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					                                                                                  Part F Guidelines



                                              Salt Lake County
                                Social Services Block Grant (SSBG)
                                        Proposal Guidelines
General Rules
All Proposals must comply with the regulations of the Social Services Block Grant (SSBG) program at 45
CFR Part 96 and described by the specific guidelines below.

County Funding Priorities for FY 11-12 and FY 12-13

I. REMOVING LANGUAGE & CULTURAL BARRIERS

Purpose/Objective: To reduce language and cultural barriers that prevents County residents and
their families from using community resources to address serious issues impacting daily living.

Target population to be served: Residents and households in Salt Lake County whose native
language is not English or who have similar problems in accessing resources.

Funding amounts: The award amounts in this priority area will be based on the number and quality of
eligible Proposals received and the total amount of government funds available from all sources
to support efforts in this area. At this time it is projected that $ 214,000 will be available in this
category. Currently the County is providing $242,000 to 13 agencies with contracts ranging
between $ 7,500 and $34,000.

Proposal preferences and restrictions:
    Agencies need to indicate how their proposal will address the needs in the United Way of
      Salt Lake 2010 Community Assessment regarding “Immigrant and Refugee Integration.”
      (http://www.uw.org/images/stories/commasses2010_low-res.pdf)
    To maximize the impact of limited funding, SSBG prefers funding projects which
      collaborate with mainstream agencies to meet identified needs.
    Proposals need to address current gaps in services and funding and identify how
      requested services will compliment existing efforts in the community.
    Funding is not intended to support services to refugees who originally resettled in Utah
      during their first 24 months in the State.
    The County is particularly interested in projects that clearly impact the entire
      household/family and improve self-reliance and employability.

II. PREVENTING HOMELESSNESS AMONG HIGH RISK POPULATIONS

Purpose/Objective: To focus on the prevention goals of the County’s Ten Year Plan to End
Chronic Homelessness.

Target population to be served: County residents at risk of becoming homeless with preference
given to efforts addressing populations most at-risk.
                                                                                  Part F Guidelines


Funding amounts: The award amounts in this priority area will be based on the number and quality
of eligible Proposals received and the total amount of government funds available from all
sources to support efforts in this area. At this time it is projected that $ 88,400 will be available
in this category. Currently the County is providing $100,000 among five agencies with contracts
ranging between $10,000-$ 40,000.

Proposal restrictions and preferences:
       “At Risk Of Homelessness” refers to an individual or family that has insufficient
           resources immediately available to attain housing stability; and
               (i) Has moved frequently because of economic reasons;
               (ii) Is living in the home of another because of economic hardship;
               (iii)Has been notified that their right to occupy their current housing or living
                    situation will be terminated;
               (iv) Lives in a hotel or motel;
               (v) Lives in severely overcrowded housing;
               (vi) Is exiting an institution; or
               (vii) Otherwise lives in housing that has characteristics associated with
                    instability and an increased risk of homelessness
       Proponents need to identify how their proposal will support the County’s Ten Year
           Plan to End Chronic Homelessness (www.crd.slco.org).
       Funding is not intended for services to people who are considered homeless. Rather
           monies are intended to fill the gaps in homeless prevention efforts with preference
           given to programs that may not be eligible for other government funding available in
           this area.
       For improved coordination, the County would prefer that programs participate in the
           Homeless Management Information System.

III. INCREASING QUALITY, AFFORDABLE AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Purpose/Objective: To provide households with at-risk youth of elementary school and junior
high school age with affordable, after-school programming that stresses academic achievement,
community involvement and leadership development. The intent is to increase the number of
households with youth in consistent, quality, after-school programs.

Target population to be served: Low-income or otherwise disadvantaged elementary and junior
high school age youth who do not have access to other after-school programs.

Funding amounts: The award amounts in this priority area will be based on the number and quality
of eligible Proposals received and the total amount of government funds available from all
sources to support efforts in this area. At this time it is projected that $ 181,000 will be available
in this category. Currently the County is providing $204,600 among six agencies with contracts
ranging between $ 20,000-$ 50,000.

Proposal restrictions and preferences:
       “After school programming” refers to activities conducted during a school year which
           may include activities before school, during off-track breaks and on periodic days
           when school is not in session. It does not include summer programs when a school is
           normally out of session.
                                                                                Part F Guidelines


          Such efforts must have formal enrollment, regular attendance records and provide a
           consistent program. Preference will be given to proposals that offer programming 5
           days a week.
           After school programs are expected to participate in the Utah After School Network
           self-assessment effort and to meet minimum quality standards.
          The County will consider funding junior high school programs in areas where
           elementary school age programs exist in order to provide a continuum of service that
           benefit working families with children of varying ages.
          County funding is not intended for projects that are primarily recreational in nature.
           Preference will be given to programs where at least 70% of the youth’s scheduled
           activities are focused on academic enhancement and community services
          Preference will be given to Proposals that serve youth in the unincorporated areas of
           Salt Lake County.
          Preference will also be given to Proposals addressing youth populations most at risk.

Service Categories within each Priority Area.

Part F Guidelines/Definitions contains a list of the allowable service categories and their federal
definitions. In addressing the County’s priorities for this funding, the proposal must use
requested funding to provide one of the following services:
     Case Management Services
     Education and Training Services
     Employment Services
     Health Related and Home Based Services
     Housing Services
     Information and Referral
     Independent and Transitional Living Services
     Legal Services
     Special Services for Youth Involved or At-Risk of Criminal Behavior

Amount and Duration of Funding
About $483,000 of Salt Lake County funding may be available to fund program proposals within
the County’s three priority areas. Proposals need to request a minimum of $20,000 in SSBG
funds. Final SSBG awards may fall below this minimum request level.

SSBG funding is expected to be available for the fiscal year 2011-12 beginning July 1, 2011, and
ending June 30, 2012. Successful proposals for FY12 funding may have their contracts extended
for another year (FY13). In making this determination, the County will consider the following
factors: 1) availability of FY13 funding 2) program performance measures 3) satisfactory
contract management 4) status as a recently established program.

Who May Apply
   Non-profit and government entities which directly provide human services to Salt Lake
    County residents are eligible to submit proposals. Non-profit entities must submit proof of
    existing 501c (3) status in order to be eligible to apply for funding.
   Preference will be given to collaborative proposals that work with the community and private
    non-profit organizations
                                                                                Part F Guidelines


Training and Technical Assistance for Proponents
Community Resources and Development staff will be available to provide technical assistance to
applicants through December 13th, 2010. Call Dorothy Owen at 801-468-2189 for assistance.
TTY Users call 7-1-1. Agencies are strongly encouraged to contact staff early in the
proposal process regarding any questions related to the agency’s eligibility or the project’s
suitability for funding.

Salt Lake County and the Division of Community Resources and Development will conduct a
pre-proposal training for interested agencies on Wednesday, November 17th from 3:00-5:00
pm in Room N2003 in the County Government Center 2001 South State Street (North
Building). A repeat of the information will be presented at a second training session on
Tuesday, November 23rd from 3:00-5:00 pm in Room S1007 in the County Government
Center (South Building). Unless other arrangements are made, attendance at one of these
trainings is required of any agency submitting a proposal.

Proposal Deadline
Submit two (2) complete proposals (with original authorizing signatures) in one sealed envelope
for each program proposal. The letters “SSBG” should be printed on the outside of the envelope.
Proposal forms and narratives MUST be received in the Salt Lake County Contracts &
Procurement Office, 2001 South State Street, Room N-4500, before 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday
December 14, 2010. Any proposals submitted after that time or to any location other than the
one listed will be rejected.

Proposal Review
Proposals will be reviewed and recommendations made to the Salt Lake County Mayor by a
citizen review panel appointed by the Salt Lake County Mayor. Upon receipt, each proposal will
be reviewed by Community Resources and Development staff to determine whether it meets the
minimum requirements of this document. Proposals that do not meet the requirements of the
RFP will not be considered further, and the agency will be so notified within ten (10) working
days of the receipt of the proposal.

The subsequent review of accepted proposals will consist of an evaluation of the information in
the project proposal. For programs which have previously received County funding, additional
information may be evaluated regarding the operation of that contract. Citizen reviewers may
also conduct interviews when necessary to complete their evaluation of the proposals. Such
interviews may be conducted by a subcommittee. Proposals addressing homeless prevention
may include additional reviewers outside the Social Services Advisory Council in order to
provide a more in-depth system perspective.

Appeal Procedures
Agencies who are aggrieved by the Division’s eligibility determination may protest to the
County Purchasing Agent. A protest regarding the Division’s eligibility determination shall be
submitted in writing within five (5) working days after the aggrieved party has received
notification from the Division. Protest letters to the Purchasing Agency should specifically
state the facts and the desired remedy. Further details are set forth in section 3.20.140, Salt Lake
County Code of Ordinances.
                                                                               Part F Guidelines



Employee Status Verification System
The Proponent will be required to register and participate in the Status Verification System
before entering into a contract with the County as required by Utah Code Section 63G-11-
103(3). The Status Verification System is an electronic system operated by the federal
government, through which an authorized official of a state agency or a political subdivision of
the state may inquire by exercise of authority delegated pursuant to 8 U.S.C. § 1373 to verify the
citizenship or immigration status of an individual within the jurisdiction of the agency or
political subdivision. The proponent will be individually responsible for verifying the
employment status of only new employees who work under the proponent’s supervision or
direction and not those who work for another contractor or subcontractor, except each contractor
or subcontractor who works under or for another contractor shall certify to the main proponent
by affidavit that the contractor or subcontractor has verified, through the Status Verification
System, the employment status of each new employee of the respective contractor or
subcontractor. The proponent will be required to comply in all respects with the provisions of
Utah Code Section 63G-11-103(3). Proponents’ failure to so comply could result in the
immediate termination of its contract with Salt Lake County.

Benefit Recipient Status Verification System

The Proponent may be required to register and participate in the Systematic Alien Verification
for Entitlement Program (“SAVE Program”), or an equivalent program designated by the
Department of Homeland Security, before entering into any contract, after June 30 2009, with
County as required by Utah Code Section 63G-11-104. The SAVE Program is an electronic
system operated by the Department of Homeland Security, through which authorized officials
may verify the lawful presence in the United State of an individual who has applied for federal,
state or local benefits. The Proponent is individually responsible for verifying the status of
anyone, at least 18 years of age, applying for federal, state or local benefits. The Proponent may
be required to have the applicant certify, in accordance with 63G-11-104(4), that the applicant is
a United States citizen or qualified alien and lawfully present in the United States. The
Proponent may then be required to verify the applicant’s certification through the SAVE
Program. Proponent shall certify to the County by affidavit that the Proponent has verified,
through the SAVE Program, the status of each recipient of federal, state or local benefits. The
Proponent shall comply in all respects with the provisions of Utah Code Section 63G-11 – 104.
Proponent’s failure to comply may result in the immediate termination of its contract with Salt
Lake County.

Evaluation Criteria
Proposals will be individually scored by reviewers on the criteria identified in the table below.
Funding recommendations to the Salt Lake County Mayor will be made upon consideration of
these scores (maximum 300 points) and the comparative ranking of proposals. The County will
also consider all available resources in making funding allocations.
                                                                                  Part F Guidelines


POINTS       CRITERION                  ELEMENTS OF EVALUATION
                               See “Proposal Requirements” Section
    N/A     ELIGIBILITY

                         Proposals will be evaluated on the need for the specific project not the
                         general service need. Does the proposal present a compelling need for the
    25         NEED      specific program? Will the proposal make a significant difference in
                         addressing the County’s priority need? How does the need compare
                         relative to other proposals?
                         Project design is based on identified needs and is client-focused. Program
                         design is specific, logical, realistic and cost-effective. Proposed program
             PROGRAM
    75                   does not duplicate services already available to clients. Project addresses
              DESIGN
                         targeted population at most risk. Design emphasizes a community-based
                         delivery system
                         Project objectives/ outcomes are clear, specific, meaningful, realistic and
            OUTCOMES     verifiable. Outcome measures reflect the program’s impact on clients
    75           &       rather than program activities. Project demonstrates significant outcomes
             BENEFITS    and impacts on identified need. Project demonstrates ability to achieve
                         identified objectives.
                         Priority given to projects which not only complement but build upon the
    25     COORDINATION efforts of others. Such efforts reflect an actual commitment of resources to
                 &
           COLLABORATION achieving mutual objectives rather than a coordination of services to
                         prevent duplication.
                         Staff expertise, agency infrastructure and volunteer resources will be
           MANAGEMENT considered. Does the agency have the ability to successfully carry out the
    50
             ABILITY &   proposal? Proposal shows a history of effective program management.
             CAPACITY    Proposal has demonstrated track-record in similar activities
                         Expenditures appear reasonable and realistic. Proposal clearly
              BUDGET     demonstrates fiscal need, responsibility and expertise. Requested funding
    50           &       fills an important gap in resources. Requested monies do not supplant other
            LEVERAGE     funding. Project leverages funding with a variety of other monies and
                         resources including in-kind or volunteer services.

Proposal Requirements
ALL PROPOSALS MUST:
 Have an office/facility within Salt Lake County and demonstrate that clients served with
  County funds reside within Salt Lake County.

    Contain a budget which includes the minimum amount of matching funds in addition to the
     County funds requested. The required match must equal at least 25% of the
     requested County funding. For example, a Proposal requesting $20,000 must contain
     a cash match of at least $5,000. This minimum cash match amount must be met with non-
     federal funds and can not include in-kind resources.

    Address one of the priority needs identified in the RFP: removing language and cultural
     barriers; preventing homelessness; and increasing quality, affordable after school programs.
     If a proposal fits more than one priority, the agency should select the most appropriate one.
     Staff reserves the right to designate proposals to other priority areas after discussions with the
     agency.
                                                                                Part F Guidelines



   Meets a current need in the community as demonstrated by 1) high demand including waiting
    lists and/or large caseloads and/or 2) a trend of past service with positive and measurable
    outcomes.

PRIOR TO ENTERING INTO A CONTRACT WITH THE COUNTY, THE AGENCY MUST:
       Obtain and maintain appropriate agency liability insurance, worker’s compensation
        coverage and, where appropriate, professional liability and motor vehicle insurance. (For
        details go to www. http://www.crd.slco.org to view a sample SSBG contract paragraph
        10 Insurance.)

       Register and agree to participate in the Status Verification System operated by the federal
        government in order to verify the citizenship or immigration status of new employees.
        (For details go to www. http://www.crd.slco.org to view a sample SSBG contract
        paragraph 15 Administrative…Documentation Requirements.)

       Certify compliance with applicable provisions of the Systematic Alien Verification for
        Entitlement Programs (SAVE). May require verification of the status of anyone, eighteen
        years of age or older, applying for federal, state or local benefits.

       Obtain a federal DUNS number to facilitate federal tracking of grant expenditures

       Agree to enter progress reports into the online web based SSBG reporting system for
        tracking outcome measures.

       Maintain an accounting and record-keeping system that enables verification of costs and
        services;

       Meet all applicable Federal, State and local licensing requirements.

Other Funding Restrictions
Requested funds CANNOT be used for any of the following:

        1. For the purchase or improvement of land, or the purchase, construction, or
           permanent improvement (other than minor remodeling) of any building or other
           facility;

        2. For cash payments for the costs of subsistence or for room and board.
           An exception is made for subsistence during rehabilitation; room and board provided
           for a short term as an integral but subordinate part of a social service; or temporary
           emergency shelter provided as a protective service;

        3. For payment of wages of any individual as a social service. An exception is made
           for the payment of the wages of welfare recipients employed in child day care;

        4. For medical care unless it is an integral but subordinate part of a SSBG eligible
           social service. An exception is made for rehabilitation services or initial
           detoxification of an alcoholic or drug dependent individual;
                                                                               Part F Guidelines



       5. For social services provided in and by employees of any hospital, skilled nursing
          facility, intermediate care facility or prison to any individual living in such
          institution. An exception is made for services to an alcoholic or drug dependent
          individual or rehabilitation services.

       6. For any educational service which the State makes generally available to its
          residents without cost and without regard to their income;

       7. For child day care services that do not meet applicable standards of State and
          local law;

       8. For the provision of cash payments as a service; or

       9. For individuals or entities that have committed acts of fraud or abuse under the
          Medicare or State health care programs.

Contents of Proposal Packet
The FY12 SSBG Proposal and instruction packet can be found at http://www.crd.slco.org.
A complete Proposal packet needs to contain the coversheet (Part A) with a summary of the
Proposal. This summary information is not only used by reviewers to quickly understand the
Proposal but by the County in initially drafting the work statement for the resulting contract.
Therefore, this summary needs to be clear, concise and specific in describing the Proposal. A
Proposal packet also needs to include a one-page logic model of the program. An optional
format for such a logic model is included in Part D. The logic model should include specific
quantifiable baseline data as well as quantifiable anticipated changes in outputs and/or outcomes.
The logic model also needs to be consistent with information presented in other parts of the
Proposal. A detailed program description, as outlined in Part B, needs to be included in the
Proposal packet. No specific format is required in preparing this section other than to separately
address each of the factors identified. The narrative proposal (consisting of the cover sheet,
a logic model, and the detailed project description) should not exceed 7 easily readable
pages.

In addition, a Proposal packet needs to contain two budget forms (one of the current or baseline
budget and one of the proposed budget with the requested funds identified) and a budget
narrative which explains the use and changes in the budget and program revenues. Finally, if
applicable, the packet needs to contain a copy of the agency’s tax exempt status. A completed
proposal checklist (Part E) should be attached to the top of each Proposal packet. These items
are not included in the 6 page limit noted above.

Program Logic Model
(Source: Measuring Program Outcomes: A Practical Approach, United Way of America)
A program logic model is a description of how a program theoretically works to achieve benefits
for participants. It is the “If-Then” sequence of changes that the program intends to set in motion
through its inputs, activities, and outputs. Logic models help a grant reviewer think through the
steps of a participants’ progress and develop a realistic picture of what a program can expect to
accomplish for participants. It also identifies the key program components that must be tracked
                                                                              Part F Guidelines


to assess the program’s effectiveness. Logic models are usually diagrammed as a series of boxes
representing program inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes.
     Inputs are resources dedicated to or consumed by the program as well as constraints on
        the program.
     Activities are what the program does with the inputs to fulfill its mission.
     Outputs are the direct products of program activities and are usually measured in terms
        of the volume of work accomplished. Outputs have little inherent value in themselves.
        They are important because they intend to lead to a desired benefit or change for
        participants.
     Outcomes are benefits or changes for individuals or populations during or after
        participating in program activities. By measuring the program’s outcomes one seeks to
        identify whether and how much a program’s participants have changed, how their status
        has improved or how they have benefited by the program.
     Outcome measurement provides an ongoing means to track how many participants
        achieve the desired outcomes, but it does not prove that the program, and the program
        alone, caused the outcomes.

For more specific examples of what falls under each category, see the following chart entitled
“Program Outcome Model.” Part D also contains a suggested format for preparing a Program
Logic Model.
Part F Guidelines
                  Federal Definitions of Allowable SSBG Services

1. Case Management Services
  Services or activities for the arrangement, coordination and monitoring of services to
  meet the needs of individuals and families. Component services and activities may
  include individual service plan development; counseling, monitoring, developing,
  securing and coordinating services; monitoring and evaluating client progress; and
  assuring that clients’ rights are protected.

2. Education and Training Services
  Services provided to improve knowledge or daily living skills and to enhance cultural
  opportunities. Services may include instruction or training in, but are not limited to, such
  issues as consumer education, health education, community protection and safety
  education, literacy education, English as a second language and General Educational
  Development (G.E.D.). Component services or activities may include screening,
  assessment and testing; individual or group instruction; tutoring; provision of books,
  supplies and instructional material; counseling; transportation; and referral to community
  resources.

3. Employment Services
  Services or activities provided to assist individuals in securing employment or acquiring
  or learning skills that promote opportunities for employment. Component services or
  activities may include employment screening, assessment or testing; structured job skills
  and job seeking skills; special training and tutoring, including literacy training and pre-
  vocational training; provision of books, supplies and instructional material; counseling,
  transportation; and referral to community resources.

4. Health Related and Home Health Services
  Health related and home health services are those in-home or out-of- home services or
  activities designed to assist individuals and families to attain and maintain a favorable
  condition of health. Component services and activities may include providing an
  analysis or assessment of an individual's health problems and the development of a
  treatment plan; assisting individuals to identify and understand their health needs;
  assisting individuals to locate, provide or secure, and utilize appropriate medical
  treatment, preventive medical care, and health maintenance services, including in-
  home health services and emergency medical services; and providing follow-up
  services as needed.

5. Housing Services
  Services or activities designed to assist individuals or families in locating, obtaining or
  retaining suitable housing. Component services or activities may include tenant
  counseling; helping individuals and families to identify and correct substandard housing
  conditions on behalf of individuals and families who are unable to protect their own
  interests; and assisting individuals and families to understand leases, secure utilities,
  make moving arrangements and minor renovations.

6. Independent and Transitional Living Services
  Services and activities designed to help the homeless youth make the transition to
  independent living, or to help adults make the transition from an institution, or from
  homelessness, to independent living. Component services or activities may include
  educational and employment assistance, training in daily living skills and incidental, one-
  time deposits and housing assistance (not for rental subsidies).
7. Legal Services
  Legal services are those services or activities provided by a lawyer or other person(s)
  under the supervision of a lawyer to assist individuals in seeking or obtaining legal help
  in civil matters such as housing, divorce, child support, guardianship, paternity, and legal
  separation. Component services or activities may include receiving and preparing cases
  for trial, provision of legal advice, representation at hearings, and counseling.

8. Special Services for Youth Involved in or at Risk of Criminal Activity
  Special services for youth involved in or at risk of involvement with criminal activity
  are those services or activities for youth who are, or who may become, involved with
  the juvenile justice system and their families. Components services or activities are
  designed to enhance family functioning and/or modify the youth's behavior with the
  goal of developing socially appropriate behavior and may include counseling,
  intervention therapy and residential and medical services if included as an integral but
  subordinate part of the service.



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