Teak Outdoor Furniture is as Popular as Ever by djsgjg0045

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									teak outdoor furniture; even though it has inherent defenses, the wood can suffer from
mistreatment. For example, when cleaning it, use only mild soap; never use a power
washer, as that could strip the wood of its innate oils. If you use a sealant, make it one
that brings out the natural color of the wood, and provides UV protection.
  If you’re going to leave it outside, instead of storing it in the shed for the winter, use
outdoor furniture covers that allow airflow, so that moisture can’t build up and
encourage mildew growth. Furthermore, even though you can coat it with teak or tung
oil, you should use it sparingly, as a build-up of oil can cause mildew to form.
  When treated properly, teak outdoor furniture can last a lifetime; and it may turn out
to be one of the best investments that you’ll ever make. ">Houses, cars, jewelry, and
stocks, are among the biggest, and most carefully-considered, investments that people
make. Of course, there are many other items that must be weighed just as seriously
before they are purchased. While appliances and electronics are leaders in this
category, home furnishings are just as crucial; and this includes outdoor furniture.
  While there was a time when things like patio chairs, picnic tables, and porch swings,
seemed almost like afterthoughts, today, they are every bit as significant as indoor
furniture. As millions of people turn their yards, porches, and gazebos, into outdoor
living rooms, they want patio furniture that will last for decades. Although there are
many new materials, colors, and styles available to accommodate these demands, it
seems that people love wood just as much as ever.
  Indeed, cedar, pine, cherry, and oak continue to ride high in popularity; but teak still
reigns supreme. This comes as no surprise, because teak has been cherished for
centuries, having been used for construction in ancient civilizations in India and
Malaysia. In Siam and Thailand, it was the hardwood of choice for building many
significant structures, including temples and palaces.
  Teak is extraordinarily radiant, ranging in tones from amber, to reddish, to dark
brown. It comes from the Tectona Grandis tree, which is indigenous to Asia, and
grows in soil that is rich in oils and minerals, including silica. This creates
straight-grained wood that is waxy, dense, rubbery, and thermally stable, therefore
highly resistant to decay, insects, moisture, and warping. That’s why it has been used
for building ships since the Middle Ages, and is still a favorite in the industry today.
  One of the things that makes it so great for use in patio furniture is that it requires
very little maintenance. You can treat your teak porch chairs yearly with a coating of
oil, if you wish to preserve the wood’s natural color, or leave them to weather to a
silvery gray; and doing the latter won’t affect the wood’s durability. In fact, in
England, you can still find teak garden benches that were built from the wood of
dismantled World War I British Navy ships. As strong as ever, they have weathered to
a silvery hue that almost makes them look as if they are made of metal.
  Even so, there are some things that you should do to protect your teak outdoor
furniture; even though it has inherent defenses, the wood can suffer from
mistreatment. For example, when cleaning it, use only mild soap; never use a power
washer, as that could strip the wood of its innate oils. If you use a sealant, make it one
that brings out the natural color of the wood, and provides UV protection.
  If you’re going to leave it outside, instead of storing it in the shed for the winter, use
outdoor furniture covers that allow airflow, so that moisture can’t build up and
encourage mildew growth. Furthermore, even though you can coat it with teak or tung
oil, you should use it sparingly, as a build-up of oil can cause mildew to form.
 When treated properly, teak outdoor furniture can last a lifetime; and it may turn out
to be one of the best investments that you’ll ever make.

								
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