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					                Curriculum Guide for


 Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes
                   by Louis Sachar



                        and




      Poetry
          Seventh Grade Standards Aligned




Questions e-mail: echapin-pinotti@amadorcoe.k12.ca.us



                                                        1
                                      Table of Contents

LESSON 1: ACTIVE and PASSIVE VOICE: California Contend Standard: Writing Conventions
1.0: 1.1 Sentence Structure: place modifiers properly, and use the active voice.
Chapters 1 – 4 of Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes                             pages 3-6

LESSON 2: INFINITIVES and PARTICIPLES: CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 1.0: Writing
Conventions – 1.2 Grammar: identify and use infinitives and participles and make clear
references between pronouns and antecedents.
Chapters 5 – 10 of Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes                                 pages 7-10

LESSON 3: PARTS OF SPEECH: CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 1.0: Writing Conventions – 1.3
Grammar: identify all parts of speech and structure of sentences.
Chapters 11- 15 of Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes                          pages 11-16

LESSON 4: LITERARY RESPONSE: CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response
and Analysis: 3.2 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: identify events that
advance the plot, and determine how each event explains past or present action(s) or
foreshadows future action(s).
Chapters 16 – 20                                                        page 17-20

LESSON 5: CHARACTER TERMS: CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response
and Analysis: 3.3 Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: analyze characterization
as delineated through a character’s thoughts, words, speech patterns and actions; the narrator’s
descriptions; and the thoughts, words and actions of other characters.
Chapters 21 – 25                                                        pages 21- 23

LESSON 6: CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis: 3.2
Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: identify events that advance the plot, and
determine how each event explains past or present action(s) or foreshadows future action(s).
Chapters 21 – 25                                                         pages 24


LESSON 7: CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis: 3.2
Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: identify events that advance the plot, and
determine how each event explains past or present action(s) or foreshadows future action(s).
Chapters 21 – 25                                                         pages 24


Standards: Reading: 1.0 Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary Development
Students use their knowledge of word origins and word relationships, as well as historical and
literary context clues, to determine the meaning of specialized vocabulary and to understand the
precise meaning of grade-level-appropriate words. Vocabulary and Concept Development --
1.1 Identify idioms, analogies, metaphors, and similes in prose and poetry.


2.0 Speaking Applications (Genres and Their Characteristics) -- Students deliver well-
organized formal presentations employing traditional rhetorical strategies (e.g., narration,
exposition, persuasion, description). Student speaking demonstrates a command of standard
American English and the organizational and delivery strategies outlined in Listening and
Speaking Standard 1.0.
                                                                         page 25 on




                                                                                                   2
                                        LESSON 1

California Contend Standard: Writing Conventions 1.0: 1.1 Sentence
Structure: place modifiers properly, and use the active voice.

Chapters 1 – 4:

Lesson: ACTIVE and PASSIVE VOICE:

Goal/Objective
To help students understand the difference between the active and passive voice and
when it is appropriate to use them.
Lesson Outline:

Introduction
Verbs have two voices – the active voice and the passive voice. Voice refers to whether
the subject performs the verb’s action (active voice) or is the recipient of the verb’s
action (passive voice). Review the handout demonstrating various examples of the two
voices and review the explanation of how each is formed.

Activity
Have the students identify whether the sentences contained in section one of the
handout are in the active or passive voice, and then have the students form groups and
compose their own sentences using the verbs contained in section two As a class,
discuss whether the sentences the groups wrote are more appropriately written in the
passive or active voice.

Debriefing/Evaluation Activity
As a class, discuss whether the sentences the groups wrote are more appropriately
written in the passive or active voice. Explain that it is easy to fall into a trap and use
the passive voice more than you should. Sometimes use of the passive voice can make
an essay sound more important. But be careful. You can change the whole impact of
your message by using the passive voice. You also run the risk of confusing the reader
because of awkward sentence structure.

Real-Life Connection
Ask the students to review magazines or the newspaper and identify examples of active
and passive voice. Have them re-write the sentences in the opposite voice. Ask them
which is easier to understand.

Extension Activity
Provide students with sample essays which have sentences written in the active and
passive voices. Have the students identify 2-3 of these sentences and rewrite them in
order to make them more understandable.




                                                                                              3
ESL Accommodations
• Provide students an opportunity to develop a learn log that will serve as their notes on
what they have learned.
• Use color to enhance the material. If you provide the Overview on an overhead
projector—use a color to highlight important phrases on which the students can focus.
VOICE

Voice indicates whether the subject is acting or being acted upon.

Active Voice: Active Voice indicates that the subject of the verb is, has been or
will be doing something.

         For many years Goon held the joke-telling record.

Active voice makes your writing more interesting, direct and alive.

Passive Voice: Passive voice indicates that the subject of the very is being, has
been or will be acted upon.

         For many years the joke telling record was held by Goon.

NOTE: With a passive verb, the person or thing creating the action is not
always stated.

         The homework rule was overturned.

In a sentence written in active voice, the subject performs the action expressed
in the verb. It is the here and now. The subject acts – in the present tense.

                        Active Voice                                 Passive Voice
Tense      Singular            Plural                 Singular                Plural
Present    I see               we see                 I am seen               we are seen
           you see             you see                you are seen            you are seen
           he/she/it sees      they see               he/she/it is seen       they are seen
Past       I/he saw            we/they saw            I/it was seen           we/they were seen
           you saw             you saw                you were seen           you were seen
Future     I/you/he will see   we/you/they will see   I/you/it will be seen   we/you they will be
                                                                              seen




                                                                                            4
                             HELP WITH THE LESSON

Introduction
Say: Some sentences are written so that the subject is doing the action of the verb. For
example: The dog bit John. Ask: What is the subject of the sentence? What did the
subject do? When sentences are written this way, we say that it uses the active voice.
But the sentence can be rewritten so that the subject is the recipient of the action.

For example: John was bitten by the dog. Ask: What is the subject of the sentence this
time? What happened to the subject? This is known as the passive voice. The action
happened to the subject – so the subject was passive. Can you see the difference
between the two sentences? If the action is being performed directly by the subject – it
is considered active.

Main Activity
Say: Before we get started working on some sentences, let’s review the handout. Have
the students get into groups of three of four. Say: The worksheet contains some
exercises where you have to find sentences from Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes that are in the
active or passive voice. As a group you will also have a chance to write some sentences
using both voices. When you complete that part, each group will decide whether some
sentences are appropriately written in the active or passive voice.

Debriefing/Evaluation Activity
When students have completed their sentences, have each group present the sentences
to the rest of the class. Have the remainder of the class identify whether the sentence
was written in the active or passive voice. Have students vote on whether the sentence
should have been written in the active or passive voice. If students agree that a
sentence would be better written in the opposite voice, have them rewrite the sentence
as a group. Compare the sentences to determine which is most effective.

Say: Effective writing is more than correct grammar, spelling and punctuation. It is also
knowing how to structure a sentence so that it doesn’t confuse the reader. Sometimes
the passive voice can be awkward or difficult to understand. However, it can also be an
effective way to stress certain ideas.




                                                                                           5
Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________________

               Active and Passive Verbs: Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 1.0: Writing Conventions – 1.1 Sentence
Structure: place modifiers properly, and use the active voice.



                                              Change the sentences to active voice.
Find 10 passive voice sentences in Dogs       (Hint: Put the subject doing the action
Don’t Tell Jokes. (Hint: Look for helping     FIRST)
verbs)
 Example: The talent show had been Brenda
Thompson’s idea.                              Example: Brenda Thompson wants to have
                                              a talent show.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Now find 10 active voice sentences.           Change them to passive voice.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Bonus Question: When is a good time to use passive voice instead of active voice?




                                                                                        6
                                       LESSON 2

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 1.0: Writing Conventions – 1.2 Grammar:
identify and use infinitives and participles and make clear references between
pronouns and antecedents.

Chapters 5 – 10

Definitions:

Infinitive: An infinitive is a verb form usually introduced by to. The infinitive
may be used as a noun, an adjective or an adverb.

Example:
   1. Most people find it easy to joke. (Verb modifying an adjective)
   2. To joke on stage must be a thrill. (infinitive phrase as noun)
   3. The desire to joke in a talent contest is more common. (infinitive phrase as
      an adjective)

Participles: A participle is a verb form ending in ing or ed that acts as an adjective.

Example:
   1. The contestants telling jokes are tired and thirsty. (participial phrase modifies
      contestants)
   2. The list full of added entries are evidence of Brenda’s hard work. (participle
      modifies leaves)




                                                                                          7
Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________________

                       Infinitives: Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 1.0: Writing Conventions – 1.2 Grammar:
identify and use infinitives and participles and make clear references between
pronouns and antecedents.

Copy ten sentences from Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes and modify it to include an
infinitive or infinitive phrase.

Original Sentence                              Modified Sentence
                                               Goon wrote the assignment he needed to
1. Goon wrote the assignment from the board.
                                               do his math.
2.


3.


4.


5.


6.


7.


8.


9.


10.




                                                                                    8
Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________________

                        Participles: Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 1.0: Writing Conventions – 1.2 Grammar:
identify and use infinitives and participles and make clear references between
pronouns and antecedents.

Participles: A participle is a verb form ending in ing or ed that acts as an adjective.

Example:
   3. The contestants telling jokes are tired and thirsty. (participial phrase modifies
      contestants)
   4. The list full of added entries are evidence of Brenda’s hard work. (participle
      modifies leaves)

Directions: Write a paragraph summarizing what has happened so far in Dogs
Don’t Tell Jokes using participles. Be sure to underline your parcitiples and
participial phrases.

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________


                                                                                          9
                                     LESSON 3

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 1.0: Writing Conventions – 1.3 Grammar:
identify all parts of speech and structure of sentences.

Chapters 11- 15

Nouns

A noun is a person, place or thing

A proper noun is a specific person, place or thing.

A noun clause contains a subject and a verb that act like nouns.

       The way you look in that dress is amazing.

Plural nouns

       Most plural nouns require an s at the end.
       Plural nouns ending is s, x, z, ch, or sh are formed by adding es.
       Plural nouns ending in y preceded by a consonant are formed by changing
        the y to i and adding es.
       Plural nouns ending in y preceded by vowels are formed by adding s.
       Plural nouns of words ending in f or fe are formed by changing the f to ve
        and adding s -- but only sometimes.
       Plurals of compound nouns consisting of a noun plus a modifier are
        formed by making the noun plural.




                                                                                10
Pronouns

A pronoun is a word used to refer to a noun whose identity is made clear earlier
in the text.

     Jose likes to play tennis. He is a great player.

Unlike nouns, pronouns change form when they change case:




                                                                               11
Verbs

A verb is an action word. Verbs carry the ideas of action or being in a sentence..

Regular Verb Forms




Verb Tense

 Present tense is used to indicate an action that is occurring in the present.
 Past tense is used to indicate an action that has already happened.
 Future tense is used to indicate an action that will occur in the future.
 Present perfect tense is used to indicate an action that and was finished in
  the past or continues in the present.
 Past perfect tense is used to indicate action completed before another past
  action. It is the verb plus the past participle.
 Future perfect tense is used to indicate action that is ongoing and will be
  completed in the future.




                                                                                  12
Subject - Verb Agreement

BASICALLY -- Single subjects need single verbs and plural subjects need plural
verbs.

Indefinite pronouns, anyone everyone ,someone, no one, nobody are always
singular and, therefore, require singular verbs.

None is the exception for the indefinite pronouns. None can be either singular or
plural -- assume it is plural unless something in the sentence indicates otherwise.

The pronouns several, few, both and many always take plural verbs.

The pronouns, each, either, neither, one, everyone, no one, nobody, anybody
and someone, always take plural verbs.

Subjects joined by and take plural verbs.

When a singular subject and an plural subject are joined by the conjunctions or
or nor, the verb agrees with the subject nearer to the verb.

Collective nouns, like class, may be either singular or plural.

Every and many used before a subject take a singular verb.

Pronouns agree with their antecedent in both number and gender.

Modifiers and Generally Confusing Words

Misplaced Modifier: A modifier that is not placed near the word it is modifying.
Avoid misplaced modifiers by placing phrases and clauses as close as possible to
the words they modify.

     Misplaced: She barely ran three laps around the track.

     Better:      She ran barely three laps around the track.

Dangling Modifier: A modifier that does not clearly modify a word.

           Dangling: Changing a printer cartridge with a new one, the printer
            prints more clearly.
           Better: Changing the printer cartridge with a new one, Michelle
            found that the printer printed more clearly.




                                                                                 13
       The forms of modifiers change when they are used to show comparison.
       A modifier of one syllable usually forms its superlative by adding --er or --
        est.
       Some modifiers of more than two syllables form their comparative and
        superlative by adding more or most.
       Comparisons of less or least are accompanied by the words less and least
        before the modifier.
       Avoid double comparisons. She is the shortest in the class. Not: She is
        the most shortest in the class.




Informal and Formal Language

Formal language is used more in writing than in speaking and includes long,
complex sentences, rich vocabulary and does not include informal language such
as slang and colloquialisms.

Informal language is casual, shorter and uses simpler vocabulary. It may contain
jargon, slang and/or colloquialisma.

Jargon is words or phrases used in a particular area such as, medicine, sports or
surfing.

Colloquialisms are words found in informal speech or writing.

       We went to the mall and bought two pairs of cool shoes.

Cliches are tired words or expressions that are overused.

       We we up and out of the house bright and early.




                                                                                   14
Sentence Structure

Fragments are parts of a sentence that do not contain complete thoughts.

     Although we went to the game.

Run-on sentences contain two or more sentences separated by a comma or not
punctuation mark.

     What time are we going I don't want to be late.

Parallel sentence structure is obtained by using the same grammatical form to
express equal ideas -- use a phrase with a phrase, a noun with a noun a
participle with a participle.

     I like to run, swim and bike.

     Rather than: I like to run, bike and swimming.




                                                                                15
Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________________

                 PARTS OF SPEECH: Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 1.0: Writing Conventions – 1.3 Grammar:
identify all parts of speech and structure of sentences.

List twelve nouns from Chapter 12:

1.                                5.                        9.

2.                                6.                        10.

3.                                7.                        11.

4.                                8.                        12.



List twelve pronouns from Chapter 12:

1.                                5.                        9.

2.                                6.                        10.

3.                                7.                        11.

4.                                8.                        12.



List twelve irregular verbs from Chapter 12:

1.                                5.                        9.

2.                                6.                        10.

3.                                7.                        11.

4.                                8.                        12.




                                                                       16
                                  LESSON 4

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis: 3.2
Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: identify events that advance
the plot, and determine how each event explains past or present action(s) or
foreshadows future action(s).

Chapters 16 - 20

Definitions:

1.    Foreshadow: Clues or hints a writer uses to suggest what is going to
happen next in the story.

LESSON: Before you do your interactive reading aloud – discuss foreshadowing
and events that advance the plot.

While you and/or your students are reading aloud – stop and do ―think alouds‖ –
demonstrate how context clues and foreshadowing and different events advance
the plot.

When you are finished with the class read alouds – brain storm some ways in
which the plot advances and some incidents of foreshadowing. Make a list on
the board.

ACTIVITY: From the lists on the board, do a group summary of Dogs Don’t Tell
Jokes using the overhead pages of the template. Make sure you copy a
template per student so each can copy what you write.




                                                                              17
                       Event Summary Outline Template – Literary Analysis
                                                      Summary
Paragraph 1
Type of Sentence                                                Your Sentence
1. Topic Sentence



2. Foreshadowing or Event 1



3. Foreshadowing or Event 2



4. Foreshadowing or Event 3



5. Explain Topic Sentence



6. Concluding Sentence -- tie it all together




                                                Summary -- Paragraph 2
1. Foreshadowing or Event 1:



2. Detail or fact to support:



3. Detail or fact to support:



4. Explain Detail or fact:



6. Concluding Sentence -- tie this paragraph all together




                                                                                18
                                                Summary – page 2


                                           Summary -- Paragraph 3
Type of Sentence                                           Your Sentence
1. Foreshadowing or Event 2:



2. Detail or fact:



3. Detail or fact:



4. Explain Detail or fact:



6. Concluding Sentence -- tie this paragraph all together




                                           Summary -- Paragraph 4
Type of Sentence                                           Your Sentence
1. Foreshadowing or Event 3:



2. Detail or fact:



3. Detail or fact:



4. Explain Detail or fact:



6. Concluding Sentence -- tie this paragraph all together




                                                                           19
                                               Summary – page 3

                                            Summary -- Paragraph 5
Type of Sentence                                                  Your Sentence
Conclusion -- Re-read your first paragraph and put it into different words:




6. Concluding Sentence -- tie this paragraph all together




                                                                                  20
                                      LESSON 5

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis: 3.3
Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: analyze characterization as
delineated through a character’s thoughts, words, speech patterns and actions;
the narrator’s descriptions; and the thoughts, words and actions of other
characters.

Chapters 21 – 25

                                  Character Terms

Narrator: The persona telling the story (not necessarily the protagonist).

Protagonist: The main character of a story.

Antagonist: The character or force who opposes the protagonist and tries to keep the
protagonist from reaching his goal.

Character Foil: A character who by comparison or contrast reveals more about a main
character in a mirror-like image.

Round Characters: Characters that are well-developed

Flat characters: Characters who are not well-developed (stereotypes are flat
characters, but flat characters are not necessarily stereotypes)

Dynamic Characters: Characters who change somehow in the story (not necessarily
a big change--perhaps an insight or epiphany). Dynamic characters will be round.

Static Characters: Characters who do not change in the story. Static characters can
be flat or round.




                                                                                   21
Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________________

            LESSON 5: Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes – Character Mapping

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis: 3.3 Narrative Analysis of
Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: analyze characterization as delineated through a character’s
thoughts, words, speech patterns and actions; the narrator’s descriptions; and the thoughts,
words and actions of other characters.

                Character                                     Details
                                               Describe what the character looks like.
Name:

Draw the Character Below:




                                               How does the character act?




                                               How do the other characters in the
                                               story react to this character?




                                                                                          22
Name: ___________________________________ Date: ___________________

             LESSON 5: Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes – Character Perspective

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis: 3.3 Narrative Analysis of
Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: analyze characterization as delineated through a character’s
thoughts, words, speech patterns and actions; the narrator’s descriptions; and the thoughts,
words and actions of other characters.

                      Character 1                                             Character 2


Setting: Where and when does the story take place?      Setting: Where and when does the story take place?




Problem: What is this character’s problem?              Problem: What is this character’s problem?




Goal: What is this character’s goal? What does this     Goal: What is this character’s goal? What does this
character want?                                         character want?




Action: What does this character do to help solve the   Action: What does this character do to help solve the
problem or attain the goal?                             problem or attain the goal?




Outcome: What happens as a result of the action?        Outcome: What happens as a result of the action?




Reaction: How does the character feel about the         Reaction: How does the character feel about the
outcome?                                                outcome?




Theme: What point did the author want to make?          Theme: What point did the author want to make?




                                                                                                                23
                                  LESSON 6

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis: 3.2
Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: identify events that advance
the plot, and determine how each event explains past or present action(s) or
foreshadows future action(s).

ACTIVITY: Have students copy the work from their summary template onto
notebook paper, peer edit and submit a rough draft.


                                  LESSON 7

CA 7th ELA Content Standard: 3.0: Literary Response and Analysis: 3.2
Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text: identify events that advance
the plot, and determine how each event explains past or present action(s) or
foreshadows future action(s).

ACTIVITY: Write and submit a final draft of their summary literary analysis
essay.




                                                                              24
Poetry Lessons

GOAL: Write and recite poetry.

Standards: Reading: 1.0 Word Analysis, Fluency, and Systematic Vocabulary
Development Students use their knowledge of word origins and word
relationships, as well as historical and literary context clues, to determine the
meaning of specialized vocabulary and to understand the precise meaning of
grade-level-appropriate words. Vocabulary and Concept Development --
1.1 Identify idioms, analogies, metaphors, and similes in prose and
poetry.


2.0 Speaking Applications (Genres and Their Characteristics) --
Students deliver well-organized formal presentations employing traditional
rhetorical strategies (e.g., narration, exposition, persuasion, description). Student
speaking demonstrates a command of standard American English and the
organizational and delivery strategies outlined in Listening and Speaking
Standard 1.0.


ACTIVITIES:
  1. Discuss poem style and literary devices that can be used.
  2. Do a group poem using the transparency.
     Have students write poetry on their own.




                                                                                  25
Poetry is expressive writing that is used to inspire or draw emotions or
motivate or create images…Poetry can be structured or free verse.
Poetry can take the form of a Haiku or the lyrics to a song.

What is a Poet? e.e. cummings

“A poet is somebody who feels, and who expresses
   his feelings through words.
     This may sound easy. It isn't.
     A lot of people think or believe or know they
   feel -- but that's thinking or believing or
   knowing; not feeling. and poetry is feeling --
   not knowing or believing or thinking.
     Almost anybody can learn to think or believe
   or know, but not a single human being can be
   taught to feel. Why? Because whenever you think
   or you believe or you know, you're a lot of other
   people; but the moment you feel, you're
   NOBODY-BUT-YOURSELF.”




                                                                      26
Synonym Poetry:

Choose any word. Write that word in capital letters on the first line.
Look up the word and find three to five synonyms for it. Write the
synonyms on the second line. On the third line, write a descriptive
phrase about the word. The last two lines of the poem should rhyme.

           LOVE
           Adoration, devotion, passion, care
           Once in the heart, will always there.


           CHAOS
           Confusion, bedlum, disorder, turmoil
           Total disarray that makes one recoil.

Word:

3-5 Synonyms

Descriptive Sentence




Word:

3-5 Synonyms

Descriptive Sentence




Word:

3-5 Synonyms

Descriptive Sentence




                                                                     27
List Poems:

List poems are simply that – lyrically listed words that have a
commonality.

Lists can be either rhyming or not. It is up to the writer to decide
which style to use. List poems can be funny, ironic – even so far-
fetched that the list is beyond reality. The final line, however, gives
the list a serious spin.

                            Ideas for List Poems
   The sources of:              Things that:              Things…
        Darkness                    Light           That make you feel tall
          Love                     Travel            That make you sweat
          Cold                      Ring           That you tell your friends
        Squeaks                     Sing             That you keep secret
        Any color              You find in a …        That you jump over
         Sights                  Are round               That you eat
         Sounds                 Red…pink…               That make you
                                                       sad…happy…etc.

Example:

THINGS THAT SQUEAK
                                       Title:
The   floor in the hall.
The   mouse on the stair.
The   shoe on the floor.
The   rickety chair.
The   voice of a child.
The   balloon in my hand.
The   door to the room.
The   horn in the band.




                                                                           28
Three Word Forms:

A “Three Word Forms poem is a progression of images that tell a story.
Each line of this form is made up of three words. The last two words
become the first two words in the next line. In the poem, there will be
a progress of images and a story will be told.

SCHOOL

Learning, reading, writing
Reading, writing, math
Writing, math, history
Math, history, science
History, science, recess
Science, recess, lunch
Recess, lunch, art
Lunch, art, band
Art, band, busses
Band, busses, home



                  Title:




                                                                     29
I Don't Understand...:

Begin the poem with "I don't understand..." List three things you do
not understand about the world or people. Name the thing you do not
understand most of all. End the poem with an example of something
you DO understand.

                 I DON'T UNDERSTAND...

                 I don't understand
                   why people hurt people
                   why we can’t get along
                   why people are hungry

                 But most of all
                   why people are prejudiced
                   why we get into fights
                   why we say mean things
                   why we still fight wars

                 What I understand most is
                  why I like my friends
                  why I eat chocolate
                  why Diet Coke tastes good
                  and why I love my family.


                    Title:




                                                                   30
AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL:


Write a poem about yourself using this form.


Line   1: __ Your name
Line   2: _, _, _ 3 personal characteristics or physical traits
Line   3: Brother or sister of__ or son/daughter of
Line   4: Who loves__, __, and __ 3 people, things, ideas
Line   5: Who feels__ about__1 emotion about 1 thing
Line   6: Who needs__, __, and __ 3 things you need
Line   7: Who gives __, __, and __3 objects you share
Line   8: Who fears__, __, and __3 items
Line   9: Who'd like to see, __1 place, or person
Line   10: Who dreams of __ 1 item or idea
Line   11: A student of__ your school or teacher's name
Line   12: __ Nickname or repeat your first name



   Title:




                                                                  31
Autobiographical Poem 2:

Below is the line-by-line set-up for this version of this autobiographical poem:


                  1st Stanza

                  I   am (two special characteristics you have)
                  I   wonder (something you are actually curious about)
                  I   hear (an imaginary sound)
                  I   see (an imaginary sight)
                  I   want (an actual desire)
                  I   am (the first line of the poem is repeated)

                  Stanza 2

                  I   pretend (something you really pretend to do)
                  I   feel (a feeling about something imaginary)
                  I   touch (something you imagine you touch)
                  I   worry (a worry that is real to you)
                  I   cry (something that makes you very sad)
                  I   am (the first line of the poem is repeated)

                  Stanza 3

                  I   understand (something you know is true)
                  I   say (something you believe in)
                  I   dream (a dream you actually have)
                  I   try (something you make an effort to do)
                  I   hope (something you really hope for)
                  I   am (the first line of the poem is repeated)




                             Title:




                                                                                   32
Diamonte:

The French word diamont means diamond. A DIAMONTE is a seven-
line poem that gradually changes from one idea to a direct opposite
idea. When it is completed, its total appearance is diamond shaped.

The Diamante is a form similar to the Cinquain. The text forms the
shape of a diamond.


Line 1: Noun or subject - one word
Line 2: Two Adjectives that describe line 1
Line 3: Three 'ing words that describe line 1
Line 4: Four nouns - the first two are connected with line 1; the last
two are connected with line 7
Line 5: Three 'ing words that describe line 7
Line 6: Two adjectives that describe line 7
Line 7: Noun Synonym for the subject

                                 candy
                             sweet, gooey
                      crunching, munching, eating
                      sugar, chocolate, fruit, mint
                       chewing, blowing, popping
                           sticky, sugarless
                                  gum

            Title:




                                                                         33
Formula Poems:

Formula poems help you use words effectively. Using parts of speech
and literary devices help to make your work lively and exciting.

   Formulas:
                                 Samples:
   #1: Participle, participle,
                                 #1:   Leaping, soaring, flying
   participle
                                 #2:   The superhero
   #2: Noun
                                 #3:   Nonchalantly
   #3: Adverb (how)
                                 #4:   Crashed
   #4: Verb
                                 #5:   Into the wall
   #5: Adverb (where or when)

                                 Title: Green
   Title: Pick a color
                                 #1: Makes me think of Spring
   #1: Describe something
       associated to it
                                 #2: Like a tree covered with
   #2: Simile or metaphor
                                 leaves
   #3: Adverb or adverb phrase
                                 #3: In a wooded forest.
   (where)



                                 Title: Silly
   Title: Feeling
                                 #1: Tickle, wiggle, giggle
   #1: Three verbs
                                 #2: Lying on the floor
   #2: Adverb (where)
                                 #3: My baby sister
   #3: Who has the feeling



           Formula                            Poem
3 participles (-ing words)
Noun
“How” adverb
Verb
“When” or “Where” adverb



         Formula                              Poem
Three Verbs
“Where” Adverb
Who has the feeling


                                                                  34
    Sense Poems:

    Think of a place that is special. Form an image in your mind of this
    place. If you need to, cluster this image. Then complete the following
    statements.

a. I see_________________________       I   see the sage-covered desert
b. I smell_______________________       I   smell the freshness of the morning
c. I hear________________________       I   hear the scream of the hawk
d. I feel________________________       I   feel the caress of a breeze
e. I taste_______________________       I   taste the dew on the wind
f. I think_______________________       I   think the new day is born

    After you have written out the sentences, remove the pronouns, verbs,
    and articles as you need to:

               sage-covered desert
               freshness of morning
               scream of the hawk
               caress of a breeze
               dew of the wind
               new day born




                                                                          35
Bull Durham Credo: In the movie Bull Durham Kevin Costner's
character is asked what he believes in. His answer provides us with a
poetic format. Follow the formula below

           BULL DURHAM CREDO

           I believe in the _________________________
           the____________________________________
           the____________________________________
           the____________________________________
           the____________________________________
           _______________,_______________,________________

           But (something you don't believe in, i.e. ("but the novels
           of Susan Sontag are self-indulgent, over-rated")

           I believe in____________________________
           I believe in____________________________
           I believe in____________________________
           ______________,________________,________________

           And I believe
           in_________________________________(longest)

           CREDO

           I believe in the wisdom of elders,
           the influence of peer pressure,
           the importance of success,
           the evil that exists in money,
           the effectiveness of hard work,
           dedication, courage, strength.

           But the belief that you don't have to strive
           for your goals is just outrageous.

           I believe in the truth that will set you free,
           I believe in love that will conquer all,
           I believe in respect for others,
           Courtesy, politeness, gratitude.

           And I believe in the fact that tomorrow
           isn't promised to you.




                                                                        36
Limerick:

A limerick has five lines.
The last words of lines one, two, and five rhyme.
The last words of lines three and four rhyme.
A limerick has to have a pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables.


  U   S   U   U   SUUS
  U   S   U   U   SUUS
  U   S   U   U   S
  U   S   U   U   S
  U   S   U   U   SUUS

An example is -
"There was an old man from Peru
Who dreamed he was eating his shoe
He awoke in the night
With a terrible fright
To discover it was totally true."



                  Title:




                                                                     37
Free Verse: Free verse is just what it says it is - poetry that is
written without proper rules about form, rhyme, rhythm, meter, etc.
The greatest American writer of free verse is probably Walt Whitman.
His great collection of free verse was titled Leaves of Grass and it was
published in 1855.

In free verse the writer makes his/her own rules. The writer decides
how the poem should look, feel, and sound. Henry David Thoreau, a
great philosopher, explained it this way, ". . . perhaps it is because he
hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears,
however measured or far away." It may take you a while to "hear your
own drummer," but free verse can be a great way to "get things off
your chest" and express what you really feel.

              Create as many free verse poems for your
                        chapbook as you like


Traditional lyrics and rap lyrics are forms of free verse poetry…




                                                                       38
Lyrics: The lyrics of songs poetry. In fact, in this modern word – the
imagery of poetry is most expressed through this medium. A great
example of the poetry of lyrics is found in Beautiful Day by U2.

            The heart is a bloom, shoots up through stony ground
               But there's no room, no space to rent in this town
            You're out of luck and the reason that you had to care,
             The traffic is stuck and you're not moving anywhere,
         You thought you'd found a friend to take you out of this place
              Someone you could lend a hand in return for grace

                       It's a beautiful day, the sky falls
                      And you feel like it's a beautiful day
                               It's a beautiful day
                              Don't let it get away

               You're on the road but you've got no destination
               You're in the mud, in the maze of her imagination
                 You love this town even if it doesn't ring true
                You've been all over and it's been all over you

                              It's a beautiful day
                              Don't let it get away
                              It's a beautiful day
                              Don't let it get away

                     Take me, take me to that other place
                   Teach me, I know I'm not a hopeless case

                       See the world in green and blue
                        See China right in front of you
                      See the canyons broken by cloud
                    See the tuna fleets clearing the sea out
                        See the beauty in fires at night
                         See the oil fields at first light
                     See the bird with a leaf in her mouth

                    After the flood all the colors came out
                             It was a beautiful day
                                 A beautiful day
                              Don't let it get away

                    Take me, take me to that other place
                  Reach me, I know I'm not a hopeless case

                 What you don't have you don't need it now
                What you don't know you can feel it somehow
                 What you don't have you don't need it now
                You don't need it now, you don't need it now
                                Beautiful day


                                                                          39
RAP

THE HISTORY OF RAP MUSIC

Rap music developed from rhythm and blues music and rhythm and
blues music developed from jazz. A discussion of rap therefore must
start with a discussion of jazz. Where did jazz music develop from?
Jazz developed from folk sources. The slaves brought music here from
Africa and as they torn from their own ancestral culture, they
developed slave music as a new form of communication in song and
story.

Black music in America retained much of Africa in it distinctive
rhythmic elements. This is true of rap music, which was first
commercially marketed in the early 1980s. Rap music in the African-
American community was however evident in the culture of the black
slave. Early musical forms dating from the slavery years include work
songs, children's songs, and dances. They rhythmic quality of these
songs in similar to rap songs in our culture today.

The beat box, which is used in today's rap music, is a result of slave
culture. The poor economic conditions of slaves led them to "get by"
with whatever they could for instruments. The combination of these
two facts undoubtedly accounts for the expressionistic nature of
African-American music from the 1600s to today.




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