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					What’s Up With Healthy Living
Table of Contents
Welcome! ...........................................................................1
The Benefits of Physical Activity.................................................2
Nutrition.............................................................................3
Nutritional Labels ..................................................................4
Hydration............................................................................5
Activity 1: The Chronicle Herald Scavenger Hunt.............................6
Activity 2: What’s Up With Healthy Living! ....................................7
Activity 3: Personal Fitness Log..................................................7
Activity 4: Healthy Headline Challenge ........................................9
Activity 5: Breakfast is Really Important .......................................10
Activity 6: Healthy Snacks ........................................................10
Activity 7: Reading Labels ........................................................11
Activity 8: Healthy Activity Inventory ..........................................13
Activity 9: The Healthy Living Challenge .......................................14
Active Games .......................................................................17
Sport for Life: From Playground to Podium ...................................21
Choosing the Right Activity Program For Your Child ..........................22
Fun Sport Facts .....................................................................24
Websites ............................................................................25
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Welcome!
        The Chronicle Herald is a valuable source of information for students. Reading a newspaper keeps
        people informed about major issues in their lives. Helping students to use a newspaper teaches them
        an important skill for lifelong learning.

        This teacher’s guide is designed to help you use The Chronicle Herald and the special section What’s
        Up With Healthy Living! prepared and sponsored by Doctors Nova Scotia and Sport Nova Scotia.
        The special section is designed to help students in grade four learn more about issues of health, fitness
        and nutrition and help your students meet the following specific curriculum outcomes in Health
        Education:

               B1.1 demonstrate a knowledge of the personal and social factors affecting food choices
               B1.2 demonstrate an ability to select nutritious breakfast foods
               B4.1 demonstrate an understanding of ways the body protects itself from danger and disease
               B7.1 participate in a broad range of physical activities
               B7.2 describe the role of exercise and diet in maintaining healthy bones and muscles
               C2.1 demonstrate an awareness of ways that friends, family and community groups can
               support healthy decision making
               D1.1 identify and demonstrate attitudes and behaviors that support healthy lifestyle choices
               D3.3 demonstrate an ability to interpret and use information on food labels when making food
               choices

        It will also help your students meet the following specific curriculum outcomes in Physical
        Education:

        Active Living
                   •   Demonstrate a willingness to participate in an intramural activity at lunch time or after
                       school.
                   •   Identify and list benefits resulting from participation in different forms of physical
                       activities.
                   •   Identify good and bad foods and their effect on the body.

        Alternate Environments
                   •   Experience using a community resource to participate in physical activity (e.g., pool,
                       rink).
                   •   Experience an outdoor activity in each of the four seasons.
                   •   Participate in a walking or jogging program in preparation for hiking, orienteering,
                       cross-country skiing.

        The activities in this guide and reading The Chronicle Herald will also meet some of curriculum
        outcomes in the English Language Arts and Mathematics sections of the grade four provincial
        curriculum.




                                                                                                                   page 1
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        The Benefits of Physical Activity
        It is important to educate students about the benefits of physical activity. Not only will this educate
        them, it will help motivate them to continue leading active and healthy lives. Being physically active
        and participating in sports at an early age has many benefits. It:

            •   builds strong bones and strengthens muscles;
            •   maintains flexibility;
            •   helps achieve a healthy weight;
            •   promotes good posture and balance;
            •   improves fitness;
            •   provides opportunities to meet new friends;
            •   strengthens the heart;
            •   improves self-esteem and increases relaxation;
            •   enhances healthy growth and development; and
            •   increases energy levels.

        As well, children who are physically active tend to perform better in school and less likely to smoke
        than their non-active peers.

        Health Canada’s Physical Activity Guide to Healthy Active Living recommends youth gradually increase
        their daily total of physical activity to 90 minutes. This total can be reached by doing various activities
        of 10 minutes or more at different levels of effort which are added up to get a daily total.

        An example of how students can reach 90 minutes of physical activity is:
           • 10 minutes walking to school,
           • 20 minutes playing tag at recess,
           • 15 minutes dancing to music,
           • 10 minutes spent walking and playing with their dog,
           • 15 minutes riding their bike, and
           • 20 minutes playing soccer

        By going over this example, you can show how easy it is to be active and students will be able to see
        just how quickly they can accumulate significant amounts of physical activity and be on their way to
        healthier lifestyles.

        Health Canada also recommends youth try to reduce the amount of non-active time they accumulate
        each day. Encourage your participants to spend half an hour less per day doing activities that don’t
        require much energy, like watching television or playing on the computer.




                                                                                                                      page 2
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Nutrition
        Our society has become very dependent on processed and fast foods as well as snacks that are high in
        fat and sugar. As a teacher, you are in the position to provide students with information about healthy
        nutrition and encourage them to move away from such a strong dependence on “junk food.”

        Remind students they only have one body to last a lifetime and that it will perform better if it is run
        on high- versus low-quality fuel. One way of helping students become more aware of what they are
        putting in their bodies is to encourage them to keep a journal, listing everything they eat and drink
        over a series of days. This exercise is helpful for showing them how much they consume and areas
        where they can make some changes to their eating habits.
        Here is some basic information about healthy food choices. We encourage you to remind students
        about ways in which they can strive for a balanced diet.

           1. Encourage them to use Canada’s Food Guide to find out which foods are healthy choices.
              Healthy snacks can include cut up fresh fruit, veggies, low-fat cheese, yogurt, popcorn and
              low-fat crackers with peanut butter.
           2. Students should choose at least one vegetable or fruit for each meal and snack. Encourage
              them to pick the dark green, orange or yellow ones as they are full of vitamins needed to grow
              and be active.
           3. Encourage students to choose lower-fat milk products such as skim milk, 1 per cent chocolate
              milk, yogurt and low-fat cheese. These provide calcium, which is good for the bones.
           4. Students should eat two or three servings a day from the meat and alternative group such as
              fish, beans, eggs, peanut butter, or chicken. These foods also provide energy for growth and
              nutrients for the muscles.
           5. Encourage students to eat at least five servings of grain or bread products a day such as whole
              grain breads and cereals, rice or pasta. These foods are a great source of energy for an active
              lifestyle.
           6. Students should limit the sugar they consume from candy, chocolate and pop. They may cause
              cavities and, if consumed excessively, can lead to weight gain and health problems.
           7. Students should limit added fats such as margarine, butter, mayonnaise and oil as well as
              other fatty foods such as processed or fast foods.
           8. Use the Healthy Eating Challenge and encourage participants to track the healthy snacks they
              eat each day in their logs.

        Health Canada’s Food Guide was updated and released in February 2007. Please visit the Food Guide
        website to learn about the changes http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/index_e.html




                                                                                                                  page 3
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Nutritional Labels
        Nutritional information is available on many food packages in the grocery store. A new system for
        providing this information was introduced in 2003 and is applicable to almost all pre-packaged foods.
        Health Canada offers information on understanding what these labels mean and how to compare the
        nutritional value of one food versus another.

        http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/alt_formats/hpfb-dgpsa/pdf/label-etiquet/inl-eni_e.pdf

        For a more interactive game-style, Health Canada also offers an interactive nutrition label lesson and
        quiz. Flash 8 Player is needed to view the interactive game, however a basic HTML version of the quiz
        and lesson are available.

        http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/label-etiquet/nutrition/interactive/index_e.html




                                                                                                                 page 4
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Hydration
        Staying properly hydrated by drinking water regularly is important when exercising and for overall
        health. Whether being active or sitting in class, the body needs water. In fact, over 60 per cent of the
        body is made up of water, so students should be encouraged to drink six to eight glasses of fluid each
        day. This can be from a variety of drinks including water, unsweetened juice, milk, chocolate milk,
        healthy milk shakes or fruit smoothies.

        Drinking fluids is especially important when exercising as it replaces water lost through sweat, helps
        the participant perform to the best of their ability, prevents them from becoming dehydrated, and
        helps maintain a healthy body temperature. Reinforce healthy hydration practices all day, everyday.

        Here are some tips regarding hydration:

             •    Dehydration, which is what happens to your body when you don’t drink
                  enough fluid, will result in you not being able to exercise to your best ability, especially
                  during prolonged aerobic exercise like running.
             •    Waiting until you are thirsty is not a good way to figure out how much to drink. By the
                  time you feel thirsty, your body is already being affected by a lack of water. It is
                  important to drink at regular intervals during prolonged exercise.
             •    Drinking large amounts of fluid before or during exercise can give you a stomach ache.
                  Drink a cup (250 millilitres) about an hour before you exercise.
             •    Sports drinks taste good but are only necessary if you are exercising for more than one
                  hour without rest or in extreme heat or humidity. Sports drinks can also be harder to
                  digest and give you a stomach ache.
             •    To prevent spreading germs, use your own water bottle or drink from the school
                  fountain.
             •    You will still sweat when running in colder temperatures so it is important to drink
                  fluids when exercising in the winter.
             •    Remember to have a drink of water after you run to replace lost fluid.




                                                                                                                   page 5
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Activity 1
        The Chronicle Herald Scavenger Hunt
        Make enough photocopies of the scavenger hunt for your class. They must complete the scavenger
        hunt using The Chronicle Herald. Allow 30 minutes to find the answers. You can speed things up by
        having groups of students complete the activity. After 30 minutes have students discuss their answers
        to the questions keeping in mind there may be more than one answer for each question! This activity
        forces your students to explore The Chronicle Herald and find out information about some of the
        sections in the newspaper, especially on the topics of health and fitness.
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                                                                                                                     page 6
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Activity 2
        What’s Up With Healthy Living!
        Have your students turn to What’s Up With Healthy Living! Let them read the section. Have a
        discussion with your students about what they have read. Some questions might be:
            • What is different about the way this section of the newspaper is written compared to other sections of
                the newspaper?
            • What did you learn from reading the information?
            • Did you enjoy reading the story?




        Activity 3
        Personal Fitness Log
        Personal Fitness Log – Young people should try to have 90 minutes of physical activity every day. For
        some, physical activity just takes place primarily in gym class or when they play organized sports like
        hockey or soccer. However, there are other ways to accumulate 90 minutes of physical activity. Many
        students walk to school or walk to a bus stop. Activity at recess, before the bell rings in the morning,
        lunch break, playing outside after school, walking the dog, shopping at the grocery store with a parent,
        and dancing with a friend to music you enjoy are all examples of physical activity.

        On the next page is a Personal Fitness Log. Make enough photocopies of the log and pass them out
        to your students. Ask them to think about all of the physical activities that they have done in the last
        seven days and estimate the time they spent on each one and write them down on the Physical Fitness
        Log. They should give a tally in minutes of activity at the end of each day.

        After the sheets are completed, ask some of the students to name some of their physical activities.
        Then by a show of hands, ask who had more than 100 minutes on Monday, then 90 to 100 minutes,
        and less than 90. Complete for each day.

        The purpose of this exercise is to introduce the idea that students should try to have 90 minutes of
        physical activity per day. Students that do not have 90 minutes of activity per day should gradually
        increase their activity until they reach the 90 minute goal.




                                                                                                                       page 7
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



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                                                                                                  page 8
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Activity 4
        Healthy Headline Challenge
        Above most stories in The Chronicle Herald you will find a short summary in large type called a
        headline. A good headline will make the reader want to read the whole story. Have your students look
        at the headlines in today’s newspaper. Then have them look at the first page of What’s Up With Healthy
        Living! You will find the following information in a box that states:

        Healthy body = Rest + Exercise + Healthy food.
        Rest: getting a good night’s sleep.
        Exercise: Being active, playing games and sports.
        Healthy food: Eating a balanced diet.
        Have your students prepare a good headline the sums up the information from scene one. Have
        willing students share their information with the class.

        They can also enter our Healthy Headline Challenge. Students can e-mail their Health Headline to
        our Newspaper in Education program, niejohn@herald.ca In the subject line of the e-mail, please
        put Healthy Headline Challenge. In the body of the e-mail, have students type their healthy headline,
        name, grade and school. On Monday, March 5, we will have a random draw for a Chronicle Herald
        backpack.




                                                                                                                page 9
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Activity 5
        Breakfast is Really Important
        Ask your students to read page two from What’s Up With Healthy Living!

        Many people skip breakfast because they are too rushed to eat and grab something like a chocolate
        bar as a substitute. A good, healthy breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Students that
        have a healthy breakfast come to school better able to learn and usually do better in their school work.
        Because of this, many schools now offer a healthy breakfast program for students.

        “Oatmeal with strawberry jam and milk on it.”This is the breakfast choice of one of the characters in
        What’s Up With Healthy Living! Is it your favourite choice? Using Canada’s Food Guide, have students
        create their own version of a healthy breakfast. You can find a copy at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-
        guide-aliment/basics-base/index_e.html

        Extended activity
        Have your students bring in grocery store flyers from The Chronicle Herald, the Out & About flyer
        pack or other grocery flyers from other publications. Divide your class into small groups. Using
        Canada’s Food Guide and the grocery flyers, have each group create a healthy lunch, dinner and
        snacks for one day for a family of four. Each group can make a colourful display on bristol board and
        display them in the classroom.



        Activity 6 Healthy Snacks
        This section mentions some great healthy snacks. Ask your students to give some examples of healthy
        snacks that they eat that are not on the list. Write them down on the chalk board. Using the snack list
        in What’s Up With Healthy Living! and the list on the board, plan a Healthy Snack Day for the class.
        Each student could bring a healthy snack and share with other students in the class.

        Extended Activity
        Students could make a healthy snack recipe book and give to other classes in the school or send home
        to parents.

        Students can create their own personalized Canada Food Guide at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-
        guide-aliment/myguide-monguide/index_e.htm




                                                                                                                   page 10
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Activity 7 Reading Labels
        All pre-packaged foods in Canada must have nutrition labeling. Students can use these labels to
        make better choices for the food they eat. All of the ingredients listed on the labels are important for
        good health. From What’s Up With Healthy Living! we learned about the amount of fat in a chocolate
        bar. Many students will not recognize the word “sodium” from the food label, but it is salt. Salt is a
        necessary nutrient for good health but too much salt in the diet is not good for you. If a food label on
        a bag of chips says that the content has 27% of the sodium needed for the daily diet, then four bags of
        chips will put you over the amount of sodium you need every day.

        The list of ingredients on food labels also lists the contents of the package from the largest ingredient
        to the smallest. It also lists the chemicals that are added to enhance flavour and give the food a long
        shelf life in the store.

        Ask students to bring in food labels from different pre-packaged foods from home. Divide the class
        into small groups and ask them to look at the food labels for each member of the group. Which food
        has the largest amount of fat, sodium, calories, vitamins? Have each group present their results to the
        class.

        Extended activity
        Look for the recipe in today’s edition of The Chronicle Herald. Cut out the recipe or copy it down and
        take it home to your parents. Assist them in preparing the meal.

        You may want to hand out the Shopping List activity to your students. Students will have to plan
        healthy meals with their parents or guardians using Health Canada’s Food Guide website for help.




                                                                                                                    page 11
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide




                                                page 12
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Healthy Activity Inventory
        The next scene takes place in gym class, where our two cartoon characters are discussing some
        physical activities they might participate in at the Milk Energy SportFair, Sport Nova Scotia’s After-
        School Physical Activity program and the Doctors Nova Scotia Youth Running for Fun.

        What healthy activities do grade four students in your community participate in? As a class discuss the
        following kinds of physical activities and write down the results on the chalk board.

        Physical activities I can do by myself. Usually there is little or no supervision involved. Some might
        be walking, jogging, shooting hoops at your basketball net at home or chores that you are responsible
        for at your home that require physical activity.

        Physical activity I do with my friends. They usually involve little or no supervision and sometimes
        the group participating makes up the rules. Some might include playing soccer at recess, hockey on a
        pond or outdoor rink, baseball with your friends on a summer afternoon, table tennis, swimming, or
        maybe you play a game with your friends that you have named and developed yourselves.

        Physical activities in our school. They are usually supervised by the gym teacher or other teachers
        at the school. Some of these activities might include soccer, track and field, dodge ball, baseball and
        badminton.

        Physical activities that take place in our community. They are usually supervised by parents or
        adults in the community and some may take place in the school after-school hours or community
        halls, arenas or gyms. Some examples could be soccer, baseball, Guides, Brownies, Scouts, Cubs, dance
        groups, hockey, basketball, gymnastics, or judo.

        Physical activities that we would like to try. These are activities that you have heard about from
        reading books, newspapers, watching television or talking to people from other places and that you
        would like to try someday. Some examples might be snowboarding, platform diving, jazz dance,
        kayaking, or mountain climbing.

        Prepare a bulletin board display of the information you have gathered to share with other students in
        your school.


        Extended activities
        Attend The Milk Energy Sport Fair with your class. For more information about this event, visit Sport
        Nova Scotia at www.sportnovascotia.ca

        Play some of the games included in the Active Games section of this guide.




                                                                                                                  page 13
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Activity 9 Putting it all together:
        The Healthy Living Challenge
        Adequate physical activity and healthy eating are the keys to good health. This means we must not
        only help our youth increase their level of physical activity but also help them adopt healthier eating
        habits.

        In the Healthy Living Challenge, each student will receive a log sheet. The back of the log sheet
        contains information about physical activity and why it’s important to be active, the four food groups,
        their recommended serving sizes and some examples from each group.

        Participants are challenged to complete seven days of being active and consuming at least the
        minimum requirements from each of the four food groups. Once the student has successfully
        completed seven days, they show their sheet to you. An option is to come up with a reward challenge
        to encourage everyone to participate.

        Be sure to check in with students regularly to see how they are making out with the challenge. You
        may want to send a note home to parents with the log sheet to explain how the challenge works and
        encourage them to work together with their kids to complete the log sheet.




                                                                                                                  page 14
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide




Activity 7 Reading Labels
All pre-packaged foods in Canada must have nutrition
labeling. Students can use these labels to make better
choices for the food they eat. All of the ingredients listed
on the labels are important for good health. From What’s
Up With Healthy Living! we learned about the amount of
fat in a chocolate bar. Many students will not recognize
the word “sodium” from the food label, but it is salt. Salt
is a necessary nutrient for good health but too much salt
in the diet is not good for you. If a food label on a bag of
chips says that the content has 27% of the sodium needed
for the daily diet, then four bags of chips will put you over
the amount of sodium you need every day.

The list of ingredients on food labels also lists the contents
of the package from the largest ingredient to the smallest.
It also lists the chemicals that are added to enhance
flavour and give the food a long shelf life in the store.

Ask students to bring in food labels from different pre-
packaged foods from home. Divide the class into small
groups and ask them to look at the food labels for each
member of the group. Which food has the largest amount
of fat, sodium, calories, vitamins? Have each group
present their results to the class.

Extended activity
Look for the recipe in today’s edition of The Chronicle
Herald. Cut out the recipe or copy it down and take it
home to your parents. Assist them in preparing the meal.

You may want to hand out the Shopping List activity to
your students. Students will have to plan healthy meals
with their parents or guardians using Health Canada’s
Food Guide website for help.




Activity 8
                                                                 page 15
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide




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                                                                page 16
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Active Games
        One way to add some fun and keep students active is by including active games to their daily routine.
        Try to use a variety of games to keep students interested. Below are some ideas for games that can be
        played on a field or in a gymnasium.

        British Bulldog: One person is “it” and stands in the middle of the field or gym. The rest of the
        participants stand on a line at one end of the field or gym. When the person who is “it” yells “British
        bulldog” everyone must try to run to the other side without being tagged. Those who are caught, join in
        the middle to try tagging remaining participants. The last person to be caught becomes “it’ in the next
        game.

        Catch-up: This game is an easy way to add some distance to a workout. Have the participants line up
        behind one another. If your group is large, break it into groups of eight to 10. These groups will jog laps
        around a specific area or to a destination and back. The goal is for the last person in each group to run
        to the front of the line. It is critical that the pace is fairly slow or those trying to run to the front will tire
        very quickly. Have the groups keep running until everyone has been to the front a few times.

        Crab walk soccer: Break the kids into two teams and play soccer with the participants in the crab
        position, on their hands and feet in a bridge position, belly facing up. They can hit the ball with their
        feet only. (Although this game does not include running, it requires participants to be very active and
        can be a great workout.)

        Islands: This game is played like statues (see below) except when the whistle is blown, students must
        run to one of the islands (hoola hoops or small mats placed on the floor). The islands can be shared but
        participants are not allowed to touch each other. The last one to land on an island is out. Reduce the
        number of islands as your group becomes smaller.

        Ladders: Break the group into two teams. Two lines are formed, facing each other. Have participants sit
        down, legs straight out, feet just touching. Give each pair a number. When a number is called, the two
        opponents jump up, run over the legs of the other pairs in one direction, then run outside the ladder
        to the other end and then continue over the legs of the other pairs until they get back to their original
        spot. The first person back to their spot wins a point for their team. Be sure to space the seated pairs
        with enough room for players to run between their legs without stepping on anyone.

        Loose caboose: One person is the loose caboose while the remaining participants break into groups of
        three, forming small trains by holding on to the hips of the person in front of them. The loose caboose
        chases the trains and tries to attach to one of the ends. When the caboose successfully attaches to one
        of the trains, the lead person or engine of that train becomes the new loose caboose.

        Obstacle courses: This can be done inside or out, depending on the size of your group and space
        available. Include as many actions as possible such as going over, under, or around items; crawling;
        hanging; hopping; skipping; etc. Participants can do this individually, one after another, or in a relay
        format. Include some callisthenics like push-ups, sit-ups or lunges somewhere in the obstacle course
        to add some variety.




                                                                                                                              page 17
What’s up with healthy living! Teaching Guide



        Active Games cont’d
        Octopus: Played like British bulldog except the player in the middle is an octopus that runs and tries
        to tag players as they cross the field or gym. As the octopus tags people, they remain in their spot and
        act as tentacles, trying to tag players without moving their feet. To make this game proceed a little
        faster, try limiting the playing space or starting off with more than one octopus in the middle.

        Port and starboard: Tell participants to imagine they are on a ship. You will yell out commands and
        the participants must obey. The last person to complete the command is out of the game. Some of the
        commands you can try are starboard (run to the right), port (run to the left), bow (run to the front),
        stern (run to the back), scrub the deck, hit the deck (lying face down), submarine (lying on back with
        one leg up in the air), and Captain’s coming (stand at attention and salute). Be creative and make up
        some of your own commands.

        Rabbits and Hounds: Choose three or four of the faster participants to start out as hounds while the
        rest are rabbits. Start the rabbits running around a lap of the field or gym. Once they get a head start,
        let the hounds loose by yelling “the hounds are loose” or “who let the dogs out.”The hounds run after
        the rabbits which are considered caught once they are passed by the hounds. Depending on the size of
        your lap, let the kids do one or two laps. Choose your next hounds from the group of rabbits who were
        not caught.

        Relay races: There are an endless number of relay races to choose from. Use forward, backward or
        sideways running; hopping; skipping; crawling; cartwheeling; running in pairs; wheelbarrows in
        pairs; leap frog; etc. You could have a simple running relay where each participant has to do a specific
        exercise at the turn around spot. For example, have them run to the spot, do a certain number of sit-
        ups, push-ups, jumping jacks, or lie down and get up without using their hands and then return to tag
        the next person who then repeats the same thing.

        Bean bag relays can be a lot of fun too. Have participants carry bean bags by balancing them on their
        heads, holding them between their knees or feet or under their chins. They must cover the distance
        and pass the bean bag to the next person.
        Over and under relays involve teams having their members stand with some space between each
        other. Have participants alternate between standing with legs apart and crouching down on hands and
        knees. The participants take turns traveling over and under each other. The first team to have all their
        players go over/under their teammates wins.

        Simon Says: This is a well-known game where participants must obey your commands but only if
        you say “Simon says” before giving the command. For example if you say “Simon says do five jumping
        jacks,” all the participants must do five jumping jacks. If you say “spin around 10 times,” participants
        must stand still. Those who move are out. Try to use a variety of commands, especially ones that
        involve running, callisthenics or other physical activities.

        Snatch It: Divide the group into two lines. Have the opposing teams form lines facing each other
        approximately 15 feet apart. Number the members of each line from opposite directions so that the
        number one participant of one team is opposite, for example, the number 20 participant of the other
        team. Place an object, such as a bean bag, in the middle of the floor between the two teams. Yell out a
        number and have corresponding players race each other to pick up the object. The player who is able
        to snatch the object and return to their spot without being tagged by their opponent gets a point for
        their team.

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        Active Games cont’d
        Soccer: This is a highly aerobic game which can be a lot of fun. Break the kids into even teams and
        play a game of soccer. If your group is really big and you have the space, have two games going
        simultaneously or use two balls. To include as many kids as possible in the play, make it mandatory to
        make three passes before a shot on net can occur.

        Statues: Try playing this popular game with or without music. Have the kids jog around the field or
        gym. When the music stops or you blow a whistle, everyone must freeze like a statue. Anyone caught
        moving is out.

        Stormy Seas: This is a variation of British bulldog. Divide participants into two groups, one being fish,
        the other being whales. Line each team up at different ends of the field. Choose one or more sharks
        to stand in the middle of the field. The sharks yell out either “fish” or “whales.”Those participants must
        then try to run to the other side of the field without being tagged. If tagged, they become seaweed and
        must stand on the spot and try to touch others as they cross the field. If the sharks yell “stormy seas”
        members from both teams run across the field. The last person to be caught starts off the next game as
        the shark.

        Tag: There are many variations of tag that will keep the kids running. Regular tag involves one person
        being “it” who chases the others. Once someone is tagged, they become “it” and begin chasing. If you
        have a large group, you may want to have a few kids as “it.”

        Frozen tag can be played many ways. The person who is tagged and therefore “frozen” must stand
        still with their legs open. He/she becomes free when another player crawls between their legs or
        runs under one of their out-stretched arms. If you have a large group, designate a few people to be
        “it.”To change this game a little, try having participants do 10 jumping jacks or five push-ups to free
        themselves instead of running under each other’s legs.

        Blob or amoeba tag involves the person who is “it” holding hands with those they tag and gradually
        forming a huge line of players that works as a unit to continue chasing the others. The blob can break
        into groups of two, three or four and continue trying to tag the remaining players.

        Partner tag starts by everyone but the person who is “it” finding a partner. The person who is “it” chases
        the pairs. When one partner of a pair is tagged, the other partner breaks loose and becomes “it.”The
        person who was “it” remains with the new partner and tries to avoid getting tagged.

        Hospital tag is similar to traditional tag except that once tagged, the person must hold the place they
        were touched, like it is an injury, and continue running around. If they are tagged again, they must use
        their other hand to hold the second injured area. A third touch means they are out of the game. This
        can be a lot of fun if the people who are it are able to touch people in different spots, like a leg or top of
        the head.

        Touch or flag football: This is another good running game which can be played by large groups
        which have players with varying abilities.




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        Active Games cont’d
        Ultimate Frisbee: This is a variation of football. Divide the group into two teams. The object of the
        game is to get the Frisbee across the field and into the end zone. Players may not run with the Frisbee.
        The only way to get a turnover is when the Frisbee is dropped or intercepted.

        What Time is it Mr. Wolf?: Choose one participant to be Mr. Wolf and have them stand at one
        end of the field with their back to the remaining participants who are standing at the other end. The
        participants ask in unison,“what time is it Mr. Wolf” to which the wolf responds with any time he/she
        chooses. The participants then advance towards the wolf by taking the number of steps designated by
        the time (i.e. if the wolf says “four o’clock”, the participants take four steps). The wolf is not allowed to
        look at the players. When the wolf senses the players getting close, he/she yells “it’s dinner time!” in
        response to the participants’ question. If the wolf catches someone that person becomes the wolf.




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        Sport for Life: From Playground to Podium
        Adapted from Canadian Sport Centres Canadian Sport for Life: Long-Term Athlete Development


        Sport Nova Scotia believes in sport for life and that every child should have an opportunity to
        participate in sport. Outlined below is the basic sport framework for individuals at all stages of life.
        The main goal with young children and pre-teens is to develop an enjoyment for physical activity
        while introducing the basic rules and ethics of sport such as Fair Play.

        Active Start (Males and Females from 0 to 6)
        § Fitness and movement skills development as a FUN part of daily life
        § Focuses on learning proper movement skills such as running, jumping, wheeling, twisting,
           throwing etc.
        § Daily physical activity

        FUNdamentals (Males 6-9 and Females 6-8)
        § Learn all FUNdamental movement skills and build overall motor skills
        § Play many sports
        § Focus on the ABCs of Athleticism: ability, balance, coordination and speed
        § Introduce simple rules and ethics of sport
        § Daily physical activity

        Learning to Train (Males 9-12 and Females 8-11)
        § Learn overall sport skills
        § Acquire sport skills that will be the cornerstone of athletic development
        § Play a variety of sports focusing on developing skills in three sport in particular

        Training to Train (Age is growth-spurt development; Males 12-16 and Females 11-15)
        § Build an endurance base, develop speed and strength towards the end of the stage, and further
           develop and consolidate sport specific skills
        § Select two favourite sports based on predisposition

        Training to Compete (Age varies depending on sport; Males 16-23+/- and Females 15-21+/-)
        § Optimize fitness preparation and sport, individual, and position specific skills and learn to
           compete internationally

        Training to Win (Ages are sport specific based on national and international normative data;
        Males 19 +/- and Females 18 +/-)
        § Podium performances
        Active for Life (Enter at any age)
        § A smooth transition from an athlete’s competitive career to lifelong physical activity and
           participation in sport.




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        Choosing the Right Activity Program For Your Child
        Adapted from Choosing the Right Activity Program for Your Child: A Parent’s Guide to Examining Quality
        in Sport & Recreation Program. Sport Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia Health Promotion and Protection and
        Recreation Nova Scotia


        Why should children participate in sport and recreation?
        When asked, kids report that the number one reason they participate in sport and recreation is for the
        FUN of it. Leaders, parents/caregivers and organizations need to remember this and get back to the
        basics when they plan, deliver and evaluate their programs.

        Of course, participating in any kind of physical activity is known to:
        ¸ Improve health and fitness and instill healthy lifestyle choices;
        ¸ Enhance self-esteem and foster leadership skills;
        ¸ Influence personal and social development;
        ¸ Reduce the incidence of self-destructive and anti-social behaviour; and
        ¸ Promote stronger families and healthier communities.

        We want to get our children on the road to a healthy and active lifestyle and sport and recreation
        provides a great opportunity to do just that. Teachers can talk to parents about getting children
        involved in sports or other physical activities. To help parents find the right sport or activity, contact
        Sport Nova Scotia for copies of the Choosing the Right Activity Program for Your Child: A Parent’s Guide
        to Examining Quality in Sport & Recreation Program or download the brochure from the Sport Nova
        Scotia website at www.sportnovascotia.ca.

        What does a quality program look like?
        There are six areas in which we can look for QUALITY when it comes to sport and recreation
        activities. Each one can play a huge part in the experience of a child. Take a moment and consider the
        program your child or any child is involved in and see if it makes a grade.

        The six areas are:
           1.       Environment: Children need a safe yet fun environment where they are free to try new
                    things without the risk of injury or ridicule. Of course, some activities have more physical
                    risks than others. We can’t avoid all injuries, but we can take the proper steps to ensure
                    the environment within which the activity takes place is free from avoidable risky areas
                    and activities.
           2.       Leadership: The Leader has the greatest impact on the quality of a sport and recreation
                    experience of a child.
           3.       Program/Practices: All of the good intentions in the world, and all of the policies,
                    procedures and plans cannot undo a problem in the delivery of the program. If children
                    aren’t enjoying what they are doing they are less likely to come back.




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        Choosing the Right Activity Program For Your Child cont’d
           4.    Interactions/Relationships: Healthy relationships are at the heart of high quality
                 experiences for children. A special relationship with a caring adult can help a child
                 overcome adversity and provide a positive model for relationships the child will form in the
                 future. The friendships that children develop through sport and recreation can follow them
                 throughout their lives.
           5.    Competitive Structure: Competitions for children should not be based upon adult
                 competition structures/frameworks. Instead, they should reflect the age and skill level of
                 the children participating.
           6.    Organizational Support: The club, local association or community group is the backbone
                 of the sport and recreation system. Its policies and procedures support the programs and
                 the leaders and can affect the child’s experience in many ways.




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        Fun Sport Facts
        Here are few simple facts that might be interesting to your students. Perhaps play a game of
        true or false just for fun.

        Did you know….

        •   That when at least one parent was involved in amateur sport in some capacity, their child’s
            participation rate jumped to 83%. (Statistics Canada 2003)

        •   Soccer is the most popular sport among kids 5 to 14 with 31% of athletically active children
            playing regularly. Swimming and hockey are tied for second place at 24% each. (Statistics
            Canada 2005)

        •   Golf replaced hockey as the number one sport in Canada. Today, more than 1.8 million Canadians
            reportedly play golf on a regular basis. (Statistics Canada 2003)

        •   Snowboarding was invented in the 1960s in Austria.

        •   The youngest winner of Tour de France was Henri Cornet at the age of 19.

        •   The only sport that has been played on the moon is golf. On the 6 of February 1971, Alan Shepard
            hit a golf ball.

        •   Average life span of a major league baseball is 7 pitches.

        •   Sidney Crosby’s NHL number is 87 due to his birthday being August 7, 1987 (8/7--87).

        •   Exercise may be just as important to bone growth in children as milk. (Lifestyle Information
            Network)

        •   Being physically inactive has the same impact on your health as smoking a pack of cigarettes a day
            (Lifestyle Information Network)

        •   Hockey and lacrosse are Canada’s national sports.

        •   Quebec (38%) and Alberta (37%) had the highest regional amateur sport participation rates
            among Canadians aged 15 years or more, while Prince Edward Island (25%) and Newfoundland
            (27%) had the lowest. (Sport Canada 2007)

        •   Basketball was invented by a Canadian -- James A. Naismith.




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        Websites
        Canada’s Food Guide – Focus on 6 to 12 year olds
        http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/res/focus_child-focaliser_enfant_e.html

        PDF document: Canada’s Food Guide – Focus on 6 to 12 year olds
        http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/alt_formats/hpfb-dgpsa/pdf/food-guide-aliment/focus_child-focaliser_
        enfant_e.pdf

        Doctors Nova Scotia
        http://www.doctorsns.com

        Sport Nova Scotia
        http://www.sportnovascotia.ca

        Doctors Nova Scotia’s Youth Running for Fun program
        http://www.doctorsns.com/content.aspx?cid=379&active_mid=587

        Health Canada’s Physical Activity Guide
        http://www.healthcanada.ca/paguide

        Dieticians of Canada
        http://www.dietitians.ca/

        Breakfast, snack and lunch ideas – Nova Scotia Department of Health Promotion and Prevention
        http://www.gov.ns.ca/hpp/publications/02-14818_Healthy_Snacks.pdf

        Snack and dessert ideas – Healthy Alberta
        http://www.healthyalberta.com/he_rcp_ssd.asp

        Snack ideas – Region of Peel
        http://www.peelregion.ca/health/nutrition/nm2004/eatwell/snacks.htm

        Health Check – Heart and Stroke Foundation
               Family Eating (brochure – pdf)
               http://www.healthcheck.org/english/documents/33030412FamilyEating02.23.05.pdf

               Healthy Snacks (brochure – pdf)
               http://www.healthcheck.org/english/documents/33050312_HealthySnacks_Eng04.25.05.pdf

               Healthy Eating and Children
               http://www.healthcheck.org/english/nutrition_healthyeat.htm




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        Websites cont’d
        True Sport
        http://www.truesportpur.ca

        Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity
        http://www.caaws.ca

        Canadian Association for Health Physical Education Recreation and Dance
        http://www.cahperd.ca

        Caring for Kids – Canadian Paediatric Society
        http://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/

        Health Canada’s Physical Activity Guide to Healthy Active Living
        http://www.healthcanada.ca/paguide

        Active game ideas
                Active team games
                http://www.funandgames.org/active_teamgame.htm

               Active non-team games
               http://www.funandgames.org/games_activenonteam.htm

               Active games
               http://www.campresources.co.uk/activities/Active-Games.html

               Active activities
               http://www.recreationtherapy.com/tx/txactive.htm




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