Sabacc – A Card Game of the Star Wars Galaxy

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					Sabacc – A Card Game of the Star Wars Galaxy
Adapted from basic game designed by Michael Stern with Douglas Kaufman and Greg
Gorden.
From Crisis on Cloud City, West End Games, 1989

Sabacc is a game of skill and chance played in gambling halls and casinos across the
Star Wars galaxy. It is the preferred game of infamous gambler Lando Calrissian,
who participated in the most talked-about game ever. (That’s the game in which he
reportedly lost his ship, the Millennium Falcon, to the equally famous Han Solo.)

The Cards
Sabacc is played with a deck of 76 cards made up of four suits – Sabres, Staves,
Flasks, Coins – and a set of face cards.

Each suit is made up of 11 regular cards (numbered 1-11) and four ranked cards;
the Commander, the Mistress, the Master, and the Ace (numbered 12-15).

The set of face cards consists of 16 cards, each with a negative value. (You can have
a hand which has a negative total in Sabacc.) In addition, each face card has a
special name and symbol. There are two of each face card in the deck.

Rules of Play
For those who already know the game of Sabacc, the game we will be playing here
shall be the TFN variant rules of play.

The object of Sabacc is to have the highest card total which is less than or equal to
23. A total which is over 23, under negative 23, or exactly zero is a bomb out, and
requires the holder of the hand to pay a penalty (see below).

There are two pots to be won in the game of Sabacc. A pot is the total amount of
credits (Star Wars money) staked by all the players in one hand of the card game.
Each pot is set apart from the other on the table near the dealer. The first of the two
pots is the pot hand, which is taken by the player who winds the hand. The second is
the sabacc pot, which continually builds, and can only be won with a special hand
(see below).

Seating will be according to first-come, first-served basis. The dealer button will
rotate through the list. To start the game of Sabacc, one player will be randomly
chosen to begin with the dealer button. The first two players below the dealer button
will have a forced blind bet, with the first player below having the little blind bet and
the second player below having the big blind bet. Each player must also ante one
credit into the sabacc pot if it is ever empty. This includes the very first hand of the
game. This sabacc ante shall be given first to an empty sabacc pot before any play
on the hand begins.

Each player takes a turn in order, beginning with the player below the big blind, that
includes the phases listed below. Once a player has completed all the phases in the
turn, it becomes the turn of the player below him.

After every hand, the dealer button shall be passed to the player below him with that
player being the new holder of the dealer button.
Turn Phases
Blind Bets Paid: The small and big blind bets shall be given to the hand pot
automatically. The small blind is 1 credit. The big blind is two credits.

The player whose turn it is, shall go through all phases before his turn is over and
the next player’s turn begins. Players remain taking turns until the hand is won.

The Betting Phase: The player below the big blind begins play with the option to
bet the big blind or raise if he chooses to do so. Each player must match that bet if
he or she wishes to remain in the hand. The minimum raise is the current bet. The
maximum raise limit is six credits. Before moving on to the next phase, each player
has the option to fold (drop out of the hand). A player may only fold during the initial
betting phase, and must pay one credit to the sabacc pot to do so.

Shifting Phase: After the betting phase is completed, the random pulse generator
shall determine if shifting occurs. The random pulse generator has six different pulse
modes. If the result is pulse mode 1, 2 or 3, shifting occurs.

In shifting, each player has one card, chosen randomly by the random pulse
generator, discarded from his hand. All of the cards which were discarded are pooled
together and shuffled by the dealer. The dealer then deals them to each player in
order, starting with the player below the dealer button.

Calling Phase After the shifting phase is completed, the dealer shall ask each player
in order beginning with the player below the dealer button, if anyone would like to
call the hand. When a hand is called, each player’s cards shall be turned face up on
the table in front of them, showing what they have. (See “Winning a Hand” for
victory conditions and penalties)

A player may only call the hand during the calling phase of another player, never
during their own turn. No one may call the hand until every player has had at least
one turn, including the dealer button.

Calling the hand simulates locking in your cards, since there is no “neutral field”
available on this site.

Drawing Phase: After the calling phase, the player whose turn it is has the option
to draw one card from the deck. If the player holds more than two cards, he may
exchange one of the cards in his hand for a card drawn from the deck, or simply
draw a card from the deck and add it to his hand (but not both).

There is no limit to the amount of cards that a player may hold in his or her hand,
but he must always have at least two cards. Cards that are dropped from a player’s
hand are removed from play.

Winning A Hand
When a hand is called, the player with the highest card total which is 23 or less wins
the hand. A player also wins the hand if everyone else folds. The winning player wins
the hand pot only.

If two or more players are tied, they must participate in a sudden demise. In a
sudden demise, the dealer deals each participating player one card from the deck
which the players must add to their hands. The best modified hand takes the pot. If
there is still a tie, the pot is split.

If any player has a total which is over 23, less than negative 23, or exactly zero
when the hand is called, he or she has bombed out. In this circumstance, the
bombed-out player must match the exact amount of credits which are currently in
the hand pot, and pay it to the sabacc pot.

In addition to this, if the player who called the hand does not win it, he or she must
also pay the sabacc pot as if they had bombed out.

Special Hands
To win the sabacc pot, a player must have one of two special hands. The first is
when a player has a card total of exactly 23. This is called Pure Sabacc, and is
usually accompanied by an enthusiastic cry of “Sabacc!” when the cards are turned
over.

The other sabacc pot winning hand is called an Idiot’s Array. To achieve this, a
player must have an Idiot face card, a two card and a three card of any suit (a literal
23).

An Idiot’s Array beats a Pure Sabacc, but if two or more players have the same
special hand in contention for the sabacc pot, a sudden demise is held as usual.
Introduction
Sabacc is a gambling card game played in the Star Wars Universe. It is a difficult game to
adapt to real-world play because it uses an electronic deck of cards that can switch values
at random. What’s more, the deck is composed of 76 cards, in the following
configuration:

       Four Suits (Sabers, Flasks, Coins, Staves)
             Values 1 - 11
             Ranked Cards
                     Commander (value 12)
                     Mistress (value 13)
                     Master (value 14)
                     Ace (value 15)

       Two copies of eight Face Cards

               The Star (value -17)
               The Evil One (value -15)
               Moderation (value -14)
               Demise (value -13)
               Balance (value -11)
               Endurance (value -8)
               Queen of Air and Darkness (value -2)
               Idiot (value 0)

       NB. In this game, each suit has both an "ace" (value 15) and a "one" (value 1)!

This means any deck used to play Sabacc must be created. Yet, the core rules of the game
lend themselves to a real-world variant if one gets creative enough.

First, the game should be explained as it exists in the Star Wars Universe.

Star Wars Universe Overview
The game is typically played by 4 to 6 beings, and is rarely played with more than eight
participants. Most casino games are dealt by a droid dealer. This droid also controls the
random pulses that change the values of the cards. It is this randomness that adds much of
the suspense to the game. A winning hand can very quickly become a devastatingly
losing hand. All hands are figured based on the numerical sum of the card values.

Sabacc’s main objective is to win Credits. There are two pots, the Main Pot and the
Sabacc Pot, to be won in Sabacc. Each hand starts with each player placing an ante into
both the Main Pot and the Sabacc Pot. Subsequent bets during the hand will be placed
only into the Main Pot.

The dealer then deals out two cards, one at a time, to each player. Depending on the
casino or the participants, it may be required for every player to call out their beginning
hand totals. Players then take turns drawing a card, trading a card, or standing.
Afterwards a betting round proceeds where players can call, raise, and bluff. The first
through fourth rounds of play and betting are usually considered the pot-building phase,
and the game cannot be Called during this time.

The hand ends when a player (after the pot-building phase) declares they would like to
Call the hand. One last round of betting occurs, starting with the Calling player, and then
players reveal their cards. Winning hands in Sabacc are hands that total 23 or -23, which
are called Pure Sabacc, or a hand made up of an Idiot (value 0) a 2 of any suit and a 3 of
any suit (this is a literal 023) called an Idiot’s Array. An Idiot’s Array beats a Pure
Sabacc. If no one has any of these winning hands, the player with the highest hand total
below 23 wins. Any player with a hand totaling more than 23, less than -23, or exactly 0
at the time the hand is called has Bombed Out. The penalty for Bombing Out is to pay an
amount equal to the contents of the Main Pot into the Sabacc Pot. The winning player
takes the contents of the Main Pot. If that player won with a Pure Sabacc or an Idiot’s
Array, the Sabacc Pot is also collected.

In the event that two or more players have equal winning hands, a Sudden Demise is
enacted between those players. Each player in the Sudden Demise is dealt one extra card.
Their hand totals are then re-summed to include their new card. Whichever player then
has the best modified hand wins. If all players involved in the Sudden Demise bomb out
they do not have to pay into the Sabacc pot, but none are then eligible to win the Main
Pot. The Main Pot in that case goes to the player with the best hand who is not bombed
out.

At any time during game-play, up until the point where players reveal their cards, a
Sabacc Shift may occur. It is the rare case when a Sabacc Shift occurs three or more
times in a single hand, though once should be expected and twice is not abnormal. This
random event is set in motion by a pulse from the droid-dealer and redistributes the
values of the cards. The only way to prevent a card from being effected by the Shift is to
place it in the Static (or Disruptor) Field. This Field disrupts and blocks the Shift pulse
and locks the values of all cards placed within it. The trade-off for placing a card in the
Field is that it is placed face-up and the value can be seen by all other players.

Adaptation of Rules
The two most difficult aspects of Sabacc, as I said earlier, are the Sabacc Shift and the
76-card deck. I have crafted my own Sabacc deck by merging parts of two regular decks
of playing cards. I then took a pen and, as nicely as I could, created the ranked cards and
the face cards. There are a few places on the internet that have printable versions of full
Sabacc decks. Creating the deck is really a matter of preference. As for the random
shifting of card values, this is easily accomplished by incorporating dice into the game
and simply collecting and re-dealing all the cards.

To play Sabacc, players need a Sabacc Deck, two dice, and some form of betting
currency.

A Sabacc Shift occurs any time the two dice match. The dice are rolled once after the
completion of every Betting Round, after each player makes a play during the Play
Round, and once after the game is Called after final bets are placed but before players
reveal their cards. This allows for a Shift to occur during every critical moment of the
game, but the probability of a Shift occurring at any point remains relatively low. If a
Sabacc Shift does occur, the dealer collects all the cards that are not locked, shuffles them
into the deck, then deals the cards back to the players. Players should end a Sabacc shift
with the same amount of cards in their hands as they had before the Shift.

Each hand starts with ever player placing an ante into both the Main and Sabacc Pots.
The Dealer then deals out two cards, one at a time, to each player. Starting to the left of
the dealer, each player calls out their beginning hand totals.

Next begins a Play Round. In this round, players can draw one card from the deck, trade a
card from their hand for a card from the deck, or stand. Players cannot discard cards.
Drawing too many cards can be risky.

Each player rolls the dice after they finish their turn in the play round. If the dice ever
pair, a Sabacc Shift occurs.

It is only during this round that players can place cards into the Disruptor Field to
prevent them from being Shifted should a Shift occur. Players do this simply by placing
their cards face-up in front of them. Players may only place one card per turn in the
disruptor field, but may have as many cards total in the Field as they desire. The
downside is that they may only remove one card per turn from the Field as well. Players
may do both, though, remove one card from and place one card into the Field per turn.

The player to the dealer’s left then places the first bet into the Main Pot, and a Betting
Round proceeds, with players raising as they see fit. The Betting Round ends when every
player has either called the bet or folded. To signal the end of the Betting Round, the
dealer rolls the dice. If they pair, a Sabacc Shift occurs.

The Hand can only be Called during the fourth Betting Round or any Betting Round
thereafter. This allows for a brief period for the pot to build. After a player Calls the
Hand, the Betting Round proceeds just like normal. After the final Betting Round is
concluded, the dice are rolled one last time, and a Sabacc Shift occurs should they match.
Then players reveal their cards.

The player with the highest hand, totaling 23 or below, wins the Hand Pot.
If a player has a hand total of 23, -23 (called Pure Sabacc) they win the Sabacc Pot in
addition to the Hand Pot.

If a player has an Idiot card, a 2 card of any suit, and a 3 card of any suit (0-2-3, called
the Idiot’s Array) he or she beats out a Pure Sabacc for both the Hand Pot and the Sabacc
Pot.

If a player has a hand total over 23, below -23, or exactly 0, that player is said to Bomb
Out. Any player that bombs out must pay an amount equal to the Hand Pot into the
Sabacc Pot.

If two or more players tie for the winning hand, they engage in a Sudden Demise. Each
player involved in the Sudden Demise is dealt one extra card. After incorporating that
card into their hand totals, they again compare hand totals, the player with the best
modified hand wins. In the case that a player Bombs Out, they do not suffer the Bomb
Out penalty. If all players involved in the Sudden Demise Bomb Out, the winner of the
hand is the player with the second-best hand.

In the event that all players Bomb Out, no Sudden Demise takes place. Instead, the Hand
Pot is moved into the Sabacc Pot and a new hand begins, with no winner declared for the
previous hand.

Game-Play proceeds in the following way:

   1.   Ante
   2.   Two cards dealt to each player
   3.   Hand totals declared
   4.   Play Round (dice rolled after each player completes their play)
   5.   Betting Round (dice rolled at the conclusion of the Betting Round)
   6.   Hand is Called during any Betting Round after the third.

Optional Changes and Variants
       Instead of matching the Hand Pot when a player Bombs Out (which can be quite
        expensive) a value can be agreed upon before play begins as to how much the
        Bomb Out Penalty is.
       A maximum bet/raise can be set before play begins.
       The number or rounds in the Pot Building Phase can be increased or decreased.
       The dice implied are typical six-sided dice. If it seems as though Sabacc Shifts are
        occurring too often, ten- or twelve-sided dice can be used. Two dice are used
        simply for the psychological excitement. But if one number is chosen before play
        begins to signal a Shift, one dice can be used. For a Hold ‘Em variant, cards
        placed in the Static Field can be considered optional community cards. That is,
        any player may choose to use any of the cards in the Field in addition to their own
        cards. This adds another risk to locking the value of a card.
      Coins, Flasks, Sabres, Staves:

       1-11
       Commander (12)
       Mistress (13)
       Master (14)
       Ace (15)

      Face Cards:

       Queen of Air and Darkness (2 or -2)
       Endurance (8 or -8)
       Balance (11 or -11)
       Demise (13 or -13)
       Moderation (14 or -14)
       The Evil One (15 or -15)
       The Star (17 or -17)
       The Idiot (0)

Besides the standard cards listed above, some decks of sabacc also included
other types of cards.

      Non-standard cards:

       The Destroyed Starship
       The Satellite
       The Wheel
       Chance
       Hazard
       Legate (ranked card with value of 11, but trumps ordinary 11)
Sabacc
======
This is a setext-formatted text file that can be viewed with EasyView
or any word processor or editor.

[Ed. note: These rules are taken from the _Crisis in Cloud City_ game
module for _Star Wars: The Role-Playing Game_ by West End Games. I've
modified them slightly to include info on using regular Tarot decks
rather than the "official" sabacc cards included with the module. The
"official" rules are not always the *most* clearly written thing I've
read, so I've also made some minor editorial changes. The rules remain
unaffected.

[Other sources for Sabacc information include the Lando Calrissian
novels by Neil L. Smith (Del Rey) and _Dark Apprentice_ by Kevin J.
Anderson (Spectra/Bantam).]

Sabacc is a game of skill and chance played in gambling halls and
casinos across the Star Wars galaxy. It is the preferred game of the
infamous gambler Lando Calrissian, who participated in some of
history's most talked-about games, including the one in which he
reportedly lost his ship, the Millennium Flacon, to the equally
infamous Han Solo.

[Ed. note: Sabacc may perhaps be best described as a combination of
poker and blackjack with a touch of roulette thrown in for good
measure...]

To play sabacc, you need this rules sheet, the sabacc deck, a six-sided
die, and something to represent credits (poker chips, coins, peanuts,
jelly beans, etc.).

The Cards
=========
Sabacc is played with a deck of 76 cards made up of four suits--Sabres,
Staves, Flasks, and Coins--and a set of face cards. Each suit is made
up 11 regular cards (numbered 1-11) and four ranked cards: the
Commander, the Mistress, the Master, and the Ace (numbered 12-15). The
set of face cards consists of 16 cards, each with a *negative* value.
(Note that it is possible to have a hand with a net negative value.) In
addition, each face card has a special name and symbol. There are two
instances of each face card in the deck.

Using Tarot Cards
-----------------
If you are using Tarot cards to play sabacc, you'll need to use *two*
decks and remove some of the cards. Two things that are a little tricky
to remember are that the "special" face cards are *negative* in value,
and that the "royal" cards in a suit are numbered 11-15. The following
table summarizes the conversion, if you are using the common Knight-
Ridder tarot deck:

Sabacc              Tarot

Sabres              Swords
Staves              Wands
Flasks              Cups
Coins               Pentacles

1-10                I-X
11                  Page [This is the most confusing conversion.]
Commander (12)      Knight
Mistress (13)       Queen
Master (14)         King
Ace (15)            Ace

Idiot (0)          Fool (0)
Queen of Air and Darkness (-2) The High Priestess (II)
Endurance (-8)     Strength (VIII)
Balance (-11)      Justice (XI)
Demise (-13)       Death (XIII)
Moderation (-14)   Temperance (XIV)
The Evil One (-15) The Devil (XV)
The Star (-17)     The Star (XVII)


In the Star Wars galaxy, electronic pulses randomly shift the faces of
the cards until they're locked in place when the player holds them in a
"neutral field." The following rules include several mechanics which
simulate the effect of the random pulses.

Rules of Play
=============
The object of sabacc is to have the highest card total which is less
than or equal to 23. A total which is over 23, under negative 23, or
exactly 0 is called a "bomb out," and requires the holder of the hand
to pay a penalty, as described below.

There are two pots to be won in the game of sabacc. A pot is the total
amount of credits staked by all of the players in one hand of the card
game (just like poker). Each pot should be kept clearly separate from
the other. The first of the two pots is called the "hand pot" and is
taken by the winner of the current hand. The second is the "sabacc pot"
and continually builds over several hands until it is won with a
special hand, as described below.

To start a game of sabacc, choose one player to be the dealer of the
first hand. Other players wishing to be dealt into a hand must first
ante by placing one credit into the *hand* pot. Each player must also
anter one credit into the sabacc pot it is empty, including the first
hand of the game.

Each player takes a turn in order, beginning with the   player to the
dealer's left, that includes the phases listed below.   Once a player has
completed all the phases, his or her turn is over and   play proceeds to
the left. After each hand, the "dealership" roates to   the left.

Phases of a Hand
================
Betting Phase
-------------
Each player is dealt two cards. The player to the left of the dealer
begins play with the option to bet. If he/she chooses to do so, that
bet is placed in the hand pot. If a bet is placed, each player must
match that bet if he or she wishes to remain in the hand.

Only the player whose turn it is may place a bet, but that bet may be
raised by any of the players in turn. The betting and raising limits
are three credits. Before moving on to the next phase, the player whose
turn it is must ask each player if they wish to fold. A player may only
fold during the the betting phase, and must pay one credit to the
sabacc pot to do so.

Shifting Phase
--------------
After the betting phase is completed, the player whose turn it is rolls
a six-sided die. If the result is 1, 2, or 3, *shifting* occurs. [Ed.
note: i.e., odds are 50-50 that your card will shift during any given
turn.]

During a shift, each player must discard one card from his or hand,
chosen randomly by the player to the right. All of the players'
discarded cards are then gathered by the dealer, reshuffled, and then
dealt to the players in order. Note that if a player folds on his or
her *own* turn, the player must still roll to see if a shift occurs,
but his or her cards are not used during the subsequent shuffling and
redealing.

Calling Phase
-------------
After the shifting phase is completed, the player whose turn it is asks
if anyone would like to call the hand. When a hand is called, each
player must immediately place their cards face-up on the table and
declare what they have. [Ed. note: in the Star Wars galaxy, the table
emits a low-frequency "suspension field" that locks the values of the
cards in place.] See "Winning a hand" below for victory conditions and
penalties.

A player may only call during the calling phase of another player's
turn; i.e., he or she may *not* do so during his or her own turn. No
one may call the hand during the caling phase until every player,
including the dealer, has had at least one turn.

If a hand is called, play proceeds to the drawing phase. If no one
chooses to call a hand, play goes back to the betting phase for another
round.

Note: You may wish to increase the minimum number of turns required
before a hand may be called when playing with less than four players;
this allows for more interesting (and richer!) hands to develop.

Drawing Phase
-------------
After the calling phase, the player whose turn it is has the option to
draw one card from the deck. If the player holds more than two cards,
he or she has the option to exchange one of the cards in his or her
hand for a card drawn from the deck *or* simply draw a card from the
deck and had it to his or hand, but not both. Note that discarded cards
are removed from play and not put back in the deck.
There is no limit to the number of cards that a player may hold in his
or her hand, but a player may not have *less* than two cards at any
time.

Winning a Hand
==============
When a hand is called, the player with the highest card value which is
less than or equal to 23 wins the hand. A player may also win a hand if
every other player folds. Note that the winning player wins the hand
pot only, not the sabacc pot.

If any player has a total which is greater than 23, less than negative
23, or exactly 0 when the hand is called, he or she has "bombed out."
When a player bombs out, he or she must match the number of credits
currently in the hand pot and pay it to the sabacc pot.

In addition, if the player who called the hand does not win it, he or
she must pay the sabacc pot just as if he or she had bombed out.

If two or more players are tied, they must participate in a "sudden
demise." In a sudden demise, the dealer deals each tied player an
additional card from the deck which is then added to their original
hands. The best modified hand, which is still equal to or less than 23,
takes the pot. If there is still a tie after the additional deal, the
players split the pot.

Special Hands and the Sabacc Pot
================================
To win the sabacc pot, a player must have one of two special hands. The
first occurs when has a card total of exactly 23. This hand is called
"Pure Sabacc," and is usually accompanied by an ethusiastic cry of
"Sabacc!" when the cards are turned over.

The other special hand is called an "Idiot's Array" or "Literal
Sabacc." To achieve this hand, a player must have the Idiot face card
(value 0), a two of any suit, and a three of any suit; i.e., a 0-2-3.

An Idiot's Array beats a Pure Sabacc, but if two or more players have
the same special hand, a sudden demise is held for both the hand and
sabacc pots.

Note that a special hand, like any other, can only be declared when a
hand is called.
Face Cards
The game has sixteen face cards. These are listed below and there are
two of each. These cards are not assigned a suit. The different rules
change the value of the cards, which can be positive or negative. The
idiot card's value never changes and is always zero no matter what
rules are played by. You can change any of the face cards from the
second deck to these face cards and can use the jokers for the idiot
cards.
Idiot
Rancor
Jedi Knight
Jedi Master
Dark Jedi
Lord of Sith
Smuggler
Bounty Hunter


STANDARD RULES
The standard rules never change no matter what version of the game is
played. Sabacc is always played with a deck of 76 cards. The idiot
card always has a value of zero and the numbered cards are worth what
they are (one=1, two=2, etc.). The ranked cards are valued as follows:
Commander=12, Mistress=13, Master=14, Ace=15. The game is dealt out
like poker, except each player has four cards instead of five. When
four cards are delt to each player, you may discard cards and get new
ones to replace them. The number of cards you are able to discard
depends on the rules you are playing by. Add up the value of your
cards to find your total. If your total is under 23, than your hand
value is the same as your total. If you have a total over 23, then you
subtract 23 from what you have to get the value of your hand (example:
you have a hand totaling 29, 29-23=6, your hand is worth six). If your
hand totals over 46, then you automatically lost. To have a perfect
hand in Sabacc, all of your cards must must have a value of 23. A
perfect hand automatically wins (NOTE: A hand totaling 23 beats a hand
totaling 46). You can also win with an idiot's array; an idiot card
plus a two and a three. An idiot's array automatically wins if no one
has a perfect hand. The different rules will list a winning
combination of cards that will win if no one has a perfect hand or an
Idiot's Array. If no player gets 23, has an idiot's array, or has the
winning card combination, then the player with the highest hand value
wins. The rest of the rules change due to what version of the game you
are playing.


RULES
The different rules for Sabacc are listed below. So far, I have made
five rules plus random sabacc and as I make more, I will update this
version of Sabacc.

Rebel Alliance Rules
You may discard no more than three cards.
A Force Array is the combination of cards where the player has both
Jedi Knights and an ace. This beats everything except Pure Sabacc.
The values of the face cards are listed below.

Rancor = 7
Jedi Knight = 3
Jedi Master = 4
Dark Jedi = 12
Lord of Sith = -10
Smuggler = 5
Bounty Hunter = 9

Imperial Rules
You may discard two cards only, no more or less than two.
A Sith Array is the combination of cards of a Lord of Sith, a
Commander, and an Ace. This beats everything except Pure Sabacc.
The card values are listed below.

Rancor = 7
Jedi Knight = 15
Jedi Master = -9
Dark Jedi = 3
Lord of Sith = 4
Smuggler = 7
Bounty Hunter = 3

Corellian Rules
You may discard no less than two cards.
A Smuggler's Array is the combination of cards of both smuggler's and
any Numbered Card in the Coin suit. This beats everything except Pure
Sabacc.
Card values are as follows.

Rancor = 4
Jedi Knight= 10
Jedi Master = -13
Dark Jedi = 11
Lord of Sith = 11
Smuggler = 4
Bounty Hunter = 3

New Republic Rules
You have a choice of discarding one or three cards, and you may not
discard any other number of cards besides one and three.
A Republic Array is the combination of a Jedi Knight, a Jedi Master,
and a Smuggler. This beats everything except Pure Sabacc.
Face card values are listed below.

Rancor = 8
Jedi Knight = 4
Jedi Master = 3
Dark Jedi = 12
Lord of Sith = -11
Smuggler = 4
Bounty Hunter = 10

Old Republic Rules
You can discard up to two cards, and up to four if you have a Jedi
Master in your hand. You must show the other players the Jedi Master
card in order to discard three or four cards.
A Jedi’s Array is the combination of a Jedi Knight, a Jedi Master,
and any Numbered Saber. This beats everything except Pure Sabacc.
Face card values are listed below.

Rancor = 9
Jedi Knight = 3
Jedi Master = 3
Dark Jedi = -14
Lord of Sith = 10
Smuggler = 10
Bounty Hunter = 9

Cloud City Casino Rules
Using these rules, you can discard two or four cards.
A Partnership Array is a combination of two smugglers and a Jedi Knight
card. This beats everything except Pure Sabacc.
Face card values are listed below.

Rancor = 7
Jedi Knight = 4
Jedi Master = 6
Dark Jedi = 9
Lord of Sith = -8
Smuggler = 5
Bounty Hunter = 7

Corporate Sector Rules
You may discard three cards using these rules, no more or less than
three.
A Hunted Array is the combination of both bounty hunters and any
numbered coin. This beats everything except Pure Sabacc.
Face card values are listed below.

Rancor = 5
Jedi Knight = -7
Jedi Master = 8
Dark Jedi = 7
Lord of Sith = 8
Smuggler = 6
Bounty Hunter = 3

Crseih Station Rules
You can discard up to two cards, no more than two.
A Temporal Array is the set combination of four flasks either numbered
or ranked. This beats everything except Pure Sabacc.
Face card values are listed below.

Rancor = 7
Jedi Knight = 8
Jedi Master = -6
Dark Jedi = 5
Lord of Sith = 4
Smuggler = 6
Bounty Hunter = 6

Mos Eisley Rules
You may discard one card or up to four if you have a bounty hunter or
smuggler in your hand.
A Criminal’s Array is the set combination of a smuggler, a bounty
hunter, and any numbered coin. This beats everything except Pure
Sabacc.
Face card values are listed below.

Rancor = 5
Jedi Knight = 7
Jedi Master = 8
Dark Jedi = -11
Lord of Sith = 10
Smuggler = 6
Bounty Hunter = 5


Random Sabacc
In random Sabacc, the game is timed and the rules are changed at a set
time interval. To play random Sabacc, you must write down the names of
all of the rules on separate pieces of paper or note cards and place
them, upside down, scattered in a pile. You also need a clock that
could tell you to change the game every two minutes. At the start of
the game and every two minutes, someone picks a paper or card from the
pile and shows everyone what rules are to be played by. The person
then places the paper or card back into the scattered pile and then
mixes the pile again up so that the next rules will be totally random.
Whatever you are doing during the new rules; taking cards, showing your
hand, etc., must follow the rules that are currently being played by.
If you are in the middle of discarding cards, then you may follow the
old rules and each player after you must follow the new rules. If you
are in the middle of showing the value of your hand when the rules
change, then your hand, everyone's hand shown before you, and
everyone's hand shown after you, is changed to follow the new rules.

				
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