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					Draft Launceston Planning Scheme - Investigations Report




LAND CAPABILITY
ISSUE OVERVIEW

1. Need to recognise and protect productive land
2. Need to recognise areas of intensive agriculture
3. Forested areas of lower quality and associated demand for rural residential use

STRATEGIC PLAN LINKS
There are no relevant vision elements or strategic directions.

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

• Noble K.E. 1991, Land Capability Survey of Tasmania. Pipers Report. Department of
  Primary Industry, Tasmania
• Noble K.E. 1991, Land Capability Survey of Tasmania. Tamar Report. Department of
  Primary Industry, Tasmania

DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

Obligation to consider land capability
An objective of the planning process established in support of the objectives of the resource
management and planning system of Tasmania is:

"...
(i)         to provide a planning framework which fully considers land capability.” 1

A planning scheme is required to seek to further this objective. To do this the planning
scheme must include appropriate provisions or references which ensure land capability is
taken into account when deciding on use and development proposals.

Land capability information
Land Capability Survey of Tasmania

Detailed land capabilty information is available in the form of the Land Capability Survey of
Tasmania (Pipers Report and Tamar Report).

The land capability system used in the Land Capability Survey of Tasmania is based on the
capability of land to produce agricultural goods without impairing the long-term, sustainable
productive potential of the land. The classification system only covers agricultural land uses
(broadscale grazing and cropping uses). It does not evaluate ratings for specific land uses,
and it does not assess the capability of land for forestry use.

The land capability classes

The system categorises land into 7 land capability classes in order of increasing degree of
limitations or hazards to use, and decreasing versatility. The following table shows the
suitability of different land uses for land capability classes:

Class definitions and features


1
    Refer Part 2 objective (i) of Schedule 1, Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993


Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                               20
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CLASS        DESCRIPTION                                   FEATURES

    1        Multiple use land with no limitations to      • Land is level or very gently sloping
             intensive cropping and grazing                  with slopes < 5%
                                                           • Soils are deep and well drained
                                                           • Productivity is high for a wide range
                                                             of crops
                                                           • Erosion hazard is nil to slight
    2        Land suitable for intensive cropping and      • Slopes may range up to 12%
             grazing                                       • Soils have a deep rooting depth for
                                                             plants and are well drained
                                                           • Minor conservation measures may
                                                             be required
                                                           • Productivity is high to moderately
                                                             high for a range of crops
                                                           • Adverse soil characteristics can be
                                                             improved economically
                                                           • The risk of flooding is low
    3        Land suitable for cropping and intensive      • Slopes may range up to 18%
                    grazing                                • Soils depth and drainage can be
                                                             variable
                                                           • Conservation measures are
                                                             necessary under cropping
                                                           • High to moderately high levels of
                                                             productivity under improved pasture
                                                             species and crops
                                                           • The range of crops is generally more
                                                             restricted than on Class 1 or 2 land
                                                           • Adverse soil characteristics can be
                                                             improved economically
                                                           • May have a range of limitations from
                                                             slope, erosion hazard, soil physical
                                                             handicaps, salinity hazard, periodic
                                                             flooding
    4        Land marginally suitable for cropping         • Slopes may range up to 30%
             because of limitations which restrict the     • Only occasional cropping is possible
             range of crops that can be grown,             • Soil depth and drainage can be
             and/or make major conservation                  variable
             treatment and careful management              • Major soil conservation measures
             necessary                                       are necessary under cropping
                                                           • Soil physical features and/or slope
                                                             restrict the amount of cultivation the
                                                             land will tolerate between pasture
                                                             phases
    5        Land with slight to moderate limitations      • Slopes can range up to 40%
             to pastoral use                               • Land may be broken by gullies and
                                                             surface irregularities
                                                           • The degree of stoniness, wetness or
                                                             other physical limitations prevents
                                                             the cultivation of the soil for
                                                             cropping
                                                           • Erosion hazard may be moderate to
                                                             severe
                                                           • Nutricient deficiency, acidity or
                                                             salinity may depress but not prevent
                                                             plant growth
    6        Land marginally suitable for grazing          • Often very steep, rocky or wetlands

Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                    21
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                because of severe limitations     • Land may have either a single very
                                                    severe limitation or a combination of
                                                    several severe limitations from
                                                    among: slope, stoniness or
                                                    rockiness, erosion hazard, soil
                                                    physical handicaps, salinity, surface
                                                    water, flooding, nutrient deficiency,
                                                    climate, altitude
  7      Land with very severe to extreme         • Similar limitations to Class 7 but the
         limitations which make it unsuitable for   limitations are very severe to
         agricultural use                           extreme, making this land unsuitable
                                                    for agricultural use
Source: Land Capability Survey of Tasmania. Pipers Report

Land capability in Launceston
The Land Capability Survey of Tasmania shows:

− The municipality contains no Class 1 land
− The municipality contains only small pockets of Class 2 land (at Lebrina and Prossers
  Forest Road)
− Approximately 25% of agricultural land is classified as Class 4 or better (i.e Classes 2-4)
  [The Department of Primary Industry has confirmed this in previously advice to the
  Commissioner for Town & Country Planning]
− Lilydale, Turners Marsh and Lebrina areas contain large pockets of Class 5 land
− Large areas in the vicinity of Boomer Hills, Tressick Hills, Nunamara and Targa areas are
  in Class 6 land

A possible planning framework to consider land capability
Two alternative frameworks to consider land capability have been considered:

1. Provide a range of rural zones in accordance with the land capability classes (may
   comprise a separate zone for each class or groups of classes - eg “intensive rural” -
   Classes 2-4 and “general rural”: Class 5 and below)
2. Provide a single rural zone and rely on assessment of land capability at the time of
   considering use or development

Early drafts of the planning scheme proposed only one rural zone to cover all classes of land
on the basis that the areas of high quality land were not of sufficient size to warrant the
inclusion of a separate zone.

The Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries did not support this approach and argued
                                                                                             2
that all land of Class 4 and above should be included in a “rural intensive agriculture” zone .
This recommendation was based on the fact that this class of land was suitable for cropping
and grazing and that with selective improvements such as improved drainage, the land could
be brought into the next class - eg Class 4 land could be improved which improved its
capability in line with Class 3 land.

The Department further argued that such a resource should be protected from non-
agricultural activities such as rural residential development.

The zoning approach clearly recognises land with high capability, but there are mapping
constraints. Land capability information is mapped at 1:100,000 scale. Conversion of these
maps to the 1:25,000 scale planning scheme maps would require further detailed
assessment of capability. Problems also arise when mapping a land class boundary that
crosses a property.

2
    Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries letter to Town & Country Planning Commissioner dated 21/12/93


Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                                     22
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The alternative approach provides a single rural zone. Under this approach the capability of
the land would be considered when deciding on an application. This approach does not
clearly identify or recognise land capability classes, and unless proper procedures are in
place to require land capability to be considered in every proposal, land with high capability
could “slip through” and be lost to inappropriate use and development. To allow a proper and
thorough assessment of capability, an applicant should be required to supply relevant land
capability information with each and every application.

POSSIBLE POLICY RESPONSE

Principles

• Recognise land capability when deciding on use and development.

Planning scheme provisions
Policy area/zone provisions

No special policy area or zone provisions are proposed but require an agricultural impact
assessment with applications to construct a house not associated with an agricultural activity.

Purpose

Not applicable.

Content

Not applicable.

FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS

None are recommended.




Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                23
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FORESTRY
ISSUE OVERVIEW

1. Forest practices carried out in State Forests and management of land in Private Timber
   Reserves exempt from planning scheme
2. Uncertainty about future timber production

STRATEGIC PLAN LINKS

Vision Element:                                            Strategic Directions:

“Attractive to residents, visitors,                        Planning
investment and business, providing                         • Complete and implement the Launceston
development and a future for young                            Town Planning scheme to achieve land
people in the region. A leading export                        use policies that meet urban and rural
focused regional centre strong in trade,                      needs.
tourism, health, education and                             • Ensure the City's competitive advantages
community services”                                           are recognised in the planning process.


AVAILABLE INFORMATION

• Forest Practices Act 1985
• Private Forests Act 1994
• Forest Practices Code, January 1993
• “Private Timber Reserves”, undated paper prepared by Peter Taylor, Regional Private
  Forester, Private Forests Tasmania
• An Economic and Demographic Profile - Northern Tasmania, Northern Tasmanian
  Regional Development Board, October 1993

DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

Forest Practices System of Tasmania
The objective of the State’s forest practices system is:

“... to achieve sustainable management of Crown and private forests with due care for the
environment while delivering, in a way that is as far as possible self-funding -

            (a)       an emphasis on self-regulation; and
            (b)       planning before forest operations; and
            (c)       delegated and decentralized approvals for timber harvesting plans and other
                      forest practices matters; and
            (d)       a forest practices code which provides practical standards for forest
                      management, timber harvesting and other forest operations; and
            (e)       an emphasis on consultation and education; and
            (f)       provision for the rehabilitation of land in cases where the forest practices
                      code is contravened; and
            (g)       an independent appeal process; and
            (h)       through the declaration of private timber reserves - a means by which private
                                                                                               3
                      land holders are able to ensure the security of their forest resources.”

This objective is relevant to planning schemes in terms of what control a planning scheme
can have over forest practices. The Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993 contains

3
    Refer Schedule 7, Forest Practices Act 1985


Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                      24
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specific references to forest practices in State forests and the managment of private timber
reserves.

Current forestry activity
Forestry is an important industry in Launceston. It is one of the City’s competitve advantaged
and as indicated in the Business/Economic paper:

− Launceston’s native timber resources is a strategic and competitive advantage
− Wood, wood products and furniture manufacturing is a major manufacturing activity
  representing 22% of activities
− Gunns Limited, Boral Resources Tasmania, North Forest Products, SEAS Sapfor and
  Koppers are major timber product employers in the Launceston region
− Most of the above industries have significant infrastructure in Launceston City and the
  location of these facilities should be noted and protected from inappropriate development
  which could threaten existing operations or future expansion plans.

Forest practices carried out in State Forests

“Works” as defined in the Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993 does not include forest
                                                                                        4
practices as defined in the Forest Practices Act 1985, carried out in State forests .
Development includes the carrying out of works.

This means that any “forest practices” carried out in a State forest does not constitute
development for the purposes of a planning scheme and forest practices carried out in State
Forests can not be regulated by a planning scheme or interim order. To the extent that a
planning scheme or interim order attempts to regulate such activity it is ineffective.

The Forest Practices Act 1985 contains the following relevant definitions:

“forest practices” means the processes involved in establishing forests, or growing or
harvesting timber, and includes the construction of roads or other works connected with
establishing forests, or growing or harvesting timber;

“harvest”, used in relation to timber, means to cut and remove timber from a forest;

“process”, used in relation to timber, means to pulp, chip, cut, or saw timber;

Forest practices therefore includes the provision and use of equipment to pulp, chip, cut, or
saw timber in a State forest.

Private Timber Reserves
Role of Private Timber Reserves

The concept of private timber reserves is a key element of the State’s forest practices
system. A Private Timber Reserve (PTR) is an area of private land used or intended to be
used to grow timber. It may be an area of native forest, plantation, or an area intended to be
used to grow timber. The land has to be capable of growing timber. The minimum area that
can be declared a PTR is 5 ha and the reserve can be declared over a whole title or over
part of a title.



Declaration of Private Timber Reserves



4
    Refer Section 3(1) Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993


Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                               21
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Private Forests Tasmania receives and assesses applications to declare land as a PTR.
Local government is consulted, but only limited opportunities are given to object to a
proposal. If approved, the Governor declares the land as a PTR and notice is published in
the Gazette.

While Council has procedures to assess and respond to applications for PTR’s, it has no
formal policy on the matter. Each application is treated on its merits, but common concerns
relate to PTR’s being established in water catchment areas, in proximity to water intake
sources, and in scenic areas. A policy on the preferred location of PTR’s should be prepared
to assist officers in responding to applications.

Use of Private Timber Reserves

A PTR protects a landowner’s right to use the land to grow timber, but it does impose certain
obligations on the holder of a declaration. Where land has been declared as a PTR it must
only be used for establishing forests, or growing or harvesting timber in accordance with the
Forest Practices Code and such other activities which the Forests Practices Board considers
to be compatible with establishing forests, or growing or harvesting timber.5 If the Board
considers these criteria are not being met then it can seek to have the declaration removed.

Exemption from planning scheme

Nothing in a planning scheme or interim order affects the management of land declared as a
                                                           6
private timber reserve under the Forest Practices Act 1985. Although “management of land”
is not defined, it is generally interpreted to reflect “forest practices” - the cultivation,
management and harvesting of timber.

Forest activities on other private and Crown land
“Development” as defined in the Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993 does include
forest practices carried out on Crown land not dedicated as State forest, and on private
property which is not declared as a PTR. A planning scheme can therefore regulate these
activities, whether or not the operation is covered by an approved timber harvesting plan.
Council can also require an environmental impact assessment in respect of proposed works.

Timber harvesting plans
Most commercial timber harvesting operations on public and private land must be carried out
in accordance with a timber harvesting plan (THP). A THP must follow the Forest Practices
Code and must be approved by an accredited Forest Practices Officer. The concept of THP’s
is to ensure community concerns are taken into account and to establish a uniform set of
environmental standards. A properly researched and implemented THP enables the
protection of soils, water, flora, archaeology and landscape.

Other issues of concern in respect to forest activities
Encroachment of urban and rural residential areas into traditional forest areas

Despite the State forest and PTR exemptions, existing forest practices may be constrained
or new forest practices prevented from establishing due to local residents’ concerns -
especially if sensitive uses are allowed to commence in proximity to State forests or PTR’s.

There is a need to recognise current forest practices but also to cater for future operations on
both public and private land, whether or not the land is State forest or a PTR. This needs to
be considered when deciding on rural development policies.

Impact of forest practices on natural and cultural values - Landscape, flora and fauna
5
    Refer Section 12-(1) Forest Practices Act 1985
6
    Refer Section 20(7)(a) Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993


Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                 22
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Forestry Tasmania recognises the need to identify and protect special landscape values and
landscape analyses are carried out when THP’s are assessed. Forest Management Plans
also contain Protection Zones - in the case of the proposed Bass Forest District Forest
Management Plan Draft, 7 of Councils potential areas of regional significance are included in
the proposed Protection Zones. Inclusion in a Protection Zone will avoid the need to provide
additional/special controls over these areas in the new planning scheme.

Natural and cultural values - Water quality and supply

Forestry Tasmania has a policy to liaise with municipal councils on water quality issues and
is committed to continue its long term water quality monitoring program. Water quality is a
matter considered in preparing and assessing THP’s.

Vehicular access

Three Year Wood Production Plans prepared by Forestry Tasmania show what public roads
are to be used by forestry vehicles. Council has previously expressed concern about the
impact of logging vehicles on its roads and at present it has agreements will several
woodchipping companies under which Council receives “voluntary” payments towards
maintenance of nominated roads. Council expects and desires that Forestry Tasmania will
liaise with municipal councils over the use of public roads outside State forests by all
vehicles associated with timber harvesting, and that it will consider the impact of vehicles
associated with timber harvesting on public roads outside State forests when deciding on
Timber Harvesting Plans. The matter of appropriate levies or charges for the ongoing
maintenance of these roads should be discussed and resolved between all relevant parties in
the future.

Use of state forests for non-forest practices

Non-forest practices such as recreation and tourism activities within State forests must be
consistent with general land use planning principles. There is a need to ensure that
opportunities for tourism, recreation and visitor education within State forests will not affect
adjacent sensitive uses or rural activities. These uses must be discretionary in State forests.

Bee keeping and honey production is also an important activity within State forests. This
activity should be a permitted activity in State forests and PTR’s.

Need to consolidate approvals and avoid duplication of control

The objectives of the planning process established in support of the objectives of the
resource management and planning system of Tasmania include:

“(c)      to ensure that the effects on the environment are considered and provide for explicit
          consideration of social and economic effects when decisions are made about the use
          and development of land; and

(d)       to require land use and development planning and policy to be easily integrated with
          environmental, social, economic, conservation and resource management policies at
          State, regional and municipal levels; and

(e)       to provide for the consolidation of approvals for land use or development and related
          matters, and to co-ordinate planning approvals with related approvals;”

Having regard to these objectives, and a corresponding desire to avoid or minimise
duplication of control over forest practices, the planning scheme should play a minor role in
commercial forest practices.

The THP process sets down standards and the Forest Practices Board has the relevant
expertise to consider, approve and administer those plans. However a THP must take into

Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                 23
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account the location of water supply catchments and domestic water supply intakes and
landscape zones. Accordingly, these need to be clearly marked on the planning scheme
maps.

Zoning and use and development provisions for forest practices

State forests and PTR’s should be included in a Forest Practices Zone. This will clearly
indicate where forest practices can occur. Since new PTR’s are gazetted regularly, the Rural
Zone needs to reflect the exemption that PTR’s enjoy. Likewise, the Forest Practices Zone
needs to address situations where land no longer is a State forest or PTR. Changes can be
incorporated in subsequent planning scheme reviews.

Where timber harvesting or tree removal does not require a THP, then the planning scheme
should apply. All such proposals should be discretionary and information submitted with an
application should generally reflect that required in preparing a THP.

Plantations in association with agro-forestry or forming shelter belts should be exempt since
they are generally developed as part of a whole farm management plan.

However, if Council wants to regulate forest practices outside State forests and outside
private timber reserves, it needs ready access to qualified personnel in order to assess
proposals. It also needs the power and ability to properly monitor and/or enforce operations.

POSSIBLE POLICY RESPONSE

Objective 2:
Strong and diversified rural industry

Principles:

Principles to achieve this objective:

• Recognise and protect the rural resources, including forest resources and
  existing quarry operations from inappropriate use and development.
• Secure the availability of and future access to rural resources.
• Encourage businesses based on or derived from rural activities,
  particularly on popular tourist routes, but subject to limitations which will
  protect highway safety and rural amenity.
• Provide for the managed cultivation and harvesting of timber.
• Protect known and proven reserves of stone and minerals for future use.

Actions:

• State Forests and Private Timber Reserves to be included in Forest
  Practices Zone.
• All existing quarries to be covered by a Buffer Distance Policy Area.


Principles

• To achieve sustainable management of Crown and private forests.
• To recognise forest resources and protect from inappropriate use and development.
• To further the objectives of Tasmania’s forest practices system.


Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                              24
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Planning scheme provisions
Policy area/zone provisions

• State Forests and Private Timber Reserves to be included in Forest Practices Zone
• Definitions to be included:
  − Forest practices
  − Tree removal
  − Agro-forestry

Purpose

• To provide for the managed cultivation and harvesting of timber.

Content

• No permit required for forest practices in Forest Practices Zone provided:
  − it is conducted in a State forest or Private Timber Reserve
  − it is in accordance with an approved Timber Harvesting Plan
• Rural activities, active recreational activies and tourist operations and associated use and
  development to be discretionary in the Forest Practices Zone. Other use and
  development to be prohibited in the Forest Practices Zone.
• Discretionary permit required for forest practices in the Forest Practices Zone where no
  approved Timber Harvesting Plan is in place.
• Forest practices to be discretionary in all other zones. Agro-forestry to be permitted in all
  other zones.
• Tree removal to be discretionary in all other zones.

FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS

• Prepare a policy on the preferred location of Private Timber Reserves to assist in
  processing and commenting on applications to declare new reserves.




Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                25
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EXTRACTIVE INDUSTRY
ISSUE OVERVIEW

1. Need to protect existing operations from encroachment of non-compatible activities
2. Need to recognise known/proven resources
3. Mineral exploration exempt from planning schemes

STRATEGIC PLAN LINKS
There is no relevant Vision Element or Strategic Direction.

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

• Quarry Code of Practice, Department of Environment and Land Management, Division of
  Environmental Management, December 1994
• Mining Act 1929
• Notes on procedures for occupation of land for mining purposes, 13th edition, 1991,
  Tasmania Department of Resources & Energy
• Tenement information from Tasmania Development and Resources, January 1996

DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

Current extractive industry activity
Tasmania Development and Resources indicates the following extractive industries are
located in the municipality:

         Location                            Product                   No. of
                                                                     operations
         Bangor                              Slate                       1
                                             Stone                       1
         Boomer Hills                        Stone                       1
         Camden Plains                       Gravel                      1
         Dilston                             Stone                       1
         Lilydale                            Stone                       3
         Nunamara                            Sandstone                   1
         Patersonia                          Gravel                      1
         Rocherlea                           Stone                       1
         St Patricks River                   Sand                        1
         Targa                               Gravel                      1
                                             Shale                       1
                                             Slate                       1
                                             Stone                       3
         Upper Blessington                   Stone                       1
         Vermont                             Stone                       2

Current planning provisions
Extractive industry definitions and their use status vary in the existing planning instruments.
However in general, extractive industry is discretionary in industrial and rural zones and
prohibited in other zones where sensitive uses are likely to establish. This approach
recognises the potential conflicts between this use and sensitive uses and should be
continued.

Quarry Code of Practice

Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                26
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The Quarry Code of Practice provides practical advice on the setting up and operation of
extractive pits. It applies to all extractive pits from which building construction and road
making materials (including sand, soil and clay) are obtained. It is frequently referred to as
extractive industry in planning schemes.

The code is not a legally enforcable document but intends to achieve good environmental
performance without the need to resort to legislative enforcement mechanisms. It provides
useful provisions which could be enforced as planning permit conditions or by issuing
Environment Protection Notices.

In particular the code recommends separation distances between quarries and sensitive
uses7. The code indicates:

“New quarries should not be located close to existing residences or other sensitive uses.
Similarly, proposals to locate new residences adjacent to existing quarries should be
discouraged, if possible, to reduce potential for environmental nuisance. It is suggested
planning authorities seek to maintain the following separation distances:

      Where no blasting, crushing or screening occurs                                     300 metres
      Where vibrating screens are utilised                                                500 metres
      Where material is crushed                                                           750 metres
      Where regular blasting takes place                                                 1000 metres

(measured from the planned maximum extent of quarry operations to any sensitive use).”

The code also advises that the separation distances may be reduced on the basis of
favourable reports on topography, building design etc.

The code and in particular, the recommended separation distances, should be used in
assessing proposals for new quarries or when considering proposals to contruct new houses
adjacent to existing quarries or in the vicinity of known or proven stone reserves.

Proven or known reserves
There is insufficient information available to accurately map stone and other resources for
future extraction. Where known, the location of potential reserves should be taken into
account when deciding on applications for use and development.

Mineral exploration exempt from planning schemes
A planning scheme does not affect the undertaking of mineral exploration in accordance with
an exploration licence, or retention licence, under the Mining Act 1929. The planning scheme
should recognise the above exemptions.

An Exploration Licence issued under the Mining Act 1929 allows/requires aerial, geological
and geophysical surverys and other exploration. A Retention Licence allows the holder to
carry out such geological, geophysical, and geotechnical programmes and other operations
and works as are reasonably necessary to evaluate the mining potential of an area. Possible
studies include mining feasibility, metallurgical testing, environmental, marketing,
engineering and design.

Possible planning scheme provisions



7
    The Quarry Code of Practice defines sensitive uses as: “... residences, residential areas (whether built on or not),
    schools, hospitals, caravan parks and other places at which individuals may abide for long periods for reasons
    other than employment or active recreation.”


Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                                                               27
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A planning scheme can control the location and operation of other extractive industries and
Council can impose conditions in respect to what roads vehicles can use, and it can require
the payment of tolls or levies, and can require the maintenance of specified roads.

The Environmental paper recommends the use of a Buffer Distance Policy Area to protect
existing major industrial uses from encroachment by incompatible uses which may
compromise the operation of those activities. This concept should also apply to existing
quarries and sensitive use such as dwellings and other accommodation facilities should be
prohibited within specified distances. These should be shown on the overlay maps.

POSSIBLE POLICY RESPONSE

Principles

• Recognise existing quarry operations and protect them from encroachment by
  inappropriate use and development.
• Protect known and proven reserves of stone and minerals for future use.

Planning scheme provisions
Policy area/zone provisions

• All existing quarries to be covered the Buffer Distance Policy Area recommended in the
  Environmental paper.

Purpose

• To recognise existing quarries and known and proven reserves of stone and minerals.

Content

• Definitions:
  − Mineral exploration
  − Extractive industry
  − Mining
• Mineral exploration in accordance with an exploration licence, or retention licence, under
  the Mining Act 1929 to be exempt from planning approval.
• Extractive industry and mining to be discretionary in General Industrial Zone and Rural
  Zone, and prohibited in other zones.

FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS
None are recommended.




Rural - DRAFT 3 - 15/12/2005                                                             28

				
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