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					              National Society of Black Engineers




                       2010-2011
             AE Collegiate Initiative Toolkit
                          Updated August 13, 2010

                               Bianca Brown
             National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Chairperson
           National Society of Black Engineers Alumni Extension



Collegiate Initiative Committee:
Rachel Myers, Region 1 Alumni Collegiate Initiative Chair: myersrachel85@gmail.com
Morgan Alsberry, Region 2 Alumni Programs Chair: r2aeprograms@yahoo.com
Keith Sylvester, Region 3 Alumni Programs Chair: r3ae.programs@gmail.com
Daphne Simms, Region 4 Alumni Programs Chair: dls0812@aol.com
Carles Miller, Region 5 Alumni Programs Chair: cmiller@burnsmcd.com
Ebonee Williams, Region 6 Alumni Programs Chair: nsbephd@gmail.com
Welcome to an exciting year in the area of Collegiate Initiative! Throughout the years, the
Society has made great strides in this area and this year we are looking to sustain and elevate
those relationships with our collegiate counterparts to the next level.

Collegiate Initiative Chairs, get ready to host your best and most exciting programs yet. We are in
position to enlighten our collegiate counterparts of all that we do as Alumni members of the
Society. We are in position to provide insight and perspective to the world that they are about to
encounter as “culturally responsible black engineers”.

Programming this year needs to be taken to the next level. We need every Region, every Chapter
participating. Now is the time that we need to step it out. Based on our economic conditions and
our current environment, our students need us! We need them, as they are our future! Let’s work
together to help get them through the pipeline.

Our mission is simple and clear and we cannot fulfill it unless we are helping our collegiate
counterparts get through the pipeline and transition from engineering students and majors to black
engineers fully functioning in their communities. Who better to help in this effort, than us!

We have an exciting year of programming ahead of us and I look forward to working with you
all.

Thanks so much, for all that you do!

Delighted to Serve,

Bianca Brown
2010-2011 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Chairperson
National Society of Black Engineers Alumni Extension




                                                2

                 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
                             National Society of Black Engineers
                           2010-2011 Collegiate Initiative Program
                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION TO NSBE ............................................................................................. 4

THE MISSION OF NSBE .................................................................................................. 4

THE PURPOSE OF COLLEGIATE INITIATIVE ............................................................ 4

STRATEGIC PLAN OF CI PROGRAMMING................................................................. 5

INTRODUCTION TO THE CI TOOLKIT ........................................................................ 4

INITIATING CI PROGRAMMING .................................................................................. 6

EVENT/PROGRAM TRACKING ..................................................................................... 6

RECOMMENDED COLLEGIATE INITIATVE PROGRAMMING ............................... 7

TIMELINE FOR COLLEGIATE INITIATVES ................................................................ 9

TIMELINE FOR COLLEGIATE INITIATVES .............................................................. 10

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE INITIATVE AWARDS ..................................................... 10




                                                           3

                     National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
INTRODUCTION TO NSBE

The National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) was founded in 1975 by six black
engineering students at Purdue University nicknamed the “Chicago 6”. The original
aspiration was to establish a student organization to help improve the recruitment and
retention of black engineering students. NSBE is now the largest student-managed
organization in the United States with more than 33,000 members.

NSBE is comprised of more than 300 chapters on college and university campuses, 75
Alumni Extension chapters nationwide and 300 NSBE Jr. Chapters. These chapters are
geographically divided into six regions. For more information on NSBE, please visit
www.nsbe.org.



THE MISSION OF NSBE

The Mission of NSBE is “to increase the number of culturally responsible Black
engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the
community”


THE PURPOSE OF COLLEGIATE INITIATIVE

The Alumni Collegiate Initiative program is an initiative in which alumni members host
programs, workshops and activities to increase the interaction between alumni and
collegiate members. The purpose is to foster relationships and encourage alumni
membership upon graduation. With that being said, the objectives and goals should
remain the same from year to year in order to maintain and sustain those relationships.


INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGIATE INITIATVE TOOLKIT
The purpose of Collegiate Initiative toolkit is to provide guidance and some direction on
the National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program. This toolkit should only be used as a
guide to assist Alumni members in creating Collegiate Initiative programs within their
regions and chapters.

Collegiate Initiative Programming can begin as early as the Spring through the summer
of the following year (when collegiate students are available). Often times, Boards hold
elections in the Spring. Chapters can begin recording face-time hours as soon the
Collegiate Initiative Chairperson is elected into office.

                                            4

                National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
STRATEGIC PLAN FOR COLLEGIATE INITIATIVE PROGRAM

We recognize that each chapter has different needs. Each chapter is encouraged to
develop detailed goals that would be most effective based on their resources. Chapter
goals and accomplishments should be reported out on monthly calls with respective
Alumni counterparts. This guarantees the continued improvement of the program and
also keeps track of how many students are being impacted through the AE Collegiate
Initiative.

Strategies:
     Chapter Collegiate Initiative Chairs to maintain communication throughout the
        year with those collegiate chapters who are located in the same region/vicinity.
            o Send out an introductory email at the beginning of the year
            o Establish a frequent email/communication cadence to ensure that all
                collegiate chapters in the area have had continued contact and interaction
                with AE chapters in the same area.
     Chapters to host various Collegiate Initiative targeted events with collegiate
        counterparts throughout the year.

Measures:
   Number of graduating seniors declare AE chapter membership after graduation
   Relationships that have developed among the chapters
          o Relationships grow between chapters from year to year as interaction and
             participation increases from year to year.
                   Measured by number of joint programs held throughout the year
   Number of participants (AE and collegiate members) in local, Regional and
      National Collegiate Initiatives activities throughout the year.




                                             5

                National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
INITIATING COLLEGIATE INITIATIVES

There may be instances (although very few) where there has not been any interaction
between an Alumni and Collegiate chapter. Should this be the case, an introduction email
should be sent from the Regional Collegiate Initiative/Programs Chair to introduce the
Alumni and Collegiate chapters. The Alumni chapter should then begin developing a
relationship with their undergraduate constituents. This can be done by frequent emails,
phone calls, chapter visits and overall face-time. Once a relationship has been developed,
the chapters can then begin developing and implementing effective Collegiate Initiative
programs.

For those collegiate chapters that are located in areas where there is no Alumni presence,
the Regional Collegiate Initiative/Programs Chairperson is responsible for establishing
the relationship – through email communications, phone calls, chapter visits and
programming.


COLLEGIATE INITIATIVE EVENT TRACKING

In order to determine the impact of Collegiate Initiative Interaction, each interaction
should be tracked on a face-time matrix. See Face-time Matrix.xls. An interaction is any
form of communication that an Alumni NSBE member has with a Collegiate NSBE
member – whether in the form of email, phone calls, face to face meetings, etc. Face-time
(the amount of time AE members spend with Collegiate NSBE members) should be
tracked on the face-time matrix (see Appendix, also in electronic Excel format).

Face-time hours should be calculated as such:
# of Alumni members present (times) the # of collegiate members present (times) the
duration of Program/activity.
       *If it is an email/text communication, the duration will be 1 minute.
       *If it is an email/text exchange, the duration will be the number of email
       exchanges (for instance, if 2 exchange – duration is 2 minutes).

Also, there is a section in the matrix that records attendance, please list all attendees to all
Collegiate Initiative programs/activities.

At the conclusion of the event, there should be a summary report prepared including all
the above mentioned tracking measures. If possible, this report should include a summary
of evaluations collected from the event. This is to determine how successful the event
was based on the responses from the attendees.


                                               6

                 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
RECOMMENDED COLLEGIATE INITIATIVE PROGRAMMING

All Chapters should implement at least one local program. Chapters are encouraged to be
creative in their approach to what programs are implemented. It is important for Alumni
members to be able to engage their collegiate counterparts and spark an interest in
collegiate initiative programming.

Some chapters may want to make a big initiative or some may want to hold something
smaller and more intimate. The key is to assess the needs of your collegiate chapters to
see what would be most beneficial for all involved.

Sample activities include but are not limited to:
   1. Inviting collegiate chapter to alumni chapter meeting,  2 hours
   2. Alumni member(s) attend the collegiate chapter meeting,  2 hours
   3. Alumni chapter host career development panel,  2 hours
          a. Dress for success workshop, life after college (social, professional,
               personal), work/life balance, life as an AE member of the Society, etc.
   4. Alumni members facilitate a professional development workshop for students,
      time varies depending on the type of professional development, could range from
      2 hours to 8 hours
          a. Great for FRC and National Convention preparation
          b. Can discuss how to approach recruiters, resume workshops, Career Fair
               dress for success, how to ace an interview, what AE members look for in
               interviews, How you can stand out
   5. Mentoring program/NSBE Study Hall (see below), continuous time.  8 hours a
      month
   6. Alumni and collegiate chapters working together on TMAL competition.
          a. Include time for weekly tutoring, 8 hour local competition.
   7. Doing a community outreach activity together.  2 hours
   8. FRC Workshop hosted by Regional Collegiate Initiative committee  2 hours
          a. Benefits of AE membership, Life as a black engineer, “Corporate
               America” struggles and realities, etc.

National Academic Excellence Programming
NSBE Study Halls
The National Academic Excellence Committee is rolling out a program referred to as
NSBE Study Halls. This is a program where there can be joint interaction between AE
and collegiate members. This program is a part of the Collegiate Freshman Retention
Program. It is a ready-made program that requires interaction between AE and collegiate
members. Each chapter will be provided with a Study Hall toolkit. This same toolkit is
embedded within this toolkit. Collegiate students are encouraged to reach out to their AE
counterparts in their area and AE members should do the same. It will require both
demographics to make this program a success.
                                            7

                National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
To implement the NSBE Study Hall program
          Reach out to your local collegiate chapters and confirm that they have
             received the NSBE Study Hall toolkit
          Inquire about implementation dates and planning
          Identify areas where AE membership can help – what subjects, what
             timeframes, etc
          Inform your local chapters to encourage participate
                 o Local chapter CI/Programs Chairs should contact local collegiate
                    chapters to coordinate
                 o AE members may need review materials to assist in particular
                    subjects
                 o Local AEx Chair and AE CI/Programs chair work to match AE
                    with collegiate members – i.e. 1 AE to 2-3 collegiate members
                    (depending on membership size) for tutoring
                 o Local AEx chair (with support of AE CI Chair) manages pairing
                    and facilitates interactions/introductions
          Study Halls are to serve as tutoring and mentoring sessions
                 o Continued frequent communication and interaction with “paired”
                    collegiate member
          This should be an ongoing program implemented throughout the year
                 o Set a schedule with the undergraduate chapter for execution
                         At least every 3-4 months, a NSBE Study Hall session
                            should be implemented
                         Can be more frequently, if needed.
          Easy way to accumulate Face-time hours
          See NSBE Study Hall_final.doc

Please keep in mind that activities are not the only means for Facetime. Facetime also
includes mentoring. As mentoring relationships (one-on-one) formed, keep track of those
relationships including things such as frequency of communication, types of
communication, an evaluation of the mentoring relationship from both the mentor and the
mentee. Please see Appendix 1 for details on the Collegiate Initiative Mentoring
Program.

Achiever’s Plus Webinars:
Please join our collegiate students and AE members as they participate in several seminar
series that will take place throughout the year that will be available via webcast and
podcasts for our members. The below topics are those that you fellow AE members will
be participating in. Please sign in to support.
     August 2010: Why Waste Time? Maximize YOUR 24 Hours.
        Sunday, August 15, 2010 at 7pm EST/EDT.


                                            8

               National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
      December 2010: Achiever's Plus (A+) Radio: NSBE in the Mirror: Chapters
       Promoting Academics. All NSBE members are encouraged and welcomed to tune
       in via http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nsbeaex on Sunday, December 5, 2010 at
       7pm EST/EDT.
      February 2011: Achiever's Plus (A+) Radio: Is Graduate School for Me?
       All NSBE members are encouraged and welcomed to tune in via
       http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nsbeaex on Sunday, February 13, 2011 at 7pm
       EST/EDT.
      April 2011: Finishing Strong. Securing the Job Opportunity.
       This WebEx seminar will be held Sunday, April 17, 2011 at 7pm EST/EDT

Technical Research Exhibition
Please participate in TRE this year with submissions or judging.
See TRE Toolkit_FINAL.pdf


COLLEGIATE INITIATVE BEST PRACTICES

      Build relationships from communication and frequency
      Collegiate students really want to see and hear from AE members, so its as easy
       as attending a chapter meeting
           o Show your face
           o Meeting some of the members
           o Follow-up on anything that you say you will do
           o Students will be very excited to see and hear from you
      Offer to host a workshop, program specifically geared towards the students’ needs
      Survey the students to inquire about what they would like to see or need from
       Alumni members and when are the best times to connect with them
           o Implement programs according to the feedback that you receive
      Utilize the media of today – Facebook, Twitter, text messaging
           o It can be as easy as meeting a member and exchanging numbers and
               sending them a text once/twice per week


TIMELINE FOR COLLEGIATE INITIATVES

Collegiate Initiative programming should begin as early as possible. There is a higher
likelihood for successful events if the relationships begin as early in the year as possible.
Take advantage of milestones through out the NSBE year. For example, Alumni
members can present workshops at RLCs and FRCs, invite collegiate students to
participate in professional development workshops at the PDC and local level, participate
in a joint community outreach activity during the holiday seasons, and many other
programs. The idea is to make these initiatives a natural part of your operating year.


                                              9

                National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
DELIVERABLES FOR COLLEGIATE INITIATVE PROGRAMMING

One deliverable is the report out in monthly programming reports and during monthly
calls of programs and accomplishments with collegiate initiative. Another deliverable of
your Collegiate Initiative activity is the closing summary report which will be included in
your ICD, along with the face-time matrix. Please reference above section, Tracking
Measures. Report should include purpose, participants, positive outcomes, and how it
impacts the NSBE mission. This summary report will allow a history to be created of
activities so future members do not have to re-invent the wheel and will also start the trail
of best practices and lessons learned.

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE INITIATVE AWARDS

There are national awards available to those chapters who participate in the Collegiate
Initiative programming. The minimum award amount is $1000. There is also an award
for the Mentor of the Year. The application process for these awards will be
disseminated from the National AE Programs Chair or from the National College
Initiative Chairperson. It is imperative that accurate tracking is done for events and
mentoring initiatives to sure eligibility for these awards.

Criteria for the National Face-time Award will be based on (but not limited to) the
following criteria:
Number of programs implemented, number of hours of face-time recorded, innovation,
scholarships awarded, and programming content: Professional Development, Mentoring,
AE membership highlights, social interaction, etc.

Contact information
If you have any questions or concerns regarding this toolkit, please feel free to contact t
Bianca Brown at ci@nsbe-ae.org, for more information.



COLLEGIATE INITAITIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS

BIANCA BROWN, 2010-2011 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Chairperson
Rachel Myers, Region 1 Alumni Collegiate Initiative Chair: myersrachel85@gmail.com
Morgan Alsberry, Region 2 Alumni Programs Chair: r2aeprograms@yahoo.com
Keith Sylvester, Region 3 Alumni Programs Chair: r3ae.programs@gmail.com
Daphne Simms, Region 4 Alumni Programs Chair: dls0812@aol.com
Carles Miller, Region 5 Alumni Programs Chair: cmiller@burnsmcd.com
Ebonee Williams, Region 6 Alumni Programs Chair: nsbephd@gmail.com



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                National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
              APPENDIX 1
Collegiate Initiative Mentoring Program




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National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
I. NSBE COLLEGIATE INITIATIVE MENTORING PROGRAM OVERVIEW

A. Goals
     Provide a consistent and structured mentoring program
     Leverage the impact of a seasoned professional and provide professional development
       opportunities for the students

B. Benefits
Mentoring relationships play a crucial role in the development of both mentor & student. The
goal of the partnership is for both parties to obtain a fresh perspective on their career
development, as well as gain access to a broader network of resources.
Protégés can obtain:
     Increased confidence in their success in the field of science, math, engineering and/or
         technology
     An increased desire to pursue a career in engineering
Mentors can obtain:
     Personal satisfaction knowing that you are fulfilling the mission of NSBE
     Professional development, including better mentoring skills
     Increased level of commitment to engineering
     Opportunities for personal development, self-reflection and personal growth

C. Guidelines
     AE Collegiate Initiative/Programs Chairs and Collegiate Academic Excellence Chairs
       partner to select mentor/student relationships
           o AE CI/Programs Chair and AEx Chairs distribute and collect questionnaires at a
                chapter meeting
           o AE CI/Programs Chair and AEx Chair schedule a meeting to review and match
                mentor/students
           o Email/Call/Invite mentors/students to let them know they have been matched
           o Host a pairing kick-off to allow mentors/students to meet
           o Recommendation to host joint Mentoring “parties” throughout the programming
                year
                     Facilitate opportunities to bring mentor/student together
     Mentor/Student develop a seven (September – March) month engagement plan while in
       the program
     Mentor/Student engage at least twice per month
     AE Collegiate Initiative Chair/Programs Chairs follow up with mentors quarterly
       (September, December, March)
           o Academic Excellence Chairs follow up with students
           o AE Collegiate Initiative Chairs and Academic Excellence Chairs meet quarterly
                to discuss program effectively
                     Report out on monthly calls
     Mentor/student share responsibility for mentoring relationship
     Regional/National – follow same guidelines with respective Boards
     Respective CI/AEx Chairs are responsible for facilitating program and encouraging
       membership participation
           o Helping to alleviate and resolve any relational issues between mentor/student



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                 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
D. Roles and Responsibilities
Mentoring relationships play a crucial role in the development of both mentor & student. The
goal of the partnership is for both parties to obtain a fresh perspective on their career
development, as well as gain access to a broader network of resources.
     Necessary time & energy to devote to mentoring
     Highly motivated
     Commitment to development
     Consistently demonstrates NSBE Mission and leadership characteristics
     Facilitate dialogue that aligns with National Directives
     Pursues continuous learning & fosters a learning environment
     Strong communication skills (ability to communicate, listen & provide guidance)
     Enjoy & be good at teaching, guiding & training




II. MENTOR RESPONSIBILITIES
Acts as a "voice of experience" to a less experienced or knowledgeable individual.
     Communicator
     Counselor
     Career Coach
     Advisor
     Relationship broker – liaison between student and future relationships
     Guidance & feedback
     Leverages experience & learning
     Serves as a role model/life coach

A. Rules of Engagement
     The Student drives the mentoring agreement & comes to meeting prepared
     The Mentor sets realistic expectations for time commitment
     The Mentoring relationship is about Learning vs. Letting off Steam

B. Expected Outcomes of First Meeting
     Student's specific development needs have been determined – i.e. identifying a career
       path, increasing my GPA, how to get where I want to be in life, creating a vision for my
       life, building a network, etc.
     Expectations of both student and mentor have been determined – i.e. both parties show up
       to meetings on time, mutual respect and accountability, responsiveness to
       communications, etc.
     Expected outcomes for the mentoring relationship have been defined
     Your ongoing meeting schedule has been agreed and scheduled (e.g. monthly, quarterly,
       etc.). At a bare minimum, you should at least have scheduled a date for your next meeting
     It is recommended that in the majority of mentoring relationships that you meet with each
       other at least once each month for 1-2 hours.


C. How to Create a Successful Mentoring Role
A mentor can serve as advisor, teacher, relationship broker and coach, but it is up to the student to
ensure that the relationship engagement focuses on meaningful and achievable professional
development goals.
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                 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
        Collaboratively establish expectations, goals & a clear definition of success
        Mentor/student share responsibility for mentoring relationship
        Mentoring relationship should be time bound
Mentoring relationships play a crucial role in the development of both mentor & student. The
goal of the partnership is for both parties to obtain a fresh perspective on their career
development, as well as gain access to a broader network of resources.
     Necessary time & energy to devote to mentoring
     Highly motivated
     Commitment to development
     Consistently demonstrates NSBE Mission and leadership characteristics
     Facilitate dialogue that aligns with National Directives
     Pursues continuous learning & fosters a learning environment
     Strong communication skills (ability to communicate, listen & provide guidance)
     Enjoy & be good at teaching, guiding & training

D. Mentoring Focus for First 90 Days
    Conduct bi-weekly meetings
    Establish communications channels – i.e. phone, Facebook, Twitter, text messaging,
       emails, etc
    Identify success criteria
    Forecasting/commit discussions
    Partner engagement & conflict resolution
    Development
    Activities to ensure success – what will you do/commit to in order to achieve the goals of
       the program?

E. Pre-Questionnaire – MENTORS: Please answer the below questions and submit to your AE
Collegiate Initiative/Programs Chairperson

    1. What can you bring to this relationship?
    2. What motivations and values do you have that will support a mentorship?
    3. What experiences have you had that you have grown from? What lessons have you
       learned from these experiences that you can share?
    4. What are your strengths? How have you built upon them?
    5. What role models of mentoring behavior have you experienced and what will you apply
       that you have learned from them?
    6. What people, experiences and viewpoints can you connect your student to that will
       provide developmental experience?
    7. How do you hope to learn of grow from this relationship?
    8. What do you need to do make this work?
    9. How will you know if the relationship is working?

F. Pitfalls for Mentors
Mentoring is intended to be a mutually beneficial relationship between mentor & student.
Sometimes, the relationship does not evolve & grow as intended.
     Violating confidentiality of either party. What is said in your mentoring relationship
        should be kept confidential (unless it’s a legal or ethical issue to the corporation)
     Minimal trust between student & mentor, which prevents a safe climate for unguarded
        interaction
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                 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
      Not understanding mentoring is a two-way street (a reciprocal & mutual learning
       partnership which includes shared vulnerability)
      Not “actively” listening, from both parties
      Lack of expectations, responsibilities, & deliverables up front
      Not committed to program (availability/accessibility is questionable)
      Exerting opinions, influence or obligations (positional authority) rather than stimulating
       self-examination/ cultivation & insight

G. Tips for Mentors
     Be flexible
     Suggest discussion topics that you deem will benefit the student – i.e. email etiquette,
        dress for success, etc.
     Share personal experience
     Maintain regular contact – Consistent contact models dependability & trust
     Clarify & re-clarify expectations – Set & communicate ground rules, goals & priorities to
        counter balance an environment of change
     Be a coach – Encourage, educate, direct, constructively confront issues & give feedback
     Don’t have all the answers – Power is in listening. Help your students discover their own
        solutions. Guide – don’t rescue.
     Be yourself – Mentoring arises out of an effective relationship & happens when the other
        person trusts, feels accepted by & views their Mentor as a role model
     Challenge your student to grow – Asking 3 basic questions: Where are you going? How
        will you achieve your vision? What is your progress?
     Be a resource channel – Identify & help access resources, relationships & support
        networks
     Make a personal investment – Share on a personal level & pass on the lessons of wisdom
        gained through your own life experience
     Remember that you’re not alone – Ask for help from other mentors, peers & resources
     Be honest with no strings attached – Trust & respect are cornerstones of a mentor
        relationship. You can be honest without judging the person.




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                National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
III. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES
A less experienced individual who partners with a more experienced individual to enhance
capabilities & facilitate career development.
      Goals, objectives, career plans
      Relationship structure
      Measures progress against expectations
      Prioritizes agreements & keep commitments
      Open & honest

A. Rules of Engagement
     The Student drives the mentoring agreement & comes to meeting prepared
     The Mentor sets realistic expectations for time commitment
     The Mentoring relationship is about Learning vs. Letting off Steam

B. Expected Outcomes of First Meeting
     Student's specific development needs have been determined
     Expectations of both student and mentor have been determined
     Expected outcomes for the mentoring relationship have been defined
     Your ongoing meeting schedule has been agreed and scheduled (e.g. monthly, quarterly,
       etc.). At a bare minimum, you should at least have scheduled a date for your next meeting
     It is recommended that in the majority of mentoring relationships that you meet with each
       other at least once each month for 1-2 hours.

C. How to Create a Successful Mentoring Role
A mentor can serve as advisor, teacher, relationship broker and coach, but it is up to the student to
ensure that the relationship engagement focuses on meaningful and achievable professional
development goals.
     Collaboratively establish expectations, goals & a clear definition of success
     Mentor/student share responsibility for mentoring relationship
     Mentoring relationship should be time bound
Mentoring relationships play a crucial role in the development of both mentor & student. The
goal of the partnership is for both parties to obtain a fresh perspective on their career
development, as well as gain access to a broader network of resources.
     Necessary time & energy to devote to mentoring
     Highly motivated
     Commitment to development
     Consistently demonstrates NSBE Mission and leadership characteristics
     Facilitate dialogue that aligns with National Directives
     Pursues continuous learning & fosters a learning environment
     Strong communication skills (ability to communicate, listen & provide guidance)
     Enjoy & be good at teaching, guiding & training

D. Mentoring Program Focus for First 90 Days
    Conduct bi-weekly meetings
    Identify success criteria
    Identify development needs
    Activities to ensure success – what will you do/commit to in order to achieve the goals of
       the program?
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                 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
E. Pre-Questionnaire – STUDENTS: Please answer the below questions and submit to your
respective Academic Excellence Chairperson

   1.   What are your career aspirations?
   2.   What are your short-term goals/long term goals?
   3.   What knowledge, skills and abilities should you develop in order to meet these goals?
   4.   What experiences could help you meet your goals?
   5.   What are your desired outcomes for the mentoring relationship?
   6.   What do you expect from your mentor?
   7.   How will you know if the relationship is working

F. Tips for Students
     Be teachable – listen actively, there is always something to learn
     Honor your commitment to the program
     Have an open mind – be open to different perspectives
     Take initiative – come to you mentor with questions.
     Be appreciative of your mentor’s time and investment
     Maintain regular contact – Consistent contact models dependability & trust
     Be yourself




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                 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
IV. Worksheets

                 SETTING DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES AND METRICS

Below please list the specific developmental objectives that you have for this mentoring
relationship. For each objective, briefly state how you will determine whether you have achieved
that objective. Please turn these in to your Academic Excellence Chairperson or Collegiate
Initiative/Programs Chairperson (AE) for monthly updates.
Objectives:                                Measures of Achievement:         Check if
                                                                            Completed:




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                 National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011
                    MENTORING ACTION PLAN WORKSHEET

Description of         Objective of           Meeting / Target   Contingencies / Next
Development Need       Developmental          Date for           Steps:
                       Opportunity            Completion:




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              National Alumni Collegiate Initiative Program 2010-2011

				
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