Marketing yourself How to for Resumes by sammyc2007

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									Marketing yourself – Resumes
2		 4			 7			 9			 11		 12		 13		 14		 16	 17		 	 18		 20		 23	 29		 30		 Introduction Content Action	verbs	 Format Aesthetics Getting	started Final	checklist Sample	#1	–	Before	and	after	resume Sample	#2	–	Chronological	resume Sample	#3	–	Combination	chronological		 and	functional	resume Sample	#4	–	Mid-career	resume Sample	#5	–	US	federal	government	resume	 Sample	#6	–	Curriculum	vitae	 	 Conclusion Additional	resources

PDP 5



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Introduction
This handout gives you an overview of how to market yourself via your most critical marketing tool, your resume. Your resume gives you the opportunity to demonstrate your fit for the position and organization and your ability to communicate effectively. In addition, your resume gives you the chance to give your potential employer an overview of your experiences and achievements that are most relevant to that potential employer. In general, resumes and curricula vitae (CVs) are a personal synopsis of your education, experience, and skills. The purpose of these documents is to persuade a prospective employer to invite you to an interview or offer you a position. However, resumes and CVs are also marketing tools. They allow you to demonstrate your ability to organize and communicate information in a clear and succinct way and to successfully market yourself as the end “product”. This guide will cover the three top components that you need to consider when creating your resume – format, content, and aesthetics. If circumstances require and space permits, some add a fourth section such as “Personal Information”, “Activities”, “Additional Skills”, etc. (See the next several pages for other ideas.) A CV is a longer resume with more sections. It can easily run two to six pages and goes into much greater detail about academic and extra-curricular experiences, scholarships, publications, etc. In many parts of the world, but not the US, a CV includes personal information such as marital status, birth date, and gender.

Should I use a resume or a CV?
There are many opinions on whether to use a resume or a CV and how long each should be. Ultimately, the template you choose is an individual decision, determined by your years of professional experience, your targeted industry, and preferred geographic location. While OCS requires a one-page resume for all employment opportunities posted through our internal recruiting tool, Fletcher Career Central (FCC), there may be situations in which a longer document is a more effective marketing tool. Below are some general guidelines to help you determine whether you should use a CV or a one- or two-page resume template. If interested in more than one path, you may want to consider maintaining multiple documents to use depending upon the type of position you are seeking.

What is the difference between a resume and a CV?
The primary differences concern length and content. A resume tends to run one to two pages and contains only the most essential items about your background that could be of importance to an employer. Resumes traditionally contain three sections: contact information, education, and work experience.



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Resume guidelines
Resume, one-page:
•	 Required	for	all	Fletcher	OCS	resume	 submissions	through	FCC	(unless	noted	 otherwise).	 •	 Recommended	if	seeking	a	private	or	nonprofit	sector	US-based	position	with	less	than	 seven	years	of	experience.	 •	 Recommended	if	seeking	an	international	 private	or	non-profit	sector	position	with	a	USbased	organization	and	less	than	seven	years	 of	experience.	 •	 Recommended	if	pursuing	a	radical	career	 change	and	past	experience	isn’t	relevant	to	 new	goal.

US Federal Government resume:
•	 Required	for	all	US	federal	government	 vacancy	announcements.	 •	 Contain	“compliance”	information,	such	as	the	 job	announcement	number,	position	title	and	 grades,	personal	information	including	social	 security	number,	veteran’s	preference,	and	 detailed	job	information	including	supervisor	 names	and	contact	numbers,	salary,	and	 number	of	hours	worked	per	week.	 •	 Tend	to	be	three	to	five	pages	depending	upon	 number	of	positions	held.

Curriculum Vitae (CV):
•	 In	the	US,	a	CV	is	primarily	used	when	applying	 for	academic,	education,	scientific	or	research	 positions,	or	for	fellowships,	grants,	and	 admission	into	graduate	school	programs.	 •	 For	employment	outside	the	US,	a	more	 detailed	CV	document	with	additional	 categories	is	recommended. •	 Most	international	organizations,	including	 the	World	Bank	and	United	Nations,	require	 either	a	more	detailed	resume	or	a	CV	for	fulltime	positions.

Resume, two-page:
•	 Recommended	for	mid-level	professionals	 with	over	seven	years	of	experience	related	to	 career	goals. •	 Recommended	if	targeted	field	requires	 technical	skills,	and	space	is	needed	to	list	 and	prove	technical	knowledge.	For	example,	 someone	with	prior	microfinance	experience	 seeking	a	management	level	position	in	the	 same	field	would	need	to	provide	project	 details	to	help	sell	relevant	skills.



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Content
Employers typically are very busy and have many applicant resumes to review. Therefore, your resume or CV must make an immediate impact! There are three basic ingredients that go into creating a successful document that will grab an employer’s eye: content, format, and aesthetics. Content refers to what you include on your resume about your background and experiences. When choosing which items or experiences to list on a resume, keep the job or company description in mind. After all, you are trying to convince an employer that your education and background are a perfect fit with the organization’s needs. Critical content: Though resumes and CVs come in many shapes and sizes, all should contain at least the following three sections of information. Within each section we have listed those items which are considered fundamental, as well as those which may be optionally added if applicable or if space allows.

Education:
Fundamental: •		graduate	and	undergraduate	study •		degrees,	fields	of	study,	honors	and	program	 dates •		GPA,	if	greater	than	a	3.5	and	only	for	resumes	 geared	towards	consulting/finance Optional: •		special	programs	or	certificates •		courses	if	relevant	to	the	position	for	which	 you’re	applying •		leadership	positions,	active	involvement	in	 school	organizations •		foreign	study	 •		awards	or	scholarships

Experience:
Fundamental: •		full-time	work •		relevant	part-time	work •		related	internships •		organization	names,	dates,	locations,	job	titles	 and	divisions	for	all	the	above •		description	of	accomplishments	and	major	 responsibilities	for	each	position Optional: •		relevant	or	extensive	volunteer	experience

Contact Information:
Fundamental: •		name •	 current	contact	information	including	address,	 phone,	and	email Optional: •		two	addresses	including	temporary	and	 permanent •		citizenship	especially	if	dual	or	relevant	to	the	 position



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Optional additional content
Apart from your contact information, education, and experience, there is no standard set of additional sections to use in resumes or CVs. Depending on the focus of your application or the requirements outlined by a prospective employer, you’ll need to decide what information to list and how to arrange this information to market yourself most effectively. You may wish to include one or several of the following sections or items listed below on your resume or CV. Please note that no single document normally contains all of them, and some will contain sections not listed here. Feel free to improvise. When composing a CV that is several pages in length, list sections in descending order of importance and be sure to put each experience or item under the appropriate sub-heading.

Activities
• List hobbies or pastimes that distinguish you • Mention activities showing leadership & other skills

Publications
• List relevant or selected publications, follow standard formatting for citations

Presentations
• List relevant or selected presentations, follow standard formatting for citations • Change this section to “Publications and Presentations” if you mention conference papers

Honors and/or awards
• List competitive scholarships, fellowships, or assistantships you’ve received • List teaching or research awards • Mention honor societies

Summary of Qualifications
• Use at the beginning of your CV/resume if you are a mid-career professional • Use when a cover letter is not required • Use in place of an “objective statement” • Use to help focus the reader on your most relevant background skills

Community involvement and/or volunteer positions
• List all significant volunteer work

Professional activities
• List professional association memberships • Mention committee membership or involvement

Languages
• Indicate your level of competency for each: native, fluent, proficient, working knowledge

Teaching experience
• Include this section if you’re applying for a teaching job • List full- or part-time teaching experience • Specify where you taught and specific courses or general subject area • Include dates when you taught and your titles

Personal information
• List citizenship and work authorization • Mention extensive international travel or living experience • Do not include information about gender, race, age, or marital status for US employers

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PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

• Consider including teaching assistantships, internships, practica, and field experiences

Research experience
• Include this section if you’re applying for a job at a research university or think tank • Describe relevant postdoctoral, doctoral, and possibly undergraduate research • Include both research topics and techniques employed • Include recent summer, intern, and interim research jobs • Note publications that resulted from the research you conducted • List current research interests or initiatives underway

References
• List three to five professional references • Give each reference’s name, title, email address, and phone number • Place this section at the end of your CV or submit as a separate document



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Action verbs
Leverage this list of action verbs when writing your resume/CV to make sure it remains in the active voice and uses a variety of verbs.
Accelerated Accomplished Achieved Acquired Acted	 Adapted Adjusted Administered Advised Allocated Analyzed Anticipated Applied Appraised Approved Arranged Articulated Assembled Assessed Assigned Assisted Attained Audited Authored Balanced Briefed Budgeted Built Calculated Carried	out Catalogued Categorized Chaired Changed Channeled Charted Clarified Classified Coached Coded Collaborated Collated Collected Communicated Compared Compiled Completed Comprehended Computed Conceived Conceptualized Conducted Consolidated Constructed Contacted Continued Controlled Conveyed Convened Convinced Coordinated Corresponded Counseled Crafted Created Critiqued Decided Defined Delegated Demonstrated Derived Designed Determined Developed Devised Diagnosed Directed Discovered Dispensed Displayed Distributed Drafted Drew	up Edited Educated Effected Elicited Employed Encouraged Endured Enlisted Entertained Established Estimated Evaluated Examined Exchanged Executed Exercised Exhibited Expanded Expedited Experienced Experimented Explained Explored Facilitated Figured Financed Focused Followed Forecasted Formed Formulated Fostered Founded Functioned Gathered Generated Governed Grouped Guided Handled Harvested



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Helped Identified Illustrated Imagined Implemented Improved Improvised Increased Influenced Informed Initiated Inquired Inspected Inspired Installed Instilled Instituted	 Instructed Insured Interpreted Interviewed Introduced Invented Investigated Judged Launched Lectured Led Lifted Listened	 Located Maintained Managed Marketed Mastered Measured Mediated

Memorized Modeled Modified Molded Monitored Motivated Named Negotiated Nurtured Observed Obtained Operated Ordered Organized Originated Outlined Oversaw Participated Perceived Performed Persuaded Planned Predicted Prepared Prescribed Presented Presided Printed Processed Produced Programmed Promoted Proposed Protected Proved Provided Publicized

Published Purchased Questioned Raised Rated Read Reasoned Recommended Reconciled Recorded Recruited Reduced Regulated Reinforced Rendered Reorganized Repaired Reported Represented Reproduced Researched Resolved Responded Restored Retained Retrieved Revamped Revised Reviewed Rewrote Routed Scheduled Searched Selected Served Serviced Shaped

Shared Showed Simplified Sketched Sold Solicited Solved Sought Spoke Staged Steered Stimulated Streamlined Structured Studied Succeeded Suggested Summarized Supervised Supported Surveyed Synthesized Targeted Taught Tested Trained Translated Traveled Treated Tutored Updated Visualized Volunteered Wrote	

	



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Format
Format considers where you arrange information on the page, and how you draw attention to certain skills or items. Essentially, how you convey information on your resume can directly affect how well you sell your experiences as being relevant to the position for which you are applying. There are three standard resume formats. Below we describe each format type, explain when it is normally used, and describe possible advantages or disadvantages associated with each style. For chronological and combination documents, refer to samples in the back of this handout to see a visual representation.

Functional:
In this style, your experience is organized by skill sets, and it’s unfamiliar to most employers. Pros: • Highlights specific skills • Can combine paid and unpaid positions to diminish lack of significant work experience • Eliminates repetition of job assignments Cons: • Makes it more difficult to grasp your overall work progression

Combination:
This style combines chronological and functional resume characteristics. Pros: • Describes competencies or skill sets within the context of your work history • Allows career changers to highlight transferable skills Cons: • May be confusing if the purpose is not clear • Can take up more space

Chronological:
This style is the one most frequently recommended by career professionals and recruiters. You list your experience in reverse order, from most recent to least recent. It’s easiest to write and most common. Pros: • Is easy to follow • Shows continuity and career growth Cons: • Highlights age and gaps in background • Makes it hard to conceal irrelevant positions • May not highlight skill areas, unless a summary of qualifications is included



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Additional tips for successful formatting
1	Contact	identification	section: •	 Make	a	statement	with	your	name •	 Make	sure	it	stands	out	from	the	rest	of	the	 page 2	Section	headings	(such	as	“Education”,	 “Experience”,	etc.) •	 Make	sure	they	visibly	stand	out	from	the	body	 of	the	text •	 Make	sure	they	indicate	the	exact	content	in	 each	section	(for	example,	do	not	list	personal	 information	such	as	citizenship	under	the	 section	heading	“Activities”) 3	Where	versus	when: •	 Downplay	dates	by	moving	them	to	the	right	 side	of	the	page;	employment	dates	are	never	 as	important	as	what	you	did,	who	you	worked	 for,	and	interesting	geographic	locations •	 Highlight	important	schools	or	companies •	 Emphasize	international	experience	by	setting	 apart	geographic	locations 4	Listing	items: •	 List	employment	duties	and	responsibilities	 using	bullet	points	wherever	possible •	 Use	short,	concise	statements	for	all	your	 descriptions 5	Consistency: •	 Be	consistent	in	where	and	how	you	place	 items	on	the	page.	For	example,	if	you	place	 geographic	locations	along	the	right	margin	in	 the	education	section,	do	the	same	for	all	other	 sections.

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PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Aesthetics
To draw an employer’s eye to important information on your resume, use the following aesthetic techniques. Experiment with those elements that you prefer, and which you think are most effective. Some may be used in combination, but be sure that your resume doesn’t end up looking too busy or cluttered, and that you don’t overdo the graphics. • Bullets Boldface Underline Each section in your resume should be adequately separated from the next, and your individual text items should have plenty of room to breathe. Remember, for a resume that is easy to read, your best friend is WHITE SPACE. Finally, be consistent throughout your resume in your use of punctuation and aesthetic devices. For example, if you use bullet points in your employment section, then you should also use bullets when listing items under the education section.

Font Size
ALL CAPITALS Italics



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Getting Started
Here are some simple guidelines to get you started:

Electronic resumes:
• Attach resumes as a Word document or PDF file when applying by email to make sure you don’t loose your formatting • Keep formatting simple, as complicated templates can be lost in transmission

Length:
• Create a one-page resume which is required for all OCS resume collections unless otherwise stated • Be sure that your name and page number appear on each page following the first one if using more than one page

Templates:
• Use templates provided on the OCS Intranet
•	 Choose	a	style	you	like,	or	one	that	is	 appropriate	for	your	professional	focus •	 Open	the	document	in	Word	and	 substitute	your	own	information

Paper:
• Use white or cream bond paper and avoid recycled or “grainy” paper • Do not staple, instead use a paper clip to attach resume pages or cover letter

• Use templates provided in Word:
•	 Under	“File”,	select	“New” •	 On	the	right	hand	side	of	page	search	 templates	for	“resume” •	 Select	the	appropriate	template		 (i.e.	“chronological	resume”)

Margins:
• Keep 1/2 to 1 inch all around your document

Font:
• Use 10 – 12 point • Keep it simple (for example, Times New Roman, Arial, etc.)



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Final Checklist
Use this final checklist when preparing your resume or CV.

Do
Spell-check your document Proofread for grammar and spelling mistakes as well as consistent punctuation Get a friend to proofread your resume – you’ve probably looked at it too long to see mistakes! Ask OCS or someone in your targeted career field to look it over Alter your resume slightly for each new position in order to sell yourself as a good fit Bring extra copies to an interview and make sure it’s the same version you sent to that employer when you originally applied

Do Not
Make spelling errors or grammatical mistakes Use abbreviations. Use acronyms only after you have first spelled the name of the organization out in full – for example, International Monetary Fund for IMF Add an objective statement to the beginning of your resume. Instead, expand on your motivation and career goals in your cover letter and consider using a summary of qualifications Use slang terms, except for some sector jargon which you know is acceptable Use long sentences or extensive prose or paragraphs List your grade point average (GPA), unless it’s a 3.5 out of 4.0 or higher and you are specifically targeting the private sector



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Sample #1: Before and after resume
These two pages demonstrate a resume makeover for a student effecting a career transition from academia to the business sector. Note the de-emphasis on prior academic experience and new emphasis on business acumen.

Old version



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

New version

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PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Sample #2: Chronological resume
This resume demonstrates the traditional one-page resume organized chronologically.



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Sample #3: Combination chronological and functional resume
This resume separates prior experience under functional headers in order to highlight former positions in the private sector.



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Sample #4: Mid-career resume
This resume illustrates a two-page resume of someone with over ten years of professional experience, as well as a summary of qualifications.



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Sample #5: US federal government resume
This resume reveals the information and formatting required when applying for a federal position, as well as ways in which to emphasize relevant courses, training, and volunteer activities.

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PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Sample #6: Curriculum vitae
This curriculum vitae (CV) is targeted for an academic, research, or international organization job and illustrates possible categories for organizing professional activities.



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

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PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Conclusion
In this handout, we discussed the form and function of resumes and CVs and the primary importance of this critical marketing tool in your job search. Not only does your resume reveal relevant experience to the employer, but it allows you to demonstrate your fit for the position and your ability to communicate concisely. Use this opportunity to its fullest by choosing the appropriate resume type, format, content, and aesthetic for each job.



PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes

Additional resources
Books
Federal Resume Handbook		 by	K.	Kraemer	Troutan Best Resumes and CVs for International Jobs		 by	R.	Krannich	&	W.	Enelow The Curriculum Vitae Handbook		 by	R.	Anthony	&	G.	Roe

Tools
There are many websites that will further assist you in the resume/CV writing process.
Check	out	the	following: •	 http://content.monster.com/resume/home. aspx •	 http://www.rockportinstitute.com/resumes. html •	 http://www.jobweb.com/Resumes_Interviews/ default.htm •	 http://jobstar.org/tools/resume/index.php •	 http://careerplanning.about.com/od/ resumewriting/Resume_Writing.htm •	 http://www.cvtips.com/

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PDP 5 marketing yourself – resumes


								
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