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Deep Vein Thrombosis - Dr. Ramesh Tripathi_ Vascular Surgeon and

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Deep Vein Thrombosis - Dr. Ramesh Tripathi_ Vascular Surgeon and Powered By Docstoc
					      What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis
      (DVT)?
• DVT is a blood clot that forms
  in a vein deep in the body
• Most often occurs in the deep veins
  of the legs, either above the knee or
  below it
• The blood clot or part of it can break
  free (called embolism) and become
  lodged in the blood vessels of the lung,
  causing pulmonary embolism (PE)
            DVT: A National Public Health
            Crisis1
• Up to 2 million people in the United States suffer from DVT every year 2,3
• Complications of DVT, such as PE, kill up to 200,000 people each year, more
  people than AIDS and breast cancer combined 2-6




      Some Causes of Death in the US                                             Annual No. of Deaths

       PE                                                                         Up to 200,000

      AIDS                                                                        16,371
       Breast cancer                                                              40,580




1. American Public Health Association. Available at: http://www.apha.org/news/press/2003/DVT_whitepaper.pdf.
2. Gerotziafas GT. Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2004;10:356-365. 3. Anderson FA Jr. Arch Intern Med. 1991;151:933-938.
4. Centers for Disease Control. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov. 5. American Cancer Society. Available at:
http://www.cancer.org. 6. Bick RL. Clin Appl Thromb Hemost. 1999;5:2-9.
           Some Risk Factors for DVT1
• Illness or injury that causes prolonged immobility increases the
  risk of a DVT
• Age >40 years (VTE risk increases with advancing age)
• Birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy
• Cancer and its treatment
• Major surgery (example: abdomen, pelvis, or hip or knee replacement)
• Obesity
• Previous DVT or PE
• A family history of blood clots7
• Certain heart problems
• Varicose veins
• Faulty blood clotting is an uncommon cause — an example is an inherited condition
  that causes the blood to clot more easily than usual (factor V Leiden)




            The more risk factors a person has, the greater
               the chances may be of developing DVT8
1. American Public Health Association. Available at: http://www.apha.org/news/press/2003/DVT_whitepaper.pdf.
7. Geerts WH. Chest. 2004;126(suppl):338S-400S. 8. Kibel AS. J Urol. 1995;153:1763-1774.
            Symptoms of DVT and PE1

 DVT                                                                         PE
 • Swelling of the leg                                                       •    Unexplained shortness of breath
 • Pain or tenderness in the leg; the                                        •    Chest pain and/or palpitations
   pain is usually in 1 leg and may only                                     •    Anxiety and/or sweating
   be present when standing or
   walking                                                                   •    Coughing/coughing up blood
 • Skin that is warm to the touch in the                                     •    Fatigue and/or fainting
   leg
 • Red or discolored skin




Not all people with DVT have signs or symptoms1



1. American Public Health Association. Available at: http://www.apha.org/news/press/2003/DVT_whitepaper.pdf.
      Diagnosing DVT
• Diagnosis may begin by confirming that you have risk factors
  for DVT
• Your doctor will ask about your general health, previous illnesses, including
  past episodes of DVT, the medicines you are taking, and your recent activities
• He or she will conduct a physical examination
• If DVT is suspected, additional tests will be needed to confirm
  the diagnosis
      Treating DVT
• Treatment of DVT can help reduce the risk of complications,
  such as PE
• The main goals in treating DVT are to help:
    – Stop the clot from getting larger
    – Reduce the chance of having another clot develop
    – Prevent the clot from breaking off in your vein and moving to your lungs
      Treating DVT
• Drugs
    – Anticoagulants (blood thinners)
    – Thrombolytic agents (drugs used to dissolve blood clots)
    – Thrombectomy (surgery to remove clots when limb viability is in danger)
    – IVC filters to prevent Pulmonary Embolism and fatal death



• Practical measures
    – Elevate the affected leg whenever possible
    – Apply heat to relieve pain and reduce swelling
    – Wear compression stockings or support hose
     – Avoid long periods of immobility
      Preventing DVT
•          The good news is that DVT may be prevented




• If you are planning to have surgery or an extended hospital stay, ask your
  doctor what you can do to reduce your risk of DVT. Some examples could be:

     – Getting out of bed and moving around as soon as possible after having
       surgery or being ill
     – Taking medicines to prevent clots during certain illnesses in the hospital or
       surgery, as directed by your doctor
      Summary
• DVT is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body
• The clot or part of it may break off and travel to the lung
• Many conditions may increase your risk for deep vein clots
• The more risk factors a person has, the greater the chances may be of
  developing DVT
• Not all people with DVT have symptoms
• The main goals in treating DVT are to stop the clot from getting bigger, to
  decrease your chance of having another clot, and to stop the clot from breaking
  off in your vein and moving to your lungs
• Medicines are used to treat DVT and help reduce the risk of DVT



              ASK TO BE TREATED BY A VASCULAR SURGEON
                        IT WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE !
      Talk to Your Doctor
• It’s important to share your concerns about cardiovascular health and DVT
  with your doctor
• Ask questions and be prepared to provide accurate information about your
  lifestyle, diet, exercise routine, and medications
• Anyone who’s off his or her feet due to illness, injury, or surgery, or who has
  ever had a blood clot, should talk to a doctor about DVT and its prevention
      Remember…
• DVT doesn't have to happen to you it may be prevented
• DVT may be treated if it does happen




For more information:
visit www.vascularsurgeon.org
or Call Tel. : +91-11-2692585, 26925801, Extn. 1953
TeleFax: +91-11-26825573
email: ramesh.tripathi@vascularsurgeon.org

				
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