Traditional Student Teaching

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					Elementary
 Education
  Program
 Handbook
   September 2006
    (Updated Fall 2006)
To the Elementary Education Candidate:

We welcome you to our Teacher Education Programs at CSUB. Thank
you for considering us as your “university of choice”!

Our program allows teacher candidates to complete a Multiple Subject
Credential (K-8 grades). We seek to provide you with optimal opportunity
to become a highly effective professional in elementary schools. Our
extremely qualified and approachable faculty and staff will assist you
throughout the process. Our program is rigorous, but attainable and
highly regarded by administrators in the field.

We are here to offer you assistance every step of the way, so please do not
hesitate to ask for information or assistance to make your experience a
rewarding one.

We look forward to working with you and wish you great success at
CSUB!


Sincerely,

The CSUB Elementary Education Program Faculty and Staff




                                    1
                                California State University, Bakersfield
                                          School of Education
                                           (MAIN CAMPUS)

                                       Elementary Education Program

Dr. Milton Woolsey, Director                                   661/654-6615, EDUC 113
Sharon Carson, Evaluator, Application Process                  661/654-2091, EDUC 106
Toni Jacobs, Field Placement Coordinator                       661/654-2208, EDUC 112
General Information                                            661/654-2484 , EDU 102
Department fax                                                 661/654-2277

                                       Teacher Education Department

Dr. Curtis Guaglianone, Dean                                   661/654-2210, EDUC 124
Dr. M. Suleiman, Department Chair                              661/654-3032, EDUC 115
Rebecca Bailey, Department Secretary                           661/654-3134, EDUC 114

EEP Advisors and Faculty
Dr. Geri Mohler                                                661/654-6163, EDUC 122
Dr. Milton Woolsey                                             661/654-6615, EDUC 113
Dr. Ron Hughes, (Science)                                      661/654-3471, EDUC 119
Dr. Irene Borrego (BCLAD)                                      661/654-2095, EDUC 118
Dr. Barbara Bartholomew                                        661/654-6155, EDUC 148
Kristen Ramirez (Intern)                                       661/654-6154, EDUC 149
Joy Henderson (PDS)                                            661/333-3527, EDUC 153
Dr. Kristina LaGue (BBEST)                                     661/654-6546, EDUC 117
Dr. Michelle Zachold                                           661/654-2338, EDUC 145
Dr. Terri Kurz (Math)                                          661-654-6163 EDUC 134

Distinguished Teachers in Residence

Mary Brouse (PBVUSD)                                           661/654-6548, EDUC 154
Joy Henderson (GUSD)                                           661/333-3527, EDUC 153

University Supervisors
Shirley Walston                                                 661/872-4944
Nancy Lee                                                       661/832-3202
Jerry Kirkland                                                  661/549-8012
Eleanor Orndoff                                                 661/747-6531
Don Erwin                                                      559/359-7513
Gordon Walter                                                   661/703-8469
Diane Walters                                                   661/619-4331




                                                    2
               SOE-CSUB (Main Campus) Partnership School Districts


Arvin Union School District
Bakersfield City School District
Beardsley School District
Delano Union School District
Edison Elementary School District
El Tejon Unified School District
Fairfax School District
Fruitvale School District
Greenfield Union School District
Kernville Union School District
Lakeside Union School District
Lamont School District
Lost Hills Union School District
Maple School District
Maricopa Unified School District
McFarland Unified School District
McKittrick School District
Norris School District
Panama-Buena Vista Union School District
Richland School District
Richgrove Unified School District
Rio Bravo-Greeley Union School District
Rosedale Union School District
Semitropic School District
South Fork Union School District
Standard School District
Taft City School District
Tehachapi Unified School District
Vineland School District
Wasco Union Elementary School District




                                           3
                           California State University, Bakersfield
                                     School of Education
                             (ANTELOPE VALLEY CAMPUS)

                          Elementary Education Program

Dr. Randy Schultz, Elementary Education Coordinator       661-952 5088 Room 306
Eric Anderson, Evaluator, Application Process             661-952-5083, Room 301
Beverly Tyler, EEP Field Placement Coordinator            661-952-5029, Room 319

                   SOE-Antelope Valley Partnership School Districts
Lancaster School District
Palmdale School District
Westside Union School District
Eastside Union School District
Keppel Union School District
Wilsona School District
Muroc Joint Unified School District
Newhall School District
Mojave Unified School District
Acton/Agua Dulce Unified School District
Sierra Sands Unified School District
Southern Kern Unified School District
Hughes-Elizabeth Lakes Union School District
Gorman Joint School District
Saugus Union School District

                           California State University, Bakersfield
                                     School of Education
                                  (College of the Canyons)

                          Elementary Education Program

Dr. Ron Hughes, EEP Coordinator                    661-654-3471
Eric Bullard, Regional Programs Director           661-654-2441
Kristie Luna, Evaluator, Application Process       661-654-3423
Debbie Meadows, Field Placement Coordinator        661-654-2441 or 661-321-6703

                          SOE-COC Partnership School Districts

Castaic School District
Newhall School District
LAUSD
Palmdale School District
Saugus Unified School District
Sulphur Springs Unified School District




                                               4
                  Elementary Education Program
                        Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: Elementary Education Program…………………......6
                    Candidate Dispositions………………..…………………...8
                    Program Overview…………………………………...........9
                    Application Information…………………….…….............10
                    Scope and Sequence……………………..………………..12

CHAPTER 2: Student Teaching Requirements……….……………13

CHAPTER 3: The Student Teaching Notebook .............................. 25

CHAPTER 4: Master Teacher Responsibilities ............................. 28

CHAPTER 5: University Supervisor Responsibilities .................. 33

CHAPTER 6: Principal Information............................................... 38

APPENDICES ................................................................................. 40

APPENDIX A           SB2042 Application ………………………….……….....41
                     Candidate Evaluation………………………….…….…..43
                     Exceptional Admit Application…………………………..45
                     Multiple Subject Substitution Form…………………..…46
                     Early Field Waiver Application……………….………….47
APPENDIX B – Student Teaching Forms……………………………........50
APPENDIX C – CSTP, TPE’s and TPA’s………………………………….59
APPENDIX D – CSU’s E.O. 758………………………………………...….66
APPENDIX E – BCLAD Requirements……………………………….........68
APPENDIX F – RICA Requirements………………………………….........73
APPENDIX G – Portfolio Requirements ( LiveText )…..………………....79




                                                5
                              CHAPTER 1
              ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM


                California State University, Bakersfield
                          School of Education




                    School of Education



                               Theme

                Excellence ~ Integrity ~ Caring




                             Mission

In support of the university’s vision of excellence, the mission of the
School of Education is to prepare highly capable educational
professionals to serve our community with integrity.




                      Vision Statement

By 2014-15, CSU Bakersfield will be the leading campus in the CSU
system in terms of faculty and academic excellence and diversity,
quality of the student experience, and community engagement.
Realization of our vision will be advanced by recruitment,
development and promotion of excellent and diverse staff within an
organizational culture committed to excellence in all areas.




                                   6
                       Multiple Subjects Credential Program Philosophy
     The mission of Multiple Subjects Credential Program is to prepare professional educators who
are committed to providing learning opportunities for all students in pluralistic schools. Our
program seeks to impart both knowledge and skill bases in novice and prospective teachers through
integrating research-based pedagogy, fostering cultural and linguistic diversity, utilizing
technology, establishing school/community partnerships, and promoting lifelong learning.


                         Multiple Subjects Credential Program Goals
The mission of the Multiple Subjects Credential Program underlies the following specific goals:

   1. To empower candidates through a solid knowledge base for reflective decision-making and
      other educational duties.
   2. To promote an understanding about the contemporary role of the teaching profession and
      the organizational system of schools.
   3. To help candidates implement content and curriculum planning through effective
      instructional strategies to facilitate learning.
   4. To foster the development of caring reflective practitioners who engage in inquiry-based
      learning and teaching.
   5. To enhance an understanding of human growth and development and cultivate cultural
      differences and global perspectives.
   6. To enhance the integration of appropriate technology and utilize various communication
      skills effectively.




                                                7
                               Candidate Dispositions
Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other professional school
personnel know and demonstrate the content, pedagogical, and professional knowledge,
skills, and dispositions necessary to help all students learn.


                                Professional Collaboration

Candidates will participate in action-oriented collaboration that will enable them to learn
from others and provide leadership in partnerships with all stakeholders.

                                  Reflective Practitioner

Candidates are reflective, life long learners who apply problem solving and critical thinking
strategies and the respectful appreciation of differing points of view.

                                   Ethical Professional

Candidates’ actions are based on accepted professional standards of conduct and reflect
insight and awareness with respect to diverse perspectives, opinions, obligations and
ethical responsibilities of the profession.

                                 Student/Client Centered

Candidates, throughout their programs, will prioritize the needs of the students/clients they
serve by maintaining trusting relationships built upon caring, nurturing (respective) and
meaningful interactions.

                                   Professional Leader

Candidates, throughout their programs, will be strong, determined, professional leaders
with a clear instructional focus using effective communication skills and a willingness to
take risks to ensure the advancement, safety, and welfare of all students in our
communities.

                                Professional Competence

Candidates will maintain high programmatic outcomes that reflect research-based
practices, principles of learning differentiation, and standards based instruction.

                                                                        Adopted January 2006
                                                                             Revised 8/29/06




                                              8
                            Program Overview

The SB 2042 Multiple Subject Credential Program (MSCP) is a state-
approved professional preparation program to earn a credential for
teaching multiple subjects in a self-contained classroom. Teachers with
this credential traditionally teach elementary (K-8) grades.

This booklet provides an overview of the program requirements. Our
program is designed to accommodate the needs of both full-time and
part-time students. With very careful planning, full-time students can
complete the program in an academic year. Day, evening and some
Saturday courses are available. Daytime fieldwork in public elementary
school settings is required for certain courses. Both student teaching
and internship options are available. Interns should make an
appointment with an advisor immediately upon hiring by a school
district.

                         Applying to the University

If you are not currently a student at CSUB or if you are a graduating
senior, you must apply to the University for admission as a post
baccalaureate student. When completing the application, be sure to
indicate that your objective is ―credential.‖ Specify multiple subjects‖
and the code ―200‖ in the appropriate place on the application.

To apply online go to:

              http://www.csumentor.edu


                  Applying to the Credential Program

Admission to the University does not constitute admission to the MSCP.
A separate Stage I Application is required for admission to the MSCP.
See page 41.




                                   9
                                                       Application Information
The following items are required for completion of your application. Use the application checklist form to help organize your materials. You
will need to make copies of all documents submitted.


Complete an application for admittance to CSU, Bakersfield

If you are currently a graduate student at CSU, Bakersfield, with a status other than qualifying for a credential, complete the appropriate form to
add credential status to your university record. Only students admitted to the university are eligible for admission to the credential program.

If you are new to CSU, Bakersfield or have been out of school for three quarters or more, you must reapply to the university.

If you are applying to graduate school for admission please do all of the following:

1.   Submit one Graduate Application to the Admissions and Records office.

2.   Submit a check or money order payable to CSU, Bakersfield in the amount of $55 or Graduate School Fee Waiver Form.

3.   You will need two official sets of transcripts in sealed envelopes from all colleges or universities previously attended. If you are or expect to
     be a graduate of CSU, Bakersfield, you do not need to submit transcripts to the Graduate School.



Preliminary Multiple Subject Credential Application (MSCP) Requirements (See SB2042 Application, Appendix
A, p. 41)

Complete and accurate information is essential to the processing of your application.

Written Essay will be completed at the orientation.

Two Candidate Evaluations: One will be from a person who has observed your performance in a work or teaching setting; and one from an
instructor who can attest to the applicant’s competence. (See Candidate Evaluations, Appendix A, pp. 43-44)

Interview:    At least one interview with one or more faculty members will be completed at orientation.

Fingerprint Clearance – Submit one of the following:

 Evidence that the fingerprint packet has
 been submitted to the California
 Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

 Or
 If you have one of the following, please
 submit a copy: Certificate of Clearance
 or a previously issued Emergency permit,
 Substitute permit or Pre-Intern certificate
 Issued by the California Commission on
 Teacher Credentialing.

Professional Liability Insurance:
As of August 1, 2006, the CSU Chancellor’s Office of Risk Management is requiring all students in various fields, including the
Credential Program to purchase Professional Liability Insurance at the cost of $16 per Academic Year. This fee may be paid at the
Cashier’s window or online. (see page 24 for details).


Official Transcripts: All students must provide one copy of official transcripts from each college/university attended, with your application and to
the admissions office.

CSET, Multiple Subject Examination: All candidates must pass the California Subject Examination for Teachers prior to admittance to the
credential program. Please provide a copy of your scores
                                                            www.cset.nesinc.com
CBEST: Provide verification of having taken the CBEST. Please provide a copy of your official scores.
Early Field Experience: Verification of completion of your 36 hours of early classroom experience. These 36 hours may be from required
observations in a completed course (EDEL 240) or from employment as an instructional aide, substitute teacher or regular teacher or other
equivalent experience. (See Early Field Experience Waver Application Appendix A, p. 47)

Negative Tuberculin Test: Provide a copy of a valid tuberculin clearance that is not over four years old.


Grade Point Average (GPA)
In order to be considered for admission to the MSCP, applicants must have attained a grade point average of at least 2.67 in all baccalaureate
and post-baccalaureate course work or a grade point average of at least 2.75 in the last 90 quarter/60 semester units attempted. A very small
percentage of exceptions to this requirement will be allowed.

                                                                        10
     Exceptional Admission
     If you feel that you have a reason to be considered for Exceptional Admission due to not meeting one or more of the admission requirements, you
     must complete and submit the Exceptional Admit Request. (See Exceptional Admit Application, Appendix A, p. 45)


     Educational Course Work
   A minimum GPA of 3.00 in all education coursework must be maintained while in the MSCP. If you earn a grade lower than a “C-“,            you may
need to retake the course or courses before taking any other courses. You will not be admitted to student teaching until your
  GPA is 3.00 or better. If your education GPA falls below 3.00, you may be placed on academic probation. Or you possibly be
   disqualified from the Program and will not be recommended for a credential. If you find yourself in this position you need to meet
   with the Director of the MSCP. Call Dr. Woolsey at 661-654-6615 or email him at: mwoolsey@csub.edu.
  ________________________________________

Prerequisite Course Work
  The courses listed below must be completed or
 in progress at the time of application to the MSCP.

*EDEL 240 Early Field Experience
*EDBI 475 Intro. to Cross-Cultural Ed.
**CTAP Level I Technology (listed below are ways you can complete CTAP Level 1)

**Take EDCI 579 or LBST 390
**Take the Preliminary Educational Technology Requirement Examination. You can register for this exam at the CSET web page at
  www.cset.nesinc.com)

Or

**Contact Kern County Superintendent of Schools: (661) 636-4000 or on the web at http://learning.kern.org/ctap.



Course Substitutions
If you have taken equivalent coursework at another university, you will need to complete a course substitution request form (See Appendix A, p. 46)
and provide a copy of the course syllabus, a catalog course description and copy of a transcript with the grade posted.



U.S. Constitution
You must complete a course including the U.S. Constitution or you may satisfy this requirement by exam. This requirement is needed to receive your
Preliminary Credential.



CPR Certification
Upon completion of the Preliminary Credential program, you will need to have a CPR Certification; Infant, Child & Adult, to apply for your credential.
PROVIDE COPIES OF THE FRONT AND BACK!

RICA (Reading Instruction Competency Assessment)
Please note that you must pass the RICA prior to all day student teaching. We recommend that you take the exam at the end of Stage II of the
program. It is the candidate’s responsibility to apply to take this exam. PROVIDE COPIES!


Helpful Information

Health Services                       661-654-2394
Admission & Records                   661-654-3036
Financial Aid Office                  661-654-3016
Testing Center                        661-654-3373
Accounting Office                     661-654-2178

CSET – www.cset.nesinc.com

CBEST – www.cbest.nesinc.com

RICA – www.rica.nesinc.com

CTAP – www.learning.kern.org/ctap

California Commission on Teacher Credentialing:
                                                                   www.cctc.ca.gov




                                                                          11
                Multiple Subjects Credential Program Scope and Sequence

      Preliminary Stage
      EDEL 240          Introductory Fieldwork                           2 Units
      EDBI 475          Introduction to Cross-Cultural Education         3 Units
      CTAP Level 1 Technology Proficiency – Take LBST 390, EDCI 579
      or provide proof of completion.
      US Constitution – Complete an appropriate course or examination at
      CSUB or at another institution.

      Stage I
      Teaching & Learning Context
      EDEL 420         Literacy Acquisition-A                              4 units
      EDEL 421         Foundations of American Education                   2 units
      EDEL 428       Teaching Reading in the Bilingual Setting             4 Units
                       (for BCLAD students only)
      EDEL 429         Classroom Learning Theories and
                       Management                                          3 units
     EDEL 437          C & I Mathematics                                   3 Units
     EDBI 476          Introduction to Language Acquisition
                        And Development                                    3 Units

     Begin working on Assessment Portfolio (See Appendix G, p. 80)

      Stage II
      Curriculum & Instruction in Content Areas
      EDBI 477         Introduction to Teaching English as a Second
                       Language (BCLAD students do not take
                       EDBI 477)                                           3 units
      EDEL 430         Literacy Acquisition-B                              4 units
      EDEL 436         C & I History – Social Science                      3 units
      EDEL 439         Preparation for Advanced Fieldwork                  6 units

                         (Continue working on Assessment Portfolio)
                       (Take the RICA Exam upon completion of Stage II)


Stage III
      Culminating Professional Activities
     EDSP 301          Teaching Exceptional Diverse Learners in
                       Inclusive Settings                                   3 units
      EDEL 438         C & I Science                                        3 units
      EDEL 449         Advanced Fieldwork                                   9 units
                        (Complete and submit Assessment Portfolio)
             Coursework will be taken in sequence as listed in Stages I, II & III.
             A GPA of 3.00 MUST be maintained while you are in the credential program!




                                                    12
                                          CHAPTER 2

                               Student Teaching Requirements

                           California State University, Bakersfield

The remaining chapters are designed to provide a brief description of the student teaching program
and to provide administrators, master teachers, university supervisors, and student teachers with an
understanding of the relationship and responsibilities of all those participating in the program.

         Student teaching is a time when students begin to merge their theoretical knowledge with
their practical knowledge. It is also a time when they begin to reach their goal of becoming a
certified teacher. In order to have a successful culminating fieldwork experience, student teachers
must effectively collaborate with the master teacher, university supervisor, site administrators,
parents, and school children. While student teachers are considered novices in the teaching
profession, they must plan and teach standards-based lessons, maintain control of the classroom,
and meet the diverse needs of all the students in their classrooms.
         Many people are needed to guide the student teacher through this exciting time in their
career. The university supervisor, master teacher, district personnel, and university professors all
play a part in helping the pre-service teacher reach the goal of becoming a certificated teacher.

                                    California’s Requirements
        The State of California establishes the guidelines which govern the CSUB student teaching
program. Student teaching is a culminating fieldwork experience that takes place in the last two
stages of the Multiple Subjects Credential Program and has the following components:
     The first ten weeks are devoted to half-day student teaching.
     The last ten weeks are in a full-day student teaching setting.
     The student teaching experience must be in a public school self-contained elementary
        setting.
     At least one of the student teaching experiences must be in a setting that is culturally,
        linguistically, economically, and socially different than that of the pre-service teacher.
     At least one experience must be in a BCLAD classroom if student is in the BCLAD
        program.

                                    General Information
    Student teachers are required to attend the Multiple Subjects Student Teaching Orientation
     Session at the beginning of each quarter.
    Student teachers are required to attend five seminars each quarter.
    Teachers who are working in a private school will complete their student teaching during
     the summer session in a year-round, public school, self-contained K-6 classroom.
    Teachers who are working in a secondary school setting are subject to evolving CCTC
     /NCLB guidelines. They must visit with the Director and a Credential Analyst to examine
     their options under pending/current credentialing guidelines.




                                                 13
                                  Which Program Should I Be In?

Traditional Program
        The traditional program is for students who are completing their Multiple Subjects
Teaching Credential without being in their own classroom, (i.e., they do not have a contract with a
school district and are not considered to be an intern teacher). Traditional student teachers work
with an experienced Master Teacher and have the opportunity to work with those who have been
working in the field. BCLAD teachers see Appendix E for requirements.

Professional Development School (PDS)
         Currently, the CSUB Multiple Subjects Credential Program has one professional
development school in the Greenfield Union School District. The students in this program must be
admitted to the program and then apply to the PDS. Students follow the university requirements
for all classes; however, they remain in the same district during all three quarters of the program.
They take the same courses; however, the courses may be varied in order to allow for more
participation in the schools. All students have the opportunity to join the PDS program.
Admission to the PDS is only available during the fall quarter. Students must make a commitment
to stay in the district during the entire academic year (all three quarters). Most classes are taught at
a school site in the district.

Intern
        The intern program has replaced the Emergency Permit program. The Intern Program
is for non-credentialed teachers in their own classrooms who need to complete a
course of study. They must be admitted to the University, the Elementary
Education Program (EEP), and be subject matter competent. They are assigned a
support provider from their school as well as a University Supervisor who works
with them throughout the entire year. The Intern Program is a collaborative
program between the university and the county consortium. BCLAD teachers see
Appendix E for BCLAD requirements.

                          Requirements for Continuing in the Program

GPA
        Candidates must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 in all required credential courses.
Candidates whose GPA falls below 3.0 will either be put on probation for one quarter or asked to
drop the program. Courses may be repeated with the permission of the instructor prior to enrolling.
Candidates may request one grade adjustment in the Graduate Program, (i.e. If a candidate received
a D in a class and repeated the class with an A–, then s/he can request the D to be removed and not
counted in the GPA.)

Advancement Through the Program

       Candidates must satisfactorily complete all of the required coursework in one stage before
advancing to the next stage. Candidates whose performance is judged to be inadequate in any stage
are expected to improve or repeat the problem courses before advancing to the next stage. The
Elementary Education Program Committee meets regularly to discuss candidates’ progress and
makes recommendations that best assist candidates to acquire the requisite professional skills and
maintain the integrity of the program.
                                                14
Student Teaching
         A candidate must be 100% subject matter competent to teach. Passage of the *CBEST is
required for student teaching. Furthermore, ALL candidates must pass all sections of the CSET
prior to full day student teaching. The student teaching experience must be in a regular education
classroom (K-6). Candidates who do not satisfy minimum requirements set forth by the Teacher
Performance Expectations (TPE) and Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) will not receive
credit for student teaching. In this case, pre-service teachers may be required to extend student
teaching another quarter, be placed on probation, or be dropped from the program. Students are
allowed to repeat any stage of student teaching a maximum of two times.
         If school district personnel formally request that a student teacher be removed from a
student teaching placement, the Elementary Education faculty must comply with this request. In
this case, the student teacher will repeat student teaching the following quarter at a different school
site.
     *Note: Effective July 1, 2004, candidates must pass all potions of the CSET to be admitted to the MSCP; i.e.,
     CSET must be passed prior to Stage I.

                                      Appeals Procedure
    Candidates may appeal an unsatisfactory performance evaluation for:
             1.        Coursework - to the instructor of record.
              2.      Student teaching - to the university supervisor and then to the field experience coordinator.
         If resolution is not obtained, a written appeal may be made to the Elementary Education
Program Director, who will submit it to the Elementary Education Program Appeals Committee.
The EEP Appeals Committee Chairperson notifies the candidate of the committee’s decision in
writing.
         If the candidate is not satisfied, a written request for reconsideration may then be submitted
to the Chair of the Teacher Education Department. If a resolution is still not obtained, a written
appeal may be made to the Dean of the School of Education. Candidates may further appeal a case
through established University procedures that are available in the Student Services Office.
         A candidate who experiences other difficulties within the EEP should discuss the issues
first with the EEP Director. If the candidate wishes to further pursue the issues and/or difficulties,
the candidate should then consult, in sequential order, with the:
    1.   Teacher Education Department Chair,
    2.   School of Education Dean,
    3.   Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs.

[See Appendix D for CSU’s Executive Order No. 758 regarding due process]


Recommendation
        Mere completion of coursework, including student teaching, does not guarantee a
credential. Candidates must be recommended for a credential based upon satisfactory completion
of the Teacher Performance Expectancies (TPE’s) with tasks found in the Teacher Performance
Assessment (TPA) in addition to satisfying other CCTC requirements and criteria. The University,
through the School of Education, makes the recommendation for issuance of a credential upon
review of a candidate's application for the credential.




                                                          15
Application for Credential
        Candidates who successfully satisfy requirements for: (a) admission criteria, (b)
Elementary Education Program courses, (c) continuation criteria, and (d) recommendations criteria
are recommended and may file for the Preliminary Credential. Applications for the credential will
be mailed to those eligible around the 9th week of the quarter.
        The Preliminary Credential is valid for five (5) years. During this time the teacher
candidate must complete a fifth year of study or a teacher induction program in order to satisfy the
requirements for the Professional Clear Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential.

                                             Placements

        The Coordinator of Field Experience makes all placements for student teachers. Under no
circumstances should the student teacher contact a school district. The Coordinator does not
handle requests for a specific school or a specific teacher in a specific district. The coordinator
makes a request to the district and the district makes the final placement.
        Each quarter student teachers, including intern teachers, fill out a Placement Request Form
for student teaching placement. The forms will be available in the student teaching office during
the 5th week of each quarter. The forms are due before the end of the quarter. If you do not
submit a placement request form by the posted deadline, then you will not receive a
placement for the following quarter. Late requests will not be accepted. It is essential that
this form be completed.

         Attempts will be made to accommodate the student teacher with one of their first three
district choices for placement; however, it is not a guarantee. If there are more requests for a certain
district than available placements, then full-day student teachers will be given priority. There are
many other circumstances that may affect the placements.
         Candidates are placed in at least one culturally different setting and in two different grade
levels (one primary and one intermediate) during the course of the student teaching experience.

                    Full Time Positions for Those Currently Student Teaching
         Any candidate offered a contract during student teaching must contact the coordinator and
discuss the possibility of continuing student teaching. If the candidate is having a successful
student teaching experience, then it is likely that candidate will be allowed to take the position. If
the candidate’s experience is less than satisfactory, then s/he may be told that the full-time position
will not be credited as student teaching. If this were to happen, the university would contact the
district and explain the rationale of the decision.

                                            Intern Teachers
        Candidates who are Intern teachers are required to complete a Placement Request Form
each quarter. This is the only way that the Coordinator of Student Teaching will know that the
candidate is planning to student teach that quarter. Submission of this form ensures that the intern
will be assigned a supervisor for the following quarter.
        Intern teachers must meet the same requirements as traditional student teachers. A contract
with a district does not automatically guarantee passage of student teaching. Intern teachers are
required to meet criteria related to lesson planning, discipline, management, etc. Unsatisfactory
performance in student teaching may require a summer student teaching experience with a master
teacher. Candidates who do not successfully complete student teaching receive no credit for that
quarter. Additionally, the university will notify the district of the candidate’s failure to meet the
                                                  16
student teaching requirements. If a candidate fails student teaching or is removed from the
classroom, a grade of NC – No Credit will be reported.
Note: Interns, please visit with your designated intern advisor and consult the Intern Handbook.

                        What am I required to do during student teaching?
        During Stages II and III student teaching experiences, candidates will be required to plan
and implement lessons and engage in various field-based activities in terms of the expected
standards and performance outcomes. During Stage II student teaching, candidates will be required
to plan and implement lessons from their methods courses where specific guides, rubrics and
directions …etc. will be provided. Candidates will assume full responsibility of the classes being
taught for half day. During Stage III student teaching, candidates will eventually assume full
responsibility of the designated classroom for the full day while being mentored and guided by the
master teacher, the university supervisor and others.
        Following are some of the general expectations during student teaching experiences:
 Maintain a student teaching notebook that will conform to specified guidelines outlined in
    Chapter 3: ―The Student Teaching Notebook‖. The university supervisor will review the
    notebook during each visit.
 Design an interactive bulletin board.
 Video tape a lesson and critique the lesson. Candidates may be asked to videotape more than
    one lesson if the university supervisor or the master teacher feels it is necessary.
    (video reflection guide in Appendix G p. 85)
 Dress appropriately and professionally as outlined in the dress code (see p. 18).
 Carefully plan each lesson that is taught. Lesson plans must conform to the standards-based
    guidelines as outlined by the university supervisor and master teacher.
 Submit lesson plans to the master teacher for approval 3 days prior to teaching. No plans=No
    teaching.
 Maintain discipline in the classroom.
 Conduct yourself as a professional educator.
 Provide a place for the supervisor in your classroom
 Attendance:
            o Sign in and out each day at the office.
            o Daily attendance is required. Be Punctual!
            o Absences – notify the master teacher and the university supervisor.
            o Excessive (more than 2 days) absences may mean that the candidate will be
                 required to repeat the intern or student teaching experience.
            o Excessive tardiness (two or more) may result in being counseled out of student
                 teaching.
 Interpersonal communication skills must be demonstrated. Some of these skills include:
            o Positive attitude
            o Motivation and enthusiasm
            o Effective interaction and rapport
            o Taking initiative

 Control of language must be maintained. Written and oral fluency are expected. Avoid
  improper use of language that might negatively influence the communicative process. Consult
  with your supervisor about some unacceptable patterns and avoiding language flaws.




                                               17
                                    Student Teaching Difficulties
        Some student teachers may experience difficulty in planning, executing the lesson plans,
and maintaining classroom management. When a master teacher/principal/support provider,
university supervisor notices a student teacher is experiencing difficulty, s/he will discuss the
problem with the student teacher and supervisor immediately. At this time, the supervisor will
begin to make additional visits to the classroom. The visits will be well documented, provide a
record of what was observed in the classroom, and will give suggestions that must be implemented
immediately. The original observation will be used to determine if the suggestions have been
followed, (teacher/support provider, university supervisor or principal will meet to discuss the
student teacher’s progress). If the student teacher continues to have difficulty, a NEEDS TO
IMPROVE FORM will be completed by the student teaching supervisor. This form gives the
student teacher specific suggestions that must be completed in a week or less. At this time, the
University Supervisor and the Coordinator of Field Experience will conduct classroom
observations and another joint meeting will be held with the University Supervisor, Coordinator of
Field Experience, Master teacher, and student teacher.
        If at any time, the master teacher/support provider or the principal feels the class is in
jeopardy and learning in the classroom is deteriorating, a request can be made to the Coordinator to
have the student teacher removed from the classroom. This requires detailed observations and
indications that the student teacher has not improved since s/he was informed of the problem. At
this point, the Coordinator of Field Experience is required to remove the student teacher from the
classroom. The student teacher will receive a No Credit for student teaching and repeat the student
teaching experience.


                                     Discipline in the Classroom
         The traditional student teacher will follow the discipline plan set up by the master teacher
in the classroom to assure continuity in the program. Elementary students are familiar with their
classroom teacher’s discipline program. Following the same program enables the students to
understand the behaviors expected of them to follow while the student teacher is in charge of the
classroom. Changes in the discipline procedures can only be made after a discussion with the
master teacher and the university supervisor.
         The traditional student teacher will share their discipline plan with the university supervisor
as part of the student teaching seminar requirements.

                                           Pagers and Cell Phones
        Cell phone and pagers are to be turned off when the student teacher is in the classroom. If
you must be contacted during student teaching hours, provide the telephone number of the school
and the school office personnel will relay the message to you. The master teacher or the supervisor
will notify the Coordinator if cell phones or pagers are used during your time in the classroom.

                                               Dress Code
        Research indicates that the manner a teacher dresses affects the way students react to you in
the classroom. The Multiple Subjects Credential Program requires that student teachers dress
professionally, even when the school has a relaxed dress code. If the master teacher or supervisor
indicates that the student teacher is dressed inappropriately, it will be noted on the observation
reports. A student teacher may be removed from a classroom for inappropriate dress. In the case
of an Intern teacher, the principal will be informed that your dress is inappropriate for a CSUB
student teacher.
                                                   18
        Female student teachers must avoid wearing dresses that are too form fitting or too short,
and tops that are low-cut or show the midriff. Remember it is difficult to get fully involved in the
classroom activities when you have to be concerned about how far you bend over. Male students
should wear collared shirts and avoid tennis shoes. Jeans and shorts are not to be worn to school
(unless you are having a sport day) by either females or males. Tattoos are not to be visible and
tongue studs are not to be worn during student teaching. Both are considered unprofessional by
CSUB and the school districts in which we service.
        Some supervisors allow their student teachers to wear jeans on Fridays if this conforms
with the school dress code. Check with your supervisor regarding this issue.

                               Phase In To Full Time Responsibility
        Student teachers phase in and phase out of each of the two student teaching experiences.
The Phase-in schedules are in the appendices [See Appendix B, pp.52-53 for phase in schedules].
Each student teacher meets with the master teacher to discuss their schedule for assuming
responsibility in each subject area.
        Intern teachers have full responsibility of the classroom during student teaching. The
university supervisor and support provider make visits to the classroom at different times during
the day to ensure that each subject is being taught for the appropriate number of minutes each day.
        The university supervisor must be informed of your teaching schedule in order to schedule
observation visits. Completion and submission of a teaching schedule is one of the student teaching
seminar requirements.

                                    First Days in the Classroom
        During the first few days in the classroom, student teachers observe the procedures and
teaching of the master teacher. In order to ensure continuity of the learning environment, each
student teacher completes a form outlining the classroom procedures. This form is placed in the
student teaching notebook, the supervisor reviews the form and monitors to ensure that the student
teacher follows the master teacher’s classroom procedures [See Appendix B, pp. 51-52 for phase in
schedules].
        The Intern teacher also completes the classroom procedures form and places it in the
student teaching notebook. Completing this form emphasizes a focus on daily and weekly
procedures that are necessary for a smooth running classroom.

                                      A Place For The Supervisor
        It is the responsibility of the student teacher to arrange for a table and a chair for the
university supervisor during their visitations. This place should include your lesson plans, plan
book and your notebook, and should not distract from instruction.

                                               Fog Delays
        If the school district calls a fog delay, candidates are expected to report to school at the
regular time [Since districts might vary, candidates must respond as indicated for the staff by
respective school district]. School districts require that all teachers be on duty because many
elementary students must come to school at the usual time. Check with your district to determine
their policy for Fog Delays.


                                           Inservice Days
        Inservice days are considered teaching days. If the district has an inservice day, check with
the master teacher or principal to determine if you can attend the inservice. Some districts
welcome you, while others feel it is only for employees. If you are not invited to attend the
inservice, then you must spend the day in the classroom preparing for instruction.

                                                  19
                                       Reporting Child Abuse
        The state mandates that suspected child abuse be reported. If you suspect child abuse in
your classroom, talk to the teacher. The teacher is responsible for this and will provide you with
guidelines for reporting. You should never take it upon yourself to report an incident without
speaking to the teacher and site administrator.
        If the teacher or administrator asks you to write a report, do so. Be sure that both of the
teacher and the administrator sign any reports that you write and keep a copy of the report for your
own file.

                                 Student Teacher General Policies
        The student teacher is a guest in the assigned school. As a guest, you are expected to
support school policies and personnel, follow all rules and regulations, and conduct yourself as a
professional educator in your manner, dress, and communication. Many things happen in the
classroom that must be kept confidential, (i.e., classroom files, discipline, learning outcomes,
parents, etc.), and communication must be kept at a professional level. The outstanding student
teacher does not just do well on assigned tasks but displays exemplary characteristics in self-
reliance, desire, enthusiasm, and other indicators of outstanding promise.

1. Scheduled times:
        Arrival
               o The same time as the faculty of the school
        Departure
               o Stage II Student Teaching - noon
               o Stage III Student Teaching - the end of the faculty school day.
2. Attendance:
        Daily attendance is required.
               o Be punctual and sign in and out upon on arrival and departure at the school.

        Absences
            o Notify the master teacher, the school, and the university supervisor as early as
               possible on the day of your absence.
            o During the student teacher’s absence, the master teacher will reassume control
               of the classroom. Thus, candidates must leave their lesson plans, instructional
               materials, and other resources readily available to the master teacher.

       Excessive absences
              o If a candidate misses more than two days, they may have to extend or repeat the
                   student teaching experience.
3. Seminars
       Some districts require candidates to attend seminars prior to entering the classroom.
          The candidates will be notified prior to the beginning of the quarter if this applies to
          their assigned district.
       The candidate is required to attend the appropriate designated seminar course [see your
          Advising Sheet and/or check with your advisor], and attend seminars given by the
          university supervisor. The supervisor will notify candidates of the time and place of
          the seminars. The seminars will address important teaching topics, therefore,
          attendance at each seminar is mandatory.

                                                 20
4. Daily Schedule
         At the beginning of the quarter, candidates must complete the classroom schedule for
            themselves and their university supervisor, in order to keep the university supervisor
            informed of the classes they will be teaching. The university supervisor will visit
            candidates’ classroom to observe them teaching different subjects.
         If the candidates’ schedule is going to change (school assembly, field trip, etc.), then
            they must notify the university supervisor prior to their observation.
5. Visitations
         The university supervisor will conduct classroom observations throughout the period of
            student teaching. The total number of visits made for each student teacher depends on
            the progress being made.
         As a general rule, a minimum of five (5) visits will be made during each period of
            student teaching.
         Visits may be announced or unannounced.
6. Lesson Plans
         All lessons must be planned in advance.
         One week’s plans are required three days in advance of the week (i.e. the plans for the
            following week will be due on Wednesday).
         Schedule an appointment with the master teacher well in advance of the lesson
            presentations for feedback and direction.
         Lesson plans requirements for BCLAD emphasis student teachers are outlined in
            Appendix E at the end of this Handbook.
 [Note: Lessons will be required by all your Stage II courses as well. Specific instructions will be
provided by each Stage II & III course instructor].

7. Conferences with the Master Teacher
        It is the student teacher’s responsibility to plan a daily conference with the master
          teacher to discuss all lesson plans and presentations. Additionally, the student teacher
          should make a list of questions to discuss prior to each conference.
8. Conferences with University Supervisor
        The university supervisor will meet with the student teacher following each visit -
          either in person or via a phone conference. (You will also be required to attend the
          student teaching seminar course taught by the university supervisor; the university
          supervisor will arrange the time and place).
9. Video Tape
        The candidate is required to videotape and reflect on one lesson each quarter and
          submit the videotape and reflection to the university supervisor. If permission is not
          granted by the school to video tape, the candidate may have the option of using an
          audio tape.
       Note: (There is a sample video reflection guide in Appendix G)

[IMPORTANT NOTE: Candidates must obtain a written permission from the parents/guardians
of the students being videotaped and/or audio-taped. Check with the master teacher and the site
administrator to follow the school’s policy].




                                                21
10. Classroom Manner

          Candidates are student teachers as guests in the classroom; they are not peers.
           Candidates must conduct themselves accordingly in a professional manner when
           relating to students and others. Create a warming, caring classroom environment,
           implement the existing discipline plan, and develop a positive and respectful rapport
           with elementary students—as well as with others.

                       Other Pertinent General Program Policies
Visitor Students: Visitor status is an option for students who are admitted at another (CSU) campus’
credential program. Individuals, who have completed their student teaching experiences at their home
campus, may not be accepted. In order for CSUB to recommend for a credential, we must have
supervised the candidate in a student teaching experience. Acceptable students must be in good
standing with their home campus, and must provide in writing a formal request from their home
campus. In addition, they must submit official ―Visitor status‖ form signed and approved from their
home campus’ Admissions Office. The visitor status is valid for one quarter only. Fees are registered
and paid for the home campus.

The home campus must provide student teaching visitation and evaluation forms, and provide TB
& fingerprint clearances. If the student requires any credential courses, they must be completed
within the one quarter limit. Upon completion of the student teaching experience, the student
would order an official CSUB transcript (reflecting the grade) for his home campus. The
student’s home campus is responsible for recommending for the credential.

Courtesy Student Teaching Placement: Similar to the visitor status option, this avenue allows a CSU
campus to request a courtesy student teaching placement for a student. The student should not be in
need of any credential courses, and does not have to fill out a ―Visitor‖ form through the Admissions &
Records Office. Courtesy placements are made and facilitated by the program’s student teaching
placement coordinators in terms of the program guidelines.

Transfer Students: Transfer students are students that have been or are admitted at another campus’
credential program, and wish to transfer to CSUB. These students must request that their student file
be transferred to CSUB. As per CSU policy, the student must be in good standing in order to transfer;
and campuses are required to accept transfer students so long as availability is not a problem.
Impacted credential programs do not have to accept transfer students.

Credential Course Currency (5 or 7 year limit) – Most campuses feel that credential courses should
be considered valid for 5 years. Graduate policy for Master’s coursework currency is 7 years.
Decisions on this issue must be taken by the program personnel after an appeal request is submitted.
The Program faculty will determine which limit to follow.

Fingerprint Verification: All student teachers must have a fingerprint clearance in order to student
teach and/or participate in any field based experience. Holders of any type of emergency credential or
intern credential are not required to redo the fingerprint process. Livescan verifications are not
sufficient evidence of clearance. Under no circumstances should students be in any classroom
setting without a Certificate of Clearance. Under SB 2042 requirements, all students will be required
to submit fingerprint verification at the time of application to the credential program. This will
eliminate students from completing student teaching without a clearance. The SOE no longer allows
student teachers in the classroom with signed affidavits.
                                                   22
Equivalent Credential Course Requests: students submitting requests for equivalent coursework
must have appropriate forms, catalog course descriptions and transcripts verifying passage of
coursework. Once approved or denied by program coordinator, the student should be notified in
writing.

Continuous Enrollment & Graduation Requirements for Credential Students: The SOE Dean’s
memo dated September 8, 2004, states: “ Continuous Enrollment and Graduation Requirements – To
maintain rights to a set of graduate requirements, a student must remain in continuous enrollment or
attendance. This means that the student must enroll during two quarters or one semester of each
calendar year at CSUB, another CSU campus, or a California Community College. Absence due to an
approved educational leave or for attendance at another accredited institution of higher learning shall
not be considered an interruption in attendance if the absence does not exceed two years (page 69,
California State University, Bakersfield 2003-05 Catalog).”

Credential evaluators and credential analysts will verify this information for program
coordinators/directors.

Student Teaching Placements: Students should be assigned to complete their student teaching
requirement in appropriate classroom settings (elementary, self contained, multiple subject classroom).
Multiple Subjects candidates should only be placed in any K-6th self-contained classroom settings.
[Single Subject candidates may be placed in grades 7-12 within their subject matter area/exam.
Special Education candidates are required to complete both a regular school & special education
experience]. Please be advised that as a result of ―No Child Left Behind‖ legislation, that we NO
LONGER allow students to complete any of their student teaching experience in a Supplementary
Authorization area. This policy applies to Intern students as well.

Student teaching in private school settings: A portion of student teaching in private schools maybe
allowed after careful review and consideration. Such decisions must be considered by the program
personnel (director, student teaching placement coordinator, credential analyst and evaluator). A
minimum of one quarter of full day student teaching in public school setting is required.


Making Changes to Programs: Program changes follow certain procedures and are governed by
various evolving CSU-wide policies, accreditation guidelines and specifications, and campus protocols.
Accordingly, changes should be made by program faculty, and approved by appropriate administration.


Advising Forms: Any drafts of advising forms for ―Non-Admitted‖ students may not be accepted.
Upon admission into a basic credential program, an official advising form must be completed to ensure
accuracy of records.

Note: If uncertain about a requirement or course on the advising sheet, please do not sign off on it.
Write in a question mark (?), or pending, or anything else to indicate that this requirement must be
verified. Check with respective program personnel and document any proceedings or notes.

Credential GPA Requirement: A 3.0GPA must be maintained throughout the program.




                                                 23
*Professional Liability Insurance:


NOTE: NEW CSU CHANCELLORS OFFICE MANDATE


Mandate
As of August 1, 2006, the CSU Chancellor’s Office of Risk Management is requiring all
students in various fields, including the Credential Program to purchase Professional
Liability Insurance at the cost of $16 per Academic Year. This fee may be paid at the
Cashier’s window or online.


Professional Liability Insurance
Candidates placed in the public school systems for any field work assignment, student
teaching, observation or as a visitor by CSUB through their credential classes and/or pre-
requisites, all students must purchase Professional Liability Insurance through California State
University Risk Management Authority (CSURMA).


Who does this affect?

      Early field students taking (EDEL 240) must purchase the insurance and show proof of
       purchase to the instructor of record.
      Credential students currently in the program must provide a copy to their evaluator in
       the Credential’s Office. (Even though you may have obtained liability insurance
       through CTA, you must purchase liability insurance through CSURMA according to
       the mandate from the Chancellor’s Office.
      BBEST students must show proof to their instructors while taking credential courses
       prior to admission to the credential program. Upon applying to the Credential Program,
       you must submit proof of purchase.



                                 Student Teachers with Disabilities
        Candidates with disabilities who need special accommodations should contact the
university’s office of Services for Students with Disabilities at: 661-664-3360; TDD-661-665-
6288.

                                         Recommendations
       Even though candidates may have a teaching position now, it is advisable to begin a
placement file at the university Career Planning and Placement Office. Request that your support
provider and university supervisor fill out a recommendation form. If your site administrator has
been active in your classroom, you may want to ask him/her to fill out a recommendation form.




                                                24
                                        CHAPTER 3
                                 The Student Teaching Notebook
         Candidates must keep a notebook throughout the student teaching experience. The
notebook is a reflection of the candidate’s day in the classroom. The notebook is an invaluable
tool, an excellent resource for the future; it is also a communication tool between the candidate and
the university supervisor. In their daily journals, candidates will reflect on what has happened in
the classroom and write questions that need to be answered by the university supervisor. This is an
opportunity for candidates to engage in inquiry based learning and teaching to promote their
professional skills in the classroom. The notebook will be read, responded to, and initialized by the
supervisor on each visit. It should not contain personal information.
Guidelines for your notebook:
    A two-inch, three-ringed notebook, with labeled index dividers is required. Each section of the
notebook should be easily accessible. The following sections should be labeled on each divider:
 Schedule(s), seating charts, emergency procedures, and school/district policies
 Lesson Plans
           o This section will contain subsections for each subject area.
           o Organize the lesson plans for each subject subsection in reverse chronological
             order.
                      The most recent lesson plans are in the front of each subsection.
 Reflection Journal
           o Date each journal entry.
           o Make daily entries.
           o The candidate’s reflections are the critical evaluation of their own practices and a
             time to examine what has been learned/taught, what intended objectives were
             reached, and what target goals were met. Whatever reflections are made, they will
             guide the discussions between the university supervisor and the candidate, along
             with expected actions to be taken.
 Classroom notes
           o Notes of classroom observations, master teacher instructional strategies, etc.
           o Take this opportunity to note events in the classroom (i.e., students’ reactions to
             what is occurring in the classroom, the discipline procedures used daily, how
             students reacted to certain lessons, notes to discuss with parents, etc.).
 Work Samples
           o Begin building your file of activities and materials for your classroom. If you
             notice other teachers using activities or materials that are of interest to you, inquire
             if they will share their activities or materials with you. A camera is an excellent
             tool for recording ideas.


 Evaluations
           o Include your copies of all observations, midterm, and final evaluations.

                                                 25
        The University Supervisor will check the candidate’s notebook on their first visit to the
classroom to ensure that it is set up according to the guidelines. All student teaching and seminar
assignments are to be placed in the student teaching notebook.




Lesson Planning
        Write detailed (not scripted), long lesson plans that conform to the guidelines of the
Multiple Subject Credential Program listed below. Set aside time to plan, reflect, and revise your
lessons. All lesson plans are placed in Section 2 of your notebook.
        All of your lessons must be carefully planned, including Daily Oral Language (DOL),
journal writing, handwriting, spelling tests, etc. The university supervisor will determine when you
can begin to write lesson plans with fewer details and when you can begin using the lesson plan
book. All lesson plans must include the following:
   1. Heading:
           Subject:
           Grade:
           Date:
           Time:
   2. Standards-based Learning Objective(s): What is your final goal in the child’s learning
      today?
   3. Cite the content standard.
   4. Anticipatory Set: How will you focus the students’ attention on the lesson?
   5. Materials - What do you need for this lesson? Remember what is written here should be
      available prior to class.
   6. Vocabulary – (Required for all subjects) What words are you going to introduce? Do the
      students know the words? Do you have second language learners who will need to have
      the vocabulary explained?
   7. Procedures - This is the major part of your lesson. How will you teach this lesson? What
      back-up strategies are available to refocus the lesson? What are some alternative strategies
      for students who do not understand? What adaptations/modifications for special needs
      students? The order of instruction, practice and assessment. List Specially Designed
      Academic Instruction in English SDAIE (Specially Designed Academic Instruction in
      English) methodology. [BCLAD teachers see Appendix E for requirements].
           a. Direct Instruction: What are you going to teach the whole class?
           b. Guided Practice: How are you and the students going to practice this concept
              together?
           c. Independent Practice: Are students working in partners, groups, or individually?
           d. Closure, collect, correct, or turn-in.
   8. Assessment: informal, formal

                                                 26
   9. Active Participation Activities:
   10. Adaptations for Special Needs Students:
   Grades: You need grades to evaluate the student learning and for report cards. Try to collect
   at least 2 or 3 grades per subject per week. Copy the master teacher’s grade book and use it for
   your grades. Do not put grades in your master teacher’s grade book.
                                  Evaluation of the Supervisor
          Candidates will be asked to fill out an evaluation on their University Supervisor each
quarter. These forms are important to the University and the program evaluations to ensure that the
supervisor is making the required visits, conducting observations, and providing feedback as they
fulfill their mentoring responsibilities. The evaluations will be conducted at the end of each the
quarter.

                                      Professional Portfolio
       Candidates in the SB 2042 are required to compile a standard-based professional portfolio.
The process begins during Stage I of the program and is completed at the culmination of student
teaching. The portfolio should document both specific expectation outcomes as outlined in the
Teaching Performance Expectations (TPE’s) and reflect upon activities and opportunities found in
the Teacher Performance Assessments (TPAs). [See Appendix G for complete listing of TPEs, and
TPAs].

 Operational Definition:
        PORTFOLIO is defined as a dynamic on-going process that allows one to become a self-
evaluator and collaborator. The process may follow general guidelines and criteria as the student
documents and demonstrates in a given format the best work that has been accomplished
throughout their academic and professional training. It is an organized product that showcases
professional competencies through captioned artifact selections by the student and other members.
The process/product of portfolios should be a purposeful, standard-based, goal-driven collection of
relevant, reflective, and optimal work presented.
Underlying Assumptions:
        Portfolios should . . .

       Be consistent with accreditation agencies' guidelines

       Reflect research-based benefits and recommendations
       Represent the process and product of teacher education
       Involve professional continuity and collaboration
       Provide a timeline for evolving growth and development
       Include a broad display of knowledge and skill base
       Have inclusive accounts of what credentials don't specify
       Have a chronology of professional/academic development
       Note: Various artifacts must be included from coursework and fieldwork activities. For
each section of the portfolio, reflections must be included. You must submit the portfolio in
LiveText or electronic form. Further guidance will be provided in EDEL 449 regarding completing
and scoring your portfolio which will be due by the end of your Stage III quarter.




                                                27
                                          CHAPTER 4
                                 Master Teacher Responsibilities

        The master teacher is an important asset in helping prepare student teachers for their own
classrooms. Without the master teacher, CSUB would not be able to have a program. The master
teacher works closely with the university supervisor in helping the student teacher mature and
develop in their classroom knowledge.
    Master teachers should possess the following qualifications:
        At least three years of elementary teaching experience
        Tenure in the district
        An on-going successful record of teaching excellence
        Current knowledge of subject matter methodology
        Willingness to share their expertise, materials, and classroom with a student teacher
        CLAD certification
        BCLAD certification is required for BCLAD mentors

        In order to facilitate collaboration between the master teacher, student teacher, and
university supervisor, each master teacher works with the university supervisor who attends
quarterly orientation sessions where the roles and responsibilities of each participant are outlined
and discussed.
        The master teacher works closely with the student teacher to ensure that growth occurs in
student teaching during the quarter. Although the master teacher is legally responsible for the
classes taught by the student teacher, they must be willing to gradually relinquish control of the
classroom and allow the student teacher to assume full responsibility of the classroom for an
assigned period of time. (Stage II Student Teaching: 10 half days of full responsibility; Stage III
Student Teaching: 15 full days of full responsibility).
        After the master teacher gains confidence in the student teacher’s ability to maintain
classroom control and effectively deliver lesson content, they will step out of the classroom for
brief periods of time. When the student teacher begins his or her period of full-responsibility, the
master teacher should leave the classroom for longer periods of time. It is natural and
recommended that the master teacher periodically check the classroom when the student teacher is
teaching full time.

                                  What is a Stage II student teacher?
        Stage II Student Teaching students will be in the classroom during the morning hours,
should arrive to school at the same time as the master teacher, and are to remain at school until
noon. Stage II student teachers gradually take over all classes taught in the morning, and they are
required to complete ten (10) half-days of full responsibility. They will also be attending seminars
with the university supervisor.
        It is the responsibility of the student teacher to arrange daily conferences with the master
teacher to discuss all lesson plans and presentations and other classroom matters. It would be
helpful if the master teacher could meet with the student teacher at a time when they do not have to
return to the classroom, (i.e., before school, at recess, or during lunch). Regular meetings between
the master teacher and student teacher are recommended in order for the master teacher to review
lesson plans, critique lesson presentation, and assist the student teacher with future planning.




                                                 28
                                What is a Stage III student teacher?
        The Stage III student teacher will follow the negotiated contract day for teachers. They are
to arrive at the same time as the faculty in the school and remain until the end of the teacher’s
school day. The Stage III student teacher has experienced blending the theoretical with the
practical. However, it may take time for them to adjust to a new grade level and/or a new school.
They will require the guidance and assistance of their master teacher, so regular meetings are
necessary for a successful student teaching experience.
        Stage III student teachers gradually take over the classes taught throughout the day until
they are teaching all subjects. They are required to complete fifteen (15) days of full responsibility.

                                    Student Teaching Difficulties
        Some student teachers may experience difficulty in planning, executing the lesson plans,
and maintaining classroom management. When a master teacher/principal/support provider notices
a student teacher is experiencing difficulty, s/he will discuss the problem with the student teacher
and supervisor immediately. At this time, the supervisor will begin to make additional visits to the
classroom. The visits will be well documented, provide a record of what was observed in the
classroom, and will give suggestions that must be implemented immediately. The original
observation will be used to determine if the suggestions have been followed, (teacher/support
provider or principal will meet to discuss the student teacher’s progress). If the student teacher
continues to have difficulty, a NEEDS TO IMPROVE FORM will be completed by the student
teaching supervisor. This form gives the student teacher specific suggestions that must be
completed in a week or less. At this time, the University Supervisor and the Coordinator of Field
Experience will conduct classroom observations and another joint meeting will be held with the
University Supervisor, Coordinator of Field Experience, Master teacher, and student teacher.
        If at any time, the master teacher/support provider or the principal feels the class is in
jeopardy and learning in the classroom is deteriorating, a request can be made to the Coordinator to
have the student teacher removed from the classroom. This requires detailed observations and
indications that the student teacher has not improved since s/he was informed of the problem. At
this point, the Coordinator of Field Experience is required to remove the student teacher from the
classroom. The student teacher will receive a No Credit for student teaching and repeat the student
teaching experience.


                                     Discipline in the Classroom
         The traditional student teacher will follow the discipline plan set up by the master teacher
in the classroom to assure continuity in the program. Elementary students are familiar with their
classroom teacher’s discipline program. Following the same program enables the students to
understand the behaviors expected of them to follow while the student teacher is in charge of the
classroom. Changes in the discipline procedures can only be made after a discussion with the
master teacher and the university supervisor.
         The traditional student teacher will share their discipline plan with the university supervisor
as part of the student teaching seminar requirements.




                                                  29
                                     Correcting Student Papers
        Student teachers MUST correct all assignments they give to the students. The assignments
are to be returned the day after they are turned in to the student teacher. Student teachers who fail
to do so may be issued a ―Needs to Improve‖ form.

                                               Grades
         Student teachers need grades in order to evaluate the child’s learning and for report cards.
They should try to have at least 2 or 3 grades per subject per week. The master teacher will share
their format for grading with the student teacher. It is suggested that master teachers give the
student teacher a Xeroxed copy of their grade book. Student teachers are not to record grades in
the master teachers’ grade book!

                             Aides in classrooms with student teachers
        The master teacher should discuss the student teacher’s responsibilities with the aide.
Many times it is difficult for an aide to sit back and watch student teachers make mistakes.
Although aides know the classroom and wish to be helpful, they must let the student teacher take
control so he or she may learn from their mistakes.
        If the student teacher is to provide work for the aide working with students, please guide
the student teacher in preparing the work. The master teacher may need to serve as the liaison
between the student teacher and the aide.

                                      Pagers and Cell Phones
        Pagers and cell phones are not to be used during the instructional day. Students are asked
to have emergency telephone calls directed to the school office. If the student teacher abuses this
procedure, please notify the supervisor immediately.

                                              Dress Code
         Student teachers are to dress professionally. We realize many schools have a relaxed dress
code; however, student teachers have a tendency to be too relaxed in their dress. We have
discussed the dress code with the student teachers and have informed them that dress can affect the
way students respond to them in the classroom.
         Female student teachers must avoid wearing dresses that are too form fitting or too short,
and tops that are low-cut or show the mid-diff. Male students should wear collared shirts and avoid
tennis shoes. Jeans and shorts are not to be worn to school (unless you are having a sport day) by
either females or males. Tattoos are not to be visible and tongue studs are not to be worn during
student teaching. Both are considered unprofessional by CSUB and the school districts in which
we service.
         Some supervisors will allow their student teachers to wear jeans on Fridays, if this
conforms with the school dress code. If the student teacher’s dress is inappropriate, please let the
supervisor know immediately.

               How do I know when the student teacher is to take over a subject?
       We have a Phase-in schedule for all student teachers. These can be found in appendix B
and can be modified to meet your individual needs. Please feel free to discuss the schedule with
the University Supervisor.


                                    The classroom environment
         The student teachers have a form that they are required to fill out during the first few days
in the classroom. The form asks them to record the classroom procedures: the arrival procedure,
lining up, going to and from the playground, lunch routine, signal for desired behavior, etc. Please
                                                  30
ask the student teacher for a copy of this form. They are required to turn their form in to the
university supervisor, to let them know they are aware of the classroom routines and procedures.

                   What does the University require of each student teacher?
       All student teachers are required to keep a daily notebook of the happenings in the
        classroom. The university supervisor will review this notebook during each visit. The
        notebook contains classroom activities, lesson plans, classroom organization, management
        techniques, etc.
       Make an interactive bulletin board
       Videotape a lesson. A written critique of the videotaped lesson must be submitted to the
        university supervisor. (See sample video reflection guide in Appendix G)
       Mere completion of coursework, including student teaching, does not guarantee a
        credential. The candidates must be recommended for a credential based upon satisfactory
        completion of the Teacher Performance Expectancies (TPE’s) and the Teacher
        Performance Assessment (TPA). The University, through the School of Education, makes
        the recommendation for issuance of a credential before a candidate's application for the
        credential can be processed.

                                   Student Teacher Observations
         The master teacher is required to conduct at least 2 to3 formal observations of the student
teacher using the forms provided. Please provide both positive feedback and suggestions for
improvement. A copy of the observation should be given to the student teacher and a copy to the
university supervisor.
         The observations are extremely important especially if the student teacher is experiencing
difficulty. Thorough documentation is imperative.

                            Three Way Midterm and Final Evaluation
        You are expected to fill out midterm and final evaluation forms and participate in a
midterm and final collaborative evaluation conference with the student teacher and university
supervisor. The evaluation forms are placed in the student teacher’s file and are not part of their
application packet unless they choose to include them.

                                         Recommendations
         The student teacher may ask you to write them a letter of recommendation. This will be
your decision - you do have the right to refuse. If you agree to do so, the student teacher may give
you a form from the CSUB placement office or you may write a letter. This evaluation will be part
of their application file.

                        Suggestions for Working with Student Teachers
    1. The following are suggestions for working with the student teacher.
    2. Make your expectations clear from the beginning - unclear expectations lead to frustrations
       on the part of the master teacher and the student teacher.
    3. Provide immediate feedback on lessons so that the student knows how to improve.
    4. Discuss the daily routine and schedules.
    5. Introduce the student teacher to the school environment - make him/her feel welcome at the
       school site.

    6. Provide a work place for the student teacher to keep materials and personal belongings.
    7. Inform the student teacher of school and district policies.
    8. Discuss guidelines for discipline, grading, classroom organization, special classes, aides,
       etc.
                                                  31
    9. Provide copies of the teachers’ edition for each subject area that the student teacher will
        teach.
    10. Share your faculty handbook with the student teacher.
    11. Discuss emergency plans for earthquake and fire drills.
    12. Discuss in confidence the pupils in your class prior to the student teacher assuming
        classroom responsibility. Exercise caution with the statements you make.
    13. When possible, bring closure to each day with encouragement and suggestions.
    14. Prepare the class for the student teacher’s arrival and introduce your student teacher to the
        class.
    15. Inform the student teacher where to get supplies and materials needed for his/her teaching
        experience - also inform him or her if there is a resource center available for use.
    16. Encourage your student teacher to apply methods learned in university classes.
    17. Mentor your student teacher—conversations can be productive if you respect each other
        professionally.
    18. Provide periodic written feedback during the quarter.
    19. Be willing to give constructive criticism to the student teacher.
    20. Assist your student teacher in establishing classroom control.
    21. Set aside a time to discuss the daily events in the classroom.
    22. Participate in the midterm and final evaluations.

                                Substituting During Student Teaching
         If a student teacher has an emergency substitute permit and is registered to substitute in the
district in which they are student teaching, he or she may substitute in your classroom for a
maximum of three days during the quarter. The student teacher must obtain permission in advance
from the principal of the school and the supervisor and have the appropriate paper work completed
at the district office. The student teacher should be paid for these days.
         Under no circumstances will the student teacher substitute in another teacher’s classroom.
The days of full time substituting may not be counted toward the days required for full
responsibility.




                                                  32
                                          CHAPTER 5
                              University Supervisor Responsibilities


                              California State University, Bakersfield
                                        School of Education

         The University Supervisor is a liaison between the school district and the university. The
university supervisor will work closely with the principal and the master teacher to ensure a
positive student teaching experience, and should introduce themselves to the principal on their first
visit to the school.

                              University Supervisor Responsibilities
      Review the student teachers’ lesson plans and provide written responses if necessary.
      Initial the lesson plans during each visit.
      Arrange a meeting with the principal the first week.
      Discuss the experiences the student teacher should have during the quarter with the
       principal and the master teacher.
      Observe the student teachers in their assignments.
      Review the student teacher’s journal and respond appropriately. Initial the journal.
      Schedule conferences with the student teacher.
      Schedule seminars with the student teachers.
      Assist the student teachers in self-reflection and evaluation of their teaching.
      Establish effective communication with administrators regarding the student teaching
       program.
      Provide, upon request, a letter for the candidates’ placement file (if you so choose).
      Attend monthly university supervisor meetings with the Coordinator of Field Experience.
      BCLAD student teacher supervisors must be fluent in Spanish at the intermediate Spanish
       level.

                                           Number of visits
         The university supervisor will observe the student teacher a minimum of five times during
each culminating fieldwork experience, however, weekly visits are encouraged. Supervisors
should do a combination of scheduled and unscheduled visits, in order to present a true picture of
what is happening in the classroom.
         Using the CSTP, TPEs and TPA-based outcomes as a guide, the supervisor will fill out a
visitation form for each visit with the student teacher. The evaluation form should include positive
comments as well as suggestions for improving the lesson. Alternative methods for presentations
should be considered so the student teacher will reflect on the experience. Discuss the alternative
presentations with the master teacher. Do not ask student teachers to go against the master teacher
or school policies.




                                                 33
                                Conferencing with the student teacher
        Supervisors will conduct formal and informal conferences with the student teacher. The
informal meeting is part of the ongoing communication between the supervisor and the student
teacher. If the student teacher is teaching all morning or all day, the informal conference may be
by telephone.
        The university supervisor should attempt to conference with the student teacher following
each visit. If this is not possible, have the student teacher telephone you at a given time to discuss
the observation. Be sure they have your telephone number - either your home number or your
voice message number.
        The master teacher should be included in some of the conferences when you are
supervising a traditional student teacher.
        You will leave one copy of your visitation form with the master teacher and one with the
student teacher. When the master teacher has completed observations, the student teacher is
responsible for giving you a copy of the observation.

                                              Seminars
        All supervisors are required to have a minimum of five seminars. The subject of the
seminars will vary from supervisor to supervisor. It is suggested your seminars reflect on the
observations you have made in the classrooms. The seminars should not exceed one hour in
length. The handbook is the syllabus for the seminars. Student teachers must attend all five
seminars to receive credit for student teaching.

                                            Documentation
         You need to keep careful documentation of the happenings in the classroom. If you feel a
student teacher is beginning to have difficulty, you will need to keep more detailed records. These
detailed records will help us in making a decision regarding the student teacher. Give the student
teacher specific suggestions, and time limits to complete the suggestions. If you have given a
suggestion, and the student teacher has not implemented the change, note it again by referring to
your original suggestion. If the student teacher continues to ignore the suggestion, give them a
―Needs to Improve‖ form. Refer to the TPE’s and TPA when writing the ―Needs to Improve‖ form.
         If the student teacher is experiencing difficulty, the supervisor should increase the number
of visits – both formal and informal. Document the times of the visit and what you observe in the
classroom. Be very specific in your documentation – again make reference to the TPE’s and
TPA’s.
         Documentation is extremely important, especially in the case of a grievance. The
documentation will indicate that the student teacher was notified of the concern and was given an
opportunity to improve.
         The standards for student teaching are an important resource. If a student teacher is having
difficulty, you might want to specify the California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP),
the TPE or TPA they are not meeting.

                                        BCLAD Classrooms
         Students involved in the program at this time are under the AB 1059 or BCLAD
certification. Please refer to the BCLAD Requirements in Appendix E.




                                                  34
                                          Lesson Planning
        Student teachers are required to have their lesson plans completed three days prior to
teaching a lesson, (i.e. If they are going to teach math the following week, the week’s lesson plans
are due on Wednesday of the previous week).
        The first time a student teacher does not have lesson plans, give them a notice and have
them bring the lesson plan to you by the next day. The second time they do not have lesson plans,
they will be given a ―Needs to Improve‖ form. The third time, the coordinator will visit them and a
determination will be made as to whether the student teacher will be given credit for the quarter.
        Student teachers are not to begin using the lesson plan book until they have demonstrated
proficiency in writing a complete plan (following the suggested format) and following through with
that plan in their lesson presentation. The supervisor will determine when this is to happen. If the
student teacher has difficulty after they have transferred to the lesson plan book, the supervisor has
the option of asking them to write out complete lesson plans again. All long lesson plans must be
placed in the student teaching notebook for your review.

                                       Classroom Management
        Classroom management is one of the most difficult areas of student teaching. The student
teacher should inform the supervisor of the discipline plan that is in place in the classroom in
writing as part one of the student teaching seminar requirements. In addition, the classroom
procedures form must be in the student teaching notebook. This enables the supervisor to observe
and make suggestions for improving classroom management.
        If a student teacher is experiencing difficulty with classroom management, please work
with them immediately and make sure they have the classroom under control. You may want to
ask for the master teacher’s assistance in this area.

                                      Needs to Improve Form
        The Needs to Improve form is given to a student teacher that is experiencing difficulty in
the classroom. The university supervisor or the master teacher may initiate the form. The form
should refer to the TPE’s that the student is not meeting by stating the problem, the solution, and a
time line for showing improvement. The time line should not be more than two weeks. Be sure
you have completed careful documentation prior to giving the needs to improve form. The needs
to improve form can be given at any time during the quarter provided that careful documentation
has been recorded prior to issuance of the form.
        Once the Needs to Improve form has been given, the coordinator (or a designee of the
coordinator) will visit the classroom. If necessary, the coordinator will make more than one visit to
determine progress. After the coordinator has completed the visitation, a conference will be held
with the master teacher, university supervisor, student teacher, and coordinator. A decision will be
made at that time regarding the action needed.
    The resulting action may be:
 termination of the student teaching for the remainder of the quarter
 reassignment to another classroom
 a grade of ―NC‖ for the quarter and reassignment to another classroom for the following
    quarter.




                                                 35
                                    Student Teaching Difficulties
        We realize some student teachers may experience difficulty in planning, executing the
lesson plans and maintaining classroom management. When a master teacher/principal/support
provider notices a student teacher is experiencing difficulty, s/he will discuss the problem with the
student teacher and supervisor immediately. At this time, the supervisor will begin to make
additional visits to the classroom. The visits will be well documented and provide a record of what
was observed in the classroom, and will give suggestions that must be implemented immediately.
The supervisor and master teacher/support provider or principal will refer to the original
observation to determine if the suggestions have been followed, and meet and discuss the student
teacher’s progress. If the student teacher continues to have difficulty, a NEEDS TO IMPROVE
FORM will be completed. This form gives the student teacher specific suggestions that must be
completed in a week or less. At this time, the University Supervisor and the Coordinator of Field
Experience will conduct classroom observations and another joint meeting will be held.
        If at any time, the master teacher/support provider or the principal feels the class is in
jeopardy and learning in the classroom is deteriorating, a request can be made to the Coordinator to
have the student teacher removed from the classroom. This requires detailed observations, and
indications that the student teacher has not improved since s/he was informed of the problem. At
this point, the Coordinator of Field Experience is required to remove the student teacher from the
classroom; the student teacher will receive a No Credit for student teaching and repeat the student
teaching experience.


                                     Discipline in the Classroom
         The traditional student teacher will follow the discipline plan set up by the master teacher
in the classroom to assure continuity in the program. The elementary students are familiar with the
discipline program, and it will help them to understand the behavior you expect them to follow
while you are in charge of the classroom. Changes in the discipline can only be made after a
discussion with the master teacher and the university supervisor.
         The traditional student teacher will share their discipline plan with the university supervisor
as part of the student teaching seminar requirements.

                                      Pagers and Cell Phones
        Pagers and cell phones are not to be used during the instructional day. Students are asked
to have emergency telephone calls directed to the school office. If the student teacher abuses this
procedure, please notify the supervisor immediately.

                                              Dress Code
         Student teachers are to dress professionally. We realize many schools have a relaxed dress
code, however, student teachers have a tendency to be too relaxed in their dress. We have
discussed the dress code with the student teachers and have informed them that dress can affect the
way students respond to them in the classroom.
         Female student teachers must avoid wearing dresses that are too form fitting or too short,
and tops that are low-cut or show the mid-diff. Male students should wear collared shirts and avoid
tennis shoes. Jeans and shorts are not to be worn to school (unless you are having a sport day) by
either females or males. Tattoos are not to be visible and tongue studs are not to be worn during
student teaching. Both are considered unprofessional by CSUB and the school districts in which
we service.
         Some supervisors will allow their student teachers to wear jeans on Fridays, if this
conforms to the school dress code. If the student teacher’s dress is inappropriate, speak to the
student teacher immediately.


                                                  36
                              Phase In To Full Time Responsibility
       We have a Phase-in schedule for all student teachers. These can be found in the appendices
and can be modified to meet the individual needs of the master teacher. A copy of this schedule
should be provided to the supervisor at the beginning of the quarter.

                                     The classroom environment
        The student teachers have a form that they are to fill out during the first few days in the
classroom. The form asks them to record the classroom procedures: the arrival procedure, lining
up, going to and from the playground, lunch routine, signal for desired behavior, etc. They are
required to turn their form in to the university supervisor, to let them know they are aware of the
classroom routines and procedures.

                                Substituting During Student Teaching
         If a student teacher has an emergency substitute permit and is registered to substitute in the
district in which they are student teaching, he or she may substitute in the student teaching
classroom for a maximum of three days during the quarter. The student teacher must obtain
permission in advance from the principal of the school and the supervisor and have the appropriate
paper work completed at the district office. The student teacher should be paid for these days.
         Under no circumstances will the student teacher substitute in another teacher’s classroom.
The days of full time substituting may not be counted toward the days required for full
responsibility.


                                     A Place For The Supervisor
        The student teacher needs to arrange a place for you to be during visitation. If they do not
do so, please talk to them in order to avoid disturbance in the classroom.




                                                  37
                                          CHAPTER 6
                                      Principal Information

                                  Elementary Education Program
                              California State University, Bakersfield



               What does the student teacher participate in while student teaching?
        The Elementary Education Program faculty wants to encourage student teachers to become
a part of the school environment in which they are working. We feel the more experiences they
have on your campus, the better they will be prepared as future teachers. They are encouraged to
attend all open houses, orientation meetings, parent meetings, conferences, inservice training,
programs etc.
        Student teachers may need to have experiences in classes other than the one to which they
are assigned. If you have special programs, it might be helpful for the student teacher to visit one
of these programs.


                              What happens if the student teacher is not
                                    able to handle the classroom?
        We realize some student teachers may experience difficulty in planning, executing the
lesson plans and maintaining classroom management. When a master teacher/principal/support
provider notices a student teacher is experiencing difficulty, s/he will discuss the problem with the
student teacher and supervisor immediately. At this time, the supervisor will begin to make
additional visits to the classroom. The visits will be well documented and provide a record of what
was observed in the classroom, and will give suggestions that must be implemented immediately.
The supervisor and master teacher/support provider or principal will refer to the original
observation to determine if the suggestions have been followed, and meet and discuss the student
teacher’s progress. If the student teacher continues to have difficulty, a NEEDS TO IMPROVE
FORM will be completed. This form gives the student teacher specific suggestions that must be
completed in a week or less. At this time, the University Supervisor and the Coordinator of Field
Experience will conduct classroom observations and another joint meeting will be held.
        If at any time, the master teacher/support provider or the principal feels the class is in
jeopardy and learning in the classroom is deteriorating, a request can be made to the Coordinator to
have the student teacher removed from the classroom. This requires detailed observations, and
indications that the student teacher has not improved since s/he was informed of the problem. At
this point, the Coordinator of Field Experience is required to remove the student teacher from the
classroom; the student teacher will receive a No Credit for student teaching and repeat the student
teaching experience.




                                                 38
                                              Dress Code
         Student teachers are to dress professionally. We realize many schools have a relaxed dress
code, however, student teachers have a tendency to be too relaxed in their dress. We have
discussed the dress code with the student teachers and have informed them that dress can affect the
way students respond to them in the classroom.
         Female student teachers must avoid wearing dresses that are too form fitting or too short,
and tops that are low-cut or show the mid-diff. Male students should wear collared shirts and avoid
tennis shoes. Jeans and shorts are not to be worn to school (unless you are having a sport day) by
either females or males. Tattoos are not to be visible and tongue studs are not to be worn during
student teaching. Both are considered unprofessional by CSUB and the school districts in which
we service.
         Some supervisors will allow their student teachers to wear jeans on Fridays, if this
conforms to the school dress code. If the student teacher’s dress is inappropriate, the university
supervisor will address the situation immediately.

                          Student Teacher Observations and Evaluations
        The university supervisor will conduct at least five formal evaluations of classroom
teacher, and the master teacher is required to formally observe three lesson presentations
throughout the student teaching experience.
        Student teachers are formally evaluated during midterm and final collaborative conferences
of the master teacher, student teacher and university supervisor. Both the master teacher and the
University Supervisor complete evaluation forms that are shared with the student teacher.

                               Substituting during student teaching
        If a student teacher has an emergency substitute credential, he or she may substitute in their
classroom for a maximum of three days during the quarter. The student teacher must obtain
permission from the principal and have the appropriate paper work completed at the district office.
The student teacher must be paid for the days they serve as a substitute teacher.
        Under no circumstances will the student teacher substitute in another teacher’s classroom.
The days of full time substituting may not be counted toward the days required for full
responsibility.




                                                 39
        APPENDIX A
       Application Forms

        SB2042 Application
       Candidate Evaluation
 Exceptional Admit Application
Multiple Subject Substitution Form
 Early Field Waiver Application




                40
                                                   SB-2042 Application
                                      Preliminary Multiple Subject Credential Program
                   (Please complete the front and back of this application and attach copies of documentation)
    ___________________________________________________________________________
This application packet is used by the Credential Program to certify that you have met the requirements for admission to the Multiple Subject
Credential Program.

Quarter/Year Applying_______________________________                                Email
Address________________________________@runner.csub.edu

Credential Option:        (check all that apply)

_____Multiple Subject, Traditional _____with BCLAD

_____Multiple Subject, PDS (PDS program start in fall quarter only)      _____with BCLAD



  Degree_________________________________                                                                      Major______________________________
University________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
LAST NAME                                       FIRST NAME                          MIDDLE                                         CSUB ID#

Mailing Address:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
                             street                          city                           state                            zip code

DOB:___________________________________________ Ethnicity:_________________________________                                       Gender: _____Male
_____Female

Home Phone: _________________________________________                  Work Phone: _________________________________              Cell
Phone_____________________
                            area code & number                                                      area code & number                         area
code & number

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

A minimum GPA of 3.00 in all Education coursework must be maintained while in the MSCP. If you earn a grade lower than a “C“, you must
retake the course before taking any other courses. You will not be admitted to supervision until your GPA is 3.00 or better. If your education GPA
falls below 3.00 you could be placed on academic probation, disqualified from the program and/or will not be recommended for a credential.

Completion of Prerequisites:          _____EDEL 240 Introductory Fieldwork
                                      _____EDBI 475 Intro. To Cross-Cultural Education
                                      _____CTAP Level 1: Region 8 or school district workshop or equivalent

____        Professional Liability Insurance: As of August 1, 2006, the CSU Chancellor’s Office of Risk Management is requiring all
            students in various fields, including the Credential Program to purchase Professional Liability Insurance at the cost of $16
            per Academic Year. This fee may be paid at the Cashier’s window or online.( see page 24 for details)

____        CSET Passage:     Passage the California Subject Examination for Teachers, subtest I, II & III is required for admission to the
                              credential program.
            Please attach a copy of your scores

____        Transcripts: All applicants (except where noted) must provide the following transcripts to:
                                    1.    The Graduate Admissions Office (current & former CSUB students are excluded): one official sealed
                                          transcript from every junior college/college/university attended AND
                                    2.    The MSCP will need copies of official transcripts from every junior college/college/university attended
                                          (current & former CSUB Students are excluded)

_____       Grade Point Average (GPA): In order to be considered for admission to the MSCP, applicants must have attained a grade
                                      point average of at least 2.67 in all baccalaureate and post–baccalaureate course work OR a
                                      grade point average of at least 2.75 in the last 90 quarter/60 semester units attempted.
                                      A very small percentage of exceptions to this requirement will be allowed.

____        Exceptional Admission:        If you feel that you have a reason to be considered for Exceptional Admission due to not
                                         meeting one or more of the Admission requirements, you must complete and submit the
                                         Exceptional Admit Request form which is included in the application packet.

_____       CBEST :                   ______Passed (attach a copy of your scores)

                                      ______Not passed: ____submit copy of scores or submit ____proof of registration




                                                                         41
_____       Fingerprint Clearance: Please submit a copy of one of the following:

            You may go to www.ctc.ca.gov to print a copy of your certificate of clearance or emergency permit.

                                   ______Copy of Certificate of Clearance issued by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing
                                             or
                                   ______Copy of a previously issued Emergency /Substitute /Pre-Intern certificate
                                             or
                                   ______Provide copies of the following: Live Scan receipt, Character and Identification application
                                       and mail receipt

_____       U.S. Constitution:     Required for the Preliminary Credential. US History 231 or PoliSci 101 (at CSUB) or equivalent
                                 course from another university/college.
                                   Course ____________________ university/college _____________________


_____       Negative Tuberculin Test:    The tuberculin clearance is valid for four years and must remain valid throughout all student
                                        teaching experiences. The clearance may be obtained at a private physician’s office, the
                                        county health department or CSU, Bakersfield’s Student Health Center. Please submit one
                                        copy.


_____       Candidate Evaluations (2): Applicants submit two candidate evaluation forms (included in the application). Only reference forms
            submitted in sealed envelopes will be accepted. It is recommended that one of the references be from a person who has observed
            the applicant’s performance in a work or teaching setting: and one reference from an instructor who has observed the applicant’s
            academic competence.

Please list all persons that you have requested to send a candidate evaluation form to the School of Education.
                         Name                                                Employment/Position                                         Telephone




I certify that the information submitted by me in conjunction with my application is accurate and complete.


Signature________________________________________________________________ Date_______________________________________




  Ethnic Identity. Please enter a code in the space provided. (optional).

        1   —   American Indian or Alaskan native                         J    —   Japanese                         G    —     Guamanian
        2   —   Black. including African-American                         K    —   Korean                           H    —     Hawaiian
        3   —   Mexican-American. Mexican, Chicano                        R    —   Asian Indian                     N    —     Samoan
        A   —   Central American                                          5    —   Other Asian                      6    —     Other Pacific Island
        B   —   South American                                            M    —   Cambodian                        7    —     White
        Q   —   Cuban                                                     L    —   Laotian                          F    —     Filipino
        P   —   Puerto Rican                                              V    —   Vietnamese                       8    —     Other
        4   —   Other Latino, Spanish-Origin, Hispanic                    T    —   Thai                             9    —     No Response
        C   —   Chinese                                                   S    —   Other Southeast Asian            D    —     Declined to State




                                                                        42
                                                Candidate Evaluation

Bakersfield Campus
School of Education
California State University, Bakersfield
Multiple Subjects Credential
Candidate Evaluation Form (Faculty- On campus)


Please return to:      Credential Office, School of Education
                       California State University, Bakersfield
                       9001 Stockdale Highway
                       Bakersfield, CA 93311-1099

                                                       has applied for admission to the Multiple Subjects Credential
Program at this University. Please give your judgment of the suitability of this candidate for the program according to the
following characteristics: (Circle appropriate description.)

To be filled out by Candidate before this form is given to the Recommender.
I am aware of the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act. I hereby authorize the release of the
information above to the Elementary Education Program, California State University, Bakersfield. I realize that I will not
view or be informed of any portion of this evaluation form.


                                                                          Signature of Applicant

Professional Aptitude...suitable aptitude and fitness for teaching and for adjustment to public school conditions
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful
Personality and Character...personality and character traits in keeping with the standards of the Teaching profession,
including:

   Positive Attitude
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful
   Receptivity to Feedback
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful
   Responsibility
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful
   Professional Appearance
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful

Many-sided interests diverse and well-balanced interests. S/He shall be able to understand and interpret his/her major
interest and field of study in suitable relationship to all others.

      Very promising       Good         Average        Fair        Very Doubtful
_______________________________________________________________________________________________

OVERALL RATING

       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful


Print Name____________________________________________ Position__________________________
Signature___________________________________________Telephone __________________________________
Date________________________________________


                                                              43
                                                Candidate Evaluation
Bakersfield Campus
School of Education
California State University, Bakersfield
Multiple Subjects Credential
Candidate Evaluation Form (Off Campus i.e., previous or current employer, pastor, co-worker)


Please return to:      Credential Office, School of Education
                       California State University, Bakersfield
                       9001 Stockdale Highway
                       Bakersfield, CA 93311-1099

                                                       has applied for admission to the Multiple Subjects Credential
Program at this University. Please give your judgment of the suitability of this candidate for the program according to the
following characteristics: (Circle appropriate description.)

To be filled out by Candidate before this form is given to the Recommender.
I am aware of the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act. I hereby authorize the release of the
information above to the Elementary Education Program, California State University, Bakersfield. I realize that I will not
view or be informed of any portion of this evaluation form.


                                                                          Signature of Applicant

Professional Aptitude...suitable aptitude and fitness for teaching and for adjustment to public school conditions
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful
Personality and Character...personality and character traits in keeping with the standards of the Teaching profession,
including:

   Positive Attitude
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful
   Receptivity to Feedback
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful
   Responsibility
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful
   Professional Appearance
       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful

Many-sided interests diverse and well-balanced interests. S/He shall be able to understand and interpret his/her major
interest and field of study in suitable relationship to all others.

      Very promising       Good         Average        Fair        Very Doubtful
______________________________________________________________________________________________

OVERALL RATING

       Very promising              Good             Average            Fair           Very Doubtful


   Print Name________________________________

   Signature _________________________________                       Position____________________________

   Telephone                      __________________               Date________ _________________________




                                                              44
                                              California State University, BakersfieId
                                                  Exceptional Admit Application
                                                      Elementary Education
      Name                                                                   Date

      Address                                                                City

                                                                   Sate
      I.   PLEASE ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS
           Your goal in this section of the application is to provide evidence that you are eligible to be considered for the
           Exceptional Admission under exceptional admit status.

           1.     Have you ever been denied admission to the Elementary Education Program under exceptional admit status?
                  Yes_____              No
                If yes, circle the quarter of your most recent denial and fill in the year: Fall Winter Spring 20

           2. Please check each all that apply.
              _____CSET:           Subtest I ____passed ___not passed           ___registered
                                   Subtest II ____passed ___not passed          ___registered
                                   Subtest III ____passed ___not passed         ___registered

                _____CBEST: _____taken, not passed _____registered
                _____GPA below 2.75 last 90 units/60 semester units
                _____Course Pre-requisites not completed: ___EDEL 240 ___EDBI 475 ___CTAP Level 1 Certification

      II. PLEASE PROVIDE ALL REQUESTED DOCUMENTATION
          Your goal in this application is to provide supportive documentation relative to your special ability and experiences for
          teaching.

           1. Provide a well-written prose statement explaining each that apply:

                _____The reasons for Exceptional Admit Request

                _____The extent and nature of work you have done with children;

                _____Unique talents/qualities/experiences (e.g., a strong math or science background, multilingual abilities) that
                      you have which can be useful in elementary teaching; and

                _____What you have done to strengthen your skills since your last application (if you have applied for and
                     been denied

           2. Attach a recommendation from an observer who has seen you working with children.

      You must turn in this form along with your supportive documentation by the due date for
      the application. (If your file is not complete by that day, it will not be reviewed by the
      committee and you will not be considered for admission under exceptional admit status.)
      Be sure to sign this form and include it with your application.

                          Student Signature


For Office Use Only

__________GPA as of ____________ Verified by__________________

__________________________________________  ____Approved _____Denied Date:______________
                            MULTIPLE SUBJECT CREDENTIAL PROGRAM
           Director Signature
                                              COURSE SUBSTITUTION FORM
                                     Multiple Subject Substitution Form


                                                                     45
                               Multiple Subject Substitution Form
  Transcripts of course (s) taken as well as the course syllabus are needed for the Director’s review. Once a
                              decision has been made you will be notified by mail.


Name:                                                                 Date of Application:
Address:                                                              Campus ID #:
Phone #:                                                                 Email:


Please indicate the corresponding course(s) for which you are requesting a substitution. Attach
                                    supporting documents:
                            1) Course Syllabus,      2) Transcripts.
                                    Substitution of Early Field Experience:
                  Course No./Title completed   Grade           University/College                Initials

EDEL 240          _____________________         _____          ______________________        __________

Substitution of Credential Coursework:

                  Course No./Title completed   Grade       University/College                 Initials

EDEL 420        ________________________       _____       ___________________      ____accepted ___ denied

EDEL 421       ______________________ _____               __________________ ___accepted ___denied
EDEL 429          ______________________ _____             __________________ ___accepted ____denied
EDEL 430          ______________________ _____             __________________ ___accepted ____denied
EDEL 436          ______________________ _____             __________________ ___accepted ____denied
EDEL 437          ________________________        _____    ____________________ ___ accepted ___ denied
EDEL 438          ________________________        _____    ____________________       ___accepted ____ denied
EDEL 439          ______________________ _____             __________________ ___accepted ____denied
EDEL 449          ______________________          _____ __________________ ___accepted ____denied
EDBI 475          ______________________          _____        __________________ ___ accepted ___denied EDBI
476               ________________________        _____    ____________________ ____ accepted ___denied
EDBI 477          ______________________          _____        __________________ ____accepted___denied
EDSP 301          ______________________          _____        __________________ ____accepted ___denied




Applicant Signature                        Date

Substitution request reviewed by:
Office Use Only
                                      ____________________________________________________________
                                         Director, Secondary Education                          Date




                                                          46
                  CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BAKERSFIELD
                       ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM
             ED-EL 240: Early Field Experience in the Elementary Schools

____1. Para-professional(Teachers Aide)
____2. Teaching position in a self contained elementary classroom.
____3. Long Term Emergency permit position with a minimum of 60 hours in the same
       elementary classroom.

                                Early Field Waiver Application

I hereby request a waiver of the required Early Field Experience (ED-EL 240). I have had a similar
experience in an elementary classroom (K-6th grade) setting detailed below (at least 60 hours is
expected within the past seven years prior to the date of this waiver). To be considered, please
complete this page, and give the attached evaluation to your principal. Return both to the Student
Teaching Office.

Name:____________________________________________________________________

Address:___________________________________________________________

City/State:________________________________Zip Code:__________________

Phone Number:______________________Campus ID#______________________

Summary of Experience

Location:_____________________________Grade Level:___________________

Dates Beginning:_________________________Ending:__________________________

Times: Number of days per week:_______Number of hours per day:_________

Total:_________________________

Nature of Experience (brief, clear description):




_____________________________________________________________
_________
For Elementary Education Program Use ONLY

Waiver Accepted:______
       _________________________________________________
Waiver Denied:________          Director, Elementary Education Program               Date




                                               47
                                                Confidential

                            Evaluation for Early Field Waiver Request


Student's Name ______________________________Quarter Applying_________
School Site__________________________________Grade Level______________


Directions: Circle the number to indicate student's performance according to the following criteria:
1= Low, 3= Average, 5= Very Good, or NA= not applicable

                                                                       Low        Average          High   NA
1. Dependability                                                       1    2        3 4       5       NA
  Attends regularly; is ready to begin work upon arrival;
  willing to accept responsibility; usually carries job
  through completion..

2. Initiative                                                    1          2        3    4     5      NA
   Asks intelligent questions about field situation; becomes
   involved with students and their activities; accepts leadership
   role.

3. Interpersonal relations with students                          1          2        3    4       5      NA
   Is sensitive to student's moods and attitudes; relates attitude
   which gives individuals feelings of self-respect, sense of
   accomplishments; avoids condescending manner; has
   genuine liking for students.

4. Interpersonal relation with faculty                                  1    2        3   4     5      NA
   Is congenial and cooperative; relates well with school staff

5. Incorporating suggestions                                      1          2       3    4        5   NA
   Is receptive to constructive criticism and follows suggestions
   accordingly.

6. Interest in teaching                                        1            2        3    4        5   NA
   Seeks advice and guidance from faculty regarding teaching;
   shows interest in assuming professional attitudes; plans to
   enter and remain in teaching.

7. Self-evaluation                                                     1    2        3    4     5      NA
   Capable of self-evaluation; accepts and profits from
   constructive suggestions




                                                      48
                                                             Low      Average   High    NA

8. Philosophy of education/teaching                          1    2    3   4     5      NA
   Has student-centered concept of education
   and role of teachers

9. Appearance                                                1    2    3   4    5       NA
   Dresses appropriately; well groomed.

10. Effective speech                                        1     2    3   4    5       NA
    Enunciates clearly; speaks in sentences; uses acceptable
    grammar; voice appropriate to instructional setting.

11. Survival capability                                       1   2    3   4    5       NA
    Demonstrate an ability to accommodate to situations;
    Would be able to cope; is able to work within established
    guidelines.

12. Content                                                  1 2       3   4        5   NA
    Is able to relate elementary classroom content knowledge with
    university academic courses, background and preparation.

Return to: Student Teaching Office
           Elementary Education Program
           California State University, Bakersfield
           9001 Stockdale Highway
           Bakersfield, Ca 93311-1099

Comments: Please comment anything of importance that you have observed in working
with this student (e. g., elaboration of above items, specific strengths or weaknesses
noted). This evaluation is confidential information, and will not be seen by the student.
It's purpose is to determine if the student has had equivalent or appropriate classroom
experience in order to waive the pre-requisite course for the elementary credential
program.




Evaluator's
Name____________________________________________Date______________

Position_______________________________Site__________________________

Phone Number___________




                                                49
                     APPENDIX B

                Student Teaching Forms:

Phase In Sample Schedules (Phases/Stages II & III)
Fieldwork Observation Form
Notice of Need to Improve Form
Stage II&III Midterm & Final Student Teaching Record




                           50
                                                    Sample



                                  PHASE-IN SCHEDULE FOR PHASE/STAGE II

DESCRIPTION                                         WEEK OF       COMPLETE BY LISTING
                                                    (DATE)        SUBJECT/CURRICULAR AREAS
BEGIN OBSERVATION, FILL OUT MGMT.                   (wk 1)
SHEETS AND DISCIPLINE PLAN; BEGIN
RECORDING IN BLUE BOOK
SMALL GROUP OR LIMITED ACTIVITY SUCH                (wk 1-2)
AS ATTENDANCE, DOL (W/LESSON PLANS):
SUBMIT PLANS FOR 1ST AREA -(SEE BELOW)
TEACH FIRST AREA OF CORE CURRICULUM;                (wk 2-3)
CHOOSE FROM MATH READING SOC. ST., OR
SCIENCE
BEGIN TEACHING 2ND CORE CURRICULUM                  (wk 3-4)
AREA
BEGIN TEACHING 3RD AREA (ANY); AT                   (wk 5)
LEAST 2 MASTER TEACHER OBSERVATIONS
AND A COMPETED MID-TERM DUE
VIDEO TAPING WEEK; WRITTEN ANALYSIS                 (wk 5-6)
DUE NEXT WEEK; BEGIN TEACHING 4TH &
5TH AREA (ANY)- MASTER TEACHER STILL
PRESENT!!
FULL RESPONSIBILITY BEGINS (10 DAYS                 (wk 7)
TOTAL); BULLETIN BOARD MUST BE
COMPLETED BY END OF WEEK
FULL RESPONSIBILITY                                 (wk 8)
LAST WEEK OF FULL RESPONSIBILITY;                   (wk 9)
FINAL EVALS. FROM MASTER TEACHER
DUE BY END OF WEEK
PHASE OUT / OBSERVE AT SAME SITE;                   (wk 10)
FINAL EVALUATIONS DUE FROM MASTER
TEACHER


-------------------------------------------------
          Master Teacher Signature                  **Advise your supervisor of CTBS testing dates




                                                      51
                                                          Sample


                                      PHASE-IN SCHEDULE FOR PHASE/STAGE III

DESCRIPTION                                               WEEK OF        COMPLETE BY LISTING
                                                          (DATE)         SUBJECT/CURRICULAR AREAS
BEGIN OBSERVATION, FILL OUT MGMT.                         (wk 1)
SHEETS AND DISCIPLINE PLAN
SMALL GROUP OR LIMITED ACTIVITY SUCH                      (wk 1-2)
AS ATTENDANCE, DOL (W/LESSON PLANS):
SUBMIT PLANS FOR 1ST AREA
TEACH FIRST AREA OF CORE CURRICULUM;                      (wk 2-3)
CHOOSE FROM MATH READING SOC. ST., OR
SCIENCE
CONT. TEACHING W/FIRST AREA, BEGIN                        (wk 3-4)
PLANNING FOR 2ND CORE CURRICULUM
AREA-(SEE BELOW)
BEGIN TEACHING 2ND AREA; AT LEAST 2                       (wk 5)
MASTER TEACHER OBSERVATIONS AND A
COMPETED MID-TERM DUE
VIDEO TAPING WEEK; WRITTEN ANALYSIS                       (wk 5-6)
DUE NEXT WEEK; ADD A THIRD SUBJECT
AREA
ASSUME ANY OTHER AREA IF TAUGHT;                          (wk 6-7)
MASTER TEACHER STILL REQUIRED TO BE
PRESENT-THIS IS NOT COUNTED AS FULL
RESPONSIBILITY!
PHASE II –FULL RESPONSIBILITY BEGINS –                    (wk 8)
MUST HAVE 15 DAYS TOTAL; BULLETIN
BOARD MUST BE COMPLETED BY END OF
WEEK
LAST WEEK OF FULL RESPONSIBILITY;                         (wk 9)
FINAL EVALS. FROM MASTER TEACHER
DUE BY END OF WEEK
PHASE OUT / OBSERVE AT SAME SITE;                         (wk 10)
FINAL EVALUATIONS DUE FROM MASTER
TEACHER


-------------------------------------------------
Master Teacher Signature                            **Advise your supervisor of CTBS testing dates




                                                             52
                                                                                                CURRENT
                                                                                                QUARTER
California State University, Bakersfield
Fieldwork Observation Form                                                                                2006

                                                                                            Date:
Student                              School                                                     Visit #
                                                                              Grade Level _______________
Teacher
Cooperating                          Supervisor                               Date                ____________
                                                                                                  Page 1 of ___
Teacher                                                                                     _______

                                     Teaching Performance Expectations
1.Subject-specific pedagogical skills: Reading/language arts Math History/social science
2. Monitoring student learning during instruction           8. Learning about students
3. Interpretation and use of assessments                    9. Instructional planning
4. Making content accessible                                10. Instructional time
5. Student engagement                                       11. Social environment
                                                            12.
6. Developmentally appropriate teaching practices: K-3 4-8 Professional, legal, and ethical obligations
7. Teaching English learners                                13. Professional growth

Directions: Document lines of evidence in terms of CSTP domains and specific TPE behaviors/activities,
and provide feedback according to participating student teachers. Use CSTP and TPE’s as a guide to
conduct observations.
            Observation Report                                   Comments and Suggestions




Signature of Supervisor       Date                     Signature of Student          Date




                                                  53
                                                                                                Page____ of
                                                                                                ____
California State University, Bakersfield
Fieldwork Observation Form
                                                                              Date:                   ____
Student Name________________________

             Observation Report                                   Comments and Suggestions




_____________________________________________         ____________________________________________
Signature of Supervisor                   Date        Signature of Student             Date




                                                 54
                                    NOTICE OF NEED TO IMPROVE FORM

Date:   ……………………

Student Teacher: ……………………             Master Teacher: ……………………

Student Teacher: ……………………
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
In a three way conference (student teacher, master teacher, and university supervisor), we have come to an agreement
that the following improvements must be made in order for the student teacher to successfully complete this phase of
student teaching. (A calendar of assessment of improvements must be included.)




The undersigned have met and agreed to the criteria for successful completion of student teaching.

Student Teacher: ……………………             Master Teacher: ……………………

Student Teacher: ……………………

Observation required by second supervisor.

Signature of second supervisor:….….……………… Date of observation:………………………

I agree, disagree with the recommendation. ………………………………….
                                              (signature of student teacher)

Copies to Coordinator, Student Teacher, Master teacher, and University Supervisor.




                                                    55
California State University, Bakersfield
Elementary Education Student Teaching                                                                    Credit_______
No Credit_______
MIDTERM/FINAL EVALUATION

 Student                                          School                                     Quarter & Year:
 Teacher:
 Master                                           District:                                  Grade Level
 Teacher:
 Supervisor:                                      Stage:          Stage II ( ); Stage III    Midterm / Final             Mid ( ) Final
                                                                  ( )                                                    ()

                                                               Outstanding      Strong Competent Weak Unsatisfactory

                                                                     5             4         3          2            1
 Making Subject Matter Comprehensible to Students
1. Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction       ( )          ( )             ( )         (   )            (   )
    -    Demonstrate Appropriate Content Area Knowledge
    -    Strategically plan and schedule instruction to ensure that students meet or exceed the standards.
    -    Use a variety of Instructional Strategies appropriate to the various content areas.
    Cite Specific Evidence or Examples from Instruction:




Assessing Student Learning
1. Monitoring Student Learning During Instruction                  ( )           ( )             ( )          ( )         ( )
    -     Monitor student progress at key points.
    -     Pace instruction and re-teach based on evidence.
    -     Anticipate, check for, and address common student misconceptions and misunderstandings.
2. Interpretation and Use of Assessments                           ( )            ( )            ( )           ( )         ( )
    -     Use a variety of Informal and formal, formative and summative assessments
    -     Accurately interpret results of individual and groups
    -     Interpret data for EL students
    -     Give students specific, timely feedback on their learning, and maintain accurate records regarding student achievement.
    Cite Specific Evidence or Examples from Instruction:




Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning

3.   Making Content Accessible                                     ( )           ( )              ( )         ( )          ( )
     -    Use instructional materials to teach State Academic Content Standards
     -    Explain content clearly, reinforce in multiple ways
     -    Vary instructional strategies according to purpose and lesson content.
     -    Develop student skills in Academic Language.
     -    Provide opportunities and adequate time for students to practice what they have learned.
4.   Student Engagement                                            ( )           ( )              ( )         ( )          ( )
     -    Clearly communicate Instructional Objectives
     -    Ensure participation of all students
     -    Re-engage off-task behavior
     -    Ask questions which address a variety of levels of thinking. Teach students to respond to and frame meaningful questions.
     -    Motivate Students and Encourage Student Effort


                                                                 56
                                                                  Outstanding      Strong Competent Weak Unsatisfactory
                                                                       5              4      3        2          1

5.  Developmentally Appropriate Teaching Practice                    ( )               ( )        ( )          ( )           ( )
    -    Design learning activities appropriate for the Developmental Level of students.
    -    Provide an emotional environment appropriate to the developmental needs of the students.
Teaching English Learners                                                ( )            ( )        ( )         ( )           ( )
    -    Use effective ELD/SDAIE strategies in whole class lessons
    -    Plan and deliver effective ELD instruction for those students requiring additional 30-45 minutes daily instruction.
    -    Provide comprehensible input, while extending students’ current level of development.
    -    Uses Primary Language Instruction (Spanish) appropriately in planning and teaching lessons in the BCLAD instructional
         setting
    Cite Specific Evidence or Examples from Instruction:




Planning Instruction and Designing Learning Experiences for Students:

6.   Learning About Students                                                 ( )            ( )         ( )        ( )          ( )
     -     Use formal and informal methods to gather information about students’ academic, social, and emotional development.
7.   Instructional Planning                                                  ( )            ( )         ( )        ( )          ( )
     -     Establish clear short and long term goals for student learning.
     -     Use a variety of specific teaching methods such as Direct Instruction and Inquiry to help students meet and exceed grade
           level expectations.
     -     Sequence instruction so the content to be taught connects with preceding and subsequent content.
     -     Select or adapt instructional strategies, grouping strategies, and instructional materials to meet student learning goals and
           needs.
     -     Plan Differentiated Instruction to meet varied students’ needs.
     -     Plan how to explain content clearly and make abstract concepts concrete and meaningful.
     -     If support personnel, such as aides and volunteers, are available, plan how to use them to help students reach instructional
           goals.
     -     Evidence of thoughtful and thorough preparation of lesson plans as well as having appropriate materials and resources
           selected and available.
     Cite Specific Evidence or Examples from Instruction:




Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments for Student Learning:
8. Instructional Time                                                     ( )            ( )         ( )       ( )           ( )
    -    Allocate instructional time to maximize student achievement.
    -    Establish routines and procedures and manage transitions to maximize instructional time.
    -    Based on reflection and consultation, adjust use of instructional time to optimize the learning opportunities for all students.
9. Social Environment                                                     ( )            ( )         ( )       ( )            ( )
    -    Develop and maintain clear expectation for academic and social behavior.
    -    Promote student effort and engagement and create a positive climate for learning.
    -    Write and implement a student discipline plan.
    -    Help students learn to work responsibly with others and independently.
    -    Establish rapport with students and families through caring, respect, and fairness.
    -    Respond appropriately to sensitive issues and classroom discussions.
    Cite Specific Evidence or Examples from Instruction:




                                                                   57
                                                                       Outstanding      Strong Competent Weak Unsatisfactory
                                                                            5              4      3        2         1

Developing as a Professional Educator
10. Professional, Legal, and Ethical Obligations                         ( )            ( )        ( )        ( )           ( )
    -    Take responsibility for student academic learning outcomes.
    -    Dress neatly and professionally (See Dress Code in Student Teaching Handbook)
    -    Display enthusiasm for teaching.
    -    Modify behavior after constructive criticism.
    -    Appropriately manage own professional time (including arrival & departure from school, planning & prep time, etc.).
    -    Use correct English Grammar.
    -    Demonstrate Professional Ethics and models ethical behavior for students.
    -    Understand and honor professional obligations to protect privacy of students, families, and other school professionals.
11. Professional Growth                                                  ( )            ( )        ( )        ( )           ( )
    -    Evaluate own teaching practices and subject matter knowledge.
    -    Improve own teaching practices by soliciting feedback and engaging in cycles of planning, teaching, reflecting, discerning
         problems, and applying new strategies.
    -    Use reflection and feedback to formulate and prioritize goals for increasing own subject matter knowledge and teaching
         effectiveness.
    Cite Specific Evidence or Examples from Instruction:




Student’s signature indicates that he/she has had an opportunity to read and discuss this evaluation with the master teacher and/or
university supervisor. It does not necessarily indicate that the student agrees with the evaluation.




_____________________          ________________________________            _______________________________
Student’s signature & Date      Master Teacher’s Signature & Date              Supervisor’s Signature & Date




                                                                  58
                      APPENDIX C

California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP)
                             &
        Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs)
                             &
        Teacher Performance Assessments (TPAs)




                           59
                           California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP)

         Student Teaching should afford teacher candidates an opportunity to teach extensively in a
professional on-going school setting. The right to remain in the setting for the entire length of the experience
depends on a demonstration of teaching effectiveness, probably including, most if not all, of the following
performance criteria:

STANDARD ONE: Engaging and Supporting All Students in Learning
1.1 Connecting students’ prior knowledge, life experience, and interests with learning goals.
1.2 Using a variety of instructional strategies and resources to respond to students’ diverse needs.
1.3 Facilitating learning experiences that promote autonomy, interaction, and choice.
1.4 Engaging students in problem solving, critical thinking, and other activities that make subject matter
    meaningful.
1.5 Promoting self-directed, reflective learning for all students.

STANDARD TWO: Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments for Student Learning
2.1 Creating a physical environment that engages all students.
2.2 Establishing a climate that promotes fairness and respect.
2.3 Promoting social development and group responsibility.
2.4 Establishing and maintaining standards for student behavior.
2.5 Planning and implementing classroom procedures and routines that support student learning.
2.6 Using instructional time effectively.

STANDARD THREE: Understanding and Organizing Subject Matter for Student Learning
3.1 Demonstrating knowledge of subject matter content and student development.
3.2 Organizing curriculum to support student understanding of subject matter.
3.3 Interrelating ideas and information within and across subject matter areas.
3.4 Developing student understanding through instructional strategies that are appropriate to the subject
    matter.
3.5 Using materials, resources, and technologies to make subject matter accessible to students.

STANDARD FOUR: Planning Instruction and Designing Learning Experiences for All Students
4.1 Drawing on and valuing students’ backgrounds, interests, and developmental learning needs.
4.2 Establishing and articulating goals for student learning.
4.3 Developing and sequencing instructional activities and materials for student learning.
4.4 Designing short-term and long-term plans to foster student learning.
4.5 Modifying instructional plans to adjust for student needs.

STANDARD FIVE: Assessing Student Learning
5.1 Establishing and communicating learning goals for all students.
5.2 Collecting and using multiple sources of information to assess student learning.
5.3 Involving and guiding all students in assessing their own learning.
5.4 Using the results of assessments to guide instruction.
5.5 Communicating with students, families, and other audiences about student programs.

STANDARD SIX: Developing as a Professional Educator
6.1 Reflecting on teaching practice and planning professional development.
6.2 Establishing professional goals and pursuing opportunities to grow professionally.
6.3 Working with communities to improve professional practice.
6.4 Working with families to improve professional practice.
6.5 Working with colleagues to improve professional practice.




                                                      60
                                 Teaching Performance Expectations
A.      MAKING SUBJECT MATTER COMPREHENSIBLE TO STUDENTS
TPE 1: Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction
TPE 1A: Subject-Specific Pedagogical Skills for Multiple Subject Teaching Assignments
Teaching Reading-Language Arts in a Multiple Subject Assignment
    1.  demonstrate the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in English-Language Arts (K-8).
    2.  deliver a comprehensive program of systematic instruction in word analysis, fluency, and systematic vocabulary development;
        reading comprehension; literary response and analysis; writing strategies and applications; written and oral English Language
        conventions; and listening and speaking strategies and applications.
    3. strategically plan and schedule instruction to ensure that students meet or exceed the standards.
    4. create a classroom environment where students learn to read and write, comprehend and compose, appreciate and analyze, and
        perform and enjoy the language arts.
    5. make language (e.g., vocabulary, forms, uses) comprehensible to students and the need for students to master foundational skills
        as a gateway to using all forms of language as tools for thinking, learning, and communicating.
    6. use instructional materials that include a range of textual, functional and recreational texts and how to teach high quality
        literature and expository text.
    7. understand that the advanced skills of comprehending narrative and informational texts and literary response and analysis, and
        the creation of eloquent prose, all depend on a foundation of solid vocabulary, decoding, and word-recognition skills.
    8. teach students how to use visual structures such as graphic organizers or outlines to comprehend or produce text,
        comprehend or produce narrative, expository, persuasive and descriptive texts,
                          i. comprehend or produce the complexity of writing forms, purposes, and organizational patterns,
                         ii. how to have a command of written and oral English-language conventions.
    9. determine the skill level of students through the use of meaningful indicators of reading and language arts proficiency prior to
        instruction,
    10. determine whether students are making adequate progress on skills and concepts taught directly,
    11. determine the effectiveness of instruction and students’ proficiency after instruction.
Teaching Mathematics in a Multiple Subject Assignment
    1.   demonstrate the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in mathematics (K-8).
    2.   enable students to understand basic mathematical computations, concepts, and symbols, to use these tools and processes to solve
         common problems, and apply them to novel problems.
    3.   help students understand different mathematical topics and make connections among them.
    4.   help students solve real-world problems using mathematical reasoning and concrete, verbal, symbolic, and graphic
         representations.
    5.   provide a secure environment for taking intellectual risks and approaching problems in multiple ways.
    6.   model and encourage students to use multiple ways of approaching mathematical problems,
    7.   encourage discussion of different solution strategies.
    8.   foster positive attitudes toward mathematics,
    9.   encourage student curiosity, flexibility, and persistence in solving mathematical problems.
Teaching Science in a Multiple Subject Assignment
    1.   the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in science (K-8).
    2.   balance the focus of instruction between science information, concepts, and investigations.
    3.   explanations, demonstrations, and class activities serve to illustrate science concepts and principles, scientific investigation, and
         experimentation.
    4.   emphasize the importance of accuracy, precision, and estimation.
Teaching History-Social Science in a Multiple Subject Assignment
    1.   demonstrate the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in history-social science (K-8).
    2.   enable students to learn and use basic analytic thinking skills in history and social science while attaining the state-adopted
         academic content standards for students.
    3.   use timelines and maps to give students a sense of temporal and spatial scale.
    4.   teach students how social science concepts and themes provide insights into historical periods and cultures.
    5.   help students understand events and periods from multiple perspectives by using simulations, case studies, cultural artifacts,
         works of art and literature, cooperative projects, and student research activities.
B.     ASSESSING STUDENT LEARNING
TPE 2: Monitoring Student Learning During Instruction
    1.   use progress monitoring at key points during instruction to determine whether students are progressing adequately toward
         achieving the state-adopted academic content standards for students.
    2.   pace instruction and re-teach content based on evidence gathered using assessment strategies such as questioning students and
         examining student work and products.
    3.   anticipate, check for, and address common student misconceptions and misunderstandings.




                                                                 61
TPE 3: Interpretation and Use of Assessments
    1.    understand and use a variety of informal and formal, as well as formative and summative assessments, to determine students’
          progress and plan instruction.
    2.    appropriately implement the state-adopted student assessment program.
    3.    understand the purposes and uses of different types of diagnostic instruments, including entry level, progress-monitoring and
          summative assessments.
    4.    use multiple measures, including information from families, to assess student knowledge, skills, and behaviors.
    5.    know when and how to use specialized assessments based on students' needs.
    6.    know about and appropriately use informal classroom assessments and analyze student work.
    7.    teach students how to use self-assessment strategies.
    8.    provide guidance and time for students to practice these strategies.
    9.    understand how to familiarize students with the format of standardized tests.
    10.   know how to appropriately administer standardized tests, including when to make accommodations for students with special
          needs.
    11.   know how to accurately interpret assessment results of individuals and groups in order to develop and modify instruction.
    12.   interpret assessment data to identify the level of proficiency of English language learners in English as well as in the students’
          primary language.
    13.   give students specific, timely feedback on their learning, and maintain accurate records summarizing student achievement.
    14.   explain, to students and to their families, student academic and behavioral strengths, areas for academic growth, promotion and
          retention policies, and how a grade or progress report is derived.
    15.   clearly explain to families how to help students achieve the curriculum.
C.     ENGAGING AND SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN LEARNING
TPE 4: Making Content Accessible
    1.  Candidates for Teaching Credentials incorporate specific strategies, teaching/instructional activities, procedures and experiences
        that address state-adopted academic content standards for students in order to provide a balanced and comprehensive curriculum.
    2. use instructional materials to reinforce state-adopted academic content standards for students and they prioritize and sequence
        essential skills and strategies in a logical, coherent manner relative to students' current level of achievement.
    3. vary instructional strategies according to purpose and lesson content.
    4. To meet student academic learning needs, candidates explain content clearly and reinforce content in multiple ways, such as the
        use of written and oral presentation, manipulatives, physical models, visual and performing arts, diagrams, non-verbal
        communication, and computer technology.
    5. provide opportunities and adequate time for students to practice and apply what they have learned.
    6. distinguish between conversational and academic language, and develop student skills in using and understanding academic
        language.
    7. teach students strategies to read and comprehend a variety of texts and a variety of information sources, in the subject(s) taught.
    8. model active listening in the classroom.
    9. encourage student creativity and imagination.
    10. motivate students and encourage student effort.
    11. When students do not understand content, take additional steps to foster access and comprehension for all learners.
    12. balance instruction by adjusting lesson designs relative to students’ current level of achievement.
TPE 5: Student Engagement
    1.    clearly communicate instructional objectives to students.
    2.    ensure the active and equitable participation of all students.
    3.    ensure that students understand what they are to do during instruction and monitor student progress toward academic goals.
    4.    If students are struggling and off-task, examine why and use strategies to re-engage them.
    5.    encourage students to share and examine points of view during lessons.
    6.    use community resources, student experiences, and applied learning activities to make instruction relevant.
    7.    extend the intellectual quality of student thinking by asking stimulating questions and challenging student ideas.
    8.    teach students to respond to and frame meaningful questions.
TPE 6: Developmentally Appropriate Teaching Practices
Background information for TPE 6: TPEs describe knowledge, skills, and abilities for all credential candidates, and they
underscore the importance of generically-effective strategies for teaching a broad range of students. The purpose of TPE 6 is
to establish additional expectations that are of greatest importance in teaching students at distinct stages of child and
adolescent development. It is not the intent of TPE 6 to describe practices that are appropriate or effective only at one
developmental level. This TPE describes professional practices that are most commonly used and needed for students in
each major phase of schooling, grades K-3, 4-8, and 9-12. 1
TPE 6A: Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades K-3
    1.    understand how to create a structured day with opportunities for movement.
    2.    design academic activities that suit the attention span of young learners.
    3.    instructional activities connect with the children’s immediate world; draw on key content from more than one subject area; and
          include hands-on experiences and manipulatives that help students learn.
    4.    teach and model norms of social interactions (e.g., consideration, cooperation, responsibility, empathy).

1  TPE 6 does not represent a comprehensive strategy for teaching students at any particular stage; the
elements of TPE 6 are intended merely to supplement and not replace the broader range of pedagogical skills
and abilities described in the TPEs.
                                                                 62
    5.    understand that some children hold naïve understandings of the world around them.
    6.    provide educational experiences that help students develop more realistic expectations and understandings of their environment.
    7.    know how to make special plans for students who require extra help in exercising self-control among their peers or who have
          exceptional needs or abilities.
TPE 6B: Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades 4-8
    1.    build on students’ command of basic skills and understandings while providing intensive support for students who lack basic
          skills as defined in state-adopted academic content standards for students.
    2.    teach from grade-level texts.
    3.    design learning activities to extend students’ concrete thinking and foster abstract reasoning and problem-solving skills.
    4.    help students develop learning strategies to cope with increasingly challenging academic curriculum.
    5.    assist students, as needed, in developing and practicing strategies for managing time and completing assignments.
    6.    develop students’ skills for working in groups to maximize learning.
    7.    build on peer relationships and support students in trying new roles and responsibilities in the classroom.
    8.    support students' taking of intellectual risks such as sharing ideas that may include errors.
    9.    distinguish between misbehavior and over-enthusiasm, and they respond appropriately to students who are testing limits and
          students who alternatively assume and reject responsibility.
TPE 7: Teaching English Learners
    1.    know and apply pedagogical theories, principles, and instructional practices for comprehensive instruction of English learners.
    2.    know and apply theories, principles, and instructional practices for English Language Development leading to comprehensive
          literacy in English.
    3.    be familiar with the philosophy, design, goals, and characteristics of programs for English language development, including
          structured English immersion.
    4.    implement an instructional program that facilitates English language development, including reading, writing, listening and
          speaking skills, that logically progresses to the grade level reading/language arts program for English speakers.
    5.    draw upon information about students’ backgrounds and prior learning, including students' assessed levels of literacy in English
          and their first languages, as well as their proficiency in English, to provide instruction differentiated to students’ language
          abilities.
    6.    understand how and when to collaborate with specialists and para-educators to support English language development.
    7.    Based on appropriate assessment information, candidates select instructional materials and strategies, including activities in the
          area of visual and performing arts, to develop students’ abilities to comprehend and produce English.
    8.    use English that extends students’ current level of development yet is still comprehensible.
    9.    know how to analyze student errors in oral and written language in order to understand how to plan differentiated instruction.
    10.   know and apply pedagogical theories, principles and practices for the development of academic language, comprehension, and
          knowledge in the subjects of the core curriculum.
    11.   use systematic instructional strategies, including contextualizing key concepts, to make grade-appropriate or advanced
          curriculum content comprehensible to English learners.
    12.   allow students to express meaning in a variety of ways, including in their first language, and, if available, manage first language
          support such as para-educators, peers, and books.2
    13.   use questioning strategies that model or represent familiar English grammatical constructions.
    14.   make learning strategies explicit.
    15.   understand how cognitive, pedagogical, and individual factors affect students’ language acquisition.
    16.   take these factors into account in planning lessons for English language development and for academic content.

D.     PLANNING INSTRUCTION AND DESIGNING LEARNING EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS
TPE 8: Learning about Students
    1.    draw upon an understanding of patterns of child and adolescent development to understand their students.
    2.    Using formal and informal methods, assess students’ prior mastery of academic language abilities, content knowledge, and
          skills, and maximize learning opportunities for all students.
    3.    through interpersonal interactions, learn about students’ abilities, ideas, interests and aspirations.
    4.    encourage parents to become involved and support their efforts to improve student learning.
    5.    understand how multiple factors, including gender and health, can influence students’ behavior, and understand the connections
          between students’ health and their ability to learn.
    6.    Based on assessment data, classroom observation, reflection and consultation, identify students needing specialized instruction,
          including students whose physical disabilities, learning disabilities, or health status require instructional adaptations, and students
          who are gifted.
TPE 9: Instructional Planning
    1.    plan instruction that is comprehensive in relation to the subject matter to be taught and in accordance with state-adopted
          academic content standards for students.
    2.    establish clear long-term and short-term goals for student learning, based on state and local standards for student achievement as
          well as on students’ current levels of achievement.
    3.    use explicit teaching methods such as direct instruction and inquiry to help students meet or exceed grade level expectations.


2 Teachers are not expected to speak the students’ primary language, unless they hold an appropriate
credential and teach in a bilingual classroom. The expectation is that they understand how to use available
resources in the primary language, including students’ primary language skills, to support their learning of
English and curriculum content.
                                                                   63
    4.  plan how to explain content clearly and make abstract concepts concrete and meaningful.
    5.  understand the purposes, strengths and limitations of a variety of instructional strategies, including examining student work, and
        improve successive uses of the strategies based on experience and reflection.
    6. sequence instruction so the content to be taught connects to preceding and subsequent content.
    7. In planning lessons, select or adapt instructional strategies, grouping strategies, and instructional material to meet student
        learning goals and needs.
    8. connect the content to be learned with students’ linguistic and cultural backgrounds, experiences, interests, and developmental
        learning needs to ensure that instruction is comprehensible and meaningful.
    9. To accommodate varied student needs, plan differentiated instruction.
    10. support personnel, such as aides and volunteers are available, plan how to use them to help students reach instructional goals.
E.      CREATING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR STUDENT LEARNING
TPE 10: Instructional Time
    1.   allocate instructional time to maximize student achievement in relation to state-adopted academic content standards for students,
         instructional goals and scheduled academic tasks.
    2.   establish procedures for routine tasks and manage transitions to maximize instructional time.
    3.   Based on reflection and consultation, adjust the use of instructional time to optimize the learning opportunities and outcomes for
         all students.
TPE 11: Social Environment
    1.   develop and maintain clear expectations for academic and social behavior.
    2.   promote student effort and engagement and create a positive climate for learning.
    3.   know how to write and implement a student discipline plan.
    4.   know how to establish rapport with all students and their families for supporting academic and personal success through caring,
         respect, and fairness.
    5.   respond appropriately to sensitive issues and classroom discussions.
    6.   help students learn to work responsibly with others and independently.
    7.   Based on observations of students and consultation with other teachers, recognize how well the social environment maximizes
         academic achievement for all students and make necessary changes.

F.      DEVELOPING AS A PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR
TPE 12: Professional, Legal, and Ethical Obligations
    1.  take responsibility for student academic learning outcomes.
    2.  Be aware of own personal values and biases and recognize ways in which these values and biases affect the teaching and
        learning of students.
    3. resist racism and acts of intolerance.
    4. appropriately manage own professional time spent in teaching responsibilities to ensure that academic goals are met.
    5. understand important elements of California and federal laws and procedures pertaining to the education of English learners,
        gifted students, and individuals with disabilities, including implications for their placement in classrooms.
    6. identify suspected cases of child abuse, neglect, or sexual harassment.
    7. maintain a non-hostile classroom environment.
    8. carry out laws and district guidelines for reporting such cases.
    9. understand and implement school and district policies and state and federal law in responding to inappropriate or violent student
        behavior.
    10. understand and honor legal and professional obligations to protect the privacy, health, and safety of students, families, and other
        school professionals.
    11. Be aware of and act in accordance with ethical considerations and model ethical behaviors for students.
    12. understand and honor all laws relating to professional misconduct and moral fitness.
TPE 13: Professional Growth
    1.   evaluate your own teaching practices and subject matter knowledge in light of information about the state-adopted academic
         content standards for students and student learning.
    2.   improve your teaching practices by soliciting feedback and engaging in cycles of planning, teaching, reflecting, discerning
         problems, and applying new strategies.
    3.   use reflection and feedback to formulate and prioritize goals for increasing your subject matter knowledge and teaching
         effectiveness.




                                                                64
                           Teacher Performance Assessments (TPAs)

What kinds of performance tasks will a candidate be asked to complete?
The CCTC prototype TPA will have four performance tasks. Each performance task will measure a range of
teaching performance expectations. Three of the tasks will require the candidate to base their responses on
the needs of real students they are currently teaching. Task 4 will include a teaching observation (may be
videotaped). All four tasks as a whole will provide information to the candidate about the six main domains
of teaching as defined by the set of teaching performance expectations.
Task 1: Principles of Developmentally Appropriate and Content Specific Pedagogy
Task 2: Connecting Student Characteristics to Instructional Planning
Task 3: Classroom Assessment of Learning Goals
Task 4: Lesson Design, Implementation, and Reflection after Instruction (includes a classroom observation
component)

All tasks will be designed so that candidates can practice them repeatedly.
                                                          Retrieved from: http://www.ctc.ca.gov/SB2042/TPA_FAQ.html

Note 1: For more information about the CSTP, TPEs, and TPAs, visit the CCTC website at:
http://www.ctc.ca.gov/
Note 2: For information regarding the current stance of CSU about the TPA implementation, please visit:
http://www.calstate.edu/TeacherEd/tpa/index.shtml which notes the following: ―The California State University is
preparing to implement the accreditation standard for more specific assessment of teacher candidate performance prior
to credentialing. Full implementation of this requirement, mandated under SB 2042, has been placed on hold pending
state funding to support the effort. While awaiting this funding, the CSU is committed to continuing efforts to develop
appropriate assessment instruments, train faculty and other assessors, and prepare for full implementation. This website
has been created to serve as a central communication point for CSU faculty across the state to share work, ideas, and
concerns about the effective assessment of teaching performance.‖




                                                           65
                    APPENDIX D

CSU Executive Order No. 758---Teacher Education Basic
                Credential Programs




                         66
                                            APPENDIX D
                CSU EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 758---TEACHER EDUCATION BASIC
                               CREDEISTIAL PROGRAMS

―Executive Order No. 758 establishes standards for entrance to and continuation in teacher education
basic credential programs. It establishes standards for admission to teacher education basic credential
programs and for entrance to a student teaching experience, addressed the evaluation of subject matter
competence for an entrant to a teacher education basic credential program and notes a limitation on the
transfer of community college credit in education to a teacher education basic credential program.‖

Section l.A. speaks to the requirements needed for admission to a teacher education basic credential
program (GPA, documented field experience, prerequisite courses, suitable aptitude, standards of health and
physical fitness). Section l.A.8. specifically states:
“The candidate shall have demonstrated personality and character traits that satisfy the standards of
the teaching profession. The assessment of the candidate shall be made by the teacher education
faculty of the campus, who may also consider information from public school personnel and others.
The campus may use tests, observations, and interviews for this assessment.”

As is stated in the opening paragraph, these standards are applicable to admission to a basic credential
program and continuation in a basic credential program.

The requirements outlined in Executive Order No. 758 shall be in effect for candidates applying to enter a
teacher education basic credential program in Fall 2001 or later.

                       STUDENT COMPLAINT AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES
The policy and procedures for filing a complaint and/or grievance deal only with individual student complaints
and/or grievances against the actions and/or decisions of faculty, academic administrators, or staff
professionals. The complaints and/or grievances may concern but are not restricted to (1) an assigned final
course grade, (2) administration of records, (3) admission to a program, or (4) requirements for program
completion. Group grievances are not permitted.

Complaints and/or grievances will not involve allegations of dishonesty or abuse of professional responsibility
as such allegations fall strictly under formal university disciplinary proceedings.

Procedures for redress of grievances must protect the respondent against unsubstantiated and false charges
of bias or unfairness. Therefore, in a grievance there is a presumption that procedures have been fairly
followed. It is the responsibility of the grievant to demonstrate otherwise. The final responsibility for assigning
or changing a student’s record rests solely with the faculty, academic administrators, or staff professionals.

Complaint Procedures: (A) Before resorting to a grievance, a student shall exhaust all complaint procedures
at the department/school level. (B) The student shall first address the complaint with the concerned faculty,
academic administrator, or staff professional. If the complaint is not resolved at this level, the student should
then meet with the program director and/or department chairperson. (NOTE: It is acceptable for the
program/department to have in place a Committee that hears/reviews complaints and submits its
findings/recommendations to the program director/department chairperson prior to the student meeting with
the program director and/or department chairperson. (C) If the complaint is not resolved with the program
director/department chairperson, the student should meet with the school Dean. (D) If the complaint is still
unresolved after meeting with the school Dean, the student may then, and only then, file a written grievance
with the Office of the Academic Vice President within a period of seven (7) working days following the date
the above complaint procedures were concluded.




                                                        67
   APPENDIX E

BCLAD Requirements




        68
                                          APPENDIX E

                                 BCLAD REQUIREMENTS


       Bilingual Cross-Cultural, Language and Academic Development (BCLAD) emphasis
        (Spanish). The CSUB BCLAD Program (Spanish) is accredited by the California
        Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC).

        The BCLAD emphasis prepares the candidate to teach subject-specific content and literacy
        acquisition in the target language (Spanish) and in English. BCLAD candidates meet all of
        the MSCP requirements in addition to teaching pedagogy in the Spanish language.
        BCLAD candidates learn to adapt lessons to ensure core curricular access for English
        learners through the use of sheltered English (also known as Specially Designed Academic
        Instruction in English-SDAIE). English language development (ELD) is a major
        component of the BCLAD Emphasis Credential program.

        Additional BCLAD Emphasis Multiple Subject Credential Options through California State
        University Bakersfield include: (a) an international immersion program in Queretaro,
        Mexico during the summer quarter for three or six weeks and (b) one year of study and
        credential completion in Quertaro, Mexico.

        The BCLAD Emphasis Credential requirements for California State University
        Bakersfield academic program are:

   EDBI 475 is a preliminary stage course and EDBI 476 is a stage one course. EDIB 475 should
    be taken prior to enrolling in credential classes.
   Students who have taken similar courses at another University must submit a course
    description to the BCLAD Coordinator for approval or disapproval of the course.
   Language Requirement
            1. Six semester or 9 quarter units of a language other than English are required.
            2. Three years of the same language in High School will waive the requirement with
                documentation on a high school transcript.
            3. A combination of three years of the same language in junior high and high school
                will meet the requirement.
            4. If the candidate has lived in a non-English speaking country for one year after the
                age of 18, then the language can be waived.
            5. Initial arrival at the age of 12 or older in the US after having spent from birth to 12
                years in a non-English speaking country waives the requirement.
            6. There are 19 other ways to meet the language requirement.
            7. The Language requirement must be met prior to applying for the credential.
            BCLAD Requirements:

   Spanish 202 (Prerequisite Spanish 201)
   Hispanic Culture Course or Exam
   One (upper division) of the following: Sociology 335, Spanish 427 or Spanish 428
   One upper division Literature Class
   One upper division of the following: Spanish 301, 302, 303, 416, or 419
                                                69
   One upper division Linguistics Class
   One of the following: Spanish 311, 409, 412, 415, or 420
   EDEL 428: Teaching Reading in the Bilingual Setting
   One student teaching placement where the BCLAD teacher candidate writes and teaches five
    lesson plans in Spanish.

       Spanish Language BCLAD Exit Exam
       One student teaching placement is required where the BCLAD teacher candidate writes 5
       lesson plans in Spanish and teaches these lessons in Spanish to students. This placement
       requires that either the Cooperating Teacher or the CSUB supervisor is BCLAD certificated
       and observes the teaching of the BCLAD lessons. The Spanish lesson plans (signed by the
       BCLAD supervisor or BCLAD Cooperating teacher) are filed along with the BCLAD Exit
       Exam in the candidate’s folder for compliance documentation.




                                              70
                                           BCLAD Requirements

Bilingual Cross-Cultural Language and Academic Development Program Student Teacher Information Sheet
                                               (BCLAD)

Name____________________ Home Phone_____________________________
Cell Phone ________________________ Email _________________________

Address ________________________________________________________

School (Dual Lang or Other): ______________ Phone_____________
Clad Primary Language Support Ph ___ BCLAD Primary Lang Teaching Ph ____

Principal _____________________ BCLAD Master Teacher__________________

BCLAD Supervisor ______________ Grade Level ________ !/2 Day             Full Day

Observations: 1. ____ 2. ____ 3. _____ 4. _____ 5. _____ 6. ______

Seminars Dates: 1.______ 2. ________ 3. _______ 4.________ 5._______

Midterm Evaluation: __________________ Final Evaluation: ________________
1.      Notebook: ______ Note that your reflections for the 5 lesson plans
        that you write in Spanish and conduct in Spanish must all be written in
        Spanish. Your supervisor will provide feedback and assist you as necessary.

2.      Videotape Option: ______ BCLAD students may videotape one of the
        lessons taught in Spanish and obtain feedback from the University supervisor. You are expected to
        write your critique in Spanish.

          3.     Lesson Plans: ______ Five of your lesson plans must be written in Spanish and conducted
in Spanish. 3 of these may be small group. 2 of these must be total group and can be conducted as a
Spanish as a second language lesson. Lesson plans may be scripted. Your lesson reflections must be
written in Spanish. Choose among the following for a total of 5 plans. Be sure to collaborate with your master
teacher and university supervisor regarding the plan before it is taught.

Reading __________ (2 in Spanish) Math/Science__________ (2 in Spanish)
Soc. Studies ________ (1 in Spanish) Health/Art/Other ________ (1 in Spanish)
4.      RICA ________________

5.      Bulletin Board ___________________

6.      Student Handbook _________________

7.      Daily Schedule ____________________

8.      Harmless Agreement _________________

9.      Other ____________________




                                                     71
                   APPENDIX E continued….                        BCLAD Requirements

BCLAD Lesson Planning Information Sheet for Bclad Student Teaching Placement

Plan de Leccion (Lesson Plan)

Tema/Area de Amplificacion:(Subject)
Grado:(Grade)
Fecha: (Date)
Horario: (Time)
Normas del estado de California/Ca. State Standards. (Content and ELD Standards)

1. Objetivo del Plan:
   (Objective)

2. Enfoque de Actividad:
   (Anticipatory Set)


3. Materiales Necesarios:
   (Materials)

4. Procedimiento:
   (Procedures)




5. Evaluacion del Plan:
   (Assessment)




6. Clausura:
   (Closure)



7. Actividades Participatorios:
   (Active Participation Activities)




8. Refleccion del Plan:
   (My critique of this lesson)




                                                  72
    APPENDIX F

Reading Competencies
        RICA




         73
                                               APPENDIX F
                                       Reading Competencies
                                               RICA

All student teachers are required to pass the RICA examination prior to applying for their preliminary
credential.

What is RICA?

         The State of California has initiated a basic reading skills test for all students completing the Multiple
Subject Credential Program. The state felt there was a strong need to improve reading instruction in the
State of California. They passed a law in 1996 requiring all candidates of the Multiple Subject Preliminary
Teaching Credentials to pass the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA) before obtaining a
Preliminary Credential. The effective date was October 1, 1998. The RICA is given six times a year. The
Reading classes prepare the students to take the examination. The examination booklet gives details of the
content of the test. For more information visit: http://www.rica.nesinc.com/


                          What Reading Skills should my Student Teacher Have?

Stage II Student Teachers?
Students entering the first phase of student teaching should have met the course objectives for Reading I.
They will be taking Reading II during their first phase of student teaching. They should be able to teach to
any of the objectives, and understand what each means. If you have a question regarding an objective,
please ask your master teacher. If s/he does not know, please contact the supervisor. The supervisor may
know the answer, or they will know where to obtain an answer.

Our goals and objectives for Reading 1 (EDEL 420) are:

Teaching Reading in the Elementary School I

EDEL 420

Note: This course is completed prior to student teaching and focuses on K-2 reading skills. Students have
had experiences in the content listed, and should be able to apply it to their classrooms while student
teaching. Both regular and emergency permit teachers must possess the skills listed. If you have questions,
please ask your university supervisor or CSUB’s literacy coordinator.

Each Stage II student teacher will have a RICA checklist, which must be completed during the two phases of
student teaching. This checklist is to determine which of the skills the student teachers have taught. Ask
your student teacher or supervisor to show you a copy of the form. You should initialize skills, which you see
the student teacher complete while in your classroom. This form will follow the student teacher to the next
classroom.

Course Description
This course is designed to provide instruction in reading skills including phonics, methods, theoretical bases,
and materials according to guidelines set forth by CTC, IRA, and NCTE




                                                        74
Course Objectives
The course objectives focus on the requirements of RICA, CTC, IRA and NCTE. At the conclusion of EDEL
420, students will have met the following course objectives and be able to apply their knowledge of literacy
acquisition to their own classrooms. Under each of the headings, the students will complete tasks to
demonstrate their proficiency in applying the knowledge bases listed below:

Phonological Awareness
   Plan phoneme awareness lessons and choose a variety of materials and activities that include clear
   examples of specific sound for identification, comparison, blending, substitution, and segmentation
   Select and use a variety of materials and activities that begin to make the connection between oral
   language and print (e.g., big books, literature, songs, word play)
   Knowledge of how phoneme awareness is effectively taught both before students are reading and as
   they are learning to read
   Knowledge of explicit instructional methodologies for teaching phonological awareness
   Ability to provide examples of onsets and rimes, syllables, phonemes and morphemes
   Ability to identify the characteristics of and utilize effective programs, materials, and activities that can be
   used to develop phonological awareness

Concepts About Print
   Knowledge of the importance of knowing letter names and recognizing letter shapes for beginning
   reading
   Knowledge of how to use materials, activities, and methodologies to teach concepts about print (e.g. big
   books, literature, and language experience
   Ability to use a variety of engaging activities, materials, and techniques for teaching the names and
   sequences of the letters of the alphabet

Systematic, Explicit Phonics and Other Word Identification Strategies
   Knowledge of terminology and concepts of phonics, decoding, and word attach (e.g. consonant blends,
   consonant digraphs, syllable patterns, morphology)
   Knowledge of how phonemes, syllables, and morphemes are represented in print
   Knowledge of the role of skillful and strategic word identification in proficient readers
   Knowledge of high frequency sight words that should be taught
   Knowledge of why rapid accurate decoding is n important skill for the development of reading fluency
   Knowledge of orthographic patterns of written English that should be taught sequentially as students are
   gaining mastery of word identification skills
   Ability to identify linguistic units important for word attach (e.g. sounds, onsets, and rimes, syllables,
   morphemes, letters, letter combinations)
   Ability to select decodable texts that reinforce word identification skills
   Ability to select a wise variety of texts at the students’ independent reading levels for the development of
   fluency
   Ability to identify the characteristics of and utilize effective programs, materials, and activities that can be
   used for the constructive, explicit, systematic teaching of word identification skills
   Ability to implement a phonics program that builds upon concepts of print and phoneme awareness

Spelling
Knowledge of the stages of spelling development and their manifestations in written text
Knowledge of the role and limitations of invented/temporary spelling in the development of phonological
awareness
Knowledge of the impact that poorly developed spelling knowledge has on student’s word identification
abilities




                                                        75
Vocabulary Development
Knowledge that students learn the meaning of the majority of new words form context
Ability to use a variety of engaging materials, activities, and techniques to help students increase their
vocabulary (e.g. classification, word banks, word sorts, word wails)

Reading Comprehension
   Knowledge of the relationship between prior knowledge and comprehension
   Knowledge of the different needs of early, emergent, and fluent readers and related teaching implications
   Knowledge of the importance of open discussions in developing students’ reading comprehension
   Knowledge of the structure of narrative and expository text and instructional approaches to teach these
   structures
   Knowledge of reading fluency and its impact on comprehension
   Ability to teach comprehension strategies through such techniques as modeling, scaffolding, explicit
   instruction, and coaching

Students Independent Reading and its Relationship to Improved Reading Performance
   Knowledge of contemporary, classic, and multicultural children’s authors and literature
   Knowledge of the purposes of reading and related motivational factors that promote reading
   Knowledge that the amount of time students spend reading is an important predictor of receptive
   vocabulary, verbal fluency, and reading achievement
   Ability to select and organize a wide variety of reading materials at appropriate levels for classroom use

Relationship Among Reading, Writing and Oral Language
    Knowledge of the process of first-language development and its implications for reading
    Knowledge of the development of students’ writing and its relationship to teaching reading
    Knowledge of ways in which learning to read and learning to speak are different
    Ability to use a variety of engaging activities, materials, and techniques for teaching letter formation
    (manuscript)

Diagnosis of Reading Development: The Use of Assessment and Evaluation Information
    Knowledge of well-designed and non-biased resources for assessment
    Knowledge of when and how often various assessments should be used
    Knowledge of reading skills critical to assess at given reading levels
    Ability to use assessment data to ensure that all students are engaged in tasks that will foster their
    literacy development, whether they are working with a teacher, in small groups or independently
    Ability to use flexible grouping strategies to meet the needs of individual students
    Ability to use various performance-based assessments (e.g. interviews, observations, anecdotal
    reporting, running records, miscue analysis
    Ability to determine student’s independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels with respect to
    accuracy, fluency, and comprehension
    Ability to select, administer, and analyze the results of informal and formal assessment to inform
    instruction
    Ability to organize and access assessment data

Structure of the English Language
    Ability to recognize cultural, linguistic, and lexical bias in assessments

What Reading skills should my Stage III student teacher have?

The Stage III student teacher should be able to teach to all of the objectives listed for EDEL 420 and EDEL
430 or EDEL 428 (BCLAD). They have had one quarter of student teaching, and have already experienced
many of the requirements for RICA. Your student teacher should provide you a copy of his/her checklist for
you to fill out. Student teachers must fulfill all items on the checklist in order to pass Stage III student
teaching.




Teaching Reading in the Elementary School II

                                                        76
EDEL 430

 Note: Students have completed EDEL 420 prior to taking this course. They should be knowledgeable
regarding the skills listed. They will be taking EDEL 430, which focuses on grades 3 – 6, along with their first
quarter of student teaching. They will be teaching reading, and will have started their RICA checklist. The
student teacher should have a copy of the checklist in his/her notebook. You should initialize any skills you
see the student teacher performing in your classroom. When the student teacher has completed Stage III , a
majority of the checklist should be initialized.

Course Description: This course is designed to provide instruction in theoretical models and instructional
methods for literacy acquisition according to guidelines set for the by RICA, CTC, IRA and NCTE.

Course Objectives: The course objectives focus on the requirements of RICA, CTC, IRA and NCTE. At the
conclusion of EDEL 430, students will have met the following course objectives and be able to apply their
knowledge of literacy acquisition to their own classrooms. Under each of the headings, the students will
complete tasks to demonstrate proficiency in applying the knowledge bases listed below:

Systematic, Explicit Phonics and Other Word Identification Strategies
Ability to select a wide variety of texts at the students’ independent reading levels for the development of
fluency

Spelling
   Knowledge of the etymology (word origins) and morphology (affixes and roots) of words as they relate to
   orthographic (spelling/sound) patterns in the English language
   Ability to implement engaging spelling activities based on the sequence of phonics and phonological
   awareness, as well as syllable patterns, morphology, etymology, and high frequency words
   Ability to choose words that have clear examples of the phonemes or syllables to be taught in the lesson
   Ability to identify the characteristics of and utilize effective program, materials, and activities that can be
   used to develop spelling skills
   Ability to utilize students’ writing in the development of spelling instruction

Vocabulary Development
   Knowledge of the relationship between comprehension and vocabulary
   Knowledge that students learn the meaning of the majority of new words form context
   Knowledge of the relationship between amount of reading and vocabulary growth
   Knowledge of the varieties of word relationships (e.g. antonyms, synonyms, associations, figures of
   speech, categorical connections)
   Ability to use appropriate criteria for selecting vocabulary words for study

Reading Comprehension
   Knowledge of how proficient readers read
   Knowledge of the relationship between prior knowledge and comprehension
   Knowledge of the different needs of struggling readers and related teaching implications
   Knowledge of the importance of open discussion in developing students’ reading comprehension
   Knowledge of the structure of narrative and expository text and instructional approaches to teach these
   structures
   Knowledge of reading fluency and its impact on comprehension
   Knowledge of study skills for locating, retrieving, and retaining information from reading (e.g. reference
   materials, test graphic organizers
   Ability to teach comprehension strategies through such techniques as modeling, scaffolding, explicit
   instruction, and coaching
   Ability to use a variety of engaging activities, materials, and techniques to foster comprehension before,
   after, and during reading
   Ability to formulate questions that promote students’ literal, inferential, and evaluative comprehension
   and extend learning
   Ability to teach effective comprehension strategies for content area reading


Students Independent Reading and its Relationship to Improved Reading Performance
   Knowledge of contemporary, classic, and multicultural children’s authors and literature

                                                       77
    Knowledge of the purposes of reading and related motivational factors that promote reading
    Knowledge that the amount of time students spend reading is an important predictor of receptive
    vocabulary, verbal fluency, and reading achievement
    Ability to select and organize a wide variety of reading materials at appropriate levels for classroom use

Relationship Among Reading, Writing and Oral Language
    Knowledge of different forms of writing (e.g. letter, poem, essay)
    Knowledge of the process of second language development and its implications for reading
    Knowledge of how students can transfer literacy competencies from one language to another including:
    Knowledge of the differences between spoken and written language
    Knowledge that the transfer of skills from oral language to written language is not automatic
    Knowledge of the similarities and differences between Standard English and (1) non-mainstream English
    and (2) other languages
    Ability to use a variety of engaging activities, materials, and techniques to expand vocabulary and
    grammatical structures that students use in their writing
    Ability to use a variety of engaging activities, materials, and techniques for teaching letter formation
    (cursive)

Diagnosis of Reading Development: The Use of Assessment and Evaluation Information
    Knowledge of well-designed and non-biased resources for assessment
    Knowledge of when and how often various assessments should be used
    Knowledge of reading skills critical to assess at given reading levels
    Ability to use assessment data to ensure that all students are engaged in tasks that will foster their
    literacy development, whether they are working with a teacher, in small groups or independently
    Ability to use flexible grouping strategies to meet the needs of individual students
    Ability to use various performance-based assessments (e.g. interviews, observations, anecdotal
    reporting, running records, miscue analysis
    Ability to determine student’s independent, instructional, and frustration reading levels with respect to
    accuracy, fluency, and comprehension
    Ability to select, administer, and analyze the results of informal and formal assessment to inform
    instruction
    Ability to organize and access assessment data

Structure of the English Language
    Knowledge of English grammar
    Knowledge of the ways in which academic language differs from conversational language
    Knowledge of the systems of the English language (i.e. Phonology, semantics, pragmatics, and
    orthography
    Ability to identify the characteristics of and utilize effective approaches, materials, and programs that can
    be used to develop students’ understanding of English language structure and syntax (e.g. explicit
    instruction, meaningful practice, applications to daily reading and writing)




                                                       78
                             APPENDIX G

                   PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS


Suggested Possible Artifact Checklist
TPE-Driven Portfolio General Outline
Portfolio Rubrics
MSCP Course Matrix (submitted to CCTC)
Guide for Portfolio Format
Sample Guiding Reflective Questions
Video Reflection Guide Sample
Teaching Performance Expectations Template




                                 79
                           CSUB Elementary Education Program
                          Multiple-Subject Portfolio Requirements
                          (TPE-Driven Portfolio General Outline)
Candidates in the SB 2042 program are required to compile a standards-based electronic professional
portfolio, using a template provided within LiveText. The process begins during Stage I of the program, is
completed in EDEL 449 and must be submitted via LiveText, and will become part of this portfolio by
linking it through liveText.

As part of this Portfolio, each course in the Multiple Subject Credential Program has a signature Assignment,
(see page 84) which will be submitted to the course instructor through LiveText, and will become part of this
portfolio by linking it through LiveText.

The Signature Assignment for each individual course must be submitted to the instructor via LiveText by the
end of that quarter, even if it has already been submitted and graded via hard copy. Course grades will not
be reported until the Signature Assignment is submitted through LiveText. These Signature Assignments
must be included in the LiveText portfolio.

In addition, the Candidate will document activities and opportunities specifically related to each of the
Teaching Performance Expectations by writing a series of reflective assays with connections to the TPA
domains. For each TPE, an essay will describe (a) specific learning opportunities related to that TPE that the
candidate has experienced in various courses, and (b) specific examples in which the candidate has
demonstrated proficiency in that TPE, in actual practice in the field, during the credential program.

Due Date: The completed portfolio must be submitted on LiveText by the end of the Stage III quarter. The
credential application will not be processed before successful completion of the portfolio.

Guidelines for Writing Reflective TPE Essays for the Credential Portfolio
First, READ the TPE over many times.

Next, write an introductory paragraph that addresses the overall TPE.

Then select at least 3 – 5 elements (the individual numbered items) to address. Write down each element
you have selected and for each of the elements:
        1.        Describe some relevant activities/lessons, strategies that you completed throughout your
                  credential program (reference specific courses) and their relationship to this TPE. Use the
                  TPE’s as benchmarks with evidence, pertinent knowledge and skills gained.

        2.       Reflect upon how the experiences have impacted you as a professional educator. Use the
                 TPE’s as lenses for self-evaluation, reflection, evaluation and assessment.

        3.       Describe your future goals/plans as you transition into induction.

Finally, write a concluding paragraph that summarizes or pulls it together. One or two pages of writing are
sufficient for each of the TPE’s




                                                     80
Candidate’s Name:_______________________________
Date of submission:______________________________
Date of evaluation:_______________________________

The Multiple Subject Portfolio is one of the requirements for prospective candidates seeking
teacher certification. The purpose of the portfolio is to demonstrate that candidates have
developed adequate knowledge and professional skills to perform their duties and roles effectively
in schools. In particular, the criteria are based on a set of standards and elements outlines in the
CSTPs, TPEs, and TPAs.

Upon completion of Stage III student teaching (EDEL 449), the Portfolio must be submitted for
review. The final portfolio will be reviewed by the program Portfolio Review Committee members
and be judged in terms of completeness and specific lines of evidence. After appropriate review, a
letter ranking the portfolio as TARGET, ACCEPTABLE, or UNACCEPTABLE will be placed in
the candidate’s file.

The undersigned, Portfolio Committee, has reviewed and evaluated submitted portfolio which has
been rated as:

                     ______TARGET ______ACCEPTABLE______UNACCEPTABLE

Congratulations on your successful completion of the Portfolio!

Comments:
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________
                     Assessment and Portfolio Committee Members’ Signatures
________________________                         ________________________
________________________                         ________________________
________________________                         ________________________

Program Director’s Signature                     Department Chair Signature

____________________________                   _________________________________


                                                     81
             Multiple Subject Portfolio Assessment Rubric
    All students will complete a LiveText portfolio containing a Signature Assignment from every
    course in the Multiple Subject Program, Including Student Teaching, and an essay representing
    each TPE.

                 Target (3 pts)                   Acceptable (2 pts)               Unacceptable (1pt)

All students     The document provides            The document provides            The document provides
will complete    evidence that clearly,           evidence that                    evidence that ineffectively
a portfolio      consistently, and                demonstrates the teacher         or only partially
containing a     convincingly demonstrates        candidate's ability in the       demonstrates the teacher
Signature        the teacher candidate's          TPEs being addressed.            candidate's ability in the
Assignment       ability in the TPE's being       Evidence is connected            TPEs being addressed.
from every       measured. Evidence is            across the response.             Evidence may be minimal
course in the    purposefully connected                                            inappropriate, inaccurate,
Multiple         and reinforced across the                                         or missing.
Subject          response.
Program,
including
Student          Reflection piece clearly,        Reflection piece documents       Reflection piece shows
Teaching and     consistently, and                                                 inconsistent or ineffective
                                                  the students’ ability to
an essay         convincingly documents the                                        reflection of the candidate’s
representing
                                                  evaluate his/her own teaching
                 students’ ability to evaluate    practices and subject matter     teaching practices and subject
each TPE.
(100,100%)
                 his/her own teaching practices   knowledge, and to use this       matter knowledge, and
                 and subject matter               reflection and feedback to       limited or no use of reflection
                 knowledge, and to use this       formulate and prioritize goals   and feedback to formulate
                 reflection and feedback to       for future growth.               and prioritize goals for future
                 formulate and prioritize goals                                    growth. Reflections may be
                 for future growth.                                                superficial, relating mostly to
                                                                                   how the student enjoyed the
                                                                                   activity.




                                                    82
                          Multiple Subjects Portfolio Assessments Chart
                       (Draft submitted to CCTC 2/17/04 in response to Standard 19)

Course       Sample Portfolio Item/Signature               Brief description                      TPE            Field Work
             Assignment                                                                           Addressed      Hours
EDEL 240     Checklist                                     Candidates reflect on what they                            36
             Final Reflection                              have learned from classroom
                                                           observations.

             ** If you do not have this document,
             write a short reflection explaining why.
             Describe your classroom experience prior
             to entering the Credential Program and
             explain how you decided to pursue a
             teaching career
EDEL 421     PowerPoint Presentation                       Candidates will develop a              8,9,12,13          0
                                                           PowerPoint presentation that
                                                           includes their teaching philosophy,
                                                           expectations and commitment as
                                                           teachers.


EDEL 429     Classroom Management Plan                     Candidates will design their own       1-13               10
             Reflection                                    classroom management plan.
EDEL 420     Case study/ Reflective Essay                  Candidates will write a reflective     1-13               20
             Reflection                                    essay on their case study of an
                                                           emergent reader/writer.
EDEL 430     Case study/ Reflective                        Candidates will write a reflective     1-13               20
                                                           essay on their written case study of
                                                           a struggling reader/writer in the
                                                           intermediate grades
EDEL 436     Video of teaching                             Candidates will videotape the          1-11               10
             Unit plan and 3 complete lesson plans         lessons they teach. They will fill
             Teaching strategies form                      out the teaching strategies form and
             Reflection                                    the unit rubric. They will write a
                                                           reflection on the process.

EDEL 437     Teach two lessons                             Candidates video tape the lesson       1-11
             Reflection based on videotape                 and critique their teaching.
EDBI 477     Instructional Project                         Candidates create and teach a          4,7, 8, 9,10      With
             Reflection                                    lesson to students and then write a                     Student
                                                           written reflection about the                           Teaching
                                                           experience
EDEL 428     Case study,                                   Candidates will create a graphic       4,7,8,9,10        With
             Graphic organizer                             organizer and write a case                              Student
                                                           study/reflection based on the ELD                      Teaching
                                                           standards.
EDEL 438     Unit, Reflection                              Candidates create a science unit,      1,2,4-11          With
                                                           which they teach and on which they                      Student
                                                           write a reflection essay.                              Teaching
EDSP 301     Report/Reflections/ Case Study                Case Study                             4,7, 8, 9,10      With
                                                                                                                   Student
                                                                                                                  Teaching
EDEL 439 &   Lesson Plans                                  Candidates will complete two           1-13
EDEL 449     Observation Reports                           quarters of student teaching (half
             Mid-Terms & Finals                            day during Stage II and full day
             Video reflection                              during Stage III) and will create
             Bulletin Board Pictures and Reflection        and teach a minimum of 20 lessons
             Culminating Reflection                        in multiple subject areas, complete
                                                           two videos and create two bulletin
                                                           boards during stage 2 and 3
                                                           placements.




                                                      83
                       Sample Guiding Reflective Questions
                                                   Reflection is what allows us to learn from our experiences:
                                    it is an assessment of where we have been and where we want to go next.
                                                                                                 Kenneth Wolf

―Next” Questions:

How will you use this to guide your instruction?

How will you use what you have experienced to guide your professional development?

What aspects of instruction and student achievement will you wish to study in greater detail?

How will you improve upon your current work?

What would you do differently regarding setting objectives, monitoring student progress, designing
assessments, and delivery of instruction? This could be adapted to include specific targets of each TPE.

How will you apply these activities/artifacts to your teaching?

How will you modify instruction in this area in the future?

How will you continue to develop your skills as a beginning teacher?

How does this change what you will do in a classroom?

What steps do you need to take from here?

What do you need now?

Through these experiences, what have you learned about yourself, your teaching skills, and your attitude
toward teaching?

These questions could be tailored to each TPE or TPA domains given as general prompts for reflection.


    Note:
               These questions and others can be used a guide to compile your reflections.




                                                      84
                                             Video Reflection Guide
Student Teacher Video-Tape Assignment           Name: PLEASE PUT YOUR NAME HERE!
Date: Insert Date of lesson                            Master Teacher: Master Teacher’s Name Here

For the 1st Assignment, complete Steps 1 - 3.
For the 2nd Assignment, complete Steps 1 - 4.

Step 1: Plan the Lesson

Plan the lesson using the format provided. Use the Lesson Plan Rubric to guide you in strengthening the plan. Attach a
copy of the lesson plan to this reflection.

Step 2: Teach the Lesson and Videotape it
Teach the lesson, and videotape it, making sure that you have signed parent permission slips for all students included on
the tape.

Step 3: Analyzing the Lesson

Directions:
Collect and score all of the evidence of student academic learning from the lesson. Review carefully the evidence of
student learning. Watch the videotape of the lesson with your Master Teacher. Think about the teaching of the lesson
and what you learned from this lesson about the whole class and about any English Learners in the class.
Answer the prompts below.

    Did you teach the lesson as planned?


    If not, what changes did you make to the lesson and why?


     How appropriate were your pacing and time allocations for various components of the lesson?
Cite Specific Examples:




     How effective was your classroom management? (See Classroom Management Rubric)
Cite Specific Examples:




5. How did you keep students on task, or re-direct off task behavior?
Cite Specific Examples:




                                                          85
     What strategies did you use for active engagement of ALL students?
Cite Specific Examples:




     To what extent did the class as a whole achieve the academic learning goals of the lesson?
Cite Specific Examples:




     In what ways did the environment in the classroom, including climate, rapport, routines, and procedures, contribute
     to student learning?
Cite Specific Examples:




Think about the components of the lesson and the evidence of student academic learning that you have reviewed.
Respond to the following questions for your whole class and for any English Learners in the class.

   In what ways was your lesson effective and what might you do differently to improve the lesson?
Whole Class:                                                          English Learners:




   How well did the lesson connect with the students’ background and developmental information? Cite specific
   examples.
Whole Class:                                                          English Learners:




   To what extent did the students make progress toward the academic learning goals? Cite specific examples from
   the evidence of student learning that you reviewed.
Whole Class:                                                          English Learners:




   What will you do for the student(s) who did not achieve the academic learning goals?
Whole Class:                                                          English Learners:



                                                          86
   What are your next instructional plans?
Whole Class:                                                              English Learners:




     What would be your next steps in planning to facilitate the English Language Development of any English
     Learners?




                Step 4: Reflect on the 2 videotaped Lessons and Plan future Professional Development

               Complete this Step AFTER the 2nd videotaped lesson, reflecting on both lessons together.

1.   Given your analysis of these lessons and the student learning that resulted, how will you use this information to
     guide your planning for future lessons?




2.   What are your goals for increasing your knowledge and skill in implementing instruction?




3.   How will you pursue achieving these goals?




4.   How will achieving these goals help you become a more effective teacher?




                                                           87
Teaching Performance Expectations Template

A. Making Subject Matter Comprehensible to Students
TPE 1: Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction

TPE 1A: Subject-Specific Pedagogical Skills for Multiple Subject Teaching Assignments
Teaching Reading-Language Arts in a Multiple Subject Assignment
   1.  demonstrate the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in English-Language Arts (K-8).
   2.  deliver a comprehensive program of systematic instruction in word analysis, fluency, and systematic vocabulary
       development; reading comprehension; literary response and analysis; writing strategies and applications; written and oral
       English Language conventions; and listening and speaking strategies and applications.
   3. strategically plan and schedule instruction to ensure that students meet or exceed the standards.
   4. create a classroom environment where students learn to read and write, comprehend and compose, appreciate and analyze,
       and perform and enjoy the language arts.
       make language (e.g., vocabulary, forms, uses) comprehensible to students and the need for students to master foundational
       skills as a gateway to using all forms of language as tools for thinking, learning, and communicating.
       use instructional materials that include a range of textual, functional and recreational texts and how to teach high quality
       literature and expository text.
       understand that the advanced skills of comprehending narrative and informational texts and literary response and analysis,
       and the creation of eloquent prose, all depend on a foundation of solid vocabulary, decoding, and word-recognition skills.
   8. teach students how to use visual structures such as graphic organizers or outlines to comprehend or produce text, comprehend
       or produce narrative, expository, persuasive and descriptive texts, comprehend or produce the complexity of writing forms,
       purposes, and organizational patterns,
   9. how to have a command of written and oral English-language conventions.
   10. determine the skill level of students through the use of meaningful indicators of reading and language arts proficiency prior to   i
       Instruction,
   11. determine whether students are making adequate progress on skills and concepts taught directly,
   12. determine the effectiveness of instruction and students’ proficiency after instruction.




 Reflection/Narrative:




                                                               88
                Teaching Performance Expectations
A. Making Subject Matter Comprehensible to Students
TPE 1: Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction
Teaching Mathematics in a Multiple Subject Assignment
    1. demonstrate the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in mathematics (K-8).
    2. enable students to understand basic mathematical computations, concepts, and symbols, to use these tools and
         processes to solve common problems, and apply them to novel problems.
    3. help students understand different mathematical topics and make connections among them.
    4. help students solve real-world problems using mathematical reasoning and concrete, verbal, symbolic, and graphic
         representations.
    5. provide a secure environment for taking intellectual risks and approaching problems in multiple ways.
    6. model and encourage students to use multiple ways of approaching mathematical problems,
    7. encourage discussion of different solution strategies.
    8. foster positive attitudes toward mathematics,
    9. encourage student curiosity, flexibility, and persistence in solving mathematical problems.


Reflection/Narrative:




                                                              89
                Teaching Performance Expectations
A. Making Subject Matter Comprehensible to Students
TPE 1: Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction
Teaching Science in a Multiple Subject Assignment
    1. the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in science (K-8).
    2. balance the focus of instruction between science information, concepts, and investigations.
    3. explanations, demonstrations, and class activities serve to illustrate science concepts and principles, scientific
         investigation, and experimentation.
    4. emphasize the importance of accuracy, precision, and estimation.


Reflection/Narrative:




                                                                  90
                Teaching Performance Expectations
A. Making Subject Matter Comprehensible to Students
TPE 1: Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction
Teaching History-Social Science in a Multiple Subject Assignment
    1. demonstrate the ability to teach the state-adopted academic content standards for students in history-social science
         (K-8).
    2. enable students to learn and use basic analytic thinking skills in history and social science while attaining the state-
         adopted academic content standards for students.
    3. use timelines and maps to give students a sense of temporal and spatial scale.
    4. teach students how social science concepts and themes provide insights into historical periods and cultures.
    5. help students understand events and periods from multiple perspectives by using simulations, case studies, cultural
         artifacts, works of art and literature, cooperative projects, and student research activities.


Reflection/Narrative:




                                                                  91
                 Teaching Performance Expectations
B. Assessing Student Learning
TPE 2: Monitoring Student Learning During Instruction
   1.   use progress monitoring at key points during instruction to determine whether students are progressing adequately
        toward achieving the state-adopted academic content standards for students.
   2.     pace instruction and re-teach content based on evidence gathered using assessment strategies such as questioning
         students and examining student work and products.
   3.    anticipate, check for, and address common student misconceptions and misunderstandings.


Reflection/Narrative:




                                                               92
                 Teaching Performance Expectations
B. Assessing Student Learning
TPE 3: Interpretation and Use of Assessments
   1.    understand and use a variety of informal and formal, as well as formative and summative assessments, to determine
          students’ progress and plan instruction.
   2.    Appropriately implement the state-adopted student assessment program.
   3.    understand the purposes and uses of different types of diagnostic instruments, including entry level, progress-
         monitoring and summative assessments.
   4.    use multiple measures, including information from families, to assess student knowledge, skills, and behaviors.
   5.    know when and how to use specialized assessments based on students' needs.
   6.    know about and appropriately use informal classroom assessments and analyze student work.
   7.    teach students how to use self-assessment strategies.
   8.    provide guidance and time for students to practice these strategies.
   9.    understand how to familiarize students with the format of standardized tests.
   10.   know how to appropriately administer standardized tests, including when to make accommodations for students with
         special needs.
   11.   know how to accurately interpret assessment results of individuals and groups in order to develop and modify
         instruction.
   12.   interpret assessment data to identify the level of proficiency of English language learners in English as well as in the
         students’ primary language.
   13.   give students specific, timely feedback on their learning, and maintain accurate records summarizing student
         achievement.
   14.   explain, to students and to their families, student academic and behavioral strengths, areas for academic growth,
         promotion and retention policies, and how a grade or progress report is derived.
   15.   clearly explain to families how to help students achieve the curriculum.


Reflection/Narrative:




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                 Teaching Performance Expectations
C. Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning
TPE 4: Making Content Accessible
   1.    Candidates for Teaching Credentials incorporate specific strategies, teaching/instructional activities, procedures and
         experiences that address state-adopted academic content standards for students in order to provide a balanced and
         comprehensive curriculum.
    2.   use instructional materials to reinforce state-adopted academic content standards for students and then prioritize and
         sequence essential skills and strategies in a logical, coherent manner relative to students' current level of achievement.
   3.    vary instructional strategies according to purpose and lesson content.
   4.    To meet student academic learning needs, candidates explain content clearly and reinforce content in multiple ways,
         such as the use of written and oral presentation, manipulatives, physical models, visual and performing arts, diagrams,
         non-verbal communication, and computer technology.
   5.    provide opportunities and adequate time for students to practice and apply what they have learned.
   6.    distinguish between conversational and academic language, and develop student skills in using and understanding
         academic language.
   7.    teach students strategies to read and comprehend a variety of texts and a variety of information sources, in the
         subject(s) taught.
   8.    model active listening in the classroom.
   9.    encourage student creativity and imagination.
   10.   motivate students and encourage student effort.
   11.   When students do not understand content, take additional steps to foster access and comprehension for all learners.
   12.   balance instruction by adjusting lesson designs relative to students’ current level of achievement.


Reflection/Narrative:




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                 Teaching Performance Expectations
C. Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning
TPE 5: Student Engagement
   1.   clearly communicate instructional objectives to students.
   2.   ensure the active and equitable participation of all students.
   3.   ensure that students understand what they are to do during instruction and monitor student progress toward academic
        goals.
   4.   If students are struggling and off-task, examine why and use strategies to re-engage them.
   5.   encourage students to share and examine points of view during lessons.
   6.   use community resources, student experiences, and applied learning activities to make instruction relevant.
   7.   extend the intellectual quality of student thinking by asking stimulating questions and challenging student ideas.
   8.   teach students to respond to and frame meaningful questions.


Reflection/Narrative:




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                 Teaching Performance Expectations
C. Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning
TPE 6: Developmentally Appropriate Teaching Practices in Grades K-3
     1.   understand how to create a structured day with opportunities for movement.
     2.   design academic activities that suit the attention span of young learners.
     3.   instructional activities connect with the children’s immediate world; draw on key content from more than one subject
          area; and include hands-on experiences and manipulatives that help students learn.
     4.   teach and model norms of social interactions (e.g., consideration, cooperation, responsibility, empathy).
     5.   understand that some children hold naive understandings of the world around them.
     6.   provide educational experiences that help students develop more realistic expectations and understandings of their
          environment.
          know how to make special plans for students who require extra help in exercising self-control among their peers or
          who have exceptional needs or abilities.



Reflection/Narrative:




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                 Teaching Performance Expectations
C. Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning
TPE 6: Developmentally Appropriate Teaching Practices in Grades 4-8
   1.   build on students’ command of basic skills and understandings while providing intensive support for students who lack
        basic skills as defined in state-adopted academic content standards for students.
   2.   teach from grade-level texts.
   3.   design learning activities to extend students’ concrete thinking and foster abstract reasoning and problem-solving
        skills.
   4.   help students develop learning strategies to cope with increasingly challenging academic curriculum.
   5.   assist students, as needed, in developing and practicing strategies for managing time and completing assignments.
   6.   develop students’ skills for working in groups to maximize learning.
   7.   build on peer relationships and support students in trying new roles and responsibilities in the classroom.
   8.   support students' taking of intellectual risks such as sharing ideas that may include errors.
   9.   distinguish between misbehavior and over-enthusiasm, and they respond appropriately to students who are testing
        limits and students who alternatively assume and reject responsibility.


Reflection/Narrative:




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                 Teaching Performance Expectations
C. Engaging and Supporting Students in Learning
TPE 7: English Language Learners
   1.    know and apply pedagogical theories, principles, and instructional practices for comprehensive instruction of English
         learners.
    2.   know and apply theories, principles, and instructional practices for English Language Development leading to
         comprehensive literacy in English.
   3.     familiar with the philosophy, design, goals, and characteristics of programs for English language development,
           including structured English immersion.
   4.     implement an instructional program that facilitates English language development, including reading, writing, listening
         and speaking skills, that logically progresses to the grade level reading/language arts program for English speakers.
   5.     draw upon information about students’ backgrounds and prior learning, including students' assessed levels of literacy in
         English and their first languages, as well as their proficiency in English, to provide instruction differentiated to
         students’ language abilities.
   6.    understand how and when to collaborate with specialists and para-educators to support English language development.
   7.    Based on appropriate assessment information, candidates select instructional materials and strategies, including
         activities in the area of visual and performing arts, to develop students’ abilities to comprehend and produce English.
   8.    use English that extends students’ current level of development yet is still comprehensible.
   9.    know how to analyze student errors in oral and written language in order to understand how to plan differentiated
         instruction.
   10.    know and apply pedagogical theories, principles and practices for the development of academic language,
         comprehension, and knowledge in the subjects of the core curriculum.
   11.    use systematic instructional strategies, including contextualizing key concepts, to make grade-appropriate or advanced
           curriculum content comprehensible to English learners.
   12.    allow students to express meaning in a variety of ways, including in their first language, and, if available, manage first
         language support such as para-educators, peers, and books.
   13.   use questioning strategies that model or represent familiar English grammatical constructions.
   14.   make learning strategies explicit.
   15.   understand how cognitive, pedagogical, and individual factors affect students’ language acquisition.
   16.   take these factors into account in planning lessons for English language development and for academic content.


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                                  Teaching Performance Expectations
D.    PLANNING INSTRUCTION AND DESIGNING LEARNING EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS


TPE 8: Learning About Students
     1.   draw upon an understanding of patterns of child and adolescent development to understand their students.
     2.   Using formal and informal methods, assess students’ prior mastery of academic language abilities, content knowledge,
          and skills, and maximize learning opportunities for all students.
     3.   Through interpersonal interactions, learn about students’ abilities, ideas, interests and aspirations.
     4.    encourage parents to become involved and support their efforts to improve student learning.
     5.    understand how multiple factors, including gender and health, can influence students’ behavior, and understand the
     6.    connections between students’ health and their ability to learn.
           instruction, including students whose physical disabilities, learning disabilities, or health status require instructional
           adaptations, and students who are gifted.


Reflection/Narrative:




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                                  Teaching Performance Expectations
D.    PLANNING INSTRUCTION AND DESIGNING LEARNING EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS


TPE 9: Instructional Planning
     1.  plan instruction that is comprehensive in relation to the subject matter to be taught and in accordance with state-adopted
         academic content standards for students.
     2. establish clear long-term and short-term goals for student learning, based on state and local standards for student achievement
         as well as on students’ current levels of achievement.
     3. use explicit teaching methods such as direct instruction and inquiry to help students meet or exceed grade level expectations.
     4. plan how to explain content clearly and make abstract concepts concrete and meaningful.
     5. understand the purposes, strengths and limitations of a variety of instructional strategies, including examining student work,
         and improve successive uses of the strategies based on experience and reflection.
     6. sequence instruction so the content to be taught connects to preceding and subsequent content.
     7. In planning lessons, select or adapt instructional strategies, grouping strategies, and instructional material to meet student
         learning goals and needs.
     8. connect the content to be learned with students’ linguistic and cultural backgrounds, experiences, interests, and developmental
         learning needs to ensure that instruction is comprehensible and meaningful.
     9. To accommodate varied student needs, plan differentiated instruction.
     10. support personnel, such as aides and volunteers are available, plan how to use them to help students reach instructional goals.


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                                Teaching Performance Expectations
E. CREATING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR STUDENT
LEARNING

TPE 10: Instructional Time
   1.    allocate instructional time to maximize student achievement in relation to state-adopted academic content standards for
         students, instructional goals and scheduled academic tasks.
   2.    establish procedures for routine tasks and manage transitions to maximize instructional time.
   3.    Based on reflection and consultation, adjust the use of instructional time to optimize the learning opportunities and
        outcomes for all students.



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                               Teaching Performance Expectations
E. CREATING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR STUDENT
LEARNING

TPE 11: Social Environment
   1.   Develop and maintain clear expectations for academic and social behavior.
   2.   promote student effort and engagement and create a positive climate for learning.
   3.   know how to write and implement a student discipline plan.
   4.   know how to establish rapport with all students and their families for supporting academic and personal success through
        caring, respect, and fairness.
   5.   respond appropriately to sensitive issues and classroom discussions.
   6.   help students learn to work responsibly with others and independently.
   7.   Based on observations of students and consultation with other teachers, recognize how well the social environment
        maximizes academic achievement for all students and make necessary changes.


Reflection/Narrative:




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                               Teaching Performance Expectations
F: Developing as a Professional Educator

TPE 12: Professional, Legal, and Ethical Obligations
   1.  take responsibility for student academic learning outcomes.
   2.  Be aware of own personal values and biases and recognize ways in which these values and biases affect the teaching and
       learning of students.
   3. resist racism and acts of intolerance.
   4. appropriately manage own professional time spent in teaching responsibilities to ensure that academic goals are met.
   5. understand important elements of California and federal laws and procedures pertaining to the education of English learners,
       gifted students, and individuals with disabilities, including implications for their placement in classrooms.
   6. identify suspected cases of child abuse, neglect, or sexual harassment.
   7. maintain a non-hostile classroom environment.
   8. carry out laws and district guidelines for reporting such cases.
   9. understand and implement school and district policies and state and federal law in responding to inappropriate or violent
       student behavior.
   10. understand and honor legal and professional obligations to protect the privacy, health, and safety of students, families, and
       other school professionals.
   11. Be aware of and act in accordance with ethical considerations and model ethical behaviors for students.
   12. understand and honor all laws relating to professional misconduct and moral fitness.




Reflection/Narrative:




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                               Teaching Performance Expectations
F: Developing as a Professional Educator

TPE 13: Professional Growth
   1.   evaluate your own teaching practices and subject matter knowledge in light of information about the state-adopted academic
        content standards for students and student learning.
   2.   improve your teaching practices by soliciting feedback and engaging in cycles of planning, teaching, reflecting, discerning
        problems, and applying new strategies.
   3.   use reflection and feedback to formulate and prioritize goals for increasing your subject matter knowledge and teaching
        effectiveness.


Reflection/Narrative:




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Endnote:
Program requirements may change with evolving legislation and
credentialing guidelines set forth by CSU, CCTC, NCLB, and NCATE.




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Jun Wang Jun Wang Dr
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