Docstoc

MOSAIC OF MEMORIES

Document Sample
MOSAIC OF MEMORIES Powered By Docstoc
					MOSAIC OF MEMORIES - SCRIPT
PORTRAITS OF JEWISH SURVIVAL & RESILIENCE

001: TITLE SLIDE : MOSAIC OF MEMORIES: PORTRAITS OF
JEWISH SURVIVAL AND RESILIENCE (M1)                                     (M1) Explain what the title
                                                                        “Mosaic of Memories”
                                                                        means to you. What do you
002: COPYRIGHT SLIDE
                                                                        expect to see?
003: INTRODUCTION The Holocaust – the Nazis‟ systematic
murder of six million Jews between 1933 and 1945 – represents
evil. Shattered faith. Absence of meaning. Agony and loss.
Helplessness and despair.

004: "COMING TO AMERICA" Coming to America – and to
Kansas City – after the Holocaust is about renewal. Rekindled
hope. Strength of character. Struggle and determination. And
most of all, preservation of memory.

005: MAP: EUROPE The Nazis destroyed thousands of European
Jewish communities.

006: GAS CHAMBER AND ZYKLON B CANS They applied their
technological skills to the design of gas chambers for mass
annihilation of human beings.

007: CHILDREN IN WARSAW GHETTO They murdered nearly
one and a half million Jewish children.

008: PREWAR PHOTOS – LOCAL SURVIVORS AND
RELATIVES But mere numbers deaden the senses. Until we say,
“Wait! These people were loved by parents, brothers, sisters,
husbands and wives. They were doctors and lawyers, shoemakers
and tailors, manufacturers and merchants. They worshiped God
and they dreamed dreams.

009: PREWAR PHOTOS - LOCAL SURVIVORS: llsa Cole in
race; Gustave Eisemann with soccer ball; Hanna Sukiennik
and friend, Iser Cukier on motorcycle These people lived rich
lives before the Holocaust, and a fortunate few survived to build
new ones.” Their stories reveal our common humanity. They
nurture understanding, compassion and respect. They render
meaning.

010: MAP: US By the end of World War II and in succeeding years,
more than 80,000 Jewish refugees came to the United States.
Nearly 200 settled in Kansas City. Through their stories, let us
penetrate the mists of history.




                                                                    1
GERMANY
Cradle of Culture

011: TITLE SLIDE AND MAP: GERMANY, CRADLE OF
CULTURE When the Nazis came to power in 1933, Rabbi Leo
Baeck, the most prominent rabbi in Germany foretold the future
with tragic accuracy. “The Third Reich,” he said, “has put an end to
a thousand years of Jewish history in Germany.”

012: MEDIEVAL GERMAN JEWS (M2) Except during periods of                (M2) Why were Jews
the Crusades and the Black Death, Jews of the Middle Ages              moneylenders? How do
flourished in Germany as merchants, traders and moneylenders.          stereotypes, prejudice and
They were expelled from most large German cities during the            antisemitism relate to this
Protestant Reformation, but regained positions of influence as         occupation?
businessmen in the courts of German states in the 17th century.

O13: FRANK ADLER Frank Adler's ancestors – whose original
family name Schwarzadler, or black eagle, came from the signpost
on their house in the Frankfurt ghetto – were likely among this
group.

014: 19TH CENTURY GERMAN-JEWISH FAMILY - FIVE
GENERATIONS German Jews launched the 18th century Haskalah
movement, or enlightenment, which encouraged their involvement
in the general culture, and they contributed in disproportionate
numbers to German culture, philosophy, science and economic
development.

015: ANN JACOBSON Fritz Reisner, the father of Ann Jacobson,
built oil installations for the “fatherland” during World War I. Her
mother graduated from the Berlin Conservatory of Music. Ann            (M3) What is a rite of
trained to be an Olympic swimmer.                                      passage? In what way is a
                                                                       bar/bat mitzvah a rite of
016: EVA HARTWICH Most German Jews lived comfortably                   passage?
among their Christian neighbors. Young Eva Hartwich‟s father,
Joseph Braunsbert, owned a department store.                           (M4) Compare/contrast the
                                                                       bar/bat mitzvah to a
017: EVA HARTWICH - IN BOAT WITH HER FATHER Eva played                 ceremony in another
                                                                       religion or culture.
with her dog, toys, sandbox and swings in the backyard of her
family‟s three-story house near a park in Hanover.                     (M5) How does this cartoon
                                                                       symbolize the growing
018: GEORGE ROSENBERG George Rosenberg‟s father, Julius,               antisemitism in Germany?
was an import-export merchant in Hamburg.
                                                                       (M6) In what ways did each
019: BAR MITZVAH IN GERMANY (M3) (M4) George‟s brothers                of these events (WWI defeat,
celebrated their bar mitzvahs in one of Hamburg‟s half dozen           Versailles Treaty, Great
synagogues. “On holidays,” says George, “it was like a family          Depression) affect
reunion.”                                                              Germany?

020: Antisemitic Poster – cartoon (M5) (M6) Still, nationalist
political parties in the 1870‟s promoted racist antisemitism.
                                                                   2
Germany‟s defeat in World War I, the humiliating Versailles Treaty
and the Great Depression set the stage for the rising popularity of
the National Socialist or Nazi Party. Little by little, German Jews‟    (M7) What are some of our
civil rights were taken away. Nazi anti-Jewish policies included        civil rights? Predict what
discriminatory laws and spontaneous acts of terror. (M7)                would happen if these were
                                                                        taken away. Has it
021: ADOLF HITLER AND CABINET When Hitler was appointed                 happened in the U.S? Cite
chancellor in January 1933, Jews made up less than 1% of the            historical examples
German population.
                                                                        (M8) What is a boycott?
022: NORBERT LIPSCHUETZ As a young boy, Norbert
                                                                        (M9) Share examples of
Lipschuetz saw Jews – and anyone who looked Jewish – beaten             other books with students.
on the streets of Berlin.                                               Freud , Einstein, Upton
                                                                        Sinclair, Hemingway. . . why
023: BOYCOTTPHOTO (M8) In April 1933, the Nazis led a                   were some of these books
nationwide boycott of Jewish-owned businesses.                          also targeted by Nazis?

024: GROUP PORTRAIT – SCHOOLGIRLS IN FRONT OF A
NAZI FLAG: They also passed laws excluding Jews from schools
and employment in the civil service and the professions.

025: BOOK BURNING A month later, they staged public bonfires
across Germany for the burning of books written by Jews and other
authors, including Ernest Hemingway and Helen Keller. (M9)

026: "JEWS NOT WANTED HERE" The Nuremberg Laws of 1935
established race as a basic legal principle of German life and
wrongly defined Judaism as a race rather than a religion. Jews
were stripped of their citizenship and forbidden to marry or have
personal relations with non-Jews.

027: GUSTAVE EISEMANN Nevertheless, many German Jews
believed Hitler wouldn‟t last. Gustave Eisemann‟s father, Karl, a
decorated World War I veteran, was shocked when neighbors told
him that Jews were not welcome in their air raid shelter.

028: REGGIE OHRINGER GOLDBERG Reggie Goldberg‟s
father, Jacob Ohringer, also a veteran, resisted his sons‟ pleas to
leave Germany until narrowly escaping deportation to Poland.
Reggie‟s brothers secured the family‟s passage to Cuba on a
French ship in October 1938.

029: ST. LOUIS Like the ill-fated St. Louis, it was turned back to
Europe.

030: DESTROYED SYNAGOGUE On November 9 and 10, 1938,
Kristallnacht ended the illusion that normal Jewish life in Germany
and Austria was still possible. Kristallnacht – the night of broken
glass – was a pogrom, a violent raid against Jews, devised by
Hitler's Minister of Propaganda and carried out by the Gestapo, the
SS, and other national police.
                                                                    3
031: STORE WITH BROKEN GLASS Jewish businesses were
vandalized and homes ransacked and burned. One hundred Jews
were murdered that day. Thirty thousand Jewish men were
imprisoned in concentration camps.

032: ILSA DAHL COLE Ilsa Dahl Cole was home in
Geilenkirchen, packing to leave for America, when rioters
threatened to burn down her house. That night, Ilsa‟s father, Emil,
took her to the railway station. Emil, his wife Clara and Ilsa‟s
extended family lost their lives in concentration camps.

033: CROWDS WATCHING BURNING SYNAGOGUES: The New
York Times reported: “Huge, but mostly silent crowds looked on,
and the police confined themselves to regulating traffic and making
wholesale arrests of Jews „for their own protection.‟”

034: MAP: DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (M10) Prior to Kristallnacht,
the United States, France, Great Britain and Canada had refused to        (M10) What were the
expand their immigration quotas. Only the Dominican Republic was          reasons behind the US
willing to accept greater numbers of Jewish immigrants.                   decision to limit the number
                                                                          of refugees?
035: KLAUS FRANK Klaus Frank‟s family fled to the Dominican
Republic after Klaus and his father escaped from the
Sachsenhausen concentration camp.                                         (M11) Rhetorical question:
                                                                          If you were a Jew during in
036: KLAUS IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC                                      this period, at what point
                                                                          would you have left?
037: KINDERTRANSPORT Following Kristallnacht, German                      (M12) Some people call
Jewish parents frantically sought ways to save their children.            Kristallnacht the beginning
Although Great Britain refused to admit 21,000 Jewish children into       of the Holocaust. How did it
Palestine, it did allow a total of 10,000 unaccompanied children into     change the situation for
Great Britain, Canada and Australia as part of the Kindertransport        German Jews?
program.

038: TOM LEWINSOHN (M11) (M12) Tom Lewinsohn‟s mother,
Mathilde, wanted to send Tom and his brother, but her husband,
Hugo, a physician, resisted.

039: MAP: SHANGHAI/WORLD The Lewinsohns escaped
together in 1941 in the middle of the night on a train bound for
Shanghai, China …one of the few places in the world still open to
Jews.

040: GERMAN-JEWISH MEN WEARING BADGES About half of
Germany‟s Jewish population had left Germany by the outbreak of
World War II. After September 1941, those who remained were
required to wear the yellow Star of David.

041: MARIANNE LATTER DENNIS Marianne Latter Dennis was
ten when the Nazis forced her family from their apartment.

                                                                      4
042: MARIANNE IN HIDING -1942 (M13) From 1943 until the war‟s
end, the Latters, including Marianne‟s blind father, walked the            (M13) Like people, nations
streets of Berlin and hid in basements. More than 200,000 German           and political parties have
Jews were killed immediately or died of starvation or illness in           identities. Based on what
concentration camps.                                                       you‟ve seen and heard so
                                                                           far, what values are central
                                                                           to the Nazi identity?
AUSTRIA
Germany‟s Willing Partner

043: TITLE SLIDE AND MAP: AUSTRIA: GERMANY'SWILLING
PARTNER Jews have lived in what are today Austria, the Czech
Republic and Hungary since Roman times.

044: PREWAR VIENNA - JEWISH WOMAN IN HER
APARTMENT Austria‟s Jewish community grew rapidly between
1850 and the end of World War I. Only 10% of Vienna‟s population
was Jewish, yet Jews represented 28% of university students. Most
Austrian Jews spoke perfect German, dressed in current fashions
and had proudly defended the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

045: FELICIA SUSSMAN BRILL Felicia Sussman Brill played
piano, learned ballet, sang in a choir, and was taken to the opera,
theatre and movies. Felicia absorbed her love of Judaism from her
Polish-born grandfather. Her father, Julius, was an animal feed
company executive who perished in the Treblinka death camp.

046: ANTISEMITIC ELECTION POSTER (1920) Although Jews
played a vital role in Austrian society, racial antisemitism grew
increasingly intense in Vienna during the early part of the century.
Hitler wrote of the time he lived in Vienna: “I ceased to be a weak-
kneed cosmopolitan and became an antisemite.”

047: FLAG - ISRAEL In this same environment, Theodore Herzl, a
Viennese Jew, became the founder of modern Zionism, which
ultimately led to the establishment of the State of Israel

048: NAZI STORM TROOPERS PREVENT JEWS FROM
ENTERING THE UNIVERSITY OF VIENNA Austrians greeted the
German annexation of Austria in March 1938, known as the
Anschluss, with almost total absence of resistance and with
widespread antisemitic riots.

049: EVELYN ARZT BERGL Six-year-old Evelyn Arzt Bergl saw
flames rising from her synagogue in Vienna, one of more than 200
synagogues set afire or completely destroyed by rioters on
Kristallnacht.

050: EVELYN BERGL AND FAMILY IN ITALY Evelyn‟s father
was sent to the Dachau concentration camp. After his release, the
family made its way to Italy.
                                                                       5
051: KURT METZL Kurt Metzl was named for the Austrian
chancellor, Kurt Schuschnigg.

052: Kurt Metzl in Tyrolean outfit (M14) But as the situation for       (M14) What does this
Austrian Jews deteriorated, friends urged the family to leave the       suggest about the comfort
country. Kurt‟s father crossed illegally into Switzerland. Kurt and     level of Jews at this time?
his mother joined him by taking a train for Germany and secretly        What evidence have you
getting off in Switzerland.                                             heard to support the fact
                                                                        that they were accepted
By November 1942, only 7,000 of Austria‟s pre-war Jewish                into Austrian society?
population of 185,000 remained in the country. More than 65,000
Austrian Jews lost their lives in ghettos and concentration camps.


CZECHOSLOVAKIA
Jewish Diversity

053: TITLE SLIDE AND MAP: CZECHOSLOVAKIA: JEWISH
DIVERSITY Connected to the Austro-Hungarian Empire since the
tenth century, Czechoslovakia became an independent republic
after World War I.

054: REACTIONS TO ANNEXATION OF SUDETENLAND In
September 1938, Germany annexed the Sudetenland in western
Czechoslovakia.

055: CZECH JEWS IN A CAFÉ - WESTERN CZECHOSLOVAKIA
The Jewish communities within Czechoslovakia were not alike.
Predominantly middle class and assimilated into the majority
culture, the Jews in the western part of the country were leaders in
industry, journalism, and education, while those in the eastern part
lived mostly in small towns where they engaged in retail trades.

056: LILLY LEBOVITZ SEGELSTEIN Eastern Czechoslovakia was
home to Lilly Lebovitz Segelstein and to Boris Segelstein. Lilly‟s
family had no electricity, no running water and no indoor plumbing.
Lilly‟s father Jacob, a furniture maker, and mother Gisella, a
dressmaker, worked at home. Lilly and her two sisters slept in one
bed in the same room as their parents.

057: BORIS SEGELSTEIN Lilly met her husband Boris
Segelstein, a tailor, in Como, Italy, after the war. In Boris‟s town,
500 Jews worshipped in three synagogues. Boris attended eight
years of Hebrew school. He liked to read by candlelight, ski, hike,
swim, play soccer, volleyball and ping-pong.

058: Boris Segelstein and family In November 1939, Hungary‟s
antisemitic political regime annexed parts of eastern
Czechoslovakia. Boris‟s father was taken to a field and gunned
down by a mobile killing squad. Boris‟ mother and grandmother and
                                                                6
two of his brothers were among the 270,000 Czechoslovakian Jews
murdered in the Holocaust. (M15)                                           (M15) All of these events
                                                                           happened before Germany
                                                                           invaded Poland and before
POLAND                                                                     there was any declaration of
                                                                           war. As we continue, think
The Jewish Heartland
                                                                           about whether or not WWII
                                                                           and the Holocaust could have
059: TITLE SLIDE AND MAP: POLAND: THE JEWISH                               been avoided.
HEARTLAND (M16) On the eve of World War II, more than five
million Jews – one third of total world Jewry – were concentrated in
Poland and the western part of the Soviet Union.

060: INTERIOR OF MEDIEVAL POLISH SYNAGOGUE Jewish
emigration to Poland began in the Middle Ages, when Jews fled              (M16) What do you think of
eastward to escape persecutions and expulsions from Spain and              when you hear the term
other western European countries. Poland – being poorly                    “heartland”? Why is Kansas
developed and in need of skilled craftsmen, merchants and                  City seen as “America‟s
financiers – welcomed the Jews and offered them protection.                Heartland”? Why might
                                                                           Poland be considered the
061: SHTETL LIFE And so they stayed. In the fifteenth and                  “Jewish Heartland”?
sixteenth centuries, the Golden Age of Polish Jewry, Jews settled
hundreds of urban islands called shtetlekh in a vast rural sea.

062: MARIA BRAUN DEVINKI Seventy-five percent of the
residents of Maria Braun Devinki‟s hometown in Wodzislaw were
Jewish.

 063: OLD WOODEN SYNAGOGUE Maria lived in a 200-year old
house near the town‟s 400-year old main synagogue.

064: PORTRAIT OF KHMELNYTSKYI In the seventeenth century,
Bogdan Khmelnytskyi – who, like Hitler, hated all Jews – led
Ukrainian Cossack troops in massacring 100,000 Jewish men,
women and children.

065: MINA MARKOVICH NISENKIER Three centuries later, in
Lodz, Poland, Mina Markovich Nisenkier and the rest of the
Jewish community rarely left their homes at Easter, when
accusations that the Jews killed Jesus led to death and destruction.

066: MAP: PALE OF SETTLEMENT In the eighteenth century,
political instability left one million Polish Jews living in the Russian
Empire, forbidden to live outside the shtetlekh, in an area known as
the Pale of Settlement.

067: MOLLY KOPEC NAGEL The majority of Holocaust survivors
who settled in Kansas City came from the cities and shtetlekh of
Poland. Molly Kopec Nagel grew up in Rozan, 75 miles north of
Warsaw, near the big synagogue and several small shtieblach, or
prayer houses.

                                                                       7
068: MARSHA ABEND GOLDMAN and RUTHIE ABEND TIVOL
The shtetl world of Dubienka that Marsha Abend Goldman and
Ruthie Abend Tivol knew as children revolved around politics and
culture.

069: JOSEPH GREENBAUM Joseph Greenbaum of Piotrkow
enjoyed summer picnics in the woods, soccer, basketball, American
movies and meeting girls in the park.

070: Betar Zionist youth group Still, many Jews came to realize
that Europeans would never truly accept them legally or socially as
equals. They responded by joining the Zionist movement,
supporting the re-creation of a Jewish nation in what was then
called Palestine.

071: SONIA GRYNSZTEJN WARSHAWSKI Sonia Grynsztejn
Warshawski belonged to Betar, one of the largest and most
popular Zionist youth groups in Europe that taught Hebrew culture
and self-defense.

072: MICHAEL ROTHSTEIN Michael Rothstein‟s Zionist
organization taught teenagers skills that would help them as
pioneers in the Jewish State.

073: IDA WOLF LOEFFLER Ida Wolf Loeffler, a member of
Akiva, studied Hebrew, sang Jewish songs, learned about Jewish
writers, socialized with friends and raised money to help Jews in
Palestine purchase land.

074: TOLA GOTTLIEB CUKIER But not all Jews were convinced
that the time had come for Israel‟s rebirth. Israel Gottlieb, father of
Tola Gottlieb Cukier, questioned Zionism.

075: TOLA CUKIER AND FAMILY After all, the Messiah who was
prophesied to bring about the return to Zion had yet to arrive.

076: BRONIA ROSLAWOWSKI AND FRIENDS; MARSHA
GOLDMAN AND RUTHIE TIVOL MARIA DEVINKI AND COUSINS
AT PILSUDSKI'S FUNERAL From the late nineteenth century
through the early 1930‟s, the Jewish community of Eastern Europe
was rich in numbers education, culture and tradition. It also grew
younger, poorer and much less safe.

077: ABE FLEKIER Many Jewish children in Poland like Abe
Flekier, attended government-approved Catholic schools; others
attended public school

078: ISAK FEDERMAN AT SCHOOL Most boys and many girls
also spent several hours a day in Hebrew school or with Hebrew
tutors.

                                                                          8
079: BRONIA ROSLAWOWSKI AT SCHOOL


080: DORA KIWASZ EDELBAUM Dora Kiwasz Edelbaum
attended a Hebrew school for girls. Dora had friends who were not
Jewish but feared them after they physically attacked her.

081: SAM WALTERS When the Nazis forbade Jewish children to
go to school, Sam Walters‟ father secretly hired a tutor and a rabbi.
“Son,” he said, “the only thing I can leave you is education. Nobody
can take this away from you.”

082: ARON WARREN Aron Warren came from a musical family.

083: ARON WARREN AND FAMILY Father sang in the
synagogue. Aron and his nine siblings played instruments.
Relations between non-Jews and Jews were polite at best, says
Aron.

084: SONIA BOROWICK GOLAD Sonia Borowick Golad ice-
skated and skied. She wrote to her pen pal in New York and read
the stories of Sholem Aleichem, a Yiddish writer often referred to as
“the Jewish Mark Twain.” On Sundays, she and her family took long
walks to visit extended family.

085: SIGMUND MANDELBAUMExcluded from the civil service,
state-controlled industries, most railroad and public school
employment, Jews represented more than 50 percent of all Polish          (M17) Based on what you
doctors and lawyers in private practice. Many, like Sigmund              have heard, what values are
                                                                         central to the Jewish
Mandelbaum‟s family, made ready-to-wear clothes. (M17)
                                                                         identity?
086: YELLOW JEWISH STAR BADGE The world will never know
how Polish Jewry might have changed had the Holocaust not
changed everything.

087: HANNA RYDELNIK SUKIENNIK Would Hanna Rydelnik
Sukiennik have completed her post-secondary school education at
the lyceum?

088: ANN WARSZAWSKI FEDERMAN Would Ann Warszawski
Federman, like her mother, have worn a shaytl, a wig, as a sign of
modesty and raised nine children?

089: ABE GUTOVITZ Would Abe Gutovitz, a member of the
radical Revizionist party, have gone to Palestine to fight for the
rebirth of the State of Israel?

090: GERMAN TROOP TRAIN EN ROUTE TO POLAND Germany
invaded Poland on September 1, 1939.


                                                                     9
091: BURNING SYNAGOGUE Within months, the Nazis destroyed
several hundred synagogues, boycotted Jewish businesses,
forbade Jews to own bank accounts, introduced forced labor.

092: ISAK FEDERMAN AND FRIENDS, ANNE FEDERMAN AND
SISTER – WEARING STARS They required all those over age 10
to wear a Star of David, called a Judenstern

093: BUILDING THE KRAKOW GHETTO WALL The Nazis
established hundreds of ghettos in Poland.                                  (M18) What is the definition
                                                                            of a ghetto today? What
                                                                            did the Nazis intend to
094: WARSAW GHETTO PHOTOS There, life was a daily struggle
                                                                            accomplish by forcing
against overcrowding, starvation, contagious disease, slave labor,          Jews into ghettos?
exhaustion and terror. (M18)

095: CENTRAL EUROPEAN JEWS IN LODZ GHETTO They also
transported thousands of Jews from other parts of Europe to the
Polish ghettos.

096: LODZ GHETTO - CHILDREN WEARING STARS AND
PUTTING ON A PLAY Despite brutal hardships, ghetto residents
rose above their struggle to stay alive. They performed concerts
and plays, organized secret schools and religious ceremonies,
maintained hidden presses and radios, organized soup kitchens
and orphanages, recorded their experiences in diaries and
poems…
                                                                           (M19) Based on what you now
                                                                           know, how would you
097: Warsaw Ghetto - captured resistance fighters (M19) (M20)              describe a WWII era Jewish
…and staged revolts.                                                       ghetto?

098: LODZ GHETTO - JEWS ENTERING CATTLE CARS EN                            (M20) How would you
ROUTE TO DEATH CAMPS Concentrating the Jewish population                   respond to those who ask
in ghettos made it easier to deport them to death camps, where life        „Why didn‟t the Jews resist?‟
expectancy was only two-to-three months.



HUNGARY
False Haven

099: TITLE SLIDE AND MAP: HUNGARY: FALSE HAVEN

100: BUDAPEST JEWS Hungary was last to feel the full force of
the Final Solution, the Nazis‟ plan to eliminate Jews from the face        (M21) Why was Hungary the
of the earth. (M21)                                                        last to experience the force
                                                                           of the Final Solution?
101: OLGA STARK ROTHSTEIN “When we knew that the Polish
Jews were in trouble, we thought, „It can happen there, but never in
Hungary.‟ My father owned a winery and could pick up the
telephone and talk to any senator,” recalls Olga Stark Rothstein.

                                                                      10
102: MALVINA NEIMAN STRAS Malvina Neiman Stras
remembers the Sabbath in Szatmarnemeti. Her mother lit 12
candles; her grandmother, 19. Her father returned from the
synagogue and blessed each one of the children. The family sang
songs welcoming the Sabbath. Father recited blessings over the
wine and the beautifully braided challahs. The Neimans lived above
their grocery and liquor store.

103: JUDY GONDOS JACOBS Judy Gondos Jacobs, whose
father was a radiologist and mother an artist, was four years old in
1941 when Hungary sided with Germany and introduced antisemitic
legislation. Judy holds on to her fond memories of childhood – ice
skating with her father, spending summers with her grandparents,
playing with friends.

104: EUGENE AND KATE LEBOVITZ - WEDDING IN BUDAPEST
In spite of the government‟s sympathy towards Hitler, Hungary
appeared to be a safe haven for Jews until March 1944. As the
Soviet Army approached and Hungary‟s alliance with the Axis
teetered, Germany seized the country.

105: AUSCHWITZ II-BIRKENAU – THE MAIN GATE Within two
months, the Germans and their Hungarian collaborators
transported more than 400,000 Hungarian Jews to the Auschwitz II-
Birkenau death camp, where seventy-five percent were murdered
in the gas chambers.

THE HOLOCAUST
Shoah: Catastrophe

106: TITLE SLIDE AND MAP: THE HOLOCAUST: SHOAH-
CATASTROPHE

107: LOCAL SURVIVORS WHO WERE HELPED BY NON-JEWS
The Germans carried out the systematic murder of Jews with the
help of local collaborators and the indifference of millions of        (M22) What is a
bystanders. (M22) Remarkably, seven survivors whose stories are        collaborator? How did by-
told here survived because non-Jews helped them hide.                  standers help the Nazis?

108: DEATH MARCH THROUGH GERMANY In the last months of
the war, retreating Nazis dragged 60,000 starving and sick
prisoners from the eastern camps on death marches to Germany or
packed them into cattle cars without food or water for days, even
weeks.

109: BRONIA KIBEL ROSLAWOWSKI Bronia Kibel
Roslawowski survived five camps and a death march. “I was not
afraid of the Germans,” she says. “I am strong like iron.” Still,
when battle-hardened Allied soldiers liberated the camps, they
found few prisoners alive.

                                                                 11
RESETTLEMENT AND RENEWAL
Kansas City‟s New Americans

110: TITLE SLIDE AND COLOR PHOTO OF KC SKYLINE:
RESETTLEMENT AND RENEWAL- KANSAS CITY‟S NEW
AMERICANS

111: LOCAL SURVIVORS AS DISPLACED PERSONS;                              (M23) What did it mean to be
LANDSBERG DP CAMP (M23) (M24) At war‟s end in May 1945,                 a displaced person?
some 250,000 Jewish survivors found themselves in displaced
persons camps, homeless, penniless, sick and alone.                     (M24) Predict how survivors‟
                                                                        lives would be affected
112: JUNE AND ISAAC FEINSILVER Finding loved ones was a                 following liberation.
top priority. Learning that his bride, June Rubinstein, was alive in
Bergen-Belsen, Isaac Feinsilver bicycled the 215 miles from
Buchenwald to join her. June and Isaac were the only survivors
from their immediate families.

113: SARA MITTELMAN Many who survived returned to their
towns and shtetlekh only to be met with hatred. Sara Mittelman
and her husband, back from hiding in Siberia, were warned not to
return to Pilica where, even after the Holocaust, Poles were killing
Jews.

114: ZDENKO BERGL (M25) Zdenko Bergl drove a Cadillac into               (M25) Less than 1% of
his hometown of Zabno, Croatia, in 1972. “People came from all           Europeans helped Jews
over,” recalls Zdenko. “They said, „We cleaned you Jews out. How         escape. What were some
do you do it?‟”                                                          obstacles they had to face?

115: CLARA HERCZ GROSSMAN Before the State of Israel was
founded in 1948, Great Britain allowed only a trickle of Jewish
refugees to immigrate there. Those seeking entry to the United
States also faced obstacles. American immigration quotas forced
Clara Grossman – an orphan at 15 who survived Auschwitz – to
spend three years waiting in a displaced persons camp in Germany.

116: KATE STERN LEBOVITZ Many – like Kate Stern Lebovitz
and her husband Gene – obtained visas only because American
relatives and others vouched for their upkeep.

117: GENE LEBOVITZ Gene, who weighed 104 pounds upon
liberation, found work in a New York garment factory within four
days of arrival.

118: LOCAL SURVIVORS IN USA Kansas City became home to
nearly 200 Holocaust survivors---some by choice, some by
assignment, some by accident. Kansas City is the richer for it.
The new Americans embraced their new homeland with love and
patriotism. Many speak of kissing the ground upon their arrival in
New York Harbor.

                                                                   12
119: SYLVAN SIEGLER Twelve-year-old Sylvan Siegler and his
family escaped Kaisersesch, Germany, in 1937 with the help of
American relatives.

120: SYLVAN - US ARMY Seven years later in the U.S. Army
infantry, Sylvan lay wounded in a foxhole in Germany, yet survived
to graduate from law school, raise a family and become a leader in
his community.

121: TIBERIUS KLAUSNER Tiberius Klausner of Arad, Romania,
became the youngest concertmaster to lead a major symphony
orchestra when he joined the Kansas City Philharmonic, now the
Symphony, in 1967.

122: SAM NUSSBAUM Only decades later did many Holocaust
survivors speak openly about their experiences, even to their
children. Sam Nussbaum was silent until 1992, when he traveled
to Stuttgart, Germany, to testify against the Nazi Josef
Schwammberger. Sam saw Schwammberger walk past a Jewish
prisoner – bleeding to death, crying for water – and shoot him in the
head.

123: JACK MANDELBAUM In 1975, Jack Mandelbaum realized
how little people knew of the Holocaust when a neighbor asked him
what sports he played in the concentration camp. Having both
come to the United States in 1946 on the S.S. Marine Perch, Jack
and his friend

124: ISAK FEDERMAN Isak Federman in 1993 founded the
Midwest Center for Holocaust Education…

128: “MEMORIAL TO THE SIX MILLION” JEWISH COMMUNITY
CAMPUS OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS …dedicated to teaching
the history and lessons of the Holocaust to prevent its recurrence
and promote understanding and respect for all human beings.

129: COLLAGE SLIDE: COMPOSITE OF PHOTOGRAPHS - PRE
AND POST HOLOCAUST The Talmud, an ancient collection of
commentaries on Jewish law, teaches that if you save one life you
save an entire world. Since the Holocaust ended in 1945, more
than 250 children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren have
been born to the 52 Holocaust survivors and refugees in this
presentation. These 52 Kansas Citians – a testimony to the culture
that was destroyed and the traditions it sustained – have dedicated
their lives to justice, memory, family and renewal.

130: ISER CUKIER “This is in our hearts and our minds,” says
                                                                          (M26) What new information
Iser Cukier. “We live with it, we sleep with it, we think of it, and we   did you learn? What ideas
pray that it never happens again.” (M26)                                  would you like to explore
                                                                          further?
131: CREDIT SLIDE       132: MCHE LOGO
                                                                     13

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:195
posted:2/21/2011
language:English
pages:13