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					JBoss Tools 3 Developer’s Guide
Build functional applications from
scratch to server deployment using
JBoss Tools




Anghel Leonard




                Chapter No. 3
             "JBoss Tools Palette"
In this package, you will find:
A Biography of the author of the book
A preview chapter from the book, Chapter NO.3 "JBoss Tools Palette"
A synopsis of the book’s content
Information on where to buy this book




About the Author
Anghel Leonard is a senior Java developer with more than 12 years of experience in
Java SE, Java EE, and the related frameworks. He wrote and published more than 20
articles about Java technologies and more than 100 tips and tricks. Also, he wrote two
books about XML and Java (one for beginners and one for advanced). In this time, he
developed web applications using the latest technologies on the market. In the past two
years he has been focused on developing RIA projects for GIS fields. He is interested to
bring onto the Web as much desktop as possible, therefore GIS applications represent a
real challenge for him.
         I want to thank my family, especially my wife.




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JBoss Tools 3 Developer’s Guide
Build functional applications from
scratch to server deployment using
JBoss Tools
This book will show you how to develop a set of Java projects using a variety of
technologies and scenarios. Everything is described through the "eyes" of JBoss Tools.
After we settle on the project (or scenario) that will be developed, we will configure the
proper environment for the current tool (those projects selected will cover between them
the main components of a web application in terms of the backstage technology). We
continue by exploring the tool for accomplishing our tasks and developing the project's
components. A cocktail of images, theoretical aspects, source codes, and step-by-step
examples will offer you a thoroughgoing for every tool. At the end, the project will be
deployed and tested. In addition, every chapter is "lard" with pure notions about the
underlying technology, which will initiate you into, or remind you of, the basic
aspects of it.
This book will show you complete and functional applications, and will familiarize you
with the main aspects of every tool. By the end you will have been provided with
sufficient information to successfully handle your own projects through JBoss Tools.


What This Book Covers
Chapter 1 is a compressive chapter that will help you discover the features brought by the
new JBoss Tools 3.0. The main goal of this chapter is to make an introduction to what
will follow in the next chapters and to "wake up" your curiosity. In addition, the reader
can see different possibilities of installing JBoss Tools on different platforms and for
different goals.
Chapter 2 teaches you how to use Eclipse and JBoss AS in a symbiotic manner. In this
chapter you will see how to use the JBoss AS Tools to configure, start, stop and monitor
the JBoss AS directly from Eclipse IDE. Also, you can see how to create and deploy
new projects.
Chapter 3 is a collection of tag-components from different technologies as Ajax, JSF,
RichFaces, Seam, and so on. Because the components are built on the drag-and-drop
technique, this tool is very easy to use, especially when you need a fast method for
generating tags into JSP pages. This chapter will cover—with description and
examples—the most important tags that can be generated through JBoss Palette. Also, the
chapter will contain a section about the Palette Options.


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Chapter 4 will talk about punctual framework's tools and I will start with JBoss Tools for
Java Server Faces. After I present the Faces Config Editor, which is the main visual
component for JSF support, I will follow the framework mains characteristics and I will
discuss—from the JSF Tools perspective—about managed beans, validators, converters,
navigation rules, and so on.
Chapter 5 will give you a complete cover of the graphical Struts editors that are used for
generating/managing XML documents (configuration, tiles, validators). Also, you will
see how to work with code generation and debug support for Struts projects. Everything
will be sustained by images (captures) and examples.
Chapter 6 will show you how to accomplish the most important modules of a Seam
project, like Action, Form, Entity, and so on through the Seam Tools filter in the first
part. Later, in the second part of the chapter, you will work with the visual editors
dedicated to increasing the speed of developing/controlling Seam components.
Chapter 7 will show some advanced skills, like Hibernate and Ant, generation of POJOs,
debugging goals and reverse engineering control after a detailed presentation of how to
use Hibernate Tools to speed up the configuration and mapping tasks.
Chapter 8 will discuss about the jBPM Tools. You will see how to develop and test a
complete jBPM project.
Chapter 9 will detail the main concepts of JBossESB Services, and you will see how to
use ESB Tools to develop such a Service.
Chapter 10 will help you create from scratch a WSDL document using WSDL Editor.
You will generate a complete web service from a WSDL document and from a Java bean
using WS Tools wizards, and you will publish a web service using jUDDI and Web
Services Explorer. In addition, you will see how to generate a web service's client, how to
test a web service through Web Services Explorer, how to convert WSDL documents to
WSIL documents and how to inspect WSDL web services through WSIL and WSE.
Chapter 11 will work with the Portal Tools. You will see how to use the wizards for
creating projects with Portlet Facets, creating the Java Portlet wizard and creating the
JSF/Seam Portlet wizard.




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                              JBoss Tools Palette
In this chapter, we will discuss the JBoss Tools Palette, which is a very useful tool
designed especially for speeding up the development of JSP, JSF, HTML, XHTML or
any other text file that contains tags. In principle, JBoss Tools Palette is a collection of
common tags, exposed through a flexible and easy-to-use interface.

By default, JBoss Tools Palette is available in the Web Development perspective that
can be displayed from the Window menu by selecting the Open Perspective | Other
option. In the following screenshot, you can see the default look of this palette:




Let's dissect this palette to see how it makes our life easier!




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JBoss Tools Palette


JBoss Tools Palette Toolbar
Note that on the top right corner of the palette, we have a toolbar made of three
buttons (as shown in the following screenshot). They are (from left to right):

    •    Palette Editor
    •    Show/Hide
    •    Import




Each of these buttons accomplishes different tasks for offering a high level of
flexibility and customizability. Next, we will focus our attention on each one
of these buttons.


Palette Editor
Clicking on the Palette Editor icon will display the Palette Editor window (as shown
in the following screenshot), which contains groups and subgroups of tags that are
currently supported. Also, from this window you can create new groups, subgroups,
icons, and of course, tags—as you will see in a few moments.




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                                                                                  Chapter 3

As you can see, this window contains two panels: one for listing groups of tag
libraries (left side) and another that displays details about the selected tag and
allows us to modify the default values (extreme right). Modifying a tag is a very
simple operation that can be done like this:

    1. Select from the left panel the tag that you want to modify (for example,
       the <div> tag from the HTML | Block subgroup, as shown in the
       previous screenshot).
    2. In the right panel, click on the row from the value column that corresponds
       to the property that you want to modify (the name column).
    3. Make the desirable modification(s) and click the OK button for confirming
       it (them).


Creating a set of icons
The Icons node from the left panel allows you to create sets of icons and import new
icons for your tags. To start, you have to right-click on this node and select the Create |
Create Set option from the contextual menu (as shown in the following screenshot).




This action will open the Add Icon Set window where you have to specify a
name for this new set. Once you're done with the naming, click on the Finish
button (as shown in the following screenshot). For example, we have created
a set named eHTMLi:




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JBoss Tools Palette

Importing an icon
You can import a new icon in any set of icons by right-clicking on the corresponding
set and selecting the Create | Import Icon option from the contextual menu
(as shown in the following screenshot):




This action will open the Add Icon window, where you have to specify a name and
a path for your icon, and then click on the Finish button (as shown in the following
screenshot). Note that the image of the icon should be in GIF format.




Creating a group of tag libraries
As you can see, the JBoss Tools Palette has a consistent default set of groups of tag
libraries, like HTML, JSF, JSTL, Struts, XHTML, etc. If these groups are insufficient,
then you can create new ones by right-clicking on the Palette node and selecting
the Create | Create Group option from the contextual menu (as shown in the
following screenshot).




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                                                                             Chapter 3




This action will open the Create Group window, where you have to specify a name
for the new group, and then click on Finish. For example, we have created a group
named mygroup:




Note that you can delete (only groups created by the user) or edit groups (any group)
by selecting the Delete or Edit options from the contextual menu that appears when
you right-click on the chosen group.


Creating a tag library
Now that we have created a group, it's time to create a library (or a subgroup). To
do this, you have to right-click on the new group and select the Create Group option
from the contextual menu (as shown in the following screenshot).




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JBoss Tools Palette

This action will open the Add Palette Group window, where you have to specify a
name and an icon for this library, and then click on the Finish button (as shown in
the following screenshot). As an example, we have created a library named eHTML
with an icon that we had imported in the Importing an icon section discussed earlier
in this chapter:




Note that you can delete a tag library (only tag libraries created by the user) by
selecting the Delete option from the contextual menu that appears when you
right-click on the chosen library.


Creating a new tag
After you have created a tag library, it is time to place your first tag in it. To do this,
you have to right-click on the tag library and select the Create | Create Macro option
from the contextual menu (as shown in the following screenshot).




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This action will open the Add Palette Macro window, where you can configure the
new tag. In this window, you have to specify:

   •   The tag Name (mandatory)—it is displayed in Tools Palette
   •   An Icon (optional)
   •   Start Text of the tag (optional)
   •   End Text of the tag (optional)
   •   Automatically Reformat Tag Body (mandatory).




For example, let's create a tag for representing the following HTML code, which is a
scrollable HTML table with a single column. We have named the tag <mytable>:
   <div style="overflow: auto; width: 270px; height:375px; padding:0px;
   margin: 0px">
   <table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
        <col width=270>
          <tr>
            <td width=270 valign="top" nowrap>
            </td>
          </tr>
   </table>
   </div>




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JBoss Tools Palette

For this, we fill up the Add Palette Macro as seen in the previous screenshot.

Note that you can delete a tag (only tags created by the user) by selecting the
Delete option from the contextual menu that appears when you right-click on
the chosen tag.

As you can see in the previous screenshot, there is no section for describing your
tag definition, syntax, attributes, etc. For that you can click on the tag name and
modify the description row from the right panel of the Palette Editor or you can
right-click on the tag name and select the Edit option from the contextual menu.
This will open the Edit window that contains a Description section as you can
see in the following screenshot:




In this section, we can write a tag description in HTML format. For example, for the
<mytable> tag, we have created the following description:

    <html>
      <table width="300">
       <tr>
         <td>
           <font color="OLIVE">
            <b>Name:</b>
           </font>
           <code>
            <br>Scrollable table
           </code><br>
           <font color="OLIVE">
            <b>Syntax:</b>
           </font>
           <code><br>&lt;div...&gt;&lt;table...&gt;<br>
           &lt;/table&gt;&lt;/div&gt;</code><br>
           <font color="OLIVE"><b>Atributes:</b></font>
           <br><code>CSS and table specific attributes</code>

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                                                                               Chapter 3

        </td>
       </tr>
      </table>
   </html>

Now, closing the Palette Editor by clicking the OK button will automatically add the
new group, the tag library, and the tag into the JBoss Tools Palette as shown in the
following figure (note the description that appears on mouse over).




Show/Hide
As the name suggests, this feature allows us to customize the number of groups
displayed in the palette. By default, the palette shows only five groups, but we can
add or remove groups by clicking on this button, which displays the window as
shown in the following screenshot.




In this window, select the groups and/or tag libraries that you want to see in the
palette and deselect the ones that you want to remove from the palette.

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JBoss Tools Palette

Importing third-party tag libraries
A great facility of JBoss Tools Palette is the ability to import third party tag libraries.
This can be done using the Import button, which opens the Import Tags from TLD
file window as shown in the following screenshot.




Now, it is mandatory to set the TLD file, and a name for the new tag library.
Optionally, we can specify a default prefix, a library URI, and a group that will
host the tag library (this can be an existing group or a new one). For example, in the
following screenshot you can see how we have imported the sql.tld library into a
JSF project (for now, all you can do is imagine this case, but keeping this in mind
will help you in the following chapters, where we will create real projects):




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Using tags in text files
In this section, we will discuss inserting tags from the Palette into our text files. This
is a very simple task that consists of the following steps:

    1. Navigate through the Palette until you see the tag that will be inserted.
    2. Click on this tag as you click on any button.
    3. If the tag has attributes, then you will see the Insert Tag window that allows
       you to customize the values of these attributes (the following screenshot
       represents the Insert Tag window for the <table> tag that can be found in
       HTML group, Table tag library). Note that if the selected tag doesn't have
       any attributes to be set, then this step will be skipped and the tag will be
       inserted into your page.




    4. After you have set the values of the attributes, simply click the Finish button.
       This action will automatically insert the chosen tag into your page. For
       example, in the following screenshot you can see the effect of inserting
       the <mytable> tag, created in the Create a new tag section, into an empty
       HTML page.




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JBoss Tools Palette

If you followed Chapter 2, then now you should have an empty project named
test. Expand the test | WebContent node, right-click on it, and select New | Other
option. In the New window, expand Web node and select HTML leaf. Type example
(without the .html extension) in the File name field and click on the Finish button.
Now, you have the shown example.html page and you can try to add our tag to it.
Also, you can play with other tags to get used to them! In the following chapters
this will be no more a task, it will simply be routine.



Summary
In this chapter, you have learnt how to use and customize the JBoss Tools Palette for
speeding up the development process of different kinds of pages, like JSP, HTML,
XHTML, etc. This will be an important skill to possess in the following chapters
when we will develop projects that contain many such pages.




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Where to buy this book
You can buy JBoss Tools 3 Developer’s Guide from the Packt Publishing website:
http://www.packtpub.com/developers-guide-for-jboss-tools-
3/book
Free shipping to the US, UK, Europe and selected Asian countries. For more information, please
read our shipping policy.
Alternatively, you can buy the book from Amazon, BN.com, Computer Manuals and
most internet book retailers.




                                    www.PacktPub.com




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