Australian Maritime College Maritime Transport Policy Centre

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					Australian Maritime College


Maritime Transport
Policy Centre


Research and Consultancy
Capability Statement


January 2010




           The Australian Maritime College is an institute of the University of Tasmania
Contents
1. Scope of activity ........................................................................................................... 3
   1a. Australian Maritime College (AMC) .............................................................................................. 3
   1b. National Centre for Marine Conservation and Resource Sustainability (NCMCRS) ...................... 4
   1c. National Centre for Maritime Engineering and Hydrodynamics (NCMEH) ................................... 4
   1d. National Centre for Ports and Shipping (NCPS)............................................................................. 4
   1e. AMC Search Ltd (AMCS) ................................................................................................................ 4
   1f. Maritime Transport Policy Centre (MTPC) ..................................................................................... 5
2. Disciplines: Application and scope ................................................................................ 5
3. Capability matrix .......................................................................................................... 8
   3a. Skills and capabilities .................................................................................................................... 8
   3b. Staff members ............................................................................................................................... 9
4. MTPC ADVISORY GROUP............................................................................................. 10
   4a. Purpose and functions................................................................................................................. 10
   4b. Membership ................................................................................................................................ 10




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                                               Vision
   It is our vision to be actively engaged with governments and the maritime
   industry in the development and formulation of maritime transport policy.



1. Scope of activity
1a. Australian Maritime College (AMC)
The AMC has become an international leader in the provision of training, education and research for
the maritime sector. It is amongst the top 10 maritime training institutions in the world, has a suite
of state‐of‐the‐art teaching and research facilities and attracts an international student cohort.

AMC is located across three purpose‐built campuses in Australia’s southern‐most state,
Tasmania. AMC’s main facilities are integrated into the Launceston campus of the University of
Tasmania in the city of Launceston. Some 45 minutes north at Beauty Point, on the western bank of
the Tamar River, are the seafaring and fisheries training facilities as well as AMC’s fleet of vessels.
Across Bell Bay, on the East Tamar, the Fire‐Fighting Centre caters for a range of emergency
response training.

From 1 January 2008 the AMC became an institute of the University of Tasmania, restructuring itself
around three National Centres. The National Centre for Ports and Shipping (NCPS), the
National Centre for Maritime Engineering and Hydrodynamics (NCMEH) and the National Centre for
Marine Conservation and Resource Sustainability (NCMCRS) reflect AMC’s diversity and areas of
expertise through a range of undergraduate, postgraduate and vocational courses. Business, the
marine environment, seafaring and maritime engineering all fall under AMC’s educational umbrella,
and AMC is committed to providing relevant teaching and research in areas ranging from naval
architecture to marine conservation. Some courses are available through AMC’s highly regarded
distance education programs.

To support AMC’s activities is a suite of world‐class facilities used by students, researchers, industry
partners and commercial clients alike. AMC’s new Centre for Maritime Simulation and the recently
opened Cavitation Research Laboratory join the 100m Towing Tank, Model Test Basin, Aquaculture
Centre, Emergency Response Centre and fleet of training vessels, including the 35m purpose‐built
Bluefin, as major facilities for students and researchers. They attract research partners including the
Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO), Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO),
commercial shipping companies, designers, port authorities etc.

AMC places an emphasis on working closely with the industries its graduates serve. This has given
rise to several specialist bodies within AMC including the Maritime Transport Policy Centre (MTPC)
and the Port Development Unit. AMC’s commercial arm, AMC Search, draws on AMC staff and
facilities to actively engage in industry‐based consultancy and training. It is this continued
relationship with industry that ensures AMC remains relevant and its graduates remain in high
demand with an employment rate approaching 100%.




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1b. National Centre for Marine Conservation and Resource
Sustainability (NCMCRS)
The NCMCRS brings together the study of the natural sciences with policy and management. The
combining of these study areas leads to an understanding of how to sustainably manage the marine
environment for future generations. Careful planning and good policy decisions will ensure our
oceans and coastlines are managed sustainably into the future.

Graduates are employed in professional, scientific and technical jobs across a broad range of marine
related areas, which include coastal and marine tourism, wild fisheries management and operations,
seafood industries, aquaculture, shipping, the off-shore industries, non-governmental organisations
and all levels of government, from local to global areas including policy development and marine
parks.


1c. National Centre for Maritime Engineering and Hydrodynamics
    (NCMEH)
The NCMEH offers Australia's premier maritime engineering degrees to service the needs of the
maritime industry. Studies focus on ocean engineering, naval architecture or marine and offshore
systems and equip graduates with the skills required to design, build and test some of the largest
structures on the planet.

Graduates are employed worldwide, designing and managing huge installations for the offshore oil
and gas industry, or following careers specialising in coastal engineering, underwater vehicles, and
port and harbour design. Naval Architects are employed in the Australian high speed ferry industry,
marine surveying organisations, as well as in companies that design and build leisure craft, sailing
and power yachts.


1d. National Centre for Ports and Shipping (NCPS)
The NCPS provides study in the areas of maritime business, logistics, technology management and
both ‘blue water’ and ‘brown water’ seafaring. The focus is on providing a real understanding of the
maritime industry and shipboard operations by drawing on the professional and life experiences of
staff.

Seafaring graduates are employed aboard domestic and international ships as well as in pilotage,
marine surveying, terminal operations and stevedoring. Other graduates are engaged in logistics,
cargo handling, ports and terminals management, maritime law, operational planning and
management, importing and exporting.


1e. AMC Search Ltd (AMCS)
AMCS is a specialised, client-focussed organisation, providing maritime related training and
consultancy for a wide range of international and Australian organisations and individuals. The
facilities and resources of the AMC are available for commercial use through AMCS.

AMC Search has ISO 9001:2008 Quality Certification which, together with regular audits by the
Australian Maritime Safety Authority, educational authorities, and the Department of Defence,
ensures that all training services meet or exceed the relevant requirements.


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1f. Maritime Transport Policy Centre (MTPC)
The MTPC facilitates research into maritime policy. Its role is to provide independent advice to
governments and the maritime industry on maritime transport policy and related issues. To achieve
its brief, the MTPC consults widely with government and industry; it conducts and facilitates
political, economic, social, technical, legal and environmental analysis.

The MTPC uses the experience, knowledge and skills of AMC and UTAS staff, as well drawing on its
wide-ranging national and international maritime industry, government and academic networks for
support. This ensures its work is contemporary and relevant.

Recent work includes:

Consultancies
    AMCS consultancy for Port of Melbourne Corporation, August 2008; Review of Harbour
        Towage Services in the Port of Melbourne, Stage One – Operational Issues, Stage Two –
        Institutional Arrangements.
    AMCS consultancy for Port of Melbourne Corporation, October 2009; Development of a new
        Port of Melbourne Corporation: Operations Handbook.
Publications
    MTPC Occasional Paper 1, January 2009; A review of some solutions to the shortage of
        maritime skills.
    MTPC Occasional Paper 2, August 2009; Salvaging and developing a national flag fleet: a
        review of the contemporary maritime policies of some advanced industrial nations.
Research Projects
    Climate change project: 'A preliminary assessment of the vulnerability of Australian ports to
        climate change', funded by a University of Tasmania cross theme grant.
    Regional port project: 'A study to analyse the role of regional ports in their local innovation
        systems', funded by the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and
        Local Government.
Workshops
    Maritime skills shortage workshop; Melbourne, July 2008.
    Vulnerability of Australian ports to climate change workshops; Launceston and Melbourne,
        September 2009.




2. Disciplines: Application and scope

The Council of the University of Tasmania Ordinance 15 (12 October 2007), as amended by Ordinance
137 (6 June 2008), states that the objectives of AMC are:
     providing maritime and related education and training suitable for seafarers and other
        participants in the maritime industry; and
     conducting examinations and assessments for marine competency under the Navigation Act
        1912; and
     conducting research activities and programs relating to maritime and related education and
        training, including pure and applied research, consultancies for government and industry
        and research training.


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To achieve these objectives, several disciplines are applied to a range of maritime activities; Table
2.1 illustrates:

DISCIPLINE:           APPLIED TO:

Commerce
Economics
Education
Engineering
Environment            Transport of cargoes and people;
Finance                Commercial, recreational and military shipping;
Law                    Ports and terminals;
Management             Marine resources.
Operations
Politics
Social
Technology
Table 2.1: Disciplines applied to maritime activities



The broad scope of each discipline, as deemed useful by industry is described in Table 2.2 as follows:

DISCIPLINE:           SCOPE:

Commerce                      Domestic and international trade, trade agreements and commodities;
                              Markets, trading patterns, tariffs and new markets;
                              Transport and logistics, supply chain management;
                              Commercial transactions, contractual arrangements, arbitration.
Economics                     Global and domestic economic influences;
                              Analysis of the impact of economic policy settings;
                              Economic multipliers and employment creation;
                              Economic and statistical recording, analysis and reporting;
                              Assessment of comparative modal infrastructure investment,
                               cost/benefit analysis and comparison.
Education                     Tertiary, vocational and professional pedagogy;
                              Standards for training programs, teachers and trainees for industry;
                              Certification requirements and processes;
                              Recognition of mutual training standards, prior learning;
                              Technical skills and trades;
                              Maritime Training.
Engineering                   Naval architecture, ship design, hydrodynamics;
                              Offshore facilities, sub-sea infrastructure;
                              Ship stability, structural forces and stresses, damage effects;
                              Cargo handling design and equipment;
                              Port design and hydrology;
                              Integration of ships, port and terminal infrastructure, inter-modal
                               linkages.
Environment                   Climate change, physical, ecological, social and economic impacts (e.g.
                               meteorological, hydrographical, oceanographic and marine biological
                               effects);

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                             Ship emissions, carbon reduction, emissions trading schemes;
                             Australian Quarantine Inspection Service, ballast water and introduced
                              species;
                          Hull coatings.
Finance                   Domestic and comparative international maritime fiscal policies;
                          Foreign investment, currency exchange rates, domestic and
                              international financial markets;
                          Taxation regimes; maritime corporate and personal taxation
                              structures.
Law                       Legislation, judiciary, arbitration and mediation;
                          Federation influences and cross-jurisdictional cooperation (domestic
                              and international);
                          Treaties and conventions;
                          Enforcement.
Management                Ship management, shipboard management and organisation;
                          Maritime human resources, manning practices, career opportunities;
                          Port and terminal management;
                          Supply chain management.
Operations                Cargo preparation, cargo handling and stowage, dangerous goods;
                          Pollution prevention, response and mitigation;
                          Response to maritime emergencies;
                          Casualty accident investigation and analysis;
                          Ship handling;
                          Harbour operations;
                          Navigation.
Politics                  Political agenda, electoral influences, lobbying;
                          Government structures, strategies, policy setting processes;
                          Domestic and international regional cooperation groups;
                          National maritime defence.
Social                    Culture and language;
                          Fair treatment of seafarers;
                          Occupational health and safety, fatigue management;
                          Immigration, visa and security requirements (into Australia and other
                              countries), and issues.
Technology                Communication systems, information, monitoring and record keeping;
                          E-commerce and transactions;
                          Navigation and marine engineering systems, equipment, automation;
                          Mineral exploration and exploration technology.
Table 2.2: Broad scope of disciplines




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3. Capability matrix
3a. Skills and capabilities
The following Table 3.1 lists individuals with specific skills and capabilities for each broad discipline
area. It should be noted that the listed individuals are not necessarily skilled in the full scope of the
discipline. Their full names and job titles are listed below the table in section 3b overleaf.


DISCIPLINE:           STAFF MEMBER:
Commerce              SC; JF; HH
Economics             ON
Education             MNB; HH; SBL; JL; MP; AS
Engineering           MRR
Environment           MC; MNB
Finance               SBL; ON
Law                   JF
Management            SC; PC; HH; SBL
Operations            MC; RD; IR; JL; AS; DS
Politics               SBL; MP
Social                SBL; MP
Technology            MP
Table 3.1: Staff capability matrix



The MTPC is a relatively new and developing unit. It facilitates projects by creating teams drawn
from the AMC/ UTAS and industry. Teams generally comprise academics with specialist backgrounds
but with varying levels of experience in research and consultancy. The diverse background,
experience and skills of AMC/University staff ensure that the MTPC has significant maritime
transport policy research capability. However, the capacity of the MTPC to undertake some
research/consultancies is necessarily limited on some occasions by the academic
commitments/availability of staff.




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3b. Staff members

Dr Stephen Cahoon (SC)
Head of Maritime and Logistics Management Department, NCPS

Associate Professor Marnie Campbell (MC)
Head of Marine Conservation Department, NCMCRS

Dr Peggy Chen (PC)
Lecturer, Department of Maritime and Logistics Management, NCPS

Captain Richard Dunham (RD)
Senior Lecturer, Maritime Training, Ocean, NCPS

John Francis (JF)
Director, Maritime Transport Policy Centre

Hilary Haugstetter (HH)
Lecturer in Charge, Department of Maritime and Logistics Management, NCPS

Professor Barrie Lewarn (BL)
Project Director, Maritime Transport Policy Centre

Captain John Lloyd (JL)
Director, NCPS

Dr Melissa Nursey-Bray (MNB)
Lecturer, Marine Conservation Department, NCMCRS

Dr Owen Nguyen (ON)
Lecturer, Department of Maritime and Logistics Management

Professor Malek Pourzanjani (MP)
Principal/Pro Vice Chancellor (AMC/University of Tasmania)

Professor Martin Renilson (MRR)
Australian Maritime Hydrodynamics Research Centre, NCMEH

Captain Ian Rodrigues (IR)
Manager, Centre for Maritime Simulations, NCPS

Captain Anura Seneviratne (AS)
Head, Department for Maritime Training (Ocean), NCPS


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Captain Darrel Silva (DS)
Senior Lecturer, Maritime Training (Ocean), NCPS



4. MTPC ADVISORY GROUP
4a. Purpose and functions
MTPC is in the process of establishing an Advisory Group. This group will assist in identifying
contemporary and emerging maritime policy issues that merit research, stakeholders whose input
should be sought for defining and developing research projects, and potential sources of funding for
maritime policy research. The group will also provide strategic advice and champion the wider use of
MTPC as a research facility throughout government and the maritime industry.


4b. Membership
The membership of the Advisory Group will comprise an eclectic mix of people from the maritime
industry with the ability to assist the MTPC perform its role and to achieve its vision:




                                             Vision
   It is our vision to be actively engaged with governments and the maritime
   industry in the development and formulation of maritime transport policy.




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