Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy

					Pine Rivers
Catchment
Management
 Strategy
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




FUNDED    BY THE   NATURAL HERITAGE TRUST




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                         ii
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




FOREWORD

The road to Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) in Pine Rivers began in late 1994,
with a public meeting called by the Pine Rivers Shire Council to discuss community
involvement in the protection and management of the North and South Pine Rivers. This
eventually led to the incorporation of the “North and South Pine Rivers Integrated
Catchment Association Inc.” in February 1996.

Unfortunately the path has not always been smooth. The geography of the catchment,
with its mostly urban population and rapidly changing land-uses has presented a number
of problems not experienced by other ICM groups. While these may have delayed the
development of this Strategy, they have also provided opportunities for the group to
progress.


To maintain the unique character of the Pine Rivers catchment, with its mix of urban
areas, local industries, rural vistas and forested hills, requires a planned and balanced
approach to development. There are no quick fixes to achieving this. It can only be done
by government, industry and the community working together to ensure we preserve our
quality of life and meet the needs of current and future generations. I believe the ICM
process provides a model under which this can be achieved.


While this document is the result of the work of our committee over the past years, it
should not be seen as a rigid “plan”, but rather as a guiding process for change to
achieve the sustainable use of the land, water and vegetation resources of the Pine
Rivers catchment. Issues of importance and possible solutions will change over time and
it is important that we, as the catchment community, respond to these.

The Pine Rivers Catchment Association and this strategy are advisory in nature, with no
powers to direct anyone to implement actions. Neither can it invent legislation or
prescribe by-laws. The Integrated Catchment Management concept is one of influence,
establishing networks and taking responsibility for working together for a common good.

I would like to acknowledge the work of our past and present coordinators in facilitating
the development of this strategy and progressing the objectives of the Association.
Particular thanks must go to our past coordinator, Peter Hayes, for overseeing the final
production of this document.

Finally I would like to thank the Association’s membership, and particularly the
management committees, both past and present, for their contributions to this
document. Without the input of time, experience and ideas from these members of the
catchment community, this Strategy, and indeed the Association, would not be possible.




Michael Chessells
Chairperson (1997 – 2000)




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     iii
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The Pine Rivers Catchment Association Inc. would like to thank the following
organisations, which have provided the funding and in-kind support required for the
preparation of this document:

    The Commonwealth Government's Natural Heritage Trust:
    Pine Rivers Shire Council;
    South East Queensland Water Corporation and:
    The Department of Natural Resources.

The Association would also like to acknowledge the advice and support offered by the
following groups:

    Brisbane City, Redcliffe City and Caboolture Shire Councils
    Environmental Protection Agency
    Department of Primary Industries
    Qld Commercial Fishermen's Organisation (now ASIC)
    Osprey House Environmental Centre volunteers
    Bunya Sanctuary Community Environment Centre volunteers
    University of Queensland

Special thanks must also go to those individual members of the catchment community
who gave up their time to attend meetings and workshops, and who provided suggestions
for the content of this document.



CONTACTS

For more information on the Pine Rivers Catchment Association or this Strategy, please
contact:



                                     The Coordinator
                            Pine Rivers Catchment Association
                                       PO Box 2066
                                    Strathpine Qld 4500

                                  Ph. (07) 3325 1577
                                 Fax. (07) 3325 1588
                             E-Mail. pinerivers@bigpond.com




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                      iv
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Integrated Catchment Management is a coordinated approach to the management of
natural resources, designed to achieve the sustainable & balanced use of land, water and
related biological resources. The Queensland Government's Integrated Catchment
Management Strategy recognised a priority need to develop individual Catchment
Management Strategies for all of Queensland's river catchments. This document has
been prepared in response to that need.
This Strategy covers the catchment areas of both the North and South Pine Rivers, as
well as the adjacent catchments of Freshwater Creek and Saltwater Creek.
This Strategy recognises the interrelationships between our natural resources and the
many and varied demands placed on them by people within the catchment.
Throughout the development of this document, many concerns were raised regarding the
sustainable management of the Pine Rivers catchment. The issues addressed in this
Strategy are those that have been agreed to by a diverse range of stakeholders as
priorities for the catchment.


Key issues identified (in no particular order) are:
    Water Quality                                     Water Conservation
    Soil Erosion                                      Land-Use Planning
    Sustainable Agricultural Industry                 Extractive Industries
    Native Vegetation                                 Weeds
    Feral Animals                                     Fishing & Fish Habitat
    Fire Management                                   Awareness & Education
    Mosquito Control                                  Recreation
    Cultural Heritage



This Strategy is not a regulatory document. It is designed to provide a broad
assessment of the priority land and water issues in the catchment and recommend
actions to address particular issues. Changes in practices, procedures and policies will
be achieved through goodwill and influence on the relevant authorities and groups.
The role of the Pine Rivers Catchment Association will be to negotiate with responsible
agencies to undertake these actions and assist these agencies where work is already
underway. Additionally, the Association will help develop and support funding
applications where they are written to address the actions identified within this
strategy. A number of joint projects between the Association, other community groups
and local government have already been undertaken, and more are currently being
planned.
The sustainable management of our catchment's natural resources can only be achieved
through a cooperative approach by all those you use them. This means that ultimately
we are all responsible for ensuring the future health of our land and waterways.



Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                          v
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



This document reflects the concerns of the catchment community during the period of
its development. As that community changes over time, and the way in which we view
and manage our natural resources also changes, so will the issues of most concern. It is
our hope that cooperative action in implementing this strategy will also bring about
changes to the catchment. This document will be reviewed regularly to ensure it
reflects these changes.




Figure 1. The Catchment Strategy Process




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     vi
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




CONTENTS
Foreword ...................................................................................i
Acknowledgments ........................................................................ iv
Contacts .................................................................................. iv
Executive Summary ....................................................................... v
CONTENTS .............................................................................. vii
List of Figures .......................................................................... viii
Purpose of this Document ................................................................ 1
    Vision for the Pine Rivers Catchment.................................................................................... 1
About the Pine Rivers Catchment ....................................................... 3
   What is a catchment? ...............................................................................................................3
   The Pine Rivers Catchment ......................................................................................................3
What is Integrated Catchment Management?.......................................... 5
ICM in the Pine Rivers Catchment ...................................................... 6
   About the Pine Rivers Catchment Association ....................................................................6
   Strategy Development ..............................................................................................................7
Inland Waters ............................................................................ 8
  Issue: Water Quality ....................................................................................................................8
  Issue: Water Conservation ........................................................................................................ 11
Land Resources.......................................................................... 12
  Issue: Soil Erosion .......................................................................................................................12
  Issue: Land-Use Planning ............................................................................................................14
  Issue: Sustainable Agricultural Industry...............................................................................17
  Issue: Extractive Industries.....................................................................................................19
Biodiversity.............................................................................. 20
  Issue: Native Vegetation........................................................................................................... 20
  Issue: Weeds ............................................................................................................................... 23
  Issue: Feral Animals ................................................................................................................... 25
  Issue: Fishing & Fish Habitat ................................................................................................... 26
  Issue: Fire Management ............................................................................................................ 27
Human Settlement ...................................................................... 28
 Issue: Awareness & Education ................................................................................................. 28
 Issue: Mosquito Control............................................................................................................. 30
Natural & Cultural Heritage ........................................................... 31
 Issue: Recreation .........................................................................................................................31
Implementation.......................................................................... 33
Conflict Resolution ...................................................................... 33
  Unresolved issues. ....................................................................................................................... 34
Monitoring & Evaluation ................................................................ 35
 Annual Evaluation and Reporting Process............................................................................... 36
 Strategy Review Timeline.......................................................................................................... 37



Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                                                                           vii
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Feedback ................................................................................ 37
Glossary & Abbreviations............................................................... 38
References .............................................................................. 40
Your Comments.......................................................................... 42


LIST   OF   FIGURES
Figure 1. The Catchment Strategy Process…………………………………………………………………………….iv
Figure 2. Map of the Moreton Bay Catchment…………………………………………………………………………2
Figure 3. Map of the Pine Rivers Catchment……………………………………………………………………………4
Figure 4. The Adaptive Management Cycle…………………………………………………………………………….35




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                       viii
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




PURPOSE     OF THIS   DOCUMENT
In 1991 the Queensland Government introduced an Integrated Catchment Management
Strategy. This strategy was designed to integrate the management of the state's land,
water and related biological resources in order to achieve their sustainable and balanced use.
The state strategy recognised a priority need to develop individual Catchment Management
Strategies for all of Queensland's river catchments. This document has been prepared in
response to that need.
The Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy covers the catchment areas of both the
North and South Pine Rivers, as well as the adjacent catchments of Freshwater Creek and
Saltwater Creek.
This Strategy recognises the interrelationships between our natural resources and the many
and varied demands placed on them by people within the catchment. It has been developed
by the Pine Rivers Catchment Association Inc. to provide a framework to assist in achieving
the Association's Vision.
Vision for the Pine Rivers Catchment

            "A catchment sustaining our community, our environment, our future."
Throughout the development of this document, many concerns were raised regarding the
sustainable management of the Pine Rivers catchment. Where possible these have been
grouped together into common issues. The issues addressed in this Strategy are those,
which have been agreed to by a diverse range of stakeholders as priorities for the
catchment. However this approach has meant that some specific issues of importance to
local groups or individuals may not been covered.
In this Strategy, identified issues have been addressed using the "Pressure - State -
Response" model. Issues have been grouped under internationally recognised "environmental
themes". Use of this format provides a clear definition of the issues and what the
stakeholders hope to achieve. It identifies the pressure causing the issue, and outlines the
current state and management of the catchment's natural resources. It also provides
recommended actions to minimise these pressures and improve the catchment environment.
Those agencies most likely to perform those actions have also been identified. In many
cases these agencies are already acting.
The Association has assigned priorities for action on each issue. Four categories have been
used, representing the following time frames:
    High:    next twelve months
    Medium:     1 to 3 years
    Low:     3 plus years
    Ongoing:    This indicates programs are already in place, but need to be continued.
This Strategy is not a regulatory document. It is designed to provide a broad assessment
of the priority land and water issues in the catchment and recommend actions to address
particular issues. Changes in practices, procedures and policies will be achieved through
goodwill and influence on the relevant authorities and groups.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                         1
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



A number of other strategies relevant to the management of the Pine Rivers catchment also
exist. Some of these deal with land and water resources on a regional scale, while others
address these issues in more localised areas. International, national and statewide
strategies are also in place or being developed for some of the issues addressed. This
document has been designed to be as consistent as possible with the aims of these other
strategies, thereby linking management of our catchment with the both the larger picture
and local perspectives. These other strategies include:
    Draft South East Queensland Regional Water Quality Management Strategy
    Natural Resource Management Strategy for South East Queensland (Draft)
    South East Queensland Regional Framework for Growth Management
    Local Government Strategies and Plans
This document reflects the concerns of the catchment community during the period of its
development. As that community changes over time, and the way in which we view and
manage our natural resources also changes, so will the issues of most concern. It is our hope
that cooperative action in implementing this strategy will also bring about changes to the
catchment. This document will be reviewed regularly to ensure it reflects these changes.




Figure 2. Catchment Area of Moreton Bay (courtesy of SEQRWMS)




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                      2
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




ABOUT    THE   PINE RIVERS CATCHMENT
What is a catchment?

Most people are unaware that we all live in a waterway catchment. A catchment is an area of
land bounded by natural features, such as hills or ridges, from which all water run-off flows
to a common low point such as a creek, lake, river or bay. While each individual waterway has
its own catchment, it may also be a "sub-catchment" of a larger waterway's catchment. For
example, the catchments of both Cedar Creek and Albany Creek are sub-catchments of the
larger South Pine River catchment. This catchment is itself a sub-catchment of the Pine
River. The Pine River combines with the Brisbane, Bremer, Caboolture and Logan River
catchments to make up the catchment area for Moreton Bay (Figure 2).
The Pine Rivers Catchment

The Pine Rivers Catchment covers an area of 712 km2 (Hoffmann 1980) and is shown in Figure
3. The North and South Pine Rivers both rise in the forested slopes of the D'Aguilar Range
and flow eastwards, converging just west of the Bruce Highway to form the Pine River. This
then flows into Moreton Bay at Bramble Bay, below the Redcliffe Peninsula.
The adjacent catchments of Freshwater Creek (23 km2) and Saltwater Creek (54 km2) also
flow to the Pine Rivers Estuary & Bramble Bay, and are considered as part of the Pine Rivers
catchment for the purposes of this strategy.
The catchment is almost entirely within the local government area of Pine Rivers Shire, with
small sections in Caboolture Shire and Redcliffe and Brisbane City Council areas.
A diverse range of land uses occurs within the catchment. Since the 1950's, residential,
rural and industrial land use and development within the catchment has substantially
increased. The western areas are characterised by the state forests and national parks of
the D'Aguilar Range, as well as some agriculture and an increasing rural-residential sector.
The construction of the Bruce Highway in 1973 improved access to the Brisbane
metropolitan area and the Sunshine Coast, which created further demand for urban
expansion. Most urban development has occurred in the eastern catchment, around the
Petrie, Kallangur and Strathpine areas. Over 100,000 people currently live within the Pine
Rivers catchment.
The Pine Rivers catchment takes its name from the Hoop Pines (Araucaria cunninghamii) of
its once abundant lowland rainforest areas. Around 40% of the catchment is still covered by
intact or semi-intact native vegetation (PRSC 1998). However, most of this is contained in
the largely undisturbed mountainous areas that form the catchment's western boundary.
Vegetation types range from sub-tropical rainforest through Eucalypt forests and Melaleuca
wetlands to the mangrove areas of Hays Inlet and the Pine River Estuary. Hays Inlet is
listed under the international RAMSAR Convention for its importance to migratory water
birds.
While no vegetation types present prior to European settlement of the catchment are
thought to have disappeared, several have been severely diminished (PRSC 1998). A number
of ecosystem types contained within the catchment are listed as "endangered" or "of
concern" at a regional level (Sattler & Williams 1999).




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                        3
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Figure 3. Catchment of the Pine Rivers (adapted from BRMG & BR&MBWWMS, 1996, p 91).



Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     4
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



The catchment also contains significant hard rock and sand and gravel extractive industry
operations. The ban on extractive dredging within the Brisbane River is expected to place
pressure on the identified sand and gravel reserves of the Pine Rivers. Appropriate
management practices are required to preserve and promote existing environmental values,
while maintaining access to this essential building resource.

Two major water storages exist within the catchment, Lake Samsonvale, formed by a dam on
the North Pine River, and Lake Kurwongbah, produced by the damming of Sideling Creek.
These dams supply drinking water to more than 2 million people and are an important
recreational resource for the area.
A more detailed description of the history, geology and ecology of the Pine Rivers catchment
can be found in John Bowden's Living with the Environment in the Pine Rivers Shire, available
from Pine Rivers Shire Council offices. Information is also available on the Council website
at: http://environment.prsc.qld.gov.au


WHAT    IS   INTEGRATED CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT?
Integrated Catchment Management (ICM) recognises that all natural resources (land, water,
vegetation and wildlife) are inter-related, and that river catchments are an ideal unit for
their management.
The inter-related nature of our natural resources means many of the problems affecting
them cannot be solved in isolation. For example, successful flood control requires not just
watercourse management, but erosion control and careful land-use planning throughout the
river catchment. A cooperative and coordinated approach is needed to resolve these issues.
ICM draws together community, industry and government stakeholders and fosters joint
action to ensure the sustainable future management of a catchment's natural resources. To
help achieve this sustainable and balanced management of natural resources, the Queensland
Government developed an ICM Strategy. Implemented in 1991, this Strategy was based on
the following principles:
    Land and water resources are basic and interactive parts of our environment and no one
    part can be managed in isolation;
    Management of land and water resources should be based on geographic units which
    account for interactions between these resources;
    River catchments are continuously changing in response to natural processes;
    Management of land and water resources must be planned and coordinated;
    Land and water resource management decisions must be based on the best available
    information;
    Sound land and water management is achieved through the informed action of the
    individual users and managers of these resources; and
    A balance between economic development and conservation of land and water resources
    must be maintained.
The Strategy provides for the establishment of Catchment Coordinating Committees to
prepare Catchment Management Strategies.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                      5
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




ICM   IN THE    PINE RIVERS CATCHMENT
ICM commenced in the Pine Rivers catchment in February 1996, with the incorporation of
the (then) North and South Pine Rivers Integrated Catchment Association (NASPRICA).
This name was simplified in 1999 to the Pine Rivers Catchment Association. The State
Government through the Department of Natural Resources’ Integrated Catchment
Management program has endorsed the Association.
About the Pine Rivers Catchment Association
The Association has no legal powers to direct groups or individuals to take action on natural
resource management issues. Neither can it produce legislation or by-laws - that is the
domain of Federal, State and local government. The Association's Management Committee is
a community-based, representative group established for the following objects:

    Fostering coordination between landholders, industry, community action groups and
    government agencies in their land, water and vegetation management activities.

    Promoting community and government understanding of the interactions between land,
    water and related biological resources.

    Promoting the value of a coordinated, catchment-wide approach for managing these
    resources.

    Identifying and prioritising land and water resource issues in the catchment; identifying
    solutions and agreeing on actions through public and government participation.

    Providing a forum for community and government discussions on catchment management
    issues for resolving conflicting demands on natural resources.

    Promoting the planned and sustainable economic growth of the North and South Pine
    Rivers catchment in a constructive, ecologically sustainable and balanced way.

    Providing a peak body for discussion of matters relating to the North and South Pine
    Rivers catchment.

Community, industry sectors and government agencies represented on the Management
Committee include:

          Environment Groups                Commercial Fishing
          Urban Residents                   Extractive Industry
          Rural Residents                   Development
          Recreation                        South East Queensland Water
                                            Corporation
          Landcare                          Environmental Protection Agency
          Agriculture                       Dept. of Natural Resources
          Industry                          Local Government - Pine Rivers,
                                            Caboolture, Redcliffe and Brisbane




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                       6
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



To assist in directing the Association's activities, a Mission Statement was also developed.

   "To promote action within the community and through interested sectors to achieve
 sustainable, responsible and productive management of the catchment, both now and in
                                       the future."

The Committee has been responsible for overseeing the development and implementation of
this Strategy.
Strategy Development
This Strategy has grown out of community interest in the management of the Pine Rivers. In
1995 a series of public meetings were held to determine the issues relating to natural
resource management in the Pine Rivers catchment. This was followed up with both a mail
and telephone survey. Following the formation of the North and South Pine Rivers
Integrated Catchment Association, a workshop was held in 1996 to discuss and group the
issues raised during the initial public consultation.

A report was then commissioned to outline possible means to address the issues of concern.
This report led to the development of the first draft of the North & South Pine Rivers
Catchment Management Strategy, launched in August 1998 by the Hon. Rod Welford,
Minister for Environment and Heritage and Natural Resources.
Feedback from further consultation with the community, industry and local and state
government, as well as a number of Association workshops, has been since been incorporated
to produce this final draft of the Catchment Management Strategy.

More information on the Pine Rivers Catchment Association is available on the Internet at:
http://environment.prsc.qld.gov.au/prca




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                       7
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




INLAND WATERS

Issue:   Water Quality

Objective:
Ensure protection of ecosystem health in all catchment waterways

Pressure:
Deterioration of fresh and estuarine water quality from the impacts of urban and rural land
use.

Current State:
Water Quality
Water quality is generally moderate to poor due to:
• Nutrients from forestry, agriculture, wastewater effluent and urban run-off;
• Sediments from agriculture and residential development;
• Reduced dissolved oxygen levels;
• Harmful blue-green algal blooms in the water supply storages;
• Reduced catchment and riparian vegetation, particularly in the eastern catchment; &
• Altered stream flows and extractions (BRMG & BR&MBWWMS, 1996).

Local water quality values for major sub-catchments of the Pine Rivers are being developed
as part of the SEQ Regional Water Quality Management Strategy (SEQRWQMS).

Wastewater Treatment & Reuse
Pine Rivers Shire (PRSC) and Redcliffe City Councils are undertaking Wastewater Treatment
Plant (WTP) upgrades to reduce nutrient inputs. BCC is considering decommissioning the
Bracken Ridge WTP and diverting sewage to Sandgate WTP (which is being upgraded).
PRSC reuses 100% of treated effluent from Dayboro WTP and is expanding reuse of
effluent from Brendale WTP. Redcliffe City Council is investigating effluent reuse.

Monitoring
Water quality monitoring is currently undertaken throughout the catchment by PRSC, BCC,
SEQWCo, Redcliffe City Council and the EPA.

Stormwater
PRSC & BCC have Stormwater Management Strategies. Catchment plans have been completed
for Bald Hills, Freshwater & Saltwater Creek sub-catchments, with a One Mile Creek plan in
development. All local Councils have installed various types of stormwater quality
improvement devices.

Other
Evidence exists of total loss of seagrass from Bramble Bay & Pine Rivers Estuary, due to
increased turbidity levels. (BR & MBWWMS 1998).

Limited flushing of the North Pine River and Bramble Bay occur due to local geography and
water storages (BR & MBWWMS 1998).




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     8
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Responses.
No.      Action                                       Responsibility         Priority
WQ1.     Develop & implement education programs       DNR, EPA, PRCA,        Ongoing
         on water quality                             Councils
WQ2.     Encourage application of relevant            Industry groups,       Medium
         industry codes of practice                   PRCA
WQ3.     Develop & implement stormwater quality       Councils               High
         management strategies
WQ4.     Develop a database of all point source       EPA, Councils          Low
         discharges within the catchment
WQ5.     Regularly monitor and report on              Councils, SEQWCo,      Ongoing
         catchment water quality                      EPA, SEQRWQMS
WQ6.     Support wastewater reuse and                 Councils, PRCA         High/
         alternative disposal activities                                     Ongoing
WQ7.     Enforce statutory requirements for           Councils, EPA          High
         water quality management
WQ8.     Upgrade all wastewater treatment plants      Councils               High
         to achieve levels set in SEQRWQMS
WQ9.     Investigate environmental flow               SEQWCo                 Medium
         requirements for the North Pine River
WQ10. Promote the importance of riparian              PRCA, Councils,        High
         vegetation in protecting water quality       SEQRWQMS

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action WQ1 & WQ10
           o PRCA has implemented an education program on water quality. This has
              included displays, workshops, Waterwatch activities and media articles.
           o PRSC Education officers have also undertaken regular education activities
              with local schools on water quality
           o The “Healthy Waterways” campaign, part of the SEQRWQMS, has been and
              continues to be implemented across the region
    Action WQ3
           • CSC currently developing a storm water management plan.
           • Completion of CMP’s for Saltwater Creek (PRSC, CSC & RCC), Freshwater
              Creek, Four Mile Creek, One Mile Creek (PRSC) and Cabbage Tree Creek
              (PRSC, BCC) and implementation of these plans as new developments occur.
           • CMP for South Pine River Catchment and ICMS for Lake Samsonvale due to
              be completed by PRSC by mid 2002.
    Action WQ4
           • CSC & EPA have developed a water quality monitoring program for the
              Narangba Industrial Estate.
           • PRSC report “Assessment of the Health & Biodiversity Values of Streams”
              2001, classifies stream health across the shire and identifies highly degraded
              waterways requiring further monitoring and investigation to identify pollution
              sources.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                       9
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



    Action WC5
           • PRSC undertakes 6 monthly monitoring of water quality across shire (42
              sites).
           • PRSC report “Assessment of the Health & Biodiversity Values of Streams”
              2001, presents findings of macro invertebrate survey of shire. This report
              classifies stream health across shire and identifies priority management
              actions.
    Action WQ6
           • PRSC NHT Project on Re-use of Effluent Dayboro Waste Water Treatment
              Plant. Currently 100% reuse.
           • PRSC Currently implementing waste water reuse from Murrumba Downs
              Treatment Plant to North Lakes Development.
    Action WQ 8
           • RCC upgrade of WTP in progress;
           • PRSC augmentation of Brendale & Murrumba Downs WTP’s to meet
              SEQRWQMS objectives
    Other
           • Manual of “Development Guidelines for Water Quality Management”
              developed by South East Qld Water Corporation (SEQWCo) 2001.

Related Issues:
Water Conservation, Soil Erosion, Land-use Planning, Sustainable Agriculture, Extractive
Industries, Native Vegetation, Weeds, Fishing & Fish Habitats, Awareness & Education,
Mosquito Control, Recreation.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     10
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Issue: Water Conservation
Objective:
Ensure efficient use of the catchment’s water resources

Pressure:
Increasing demand for water through population and industry growth.

Current State:
The North Pine Dam (202 000 ML) supplies water to the northern areas of Brisbane City and
parts of Redcliffe City and Pine Rivers and Caboolture Shires (GHD 1995).
Lake Kurwongbah (14560 ML) supplies water to Redcliffe City Council, AMCOR Paper Mill and
the areas of Kallangur, Petrie and Lawnton in Pine Rivers Shire (PRSC 1998a).
PRSC reuses 100% of treated effluent from Dayboro WTP and is expanding reuse of
effluent from Brendale WTP. Redcliffe and Caboolture Councils are investigating effluent
reuse.
Domestic water meters are not currently in place in Pine Rivers Shire.
Growth in Pine Rivers Shire population is expected to grow from 106,365 in 1996 to over
184,000 in 2016, (Applied Population Research Unit 1998), with an associated increase in
water demand.
If water supply and use technology remain unchanged, current water supply infrastructure
may not meet projected population needs beyond 2035 (BRMG & BR&MBWWMS 1996).

Responses.
No.      Action                                       Responsibility         Priority
WC1.     Continue domestic and industry               Councils, EPA          Ongoing
         "Waterwise" education program
WC2.     Support sustainable wastewater reuse         Councils, PRCA         High /
         and alternative disposal activities                                 Ongoing
WC3.     Encourage rainwater tanks in domestic        Suppliers, Councils,   Low
         situations                                   PRCA
WC4      Promote the use of economic incentives       PRCA                   Medium
         for management of water demand

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action WC1
             • Ongoing “Waterwise” education program through PRSC, CSC and BCC.
             • PRCA / PRSC Community Workshop series
    Action WC2
             • See Action WQ6
    Action WC3
             • BCC proposing to introduce a rebate scheme for installation of rainwater
                 tanks from July 2002 and are endeavoring to make rainwater tanks
                 compulsory in all new developments.
    Action WC4
             • Introduction of “user pays” water metering in Pine Rivers shire from July
                 2002.
Related Issues
Water Quality, Land-use Planning, Sustainable Agriculture, Native Vegetation, Weeds,
Fishing & Fish Habitats, Awareness & Education.
Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     11
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



LAND RESOURCES

Issue:   Soil Erosion

Objective:
Reduce and control soil erosion within the catchment

Pressure:
Erosion of soil through the action of wind and water is a natural process. However the rate
of soil erosion has been accelerated as result of many human activities.

Sediment inputs are a major threat to the ecological health of Moreton Bay (BR& MBWWMS
1998)

Current State:
There are increasing sediment inputs from residential development and agriculture (BRMG
1996).

Severe bank erosion exists in some waterways.

Loss of topsoil valuable to agricultural and natural systems is occurring.

Siltation and turbidity is a problem in both freshwater and estuarine environments
(BR&MBWWMS 1998).

Maintenance costs for silt removal / flood mitigation are significant.

Responses.
No.      Action                                      Responsibility           Priority
SE1.     Map soil erosion hazard areas within        DNR, Councils            High
         catchment and manage to minimize
         environmental harm
SE2.     Introduce environmental best practice       Councils, Main Roads,    High /
         for erosion & sediment control              Energex, Qld Rail        Ongoing
         associated with utility & transport
         corridors
SE3.     Encourage adoption of relevant              Industry groups,         High
         industry codes of practice for erosion      Councils, PRCA
         and sediment control
SE4.     Enforce statutory requirements for          EPA, Councils            High
         soil erosion and sediment control
SE5.     Enhance development assessment /            Councils                 High
         land use planning requirements for
         erosion and sediment control




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                        12
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action SE1
       • CMP’s completed for Saltwater Creek, Freshwater Creek, Four Mile Creek, One
           Mile Creek and Cabbage Tree Creek and soon to be completed plan for South Pine
           River Catchment identify areas of existing bank erosion and at risk areas. These
           plans provide soil loss mitigation recommendations for these areas.
       • A Waterway Management Plan is currently being developed by BCC and PRSC for
           Cabbage Tree Creek.
       • Infrastructure charge plans, in these CMP’s ensure that all new developments
           contribute to the cost of water quality improvement infrastructure, including
           riparian vegetation.
       • SEDNET modeling, undertaken as part of the SEQRWQMS, identified average
           sediment loads from different land uses and predicted erosion type (channel /
           hill slope) for the North Pine and South Pine Catchments (Section 5.9.4
           SEQRWQMS).
    Actions SE2, 3, 4 & 5.
       • PRSC, CSC and RCC in developing their planning schemes under the Integrated
           Planning Act are currently incorporating codes and development approval
           conditions.
       • BCC has Codes already in place under new planning scheme (CityPlan 2000) - these
           include Waterway Code, Stormwater Code, Biodiversity Code and others. BCC
           also has compulsory erosion and sediment controls plus enforcement team.
       • PRSC has developed a Design Manual for Best Management Practices for storm
           water management (including erosion control)
       • Voluntary Codes of Practice exist for Agriculture, Dairy Farming and Fruit &
           Vegetable Growing that contain measures for erosion minimisation. Adoption of
           these codes within the Pine Rivers Catchment is however, un-quantified.

Related Issues:
Water Quality, Land-use Planning, Sustainable Agriculture, Extractive Industries, Native
Vegetation, Fishing & Fish Habitats, Fire Management, Awareness & Education, Recreation.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                   13
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Issue:   Land-Use Planning

Objectives:
Achieve ecologically sustainable development via coordinated and integrated planning at local,
regional and state levels

Ensure the planning process accounts for the potential environmental impacts of development

Pressure:
Limited coordination of various land-use planning initiatives being undertaken by agencies at
a regional and local level.

Population projections indicate rapid future growth in South East Qld, with associated
infrastructure requirements.

Current State:
A number of planning initiatives have been or are currently being undertaken within South
East Qld e.g.
   Regional Framework for Growth Management
   Regional Coastal Management Plan
   Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy
   SEQ Regional Water Quality Management Strategy
   Local Government Planning Schemes
   Stormwater Management Plans

PRSC and CSC are developing new town plans under the Integrated Planning Act. BCC has
developed a City Plan 2000. This plan makes special provision for protection of waterways,
water quality and stormwater management, as well as management of acid sulfate soils.

29% of Australia's population growth between 1991 and 2011 is expected to occur in SEQ
(SEQ2001 Regional Resource Unit 1998).

Pine Rivers Shire, which includes most of the catchment, has displayed slightly higher growth
rates than the rest of the region during the past decade (Applied Population Research Unit
1998).




          In 1971 Pine Rivers had a population of 26000 people
         In 1996 the population was 106,365. It is expected to
          increase to over 184,000 in 2016, (Applied Population
                          Research Unit 1998),




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                        14
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Responses.
No.      Action                                     Responsibility           Priority
LP1.     Ensure local government planning           Councils, PRCA           High
         schemes incorporate the principles of
         ICM
LP2.     Prepare catchment management plans         Councils                 High
         for strategic areas of the catchment
LP3.     Ensure consistency of land-use planning    Regional Organisations   Medium
         schemes across local government            of Councils
         boundaries
LP4.     Facilitate community involvement in        PRCA, Councils           Ongoing
         strategic planning
LP5.     Map areas of actual & potential acid       QASSIT, Councils,        High
         sulfate soils and manage to minimize       DNR, Landowners
         environmental harm
LP6.     Define appropriate buffer widths for       Councils, DNR            High
         incompatible land uses and incorporate
         into planning schemes
LP7.     Plan and protect the infrastructure        Councils, DNR, BRMG      High
         requirements of allocated resource         (EIIP)
         reserves
LP8.     Adopt industry environmental best          Councils, DNR, Main      Medium
         practice in all infrastructure             Roads, Qld Transport
         development
LP9.     Ensure infrastructure development          Councils, DNR, Main      Medium
         adjacent to waterways and on flood         Roads, Qld Rail
         plains does not significantly impact on
         environmental values or increase risk
         of flooding

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action LP1.
       • PRCA has been involved in the development of the IPA planning scheme by PRSC.
           This has been through submissions to the statement of proposals, participation in
           the development of the ICMS strategy for Lake Samsonvale, participation on
           steering committees for ICM plans and participation in public consultation
           workshops.
    Action LP2
       • CMP’s have been developed for Saltwater Creek (PRSC, CSC & RCC), Freshwater
           Creek, Four Mile Creek, One Mile Creek (PRSC), Cabbage Tree Creek (PRSC, BCC)
           and Bald Hills Creek (BCC).
       • Waterway Management Plan currently being developed for Cabbage Tree Creek
           (PRSC, BCC).
       • CMP’s for the South Pine River and Lake Samsonvale are due for completion in
           mid 2002.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                       15
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



    Action LP4
       • PRCA has encouraged community involvement in strategic planning through the
           print media, organising guest speakers and facilitating community input into the
           Lake Samsonvale ICMS.
       • PRSC has sought community involvement into planning projects through public
           consultation workshops.
    Action LP5
       • This action is currently being undertaken by the QASSIT.
    Action LP6
       • This action will be addressed to some degree under provisions of the new planning
           scheme for PRSC, RCC and CSC, however clear details were not available at this
           time (April 2002)
       • BCC's new planning scheme includes delineation of Waterway Corridors
    Action LP7
       • DNR&M is currently developing a state planning policy relating to extractive
           resources and industry to ensure future access to extractive resources.
       • Locally a Hard Rock Haulage Strategy Study group has been in operation since
           1998 to develop options for haulage of extractive materials in the Pine Rivers
           Catchment.
    Action LP9
       • This action is being addressed in the development of the PRSC planning scheme
           under IPA. It is likely that a waterway corridor code will be incorporated into
           the scheme.
       • Computer based modeling has been used in development of the CMP’s to
           determine current and fully developed flood inundation levels. This information
           will be incorporated into the development codes associated with the new planning
           scheme.

Related Issues:
Water Quality, Water Conservation, Soil Erosion, Sustainable Agriculture, Extractive
Industry, Native Vegetation, Fishing & Fish Habitat, Fire Management, Awareness &
Education, Recreation, Cultural Heritage.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                      16
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Issue:   Sustainable Agricultural Industry

Objective:
Maintain & improve the economic and environmental sustainability of the catchment’s
agricultural industries

Pressure:
The combination of economic pressures and some traditional farming practices have led
to unsustainable management of some agricultural land.

Current State:
Agricultural industries within the catchment include dairying, beef production, pineapples
and assorted tree and horticultural crops.

Existing catchment dairy industry is considered regionally significant (PRSC 1998).

Deregulation of the dairy industry has placed further economic pressure on the catchment’s
dairy farmers.

Agricultural crop production within the catchment is not considered significant on a regional
level (PRSC 1998).

Approved Environmental Codes of Practice exist for Agriculture, Fruit & Vegetable Growers
and Dairy Farming.

There is an increasing trend for subdivision of rural land for residential development (GHD
1995).




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                      17
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Responses.
No.     Action                                      Responsibility            Priority
SA1.    Identify Good Quality Agricultural Land     DNR, DPI, Councils        High
        and recognise in local government
        planning schemes
SA2.    Promote use of Property Management          Industry Groups, DPI,     Medium
        Plans to achieve sustainable production     PRCA, Landcare
SA3.    Encourage adoption of relevant              Industry Groups,          Ongoing
        environmental codes of practice for         Landcare, PRCA,
        agriculture
SA4.    Encourage environmentally responsible       Industry Groups, PRCA,    Ongoing
        application of pesticides and fertilisers   Landcare
SA5.    Promote Farm Forestry activities            DNR, DPI, PRCA            Low
SA6.    Establish a register of Farm Forestry       Councils                  High
        activities to protect future harvest
        rights

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action SA5
       • The Forest Farmers Association is active within the catchment. Visits to
           demonstration sites have occurred as part of PRCA Catchment Tours. PRCA has
           hosted guest speakers from farm forestry organisations.
    Action SA6.
        •   PRSC, as part of it’s planning scheme review has undertaken a review of farm
            forestry in the shire. The purpose of this project is to investigate farm forestry
            potential in the rural areas of the Shire. The project also seeks to develop
            options and a preferred strategy to facilitate the development of sustainable
            farm forestry in a way that is compatible with water quality, biodiversity and
            landscape values and recognises the range of purposes for which rural areas are
            used.


Related Issues:
Water Quality, Soil Erosion, Land-use Planning, Native Vegetation, Weeds, Feral Animals,
Fire Management, Awareness & Education, Cultural Heritage.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                        18
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Issue:   Extractive Industries

Objective:
Ensure extractive industry is planned & managed to minimise environmental impacts

Pressure:
Extractive industry operations have caused significant environmental harm in the past.

Current State:
Significant reserves of sand and gravel, hard rock and clay are located in the catchment
(PRSC 1998).

A number of quarry and sand and gravel extraction operations are currently working in the
catchment.

There is currently no in-stream extraction of sand and gravel within the catchment.

Cessation of dredging in the lower Brisbane River has increased demand on local sand and
gravel resources (BRMG & BR&MBWWMS 1996).

Responses.
No.     Action                                      Responsibility            Priority
EI1.    Develop & implement an extractive           DNR, EPA, DME (EIU),      High
        industry management strategy for            Industry, BRMG
        South-East Qld
EI2.    Ensure environmental best management        EPA, DNR, Councils,       High
        practices in extractive sites               Industry, PRCA
EI3.    Ensure progressive rehabilitation of        EPA, DNR, Councils        Ongoing
        extractive industry sites to an agreed
        end use

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action EI1
       • An extractive industry strategy for the SEQ 2001 study area has been drafted
           by the Moreton Bay Waterways and Catchments Partnership (ex BRMG)
    Actions EI2 & EI3
       • In stream extraction activity is
           progressively being wound down by
           DNR&M in Queensland. All new
           permits require the submission of
           operations plans that address
           rehabilitation as one of the matters
           to consider.
Related Issues:
Water Quality, Soil Erosion, Land-use Planning,
Native Vegetation, Weeds, Fishing & Fish
Habitat, Awareness & Education, Recreation.



Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                        19
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



BIODIVERSITY

Issue:   Native Vegetation

Objective:
Preserve, manage and reinstate native vegetation communities to maintain the catchment's
biodiversity and ecological processes

Pressure:
Remnant vegetation is being cleared for development or degraded through weed invasion,
eutrophication and /or inappropriate burning.

Current State:
South East Qld is a major centre for biological diversity within Australia, supporting
distinctive flora, fauna and biological communities (Catterall, Storey & Kingston 1995).

Native bushland covers approx. 40% of the catchment, mostly on the slopes and ridges of
the D'Aguilar Range (Chenowth & Assoc. 1994).

Approx. 100 sq Km of the catchment is currently in National Park and State Forest.

The area of native riparian and coastal lowland vegetation in the eastern catchment has been
severely reduced (BRMG 1996)

Riparian zones have lost continuity and function due to weed invasion, development, fire and
pollution (BRMG 1996).

The clearing rate of remaining vegetation is increasing (BRMG 1996)

Several plant species listed as "rare" or "vulnerable" under Qld Legislation are found in the
catchment.

Pine Rivers Shire’s Biological Resource Assessment and Mapping project is currently in
progress.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                       20
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Responses.
No.      Action                                     Responsibility             Priority
NV1.     Survey catchment for type, location &      Councils, DNR, QPWS        High
         condition of remnant vegetation
NV2.     Develop and implement a policy on use      Councils                   Medium
         of local native species in amenity
         plantings
NV3.     Develop a linking network of native        Councils                   High
         vegetation corridors through local
         government planning schemes
NV4.     Support suitable community bushland        Councils / PRCA            Ongoing
         regeneration & revegetation initiatives
NV5.     Lobby for collection of a bushland         PRCA                       Low
         acquisition / environment levy by local
         government (where not already in
         place)
NV6.     Develop and support voluntary              Councils, PRCA             High
         conservation agreements with
         landholders
NV7.     Develop and implement a code of            DNR                        Low
         environmental best practice for
         forestry operations

Interim Actions (April 2002):

Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action NV1
        •   This action has been undertaken by the PRSC with the completion of the
            Biological Resource Assessment and Mapping project.
        •   Location, type and condition of remnant vegetation along the catchment’s
            waterways has been identified in the CMP’s for One Mile Creek, South Pine
            Catchment, Freshwater Creek, Saltwater Creek, Cabbage Tree Creek and Bald
            Hills Creek. Management actions for restoration and maintenance of this
            vegetation are also included in these plans.
        •   The report “Assessment of the Health and Biodiversity Values of Streams”,
            PRSC, 2001, also maps the condition of the riparian vegetation on all streams in
            the shire and identifies priority actions necessary for the long term protection
            of the riparian vegetation and water quality in the shire.
    Action NV3
        •   The planning scheme currently being developed by PRSC under IPA seeks to
            address this action however full details are not available at this stage.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                         21
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



    Action NV4.
        •   Since 2000, PRSC has operated a Community Revegetation Program, that
            supports and develops community involvement in native vegetation regeneration
            and revegetation activities in the shire.
        •   PRCA has been actively involved in supporting community bushcare groups in the
            catchment and in the establishment of demonstration weed control and
            revegetation sites. PRCA received funding from the NHT and PRSC to undertake
            the community based South Pine River Rehabilitation Project in 2001 and 2002.


    Action NV6.
       • Since 2000 PRSC has participated in the Land for Wildlife Program, a voluntary
           nature conservation program. Currently over 60 landholders have properties
           registered under this program.

    Other
       • PRSC has also developed a “Living with the Environment” brochure series covering
          a range of topics which promote nature conservation in the shire.

Related Issues:
Water Quality, Water Conservation, Soil Erosion, Land-use Planning, Sustainable Agriculture,
Extractive Industry, Weeds, Feral animals, Fishing & Fish Habitat, Fire Management,
Awareness & Education, Recreation, Cultural Heritage.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                    22
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Issue: Weeds


Objective:
Reduce or eradicate current infestations and prevent the spread of weeds

Pressure:
Weeds threaten local biodiversity, water quality, economic, recreational and amenity values
and increase fire risks.

Current State:
Several species of plants "declared" under the Qld Rural Lands Protection Act are present in
the catchment.

Environmental weeds are present in all sub-catchments.

SEQWCo undertakes control of aquatic weeds in Lake Samsonvale.

Aquatic weeds impact on water quality and can enhance mosquito breeding.



Responses.
No.     Action                                      Responsibility            Priority
WE1. Identify location of significant weed          Councils, DNR,            High
        infestations within the catchment           Landowners, PRCA
WE2. Develop and implement Local                    Councils, PRCA            High
        Government Pest Management Plans
WE3. Support implementation of SEQ                  Councils, State Govt.,    High
        Environmental Weed Management               PRCA, Community,
        Strategy                                    Industry
WE4. Develop lists of appropriate plant             Councils, DNR, PRCA       Medium
        species for use in local developments
WE5. Conduct education programs on impact           Councils, DNR, PRCA       Ongoing
        of weeds, best practice weed
        management and the use of appropriate
        native plant alternatives




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                        23
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:

    Action WE1.
        •   CMP’s developed for the shire waterways have identified areas of weed
            infestation and recommended management actions for the protection of
            native riparian vegetation. These studies have not however targeted
            individual weed species or infestations.
    Action WE2.
        •   PRSC and BCC have developed Pest Management Plans.
    Action WE3.
        •   PRSC and PRCA have continued to support the implementation of the SEQ
            Environmental Weed Management Strategy. PRCA has established several
            demonstration sites for control of environmental weeds in the catchment.
    Action WE4.
        •   A PRSC directive currently exists against use of plants identified as
            environmental weeds on the Queensland Herbarium Environmental Weeds list.
    Action WE5.
        •   PRCA and PRSC have collaborated to run a series of free community workshops
            covering topics such as water weeds, environmental weed identification and
            control and native garden design.
        •   Posters on Environmental and Waterweeds in the catchment have also been
            developed by PRCA and PRSC.
        •   BCC has an environmental weeds poster and a Green Garden Guide.
        •   PRSC has a wide range of other education programs via it’s website and the award
            winning “Living With the Environment in the Pine Rivers Shire” publication.



Related Issues:
Water Quality,
Soil Erosion,
Land-use planning,
Sustainable
Agriculture, Extractive
Industry, Native
Vegetation, Feral
animals,
Fishing & Fish Habitat,
Fire Management,
Awareness & Education,
Recreation, Cultural
Heritage.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                    24
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Issue:   Feral Animals
Objective:
Control feral animal populations within the catchment
Pressure:
Feral animals decrease biodiversity through destruction of habitat, disease transmission,
competition and predation on native wildlife.
Current State:
8 feral animal species are recorded in the catchment (BRMG 1996), with significant
populations of feral pigs, dogs, cats, foxes and cane toads.
Exotic pest fish, including Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and Gambusia (Gambusia
holbrooki), are present throughout the catchment's waterways.
SEQWCo and DNR undertake feral pig control programs.
There is no program for feral cat or fox control.
PRSC has a local law on responsible animal control.
Feral and uncontrolled domestic animals are causing damage to native vegetation, wildlife and
domestic animals.
Responses.
No.      Action                                       Responsibility          Priority
FA1.     Develop & implement Local Government         Councils, DNR, DPI,     High
         Pest Management Plans                        QPWS, Landholders
FA2.     Conduct education programs on problems       DNR, EPA, WPSQ (local   Medium
         caused by feral animals, including birds     branches), PRCA
FA4.     Develop community initiatives for the        PRCA, WPSQ (local       Low
         control of undeclared pest species           branches)
FA5.     Support community initiatives for the        PRCA, Councils, QFS     Low
         control of exotic pest fish
FA6.     Promote, support and enforce                 Councils                Ongoing
         responsible pet ownership
Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action FA1.
       • PRSC & BCC have completed Pest Management Plans (including operational
           plans).
    Action FA2.
       • The need for education programs on pest plants and animals has been
           identified in the PRSC Pest Management Plan.
       • PRCA and the PRSC have undertaken community workshops on the impact of
           feral animals.
       • PRCA has included information on pest species in its newsletters and hosted
           guest speakers at meetings.
    Action FA6
       • PRSC has, through its information program to residents, included information on
           responsible pet ownership on an on going basis.
Related Issues: Water Quality, Soil Erosion, Sustainable Agriculture, Native Vegetation,
      Weeds, Fishing & Fish Habitat, Fire Management, Awareness & Education & Recreation.

Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                        25
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Issue:   Fishing & Fish Habitat

Objective:
Protect and manage fisheries habitats to enhance stocks of native fish

Pressure:
Physical alteration to fish habitats and waterway processes, and changes in water quality
have reduced local capacity to support sustainable diverse fish populations.

Current State:
Urban and rural development, water infrastructure and extractive industry have adversely
affected fish habitats throughout South East Qld (Zeller 1998).
Evidence exists of total loss of seagrass from Bramble Bay & the Pine Rivers Estuary, due to
increased turbidity levels (BR & MBWWMS 1998).
Stocks of some fish species in the Pine Rivers estuary appear to be declining (Pond 1997).
Lake Samsonvale is periodically stocked with native fish fingerlings and provides an
important recreation resource for the area.
Hay's Inlet Fish Habitat Area protects 1250 ha of tidal habitat including part of the lower
Pine Estuary.
Commercial fish harvesting is limited in the Pine Rivers Estuary. Recreational fishing is
allowed in both tidal and fresh waters within the catchment.
Responses.
No.      Action                                      Responsibility            Priority
FH1.     Ensure bag & size limits for recreational   QBFP                      Ongoing
         fishers are enforced
FH2.     Provide education on responsible            Sunfish, Queensland       Ongoing
         recreational fishing and the importance     Fisheries Service
         of fish habitat                             (QFS)
FH3.     Encourage declaration of tidal areas of     PRCA, BCC                 Low
         Tinchi Tamba Wetlands as Fish Habitat
         Reserve
FH4.     Investigate viability of fish passageways   QFS, SEQWCo               Low
         between major water storages and
         downstream waterways

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action FH1.
       • This action is addressed via legislation and the enforcement role of QBFP.

Related Issues:
Water Quality, Soil Erosion, Land-use Planning, Extractive Industry, Native Vegetation,
Feral animals, Awareness & Education, Mosquito control, Recreation.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                         26
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Issue:   Fire Management

Objective:
Fire management that reduces the risk of uncontrolled bushfires without adversely
impacting native forest ecology
Pressure:
Wildfire has the potential to cause loss of both life and property.
There is limited community understanding of the role of fire in maintaining healthy native
vegetation communities.
Current State:
High risk of fire damage exists for dwellings near large areas of dry sclerophyll forest.
Dept of Natural Resources & Qld Parks and Wildlife Service undertake planned burning of
state forest, national parks and other protected areas.
Fuel management on private property is the responsibility of the landowner.
Rural fire brigades (RFB) assist in burn-offs on private property and undertake fuel
reduction on some public lands.


Responses.
No.     Action                                      Responsibility             Priority
FM1.    Develop fire management plans for at        DNR, QPWS, DES,            High
        risk areas                                  Councils
FM2.    Incorporate bushfire management             Developers, Councils       High
        considerations into rural residential
        development design
FM3.    Develop and implement an education          DNR, DPI, EPA, PRCA        Medium
        program on the role of fire in land
        management

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action FM2.
           o Bushfire management considerations are currently included in the
              development approval process by the PRSC. These considerations will
              form part of the planning scheme being developed under the Integrated
              Planning Act.
    Action FM3.
           o An education program on the role of fire in land management has been
              developed through the SEQ Fire and Biodiversity Consortium.
           o The Rural Fire Services and PRCA have held local workshops on fire and
              property management.
Related Issues:
Water Quality, Soil Erosion, Land-use Planning, Sustainable Agriculture, Native Vegetation,
Weeds, Awareness & Education.


Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                         27
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



HUMAN SETTLEMENT

Issue:   Awareness & Education

Objective:
Raise public awareness of catchment management issues and practices to achieve ecologically
sustainable development

Pressure:
Increasing demand for information from schools, community, industry and government.

Current State:
Educational material on natural resource management is available through federal and state
government agencies and local councils.

Community environmental education centres are located at:
Osprey House, Dohles Rocks (eastern catchment), & Bunya Sanctuary, Eatons Hill (central
catchment).

Responses.
No.     Action                                      Responsibility           Priority
AE1.    Deliver land and water management           DPI, DNR, EPA,           Ongoing
        education programs for schools and the      Councils
        community
AE2.    Develop and implement a communications      PRCA, Councils           High
        strategy for catchment issues
AE3.    Facilitate information sharing between      PRCA                     Ongoing
        stakeholder groups
AE4.    Appoint a catchment education officer       PRCA, Osprey House,      Medium
                                                    Bunya Sanctuary
AE5.     Support the development and                Councils, PRCA           Ongoing
         maintenance of community groups to
         monitor & address specific catchment
         management issues
AE6.     Facilitate professional development on     PRCA                     Medium
         catchment issues
AE7.     Establish a "Mountain" community           Local community, PRCA,   Low
         environmental centre                       PRSC
AE8.     Develop a "Catchment Care" award           PRCA, Councils           Medium
         program to reward good land
         management practices by industry and
         landholders




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                       28
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
Action AE1
       • Environmental Education Expos have been held in 2001 and 2002 by state
           agencies to increase access to environmental education resources, programs
           and networks.
       • The Moreton Bay Waterways and Catchments Partnership (MBWCP) and the
           Healthy Waterways program aim to deliver consistent information across
           SEQ to all levels of the community.
       • PRCA and PRSC hold 4 community workshops per year on land and water
           management issues.

Action AE2
       • PRCA has developed a communication strategy (1999) and continues to
          implement this strategy through community workshops, newsletters, media
          releases, displays, the Kumbartcho (previously Bunya) Environmental Centre
          and ICM meetings.
Action AE3
       • PRCA maintains a network with local stakeholder and environmental groups
          and communicates with these groups through stakeholder representatives,
          informal communication and newsletters.
       • This is an ongoing lead action of PRCA.
       • BCC supports a Cabbage Tree Creek Network.
Action AE4
       • No dedicated catchment education officer exists, however PRSC employs two
          officers who run education programs, including catchment based programs,
          for school groups in the shire.
Action AE5
       • PRCA provides support and advice to other community groups involved in
          address catchment issues. This is an ongoing role of PRCA that has not been
          quantified at this stage.

Related Issues:
All




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                               29
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Issue:   Mosquito Control

Objective:
Minimise breeding of mosquitoes near urban areas

Pressure:
Health risks and nuisance issues related to high mosquito numbers close to urban areas.

Current State:
Current and planned residential development in the eastern catchment has been sited close
to mosquito breeding areas.

Local governments undertake regular monitoring and control programs

Mosquito-carried Ross River and Barmah Forest Viruses have been reported in the
catchment (PRSC 1999).

Responses.
No.     Action                                      Responsibility           Priority
MC1.    Develop a code of practice for mosquito     EPA                      High
        control in SEQ
MC2.    Develop a Biting Insect Management          EPA / Councils           Low
        Plan for the catchment
MC3.    Conduct education programs on the need      Councils                 Low
        for mosquito control
MC4.    Support the application of alternative,     Councils, EPA, PRCA      Ongoing
        non-chemical methods of mosquito
        control

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action MC1
       • EPA has commenced development of this code.
    Action MC3
       • PRSC has developed a
           series of 3 information
           sheets on Mosquito
           Control in the shire.
       • BCC has developed a
           MossieNet education
           program.
Related Issues:
Water Quality, Land-use Planning,
Extractive Industry, Fishing & Fish
Habitat, Awareness & Education.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                       30
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



NATURAL & CULTURAL HERITAGE

Issue:   Recreation
Objective:
Provide suitable areas, infrastructure and management to minimise environmental harm
caused by recreational activities
Pressure:
Inappropriate siting and/or management of some recreational activities.
Current State:
The catchment offers a range of passive and active recreation and tourism opportunities.
The catchment is an important destination for day-trippers from Brisbane (Coopers &
Lybrand 1994).
Lake Samsonvale (North Pine Dam) attracted an estimated 557,000 visitors in 1997/98
(Environment Sciences & Services 1999).
Brisbane Forest Park attracts approx. 634,000 visitors per year (BRMG & BR&MBWWMS
1996).
Costs of maintaining water quality for swimming and boating is expected to increase (BRMG &
BR&MBWWMS 1996).
Responses.
No.      Action                                    Responsibility             Priority
RE1.     Develop & implement a strategy for        Councils, SEQWCo,          Medium
         provision of sustainable recreation       Brisbane Forest Park
         opportunities
RE2.     Promote natural resource eco-tourism      Tourism Pine Rivers,       Ongoing
         opportunities                             Councils, PRCA
RE3.     Develop and implement master plans for    Councils                   Medium
         all parkland / reserve areas
RE4.     Develop a network of parkland /           Councils                   Medium
         reserves along waterways
Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
    Action RE1
       • PRSC is currently developing a shire wide Recreation Trails Master Plan.
    Action RE2
       • Tourism Pine Rivers released an “Explore Pine Rivers” brochure in 2002
       • Dayboro Tourism, through the Federal Government’s Regional Assistance
           Program launched a brochure for the Dayboro Valley promoting nature based
           tourism in the area.
    Action RE4
       • PRSC’s and BCC’s current policy of acquiring riparian zones as parkland when
           development rezoning occurs has resulted in many areas along waterways
           becoming part of the catchment’s network of parkland.
Related Issues:
Water Quality, Soil Erosion, Land-use Planning, Extractive Industry, Native Vegetation,
Weeds, Fishing & Fish Habitat, Awareness & Education, Cultural Heritage.



Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     31
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Issue: Cultural   Heritage

Objective:
Identify and manage heritage sites to optimise their value to the community

Pressure:
Heritage value of some sites has been lost or damaged through inappropriate management.

Current State:

Over 50 Aboriginal, European and natural heritage sites in the catchment are either
registered or being considered for inclusion on the "Register of the National Estate".

Four sites in the catchment are listed on the "Queensland Heritage Register".

A number of other Aboriginal heritage sites exist throughout the catchment (Bowden 1999,
Chenowth & Assoc. 1994).

A number of heritage buildings have been relocated to North Pine Country Park.

Pine Rivers Shire Council has developed a Heritage Museum.

Responses.
No.     Action                                      Responsibility              Priority
CH1.    Identify local indigenous groups and        PRCA                        High
        seek their involvement in ICM
CH2.    Identify & catalogue cultural heritage      Traditional owners,         Medium
        sites within the catchment                  EPA, Councils
CH3.    Encourage recognition & management of       EPA, Traditional            High
        Cultural heritage sites in land-use         owners, Councils, PRCA
        planning
CH4.    Develop and implement an awareness          EPA, Traditional            Medium /
        program for local cultural heritage         owners, Councils, PRCA      Low
        values

Interim Actions (April 2002):
Since development of the strategy the following actions have been undertaken:
Action CH2
       • PRSC has applied for funds through the EPA to undertake a cultural heritage
           study for the shire (2002).

Related Issues:
Land-use Planning, Native Vegetation, Awareness & Education, Recreation.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                          32
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




IMPLEMENTATION
As indicated in the previous sections, the actions recommended in this strategy have been
assigned to one or a number of agencies or groups. In many cases these agencies are already
responsibility for performing these tasks, and in some cases work has begun.
Obviously not everything can be done at once. The actions have been prioritised to provide
direction as to the actions that the Association feels are most urgent. The inter-related
nature of the issues means that some actions will be most effective if undertaken in
conjunction with others.
The role of the Pine Rivers Catchment Association will be to negotiate with responsible
agencies to undertake these actions and assist these agencies where work is already
underway. Additionally, the Association will help develop and support funding applications
where they are written to address the actions identified within this strategy. A number of
joint projects between the Association, other community groups and local government have
already been undertaken, and more are currently being planned.
The actions discussed in this document relate to the overall catchment of the Pine Rivers.
Each issue will have differing degrees of relevance to the various sub-catchments. Ideally,
management plans for each sub-catchment should be developed in conjunction with local
stakeholders, to prioritise local issues and determine what actions will most benefit the
catchment environment.
While many of the proposed actions in this strategy at first appear to be the responsibility
of governments, the sustainable management of our catchment's natural resources can only
be achieved through a cooperative approach by all those who use them. This means that
ultimately we are all responsible for ensuring the future health of our land and waterways.


CONFLICT RESOLUTION
A catchment management strategy seeks to provide a united framework for stakeholders to
work towards agreed goals in a coordinated manner.
During the public consultation and strategy development phases of this document, input has
been sought from a wide range of stakeholder groups and the general community and total
consensus has been difficult to achieve.
As a result, a conflict resolution process has been developed to ensure that, conflicts can be
resolved in a timely and objective manner.
Step 1 Identification of Issues
In order to be effectively dealt with, issues will be classifies as either
    • those that remain unresolved during strategy development or major review;
    • those that due to the evolving nature of the catchment and influencing factors,
       cease to be resolved;
    • those arising during the process of ratification by stakeholder groups;
    • those raised by stakeholder groups as being of concern.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                      33
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Step 2 Clarification of Issue
Following the identification of an unresolved or conflicting issue the following will be
undertaken
    • statements documenting the position of affected parties / stakeholder group
        relating to the issue to be prepared by the parties.
    • PRCA will then commence the resolution process in agreement with the lead agency /
        stakeholder group.

PRCA will then need to decide how to resolve the issues. Options at this stage are to
   • Refer the issue to the stakeholder / lead agency to resolve the issues as they see
      fit.
   • Refer the issue to the next strategy review
   • Commence the resolution process.

Step 3 Resolution Process
   • Documentation of issue (from Step 2) should be forwarded to agencies and
       stakeholder groups with an interest in the issue.
   • Nominations from these organisations will then be sought for formation of a working
       group.
   • An independent facilitator or chairperson should be appointed to lead the working
       group.
   • Advice and input from external experts should also be sought as part of the working
       group
   • A resolution mechanism is to be developed and agreed upon by working group and
       facilitator
   • Once the working group has reached an “agreement in principle”, representatives will
       seek the endorsement of their stakeholder group.
   • An agreement should then be drafted and ratified by consultation with relevant
       stakeholder groups.
   • The outcome of the conflict resolution process should then be reported back to all
       stakeholder groups and the agreed approach incorporated into the catchment
       management strategy.
   • An agreed process for implementation of actions should also be developed as part of
       the resolution process.



Unresolved issues.
Where no agreement can be reached between stakeholder groups on a particular issue, this
will be noted in the catchment management strategy as an unresolved issue.
A summary of stakeholder positions in relation to the issue should be included.
The resolution process and working group should be re-implemented at the next strategy
review date in attempt to resolve the issue in light of new information.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                  34
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




MONITORING & EVALUATION
The Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy has evolved over a number of years as part
of the Integrated Catchment Management process. The strategy will continue to evolve as it
is implemented and adapted to the changing conditions in the catchment and the needs of its
communities.
To ensure the management of the catchment responds to these changes, it is essential that
the outcomes of actions undertaken are continuously monitored and evaluated to ensure
their effectiveness. Monitoring of "indicators" of good resource management, such as water
quality, will provide a measure against which we can test our progress. A range of resource
monitoring programs are currently underway or being developed by industry, and state and
local governments, and it is anticipated that the results of these will be used to improve
future actions.
The Association has made use of the adaptive management cycle (Figure 4.) throughout the
development of this strategy and other projects. This process provides a way to start
implementing our strategic approach to sustainable resource management, while allowing
flexibility to improve our plan in years to come.




Figure 4. The Adaptive Management Cycle (DPI 1991)


The value of the adaptive management cycle is that it recognises that people do not have full
control over, or understanding of, their environment. Regular revisions of management plans
are essential to account for unanticipated changes in community outlook or resource
conditions.



Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     35
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Annual Evaluation and Reporting Process.

An annual cycle of progress evaluation and reporting is proposed. This review is necessary to
       • document progress on implementation of the plan;
       • identify actions in the plan that have not been implemented; and
       • focus activities and actions for the next 12 months.
A Planning Review sub committee of the PRCA has undertaken the first of these annual
reviews in 2002. The results of this review will be summarised and circulated to stakeholder
groups.
A framework for future annual reviews is proposed below.



                        Stakeholder Groups Identify Priority
                      Actions to address in Catchment Strategy



                         Implementation of Priority Actions




                Stakeholder Groups Report on Actions using standard
                      format against performance indicators



                      Stakeholder reports collated into an annual
                         evaluation / progress report (draft)


                   Stakeholder forum to report on progress and to
                          identify actions for upcoming yr.
                         Setting of performance indicators
                        Comments on draft progress report



                         Annual Implementation Review Report
                           Released for general circulation




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     36
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Strategy Review Timeline
Given the rapidly changing nature of the Pine Rivers Catchment, it will be necessary to
periodically review this strategy to ensure that it maintains a contempary focus.
Over time the current state and pressures on the catchment’s natural resources will change.
As actions are implemented, new issues, actions and priorities will emerge.
As a consequence it will be necessary to undertake a review of the strategy every three -
five years.
This process should involve wide stakeholder consultation and involvement to capture new and
emerging catchment management issues and develop appropriate actions to address these
issues.

FEEDBACK
To assist in future revisions of this strategy, a feedback form has been included. Your
comments will help us ensure that future strategies reflect changing conditions and
community values.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                         37
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



GLOSSARY & ABBREVIATIONS

Acid Sulfate Soils:         Soils containing iron pyrites (sulfates) that, when exposed to
                            air, produce sulfuric acid. Usually found on flood plains or low-
                            lying areas.
ASIC:                       Australian Seafood Industry Council

BCC:                        Brisbane City Council

Biodiversity:               The variety of life forms: the different plants, animals & micro-
                            organisms, the genes they contain & the ecosystems they form.
BRMG:                       Brisbane River Management Group

BR&MBWWMS:                  Brisbane River & Moreton Bay Waste Water Management Study

Codes of practice:          Guidelines for industry operations designed to reduce
                            environmental impacts.
Corridors:                  Areas of vegetation or open space linking larger areas of
                            remnant vegetation, usually to provide for wildlife movement.
CSC:                        Caboolture Shire Council

DES                         Department of Emergency Services

DME (EIU)                   Department of Mines & Energy (Extractive Industry Unit)

DNR:                        Department of Natural Resources

DPI:                        Department of Primary Industry

Ecologically Sustainable    Using, conserving & enhancing the community's resources so
Development (ESD):          that the ecological processes on which life depends are
                            maintained, & total quality of life, now & in the future, can be
                            increased.
Ecosystems:                 A community of plants & animals interacting with each other &
                            the environment in which they live.
Effluent:                   Liquid discharge from an industrial process or sewage
                            treatment.
EIIP                        Extractive Industries Implementation Program

Environmental flows:        The pattern of flows in a waterway that maintains its natural
                            habitats, aquatic life and ecosystem processes.
EPA:                        Environmental Protection Agency

Erosion:                    Removal of land surface by water or wind.

Eutrophication:             Process by which land or water becomes over-enriched with
                            nutrients.
Habitat:                    The place or type of area where a plant or animal naturally lives
                            and grows.
Integrated Catchment        A coordinated approach to the management of natural
Management (ICM):           resources, designed to achieve the sustainable & balanced use
                            of land, water & related biological resources.



Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                         38
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Infrastructure:             The system of essential services, utilities & facilities necessary to
                            enable human communities to function.
MBWCP                       Moreton Bay Waterways and Catchments Partnership – a whole of
                            government & community framework for the management of
                            waterways and catchments in SEQ. Formed in 2001, the
                            partnership builds on the work of the BRMG and SEQWQMS.
Nutrients:                  Chemical elements that plants need to grow; in particular Nitrogen
                            & Phosphorus
Property Management         A farm business plan developed with equal consideration to land
Plans (PMP):                management, personal, financial & production aspects.

QASSIT:                     Queensland Acid Sulfate Soils Investigation Team

QFS:                        Queensland Fisheries Service

QPWS:                       Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service

Remnant Vegetation:         An area of natural vegetation left after surroundings cleared for
                            development.
Riparian:                   Situated on or belonging to a waterway or waterway bank
Sclerophyll                 Dry sclerophyll – dry open eucalypt forest with a high tolerance to
                            bushfire
Sediments:                  Soil particles washed into waterways.

SEQ:                        South East Queensland

SEQWB:                      South East Queensland Water Board

SEQWCo                      South East Queensland Water Corporation

SEQRWQMS                    South East Queensland Regional Water Quality Management
                            Strategy.
Stakeholder:                A person with an interest or concern in a given issue.

Stormwater:                 Any water that runs off lawns, roads roofs or natural areas. This
                            water is channeled down natural or man-made drainage lines before
                            discharging, usually untreated, into creeks and rivers.
PRCA:                       Pine Rivers Catchment Association Inc.

PRSC:                       Pine Rivers Shire Council

Waterwise:                  Educational program promoting water conservation.

Waterways:                  Any place with defined bed and banks, which water, flows over or
                            collects upon. Water need not be permanent. Includes rivers,
                            creeks, streams, dams, lakes & estuaries.
WPSQ                        Wildlife Preservation Society of Qld

Voluntary Conservation      Voluntary contract between landholder & state or local government
Agreements (VCA):           that protects & enhances areas of significant habitat value on
                            freehold land.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                        39
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




REFERENCES
Applied Population Research Unit, (1998), Population Projections - Pine Rivers Shire and
selected neighbouring areas, University of Qld, Brisbane. Pg. 14.

Bowden, J.(1999), Living with the Environment in Pine Rivers Shire, Pine Rivers Shire Council.

Brisbane River Management Group & Brisbane River &Moreton Bay Waste Water
Management Study, (1996), State of the Brisbane River, Moreton Bay & Waterways, Qld
Dept. of Environment, Brisbane.

Brisbane River & Moreton Bay Waste Water Management Study (1998), Moreton Bay
Catchment Water Quality Management Strategy.

Catterall, C., Storey, R. & Kingston, M. (1995), Assessment and Analysis of the Deforestation
Patterns in the SEQ 2001 Area 1820 -1987-1994, Griffith University, Brisbane.

Chenowth & Associates Pty Ltd. (1994), Pine Rivers Green Plan, vols. 1 & 2, report prepared
for the Pine Rivers Shire Council.

Coopers & Lybrand (1994), Pine Rivers Shire Tourism Strategy, report prepared for the Pine
Rivers Shire Council.

Department of Primary Industries (1991), Integrated Catchment Management – strategy
summary, Qld Government, Brisbane.

Environment Sciences & Services (1999), Review of Recreation Policies at South East
Queensland Water Board Storages, volume 1, SEQWB, Brisbane.

GHD (1995), Land-use and Catchment Management Study - North Pine Dam, SEQWB,
Brisbane.

Hoffmann, G.W. (1980), ‘Quaternary sediments and geological history of the Pine Rivers area,
southeast Queensland”, Queensland Government Mining Journal, Oct. 1980. pp 502-512.

Pine Rivers Shire Council (1998), Shire of Pine Rivers Strategic Plan.

Pine Rivers Shire Council (1998a), Lake Kurwongbah Catchment Development Control Plan
Planning Study.

Pine Rivers Shire Council (1999), Minutes of the Recreation and Health committee, 13 July
1999, pg 99/2327

Pond, P. (1997), A Study of Hays Inlet and Pine Rivers System - a report prepared for the
Moreton Bay Task Force, Qld Dept of Primary Industries, Brisbane.

SEQ2001 Regional Resource Unit (1998), South East Queensland Regional Framework for
Growth Management, Qld Dept of Local Government & Planning, Brisbane.



Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                      40
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Sattler, P & Williams, R, (eds) (1999), The Conservation Status of Queensland's Bioregional
Ecosystems, Environmental Protection Agency, Brisbane.

Zeller, B. (1998), Queensland's Fisheries Habitats - current condition and recent trends, Qld
Dept. of Primary Industries, Brisbane.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                     41
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




YOUR COMMENTS
We all live in a catchment. Integrated Catchment Management is your chance to express
your views on how that catchment should be managed. To ensure this and future strategies
reflect the view of the catchment community, the Association would like your comments.
Responding using the format provided will let us more easily integrate your comments into
future reviews of the Strategy. If there is not enough room, you may like to write your
comments on a separate sheet of paper. Please fax your comments to (07) 3325 1588 or
post to:
                               PRCA
                                PO Box 2066
                                Strathpine Qld 4500

Do you agree with the issues? Are there any you would like to add?




Do you agree with the objectives chosen? Is there anything you would like to add?




Do you have any comments on the pressures causing each issue?




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                   42
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update




Do you have any comments on the current state of each issue?




Do you agree with the proposed actions? Is there anything you would like to add?




Do you have any other comments on this Strategy?




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                                                  43
Pine Rivers Catchment Management Strategy – 2002 Update



Thank–you for your time.




Pine Rivers Catchment Association                         44

				
DOCUMENT INFO