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Phonology_course_plan2010

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					FON M10 Phonology : Course Plan

25 Jan.      Introduction/Processes/Rules (Chap. 1-4): Gösta Bruce, Merle Horne
1 Feb.       Distinctive Features/Ordered Rules (Chap. 5-6): Merle Horne
3 Feb.       Segment and syllable (Chap 10): Merle Horne
8 Feb.       Feature Geometry (Chap 11-12): Merle Horne
10 Feb.      Representing tone (Chap. 9): Gösta Bruce
15 Feb.      Supervision of course paper: Gösta Bruce, Merle Horne
22 Feb.      Stress and feet (Chap. 13-14): Gösta Bruce
24 Feb.      Relationship between phonology and morphology (Chap. 8) Gösta Bruce
1 March.     Phonology above the word (Chap. 15): Merle Horne
3 March      Intonational phonology (Chap. 9, 15): Gösta Bruce
8 March.     Student presentations
10 March     Student presentations
17 March     Deadline for paper



Examination
1) Exercises in textbook. Students are expexcted to work in groups and solve all the
exercises. The solutions can be checked using the key at the end of the book. Each group
turns in a signed paper to me confirming that they have solved all the exercises in the text
book.
N.B. There are a number of typos in the textbook (see separate list).

2) Paper + Presentation (Poster or Ppt)
Each participant in the course is to write a 4-page paper on some topic involving
phonological structure/processing in a language of their choice. Students are expected to
make a phonological analysis of a material of their choice, either data that they have
collected themselves or obtained from some other source. Topics include: the relationship
between some aspect of syntax and prosody, the relationship of music and linguistic
prosody, the relationship between phonology and lexical meaning, the relationship between
phonology and morphology, language acquision and phonology, psycholinguistic aspects of
phonological processing (production/perception), e.g. speech errors, neurolinguistic aspects
of phonological structure/proccessing, language disorders and phonology, e.g. dyslexia,
historical phonology, typological phonology, sociolinguistic aspects of phonology,
laboratory phonology, etc.

				
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