
    This framework is based on the work of Peter Weill & Jeanne W. Ross, IT Governance. Harvard Business School Press, 2004.
                                    UCLA IT GOVERNANCE


    5 IT GOVERNANCE PROCESS FRAMEWORK
The IT Governance Process framework graphically illustrates the reviews, approvals and
endorsements that may be applied to projects. Not all projects go through all steps; the specific path
taken will be determined by the Governance Triggers analysis (Page 7).




IP1133-PDG-NNA DRAFT                        4/24/2006                                     PAGE 9
                   OIT


6 IT GOVERNANCE PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM
IT PROJECT GOVERNANCE GUIDE




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