; Sbusiso Leope was born on the 28th of May 1979 and grew up as the
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Sbusiso Leope was born on the 28th of May 1979 and grew up as the

VIEWS: 391 PAGES: 3

  • pg 1
									Sbusiso Leope was born on the 28th of May 1979 and grew up as the only son of a Policeman father 
and housewife in a four roomed house full of cousins in the Gauteng township of Tembisa. After 
matriculating from boarding school in Pretoria at the tender age of 14 he did a year of entry level 
engineering at TUT before heading back to Johannesburg to enroll at Wits Tech. The bright lights and 
club paved streets of Jozi, saw him loosing focus and failing first year, “I wanted to go to parties and 
bashes and experience kwaito and see Mdu, Arthur and TKZee, and I just loved music.” He dropped 
out and because he was too scared to tell his parents he’d failed, ran away from home and went to 
live in a bachelor flat in Hillbrow.  

But the problem was money. So he got a job as a door to door sales man, “I wanted to go back to 
tech, so I saved as much as possible, my parents couldn’t afford to pay for tech.” After being spotted 
by an aunt whilst selling in town, DJ S'bu had to go and tell his parents what he’d been up to for the 
past three months. By 97 DJ S’bu had saved enough to register himself at Wits Tech. While 
supporting himself selling cell phones, it was on campus that the foundation for his future career in 
music and media was laid.  

He played at parties, created his own gigs and was a DJ on Channel T radio at Wits Tech and also 
Tembisa Info Radio. The good times didn’t impact on his studies this time round. By the end of 97 
he’d received a bursary from Eskom and by 2000 was working there. “I was still playing gigs and I just 
kept on making demos and taking them to people at radio stations.” He particularly wanted to be on 
YFM, “It was a voice for us Jozi youth. I felt ‘That’s where I belong.’” S'bu’s chance came when YFM 
ran a competition called Tropika Voice Of The Future, he won 10 000 and the graveyard show at the 
weekend with two other DJs. He was ecstatic, “It was like ‘Geez I work at Y!’ I had my foot in the 
door.” So it was no surprise when he resigned from Eskom and joined the talent agency Gaynor and 
started to get bit parts on TV shows and adverts.  

By 2002 he was presenting a prime time music talent show called Gumba Fire on SABC 1 and starting 
to fulfill his aim of being “The toppest on both radio and TV.” Life seemed so good, but disaster 
struck when S’bu was fired from YFM over a misunderstanding. But a month later he was called back 
to the station as the technical producer on Rude Boy Paul and Unathi’s afternoon drive show. It was 
on their show that he introduced the world to Mzekezeke, a man who would change S’bu’s life and 
South African youth culture forever.  

Why Mzekezeke?” He represented ordinary folk and a lot of people identified with him. He 
represented those Kasi people who can’t speak proper English. Everyone was so American and 
loosing their township essence and people were made to feel dumb just because they couldn’t speak 
English, he made it cool because he was simply saying ‘This is who I am’. “ S’bu adds, “He was a voice 
for the voiceless and said things people were afraid to say or had no platform to say and that 
touched peoples’ hearts. Mzekezeke would call celebrities and say ‘give me a deal hook me up, or 
he’d call local government officials with complaints about services in the township for instance. “ 
S’Bu continues, “Apart from being so funny he also inspired people to just do their thing without 
being self conscious, he was no holds barred and just went out to get his and he blew up on air!”  

One day at YFM he came across Thembinkosi Nciza (TK), who worked at leading record label Ghetto 
Ruff. They clicked and discovered they’d both love to open their own record label. TK and S’bu 
brought Mapaputsi to Ghetto Ruff, developed him as an artist and in the end Mapaputsi’s album and 
single Izinja was a major hit. They realized, “If we can build him from scratch, why not form our own 
company and record our own artists?” The year was 2002 and Mzekezeke was the first artist on TS 
Records. “TK and I wanted everyone to respect and take pride in township culture. Kwaito was our 
voice as young people of SA” Explains S’Bu. “At a time when everyone else was getting house 
influenced, we said ‘No man, we need to bring the hard core, original kwaito back.” S’bu and TK 
heard the amazingly hot track that would be ‘S’guqa Ngamadolo’ and DJ Cleo was immediately asked 
to produce Mzekezeke’s album. Mzekezeke was simply the biggest thing in the land. The impact of 
the hysterically funny masked man in overalls was so major that the nation got down on their knees 
and awarded Mzekezeke the Artist Of The Year and Song Of The Year SAMA Awards in 2003.  

The TS Records roster diversified to include two more kwaito acts the super popular Brown Dash and 
Izinyoka as well as Afro Pop sensation Ntando. Robbie Malinga is also a TS artist. Since the departure 
of Brown Dash and Ntando, Nhlanhla of Mafikizolo fame is now set to release her much anticipated 
solo album through TS. In the past five years TS Records have consistently won in the same 
categories, showing how much they’re in touch with the musical needs of the nation. Mzekezeke, 
Brown Dash, Afro Pop act Ntando and house DJ Sbu have not only over 20 awards, but they’ve been 
huge successes sales wise too.  

By 2004 DJ S’bu had moved up way up the YFM ladder and landed a prime time slot that was the 
afternoon drive show. In true S’bu style named the show after the township word for radio or 
wireless ‐ DJ Sbu on The Y Lens. S’Bu describes his show as following a tradition the late DJ Khabzela 
had started, “My inspiration came from Khabzela, he remained true to himself on air and stuck to 
township language. Instead of trying to be American he made township culture cool. I followed suit.” 
And DJ S’bu ended up with the biggest 3 – 6pm show in Gauteng. When he was asked to move to a 
night slot and tone down the township taal, DJ Sbu left YFM.  

A few months later, the biggest radio station in the land Ukhozi FM approached him and offered him 
their breakfast show. They were the biggest station in the country (and second biggest in the world!) 
but in Gauteng were only fourth. He says that even though isiZulu is not his mother tongue, they felt 
he’d be open to learning and would be the perfect person to “Attract an urban Gauteng audience 
and a middle class high LSM market. Obviously they wanted a lot of young listeners as well.” He took 
up the challenge, “I had too! I’m not going to leave an audience of 7 million! It’s the biggest platform 
ever.  

It’s always been my dream to speak to the most people.” Why did they choose him?” They needed a 
trendsetter, someone to help them move with the times and change the perception that Ukhozi was 
a traditional and old station. I was brought in to change that perception and bring in what’s fresh, 
current and now. His show Ezasekseni began on the 1st of April 2007 and he describes it as “Pacey 
and entertaining but also informative and responsible. We speak to young and old about everything 
from culture and entertainment to current affairs and sport…I play everything from traditional music 
to kwaito, house and Afro pop, it’s not your typical old Ukhozi playlist.  

I’ve spiced it up!” Though by 2006 he had left YFM, the popularity of his show endured so he named 
his first house compilation Y Lens Volume 1 that was released at the end of ‘06 (produced by 
Stethoscope, DJ Mbuso, Nutty Nys and Angry DJ) after the show. “The concept of the CD was to put 
my show on the CD, so on the CD there are snippets from the show – the humour, nonsense and 
laughs.” Next up is his DVD, The Making Of The Y Lens…. With 200 000 sales Y Lens Volume 1 went 
five times platinum, and it’s become his label’s biggest success. In 2007 the lead single off his album 
‘Remember When It Rained’ was crowned The Song Of The Year at the South African Music Awards, 
“I looked at the crowd and saw everyone in the industry ‐ people who’ve known me from when I 
started and seen how far I’d come ‐ standing up and giving me a five minute standing ovation. That’s 
real respect right there. …” Says DJ S’Bu of this career highlight. DJ S’bu aims to keep those highlights 
coming, making sure TS keeps on making hits, but also expanding into big business and new areas 
like endorsing big brands, marketing, advertising, events, clothes and eventually their own radio and 
TV channel. He even wants to write a book. ‘When I grew up it was only thugs in flashy cars and nice 
clothes that were looked up to. I want to be a positive role model and uplift my community. My 
biggest achievement is having been able to show young people of today that they can do it on their 
own – you just need the will to succeed.” 

								
To top