2010-11 LL.M. Handbook

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2010-11 LL.M. Handbook Powered By Docstoc
					THE BENJAMIN N. CARDOZO
     SCHOOL OF LAW


HANDBOOK FOR
LL.M. STUDENTS




  OFFICE OF GRADUATE &
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
FALL 2010 – SPRING 2011
                             HANDBOOK FOR LL.M. STUDENTS
                           BENJAMIN N. CARDOZO SCHOOL OF LAW
                                FALL 2010 – SPRING 2011
                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                         PAGE

Introduction and Welcome                                                     1

I.     General Information for all Incoming Students                         2
       A.    Medical Insurance                                               2
       B.    Immunization                                                    2
       C.    LL.M. Orientation Program                                       2
       D.    Student ID Cards                                                3
       E.    Keeping Informed                                                3
       F.    Academic Calendar                                               4
       G.    Keeping Cardozo Informed                                        4
       H.    Meetings with Professors                                        4
       I.    Ethical Standards and Student Discipline                        5
       J.    Law School Building Hours                                       5

II.    Course Information for All LL.M. Students                             6
       A.    Basic LL.M. Degree Requirements                                 6
       B.    Cardozo Curriculum                                              7
       C.    Registration Information                                        7
       D.    Special Courses                                                 8
             1.     Writing Opportunities                                    8
             2.     Winter Intercession Courses                              9
             3.     New School Courses                                       9
       E.    Practical and Clinical Experience                               10
       F.    Transfer Credit from ABA-Approved Law Schools                   12
       G.    Graduation Check Procedures                                     13
       H.    Leaves of Absence                                               13
       I.    Grading for LL.M. Students                                      13

III.   General Studies LL.M. Program                                         15

IV.    Comparative Legal Thought LL.M. Program                               16

V.     Intellectual Property Law LL.M. Program                               17

VI.    International LL.M. Students                                          18
       A.     Courses Designed Especially for International LL.M. Students   18
       B.     Enrollment in Core Doctrinal Courses                           19
       C.     A Note on Attending Classes                                    19
       D.     New York State Bar Examination                                 19
       E.     Visas, Employment, and Related Matters                         22

VII.   LL.M. Student Services                                                24
       A.     Office of Career Services                                      24
       B.     Office of Student Services                                     24
       C.     Computing                                                      24
       D.     Law Library                                                    26

                                              i
        E.    Bookstore                                                  27
        F.    Health and Counseling                                      27
        G.    Student Lounge                                             28
        H.    Food Services                                              28
        I.    Notary Services                                            28
        J.    Lockers                                                    28

VIII.   Student Finance, Scholarships, and Financial Aid                 29
        A.    Tuition                                                    29
        B.    Making Payments                                            29
        C.    Scholarships                                               30
        D.    Additional Sources of Financial Aid                        30

IX.     Cardozo Law School Programs and Activities                       32
        A.    School-Wide Student Programs and Activities                32
        B.    LL.M. Student Programs and Activities                      32
        C.    Continuing Legal Education Programs                        33
        D.    Student Memberships in Bar Associations                    33

X.      Commencement                                                     34

Appendix A:          Contact Information for LL.M. Students              35

Appendix B:          Academic Calendar                                   36

Appendix C:          Application for LL.M. Concentrations                37

Appendix D:          General Studies LL.M. Program Worksheet             38

Appendix E:          Comparative Legal Thought LL.M. Program Worksheet   40

Appendix F:          Intellectual Property Law LL.M. Program Worksheet   41

Appendix G:          Basic Courses in American Law                       42

Index




                                             ii
       Welcome to the graduate law program at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of
Law.

      This Handbook for LL.M. Students is designed to better acquaint you with
Cardozo School of Law and to assist you in developing a program of study. Following
some general information, this Handbook sets forth course selection and other useful
information for graduate students. Please read it carefully.




A NOTE ABOUT THE CARDOZO STUDENT HANDBOOK

         The Cardozo Student Handbook is the official statement of rules and regulations
for all students in the law school. You will be provided with a copy of the Cardozo
Student Handbook once you arrive at the law school. All students are charged with
knowledge of the contents of the Cardozo Student Handbook and are strongly
encouraged to read it in its entirety.

       The LL.M. Student Handbook is designed to supplement the materials in the
Cardozo Student Handbook and to highlight some of the information that may be of
particular importance to LL.M. students.

        CSL reserves the right to change its rules and regulations, admissions and
graduation requirements, course offerings, tuition, fees, and any other material set forth
in its Bulletin or handbooks at any time without prior notice. Changes become effective
when posted on official bulletin boards and/or on the Cardozo or Angel websites.
Students should check these locations for changes.




                                                                  Updated July 20, 2010
                                    I.
              GENERAL INFORMATION FOR ALL INCOMING STUDENTS


A.     Medical Insurance

       Healthcare in the United States is very costly and is not covered by the state or
Yeshiva University. All entering LL.M. Cardozo School of Law students (domestic or
international) enrolled in six (6) or more credit hours are required to maintain health
insurance that meets minimum criteria established by the University. Every entering
student will be enrolled automatically in Plan 1 and the premium will be billed to the
student's Cardozo account. Students who wish to waive coverage under the School plan
must complete a waiver form and provide proof of comparable coverage prior to the
waiver deadline. Entering LLM. students have the option to purchase Plan 2 if they want
increased coverage.

       Information can be found at www.ahpcare.com/cardozo

B.     Immunizations

       The State of New York Department of Public Health requires that all students born
on or after January 1, 1957, regardless of country of origin, provide proof of immunization
against measles, mumps, and rubella. Cardozo also asks students to complete a
statement about a meningitis vaccination.

        Once the $1,000 enrollment deposit has been paid, students should download the
form from the admitted student website and have it completed by a physician certifying
that they have had the required immunizations or otherwise have immunity. Some
religious exemptions may apply.


C.     LL.M. Orientation Program

       1.     Timing

      LL.M. orientation is generally a full two-day program which takes place during the
week prior to the start of classes.

       2.     Introduction to U.S. Law

         All international LL.M. students are required to take Introduction to U.S. Law during
their first semester of enrollment in the LL.M. program. This two-credit course introduces
students to the basics of the U.S. legal system, including the structure of the federal
system and the use of precedent, and methods of reading and analyzing case law.
Waivers are liberally granted to students from common law countries. Any requests for
waivers for this course should be made in writing to the Assistant Dean for Graduate and
International Programs.
                                              2
      Please note that 12-14 hours of special sessions of Introduction to U.S. Law are
held during the week prior to the start of courses.

D.     Student Identification Cards

       All students are required to obtain an official Cardozo identification (ID) card.
Photographs are taken for ID cards during orientation and early each semester. Students
should watch for information regarding the time and location of the photographer’s
sessions. Students must keep their identification cards with them at all times, and present
their cards each time they enter the building and any time a member of Cardozo’s security
or administrative staff requests that they do so. A valid student identification card must be
presented when obtaining information from the Office of the Registrar or when checking
out materials from the library.

F.     Keeping Informed

      It is critical that all students keep informed of announcements made by the law
school and by their course instructors. There are five primary ways in which information is
transmitted to students:

       1.     Email

              a.      @law.cardozo.yu.edu – Your Official Law School Email Account

                All students are given a Yeshiva University email account in the domain
       known as “@law.cardozo.yu.edu.” You should check your @law.cardozo account
       daily. Students are expected to have knowledge of the content of any emails sent
       to their @law.cardozo accounts. See
       https://sites.google.com/a/law.cardozo.yu.edu/cardozo-google-apps/home for
       details on using this Google Apps for Education account.

       All students will receive their @law.cardozo address before or at orientation. You
       can also find your email account name by checking with the reference librarians.

               b.      Forwarding @ law.cardozo to Another Email Address

       If you regularly use another email service provider, you can forward your
       @law.cardozo account to your other account.

              c.      Finding Another Person’s @law.cardozo Address

               If you would like to locate the email address of a Cardozo student, just type
       that person’s name in the TO field of a message while using your @law.cardozo
       account. Faculty and staff email accounts can be located by searching the
       directory at www.yu.edu/search. Faculty and staff do not have email accounts on
       @law.cardozo.yu.edu.



                                              3
       2.     Angel and Student Web Services

       Angel (https://cardozo.elearning.yu.edu/) is a course management and posting
system. Faculty members and administrative offices use Angel to post assignments and
other important notices. There is also an LL.M. Community page on Angel with important
information about the LL.M. program. It is crucial that you check your Angel account
regularly. You can forward your Angel mail to another email address. Additional
information about using Angel will be provided upon your arrival at the law school.

       3.     Cardozo School of Law Student Handbook

      You will receive a copy of the Cardozo Student Handbook from the Office of
Student Services during LL.M. Orientation. You should read this handbook carefully. The
Cardozo Student Handbook is the official statement of rules and regulations for all
students in the law school. See “A Note About the Cardozo Student Handbook,” supra.

       4.     The Calendar of Events

       The Calendar of Events is a weekly publication that lists activities that take place at
the law school. It is posted throughout the school and is also available on the law school’s
web page.

       5.     Bulletin Boards

      There are bulletin boards located throughout the building that have important
information for J.D. and LL.M. students. You should check these bulletin boards regularly.

G.     Academic Calendar

      The LL.M. academic calendar is included as Appendix B and is also available on
the Angel and Cardozo websites. Please bear in mind that this calendar is subject to
change. An updated calendar will be provided at orientation, and students should be
aware of emails and postings throughout the academic year that may announce other
changes.

      Please bear in mind that examinations cannot be rescheduled to conform to
students’ travel plans. Thus, you should not make travel plans that would require you to
leave New York City before the end of the relevant examination period.


H.     Keeping Cardozo Informed

      Any change in your contact information – address, phone number, email address –
must be immediately updated in the University computer system at www.yu.edu/myyu.

I.     Meetings with Professors

       Most professors welcome individual meetings with students by appointment or
during established office hours. Office hours will usually be noted on the course syllabus

                                              4
or posted on the professor’s door. If not, you should call or email your professor or his or
her secretary in advance.

J.     Ethical Standards and Student Discipline

      The Disciplinary Code and Rules of Procedure set forth in the Cardozo School of
Law Student Handbook are binding on all Cardozo School of Law students. Cardozo
School of Law takes these rules very seriously and harsh penalties – including expulsion –
may be imposed for violation of these rules.

       In particular, note the Cardozo Student Handbook provisions on plagiarism, as
rules on plagiarism may be treated somewhat differently in other countries. In the U.S.,
including at Cardozo, using the works of others without proper attribution is a form of
cheating. Instances of plagiarism are considered to be extremely serious and may lead to
expulsion from the law school.

       Please read the Handbook rules on Disciplinary Code and Rules of Procedure
carefully and address any questions you may have to the Assistant Dean for Graduate
and International Programs or the Assistant Dean for Students.

K.     Law School Building Hours

       During the academic year, the law school building is open Mondays through
Thursdays from 8:00 a.m. to midnight and from 9:00 a.m. through midnight on Sundays.
The law school is open Fridays from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (November – December and
January - February), 5:00 p.m. (during October), or 6:00 p.m. or later (March -
September). The law school building is closed on Saturdays and on other Jewish
holidays. Information on building hours and closings will be posted throughout the law
school.




                                              5
                                     II.
                 ACADEMIC INFORMATION FOR ALL LL.M. STUDENTS

   A.        Basic LL.M. Degree Requirements

        1.     In General

   All LL.M. degree candidates must complete a minimum of twenty-four (24) credits.
One credit is the equivalent of one 50-minute hour of class instruction per week over the
course of one semester.

   Of the twenty-four (24) credits required to graduate, at least eighteen (18) must be “in-
class” credits. “In-class” credits exclude credits earned through a thesis, an independent
research, an externship, an internship, a clinic, etc. In class credits also do not include
credits taken at another institution, e.g., the New School. No more than two (2) clinical
credits can be applied toward the twenty-four (24) credits required for the degree.

        2.     Maximum/Recommended Number of Credits per Semester

   Most full-time students take between eleven (11) and fourteen (14) credits per
semester. Students in general, and international LL.M. students in particular, are not
advised to take more than fourteen (14) credits in any semester. LL.M. students are not
permitted to take more than sixteen (16) credits per semester.

        3.     Part-Time or Full-Time Status

   Full-time students are those who enroll in nine (9) or more credits in a semester.
Students enrolled the full-time LL.M. Program are required to take a full-time courseload
per semester for two consecutive semesters.

   Part-time students are those who enroll in eight (8) or fewer credits in a semester.
Students should be aware that the part-time program is not a night program, and students
who register for the part-time program should anticipate that they will have to adjust their
outside commitments to fit with the law school course schedule.

        4.     Time to Complete Degree

   Full-time students must complete their degree requirements in one (1) year.

   Part-time students must complete their degree requirements in three (3) years.

   Students in the J.D./LL.M. program must complete their LL.M. degree requirements in
two (2) years.




                                              6
   B.        Cardozo Curriculum

       LL.M. students choose courses from the Cardozo J.D. curriculum. The Cardozo
J.D. curriculum includes core doctrinal courses (known as “first year” courses because
they are required during the first year of J.D. study) which lay the foundation of legal
concepts; and upper-level courses, which provide variety and depth to allow for
specialization in specific areas of the law.

        LL.M. students are free to choose courses from both the first-year and the upper-
level curricula, provided course prerequisites have been met.

        1.      First Year JD Curriculum

        All first year J.D. students take a set group of courses, as follows:
                 Civil Procedure—Fall semester, 5 credits
                 Constitutional Law I—Spring semester, 3 credits
                 Contracts—Full year course, 5 credits
                 Criminal Law—Spring semester, 3 credits
                 Elements of Law (not open to LL.M. students)
                 Property—Spring semester, 5 credits
                 Torts—Fall semester, 4 credits

        2.      Upper Level Curriculum

        The upper-level curriculum consists of elective courses in a variety of areas of
practice, including immigration law, intellectual property, international law, family law,
public law, criminal law, and corporate and securities law.


   C.        Registration

       The registration process requires each student first, to select the courses in which
they wish to enroll from among the courses to be offered in the upcoming semester,
consistent with program requirements and in consultation with the Assistant Dean for
Graduate and International Programs; and second, to follow the detailed registration
procedures that are available to students on the Angel courseweb system.

       The information set forth below is not intended to be a substitute for the official
registration materials. Instead, it is intended to highlight some of the important issues
addressed in the official registration materials.

        1.      Processes for Registration

       Before each registration period, the law school posts registration materials on its
Angel Homepage at https://cardozo.elearning.yu.edu. During orientation, you will get a
password to sign in to Angel, but you do not need to log in to check the registration
materials; simply go to the link for Registration to the right of the log-in box. Under that
link you will find various folders relating to registration. These are the materials you


                                                7
should consult in selecting the courses in which you would like to enroll. Please also read
the instructions carefully and in their entirety.

         2.     Timing of Registration

        Registration for courses generally takes place in July for the fall semester and in
November for the spring semester. LL.M. students thus first register for courses prior to
their initial enrollment at the law school. Courses are selected for one semester at a time.

         3.     Register for All Courses in Which You Plan to Enroll

     Students must register for all of their courses, including required courses, for each
semester in which they will be enrolled at the law school.

         4.     Importance of Registering During the Initial Registration Period

        Although every effort is made to enroll students in the courses of their choice, this
is not always possible because of limitations in class size. Classes do reach full
enrollment, and you may not get into every course that you want. A student’s prospects of
admission to a particular course are greatest if the student registers during the initial
registration period. Thus, students should review and complete their registration materials
as soon as possible upon receiving them and should register during the period indicated
on the materials.

    D.        Special Courses

         International LL.M. students should also see Part VI.

         1.     Writing Opportunities1

       Certain courses may require students to write one or more papers in lieu of or in
addition to an examination. In addition, there are two special opportunities for writing
papers as part of the LL.M. curriculum.

       Please note that credits earned for work on a thesis or independent research do not
apply towards the 18-credit in-class minimum. Students are directed to the Cardozo
Student Handbook for rules prohibiting use of work for a thesis or independent research in
other courses.




1
         International students who plan to sit for the New York State bar examination are urged to keep in
mind the requirement that students who do not meet the durational and substantive requirements of U.S.
legal education must complete a minimum of twenty (20) credits in classroom-based coursework in order to
qualify to sit for the New York bar examination. See Part VI. D. The courses listed in this section do not
apply toward these credits.

                                                     8
               a.    LL.M. Thesis
       Students in the Comparative Legal Thought Program are required to write a thesis.
Students in the General Studies LL.M. or the Intellectual Property Law LL.M. program may
write a thesis only with special permission and based on a detailed outline or plan.

       The LL.M. Thesis allows such students to write a major paper of substantial length
under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are responsible for securing the
approval of a member of the full time faculty who will supervise the Thesis. Interested
students should first speak with the Assistant Dean for Graduate and International
Programs. Students will be awarded three (3) credits for a thesis, which will generally be
45-60 pages in length.

                b.      Independent Research

        Independent Research enables students to write a significant paper under the
supervision of a faculty member. Independent Research is a major research effort
culminating in a significant paper, which should generally be approximately 15-20 pages in
length per credit. Students may take independent research for one (1) or two (2) credits
per semester, for a total of no more than four (4) credits. Students are responsible for
identifying and securing the agreement of a faculty member to supervise their independent
research.

       Students seeking to register for Independent Research should fill out an
Independent Research form (available from the Office of the Registrar) and have it signed
by the supervising faculty member and the Assistant Dean for Graduate and International
Programs. Once signed, it should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

        2.      Winter Intercession Courses

        Students should note that courses may be offered during the intercession between
the fall and spring semesters (i.e., in early January). Unfortunately, we may not be able to
confirm these courses or their scheduling until well into the fall semester. Students who
may be interested in such courses should keep this in mind when making travel plans for
early January. These courses may not be used to accelerate graduation for a full-time
student or to allow a full-time student to register for a part-time courseload during the
second semester of enrollment.

        3.      New School Courses2

      LL.M. students are permitted to enroll in and apply toward the LL.M. degree credits
earned from one (1) approved course at the Graduate Faculty or the Milano School of
Management and Urban Policy of the New School for Social Research. In order to be
approved, a course must be “law-related.” Students interested in enrolling in a New


2
         International students who plan to sit for the New York State bar examination are urged to keep in
mind the requirement that students who do not meet the durational and substantive requirements of U.S.
legal education must complete a minimum of twenty (20) credits in classroom-based coursework in order to
qualify to sit for the New York bar examination. See Part VI. D. The courses listed in this section do not
apply toward these credits.
                                                     9
School course should check the New School website for courses. For Graduate Faculty
courses, visit http://www.newschool.edu/gf/. For Milano courses, visit http://www.
newschool.edu/milano/mi_progcor.htm.

      Students wishing to take a New School course should fill out the “Permission to
Register as a Non-Matriculated Student” form, available in the Office of Student Services.
Students should include with the form a description of the proposed course and why the
course would enhance their legal studies. Written approval of the Assistant Dean for
Graduate and International Programs, the Dean of Students, and the New School
designate is required. Language courses and most history courses will not be approved.
There is no additional charge for taking a New School course.

      Students who enroll in a New School course are responsible for ensuring that their
grades are transferred to the law school.

   E.      Practical and Clinical Experience

       Although the LL.M. degree is primarily an academic degree, Cardozo offers a
number of internship and externship opportunities for its students, which are described
below. Selection for all programs is competitive and limited. Credits earned through
these offerings do not apply to the required minimum of eighteen (18) in-class credits. No
more than two (2) clinical credits can be applied toward the twenty-four (24) credits
required for the degree.2

      Additional information about these programs is available from the Office of Career
Services.

        Please note that not all opportunities are offered every year.


               1. Family Court Clinic and Family Court Practice Clinic

           These clinics introduce students to the practice of family law. Students obtain
their clinical credit by working for judges, law guardians, and family law practitioners in
both the private and public sector. Students may work with a judge or an attorney
representing clients in Family Court, drafting legal memorandums, conducting research,
working with clients, or analyzing legal issues that arise in the context of the family. In
conjunction with their field work, students attend a required seminar and engage in further
exploration of relevant developments in the law and the considerations which arise when
representing children, low income people, and families.

               2. Heyman/ACCA In-House Counsel Internship Program

       Each semester, the Office of Career Services and the Heyman Center on
Corporate Governance offer an exciting internship program with members of the New
York Chapter of the American Corporate Counsel Association ("NY-ACCA"). The goal of
the internship program is to expose law students to the practice of law in a corporate law
department. Students will work ten to fifteen hours per week with selected in-house
counsel for the semester. Students will work with in-house attorneys learning the structure

                                              10
of the corporation from the inside as well as how to spot legal issues within a corporate
setting. The in-house attorney will be responsible for evaluating the intern assigned to him
or her. Each intern will submit a legal research paper on a corporate issue related to the
work performed at the internship. LL.M. students who have completed twelve (12) credits
of study are eligible to apply for this program.

              3. Holocaust Restitution Claims Practicum/Remedies for Wartime
                 Confiscation

       This clinic is the first of its kind at any American law school. For one semester, the
Holocaust Restitution Claims Practicum offers an opportunity for students to make a
contribution to the world-wide effort to resolve legal claims regarding bank accounts,
insurance and other assets looted during World War II. Selected students provide pro
bono legal assistance to claimants. Placements have included the New York State
Holocaust Claims Processing Office, the Holocaust Assistance Project of the New York
Legal Assistance Group and other agencies handling the claims of Holocaust victims. The
commitment is ten hours per week for one clinical credit and a two-credit corequisite
seminar. This clinic is typically offered in the fall semester and is open only to students in
their second semester of study.

              4. Human Rights and Genocide Clinic

In the global environment in which we live , legal issues stand at the intersection of
domestic civil rights law and the developing law of international human rights. Joining the
ranks of only a handful of human rights clinics in the country, the Cardozo Human Rights
and Genocide Clinic , founded in the spring of 2005, introduces students to the practice of
law in the trans-national setting of international human rights litigation and other forms of
human rights advocacy. The overall objective of the clinic is to give law students first-
hand experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect
for human rights and to the diverse ways in which the law is utilized to advance social
change particularly in the area of genocide prevention. Genocide prevention necessarily
requires an understanding of its roots including intolerance, racism, discrimination, and the
denial of minority rights. Accordingly, the Clinic will engage students in a broad spectrum
of human rights advocacy, including close attention to minority rights, and international
criminal and humanitarian law.

              5. Immigration Law Clinic Externship

        This externship places students for one semester at organizations like the U.N.
High Commissioner for Refugees, Lawyers’ Committee for Human Rights, American Civil
Liberties Union, Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Legal Aid Society, and the U.S. Catholic
Conference for Migration and Refugee Services. Students work primarily on cases
involving applications for political asylum, as well as on such issues as permanent
residence, change of status, and suspension of deportation. Dealing directly with clients,
students help draft applications and substantiate claims of persecution abroad. Others
work on other types of immigration and citizenship benefits, such as permanent residence,
change of status, and cancellation of removal, briefs in support of such applications, and
related legal research. Immigration Law must be taken either as a pre-requisite or a co-
requisite.

                                              11
             6. Intellectual Property Externship Program

        The Intellectual Property Law Externship Program provides a limited number of
Intellectual Property LL.M. students with the opportunity to combine advanced intellectual
property coursework with a related work placement. The goal of the externship is to
enable students to gain practical lawyering skills in intellectual property by working at a
law firm or corporation under the supervision of attorneys who specialize in intellectual
property law. In the spring semester, externships are available in Trademark/Copyright
Law or Patent Law. In the fall semester, externship placements are available in
Trademark/Copyright Law only. Students are graded on a pass/fail basis. Students must
write a paper on a topic related to their placement in order to receive credit for the
placement. Students participating in the internship program are graded on a Pass/Fail
basis. Certain course pre- and co-requisites apply to students interested in the IP
externship program.

       IP LL.M. students who have completed twelve (12) credits of study are eligible to
apply for this program.

             7. Labor and Employment Law Externship

        This Externship enables students to gain practical experience in labor and
employment law by working eight to twelve hours a week in a law firm, government
agency, or labor organization. Participating students must commit to working 8 –12 hours
per week at the participating employer and must take the accompanying seminar. The
seminar will involve a discussion of a variety of important labor and employment topics,
including current issues relating to federal and state legislation concerning the
organization and regulation of collective bargaining, strikes, picketing and boycotts,
arbitration, bankruptcy, Title VII, and the WARN Act.

             8. Tax Clinic

       The Tax Clinic provides legal services to taxpayers who have federal and New York
income tax controversies and who cannot afford to be represented by counsel. Clinic
students represent taxpayers on audits, IRS Appeals, and U.S. Tax Court matters
involving proposed income tax adjustments. Also, students assist in collection matters,
such as obtaining installment payment arrangements and offers in compromise of
undisputed liabilities. The seminar portion of this course covers federal tax procedure, and
requires several short papers on current topics in the tax law, which give students useful
experience in tax research. All students enrolled in this clinic must have completed the
course in Federal Income Taxation.


   F.     Transfer Credit from ABA-Approved Law Schools

       Candidates for an LL.M. degree must have received a minimum of eighteen (18)
credits from Cardozo. Upon admission, candidates may seek to transfer up to six (6)
credits earned in another LL.M. program at another law school accredited by the American
Bar Association (ABA). Such credits may be transferred and applied to the LL.M. degree

                                             12
only if a student received a grade of “B” or better (or the equivalent) in the classes for
which transfer credit is sought and only if such credits were not applied towards any other
degree.

       Students seeking to have credits transferred to Cardozo law school must fill out a
form requesting the transfer of credit form another institution, available from the Office of
the Registrar, and have it approved by the Assistant Dean for Graduate and International
Programs. No credit toward the LL.M. program can be awarded for courses taken at any
school not accredited by the ABA.

   G.      Graduation Check Procedures

        As a condition to graduation, all LL.M. students must make an appointment with the
Office of the Registrar to have a “graduation check." This ensures that each student has
or will have satisfied all of the requirements necessary for his or her degree.

       All students should schedule an appointment for their graduation check toward the
end of the semester before they plan to graduate or, at the very latest, early in the
semester during which they plan to graduate. Under this latter option, students should
ensure that their graduation check takes place before the end of the add/drop period.

       Students with any remaining grades of incomplete on their record will not be
cleared for graduation. It is the responsibility of each student to ensure that any grades of
incomplete or missing grades are supplied well in advance of graduation.

   H.      Leaves of Absence

       Short-term leaves of absence from LL.M. studies are permitted. Students who
need to take a leave of absence should fill out a leave of absence application (available
from the Office of the Registrar). All requests for a leave of absence need to be approved
by the Dean of Students.

      Students who do not follow these procedures will need to reapply to the LL.M.
program in order to return to the law school.

       Information about leaves of absence from the law school should be directed to the
Office of Student Services.


   I.      Grading for LL.M. Students

        Grades for LL.M. students are as follows:

                     A             Excellent
                     B             Good
                     C             Fair
                     D             Poor
                     F             Failed
                     G             Administrative Failure

                                              13
                     I             Incomplete
                     N             No credit
                     P             Passed (used in special courses or circumstances)
                     W             Withdrew without penalty or prejudice
                     Y             Year course; second semester grade will apply to
                                   both semesters

       The symbol “+” suffixed to the grades of A, B, C, and D and the symbol “ – “
suffixed to the grades of A, B, and C indicate the upper and lower thirds, respectively, of
the range covered by those grades.

        LL.M. students are not included when calculating the curve for a particular course,
nor are they curved separately. Faculty use the JD curve in a given course as a guideline
for grading LL.M. students, but may make an adjustment for an individual LL.M. student if
it is warranted.

       There is no mechanism for grade appeals. A professor can change a grade that
has been submitted to the Registrar only in cases of computational or recording error. A
re-evaluation of the quality of a student’s work does not constitute a “computational error.”


       1.     LL.M. Students who do not Hold a J.D. Degree

      International LL.M. students have the option to convert up to six (6) credits of
grades in the LL.M. degree from A+ through D to a “P” grade. Such a designation would
remove the grade from grade point average calculation. Please keep the following in mind
when considering whether or not to avail yourself of this option:

   •   It is difficult to determine how employers will interpret a “P” grade if they see your
       transcript. Some employers may assume a “P” grade is equal to a “C” or even a
       “D”
   •   Credits for courses in which you receive a “P” may not be transferable to other
       academic programs, including J.D. programs of American law schools
   •   Once changed, the designation of a grade as “P” may not be revoked
   •   You may designate a maximum of six (6) credits of your total 24 credits as “P.”
       Choose wisely, especially in your first semester.
   •   You may not designate a portion of a course as a “P”
   •   This designation must be made either in person or via fax with a signature at the
       Office of the Registrar by January 15 for the prior fall semester’s grades, by March
       15 for the prior Winter session’s grades, and by June 7 for the prior spring
       semester’s grades,
   •   Once an individual graduates, no change of grades can be made




                                              14
                                      III.
                  COURSE INFORMATION FOR LL.M. STUDENTS IN THE
                           GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM

    A.      Curriculum

      There is no prescribed curriculum for students in the General Studies LL.M.
program. Every candidate must pursue a coherent and focused program of study,
developed in consultation with the Assistant Dean for Graduate and International
Programs.

    B.      Special Requirement for Students from Civil Law Countries

        General Studies LL.M. students who hold a law degree from a civil law country are
required to enroll in at least one (1) of the following courses: Contracts (full year course),
Torts (fall semester course), or Property (spring semester course). These courses are
listed on the schedule of first-year classes.

    C.      Optional Concentrations

    Students in the General Studies LL.M. program may but are not required to pursue one
of three specified concentrations. For interested students, the following specific
concentrations are available:
    • Alternative Dispute Resolution
    • Corporate, Commercial, and Securities Law
    • International and Comparative Law
These concentrations are available to both full-time and part-time students.

       Students wishing to declare a concentration must submit to the Assistant Dean for
Graduate and International Programs the Application for LL.M. Concentration, a copy of
which is found in Appendix C, by the following dates before your anticipated graduation:

         For students graduating in:
         June: March 15              September: June 15                          January: October 15

       There is no guarantee that students in pursuit of a particular concentration will be
able to complete the requirements of that concentration within one year of study; nor will
any special registration priority be given for students desiring to fulfill the requirements for
a specific concentration.

       A designation will appear on the Cardozo transcript of any student who completes
the requirements and procedures for a concentration. There is no separate certificate and
there will be no designation on the student’s diploma.

    D.      Student Worksheet for Program Requirements

      Students may use the table set forth in Appendix D to ensure that they have
completed the requirements of the General Studies LL.M. Program.
See also Additional Course Selection and Registration Information for International LL.M. Students.

                                                    15
                                    IV.
                COURSE INFORMATION FOR LL.M. STUDENTS IN THE
                   COMPARATIVE LEGAL THOUGHT PROGRAM

   A.     In General

       There is no prescribed curriculum for students in the Comparative Legal Thought
LL.M. program. Every candidate must pursue a coherent and focused program of
study, which should be developed in consultation with the Assistant Dean for Graduate
and International Programs.

   B.     Coursework in Comparative Legal Thought

        Students in this program are required to take at least twelve (12) in-class credits
in courses related to comparative legal thought. This includes courses in constitutional
law, legal theory, philosophy, religion, and other courses with a humanities-focused
inter-disciplinary approach. Courses that count toward this requirement are listed in
Appendix E. Please note that not all courses are offered every year.

   C.     Thesis Requirement

      Students in this program are required to write a thesis on a topic related to some
aspect of comparative legal thought. Students are awarded three (3) credits for the
completion of a thesis.

       Students who have been admitted to this program should move quickly toward
developing ideas for a thesis topic and toward identifying faculty members who might
supervise this project. For biographical information about full-time faculty members,
please visit our website at http://www.cardozo.yu.edu. Once students have
developed a thesis topic and identified a faculty member, they should contact the
Assistant Dean for Graduate and International Programs.

   D.     Concentration in Jewish Law

       Cardozo’s Program in Jewish Law and Interdisciplinary Studies allows students
in the Comparative Legal Thought Program to concentrate in Jewish Law. Students
wishing to receive such a concentration must complete a minimum of ten (10) credits in
Jewish Law courses in addition to the other requirements for the Comparative Legal
Thought degree. See Appendix E. Deadlines for applying for the concentration are
March 15 for students graduating in June; June 15 for students graduating in
September; and October 15 for students graduating in January.

   E.     Student Worksheet for Program Requirements

      Students may use the worksheet set forth in Appendix E to ensure that they have
completed the requirements of the Comparative Legal Thought LL.M. Program.
  See also Additional Course Selection and Registration Information for International LL.M. Students.


                                                  16
                                    V.
                   COURSE INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS IN THE
                    INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW PROGRAM

   A.      Required Intellectual Property Law Coursework

       The intellectual property (IP) law curriculum includes basic and advanced
offerings in each of the three (3) major IP areas: Copyright, Patent, and Trademark.
Students must take at least sixteen (16) credits in IP coursework, which must include
the basic introductory course in at least two (2) of the three (3) major IP areas. Full-time
students in the IP LL.M. program are required to enroll in two (2) of the three (3) basic
courses in their first semester of study.

     For a list of courses that count toward the IP course requirements, please see
Appendix F. Please note that not all courses are offered every year.

       A student can request a waiver of the basic course requirement by making a
request in writing to the Assistant Dean for Graduate and International Programs, if
he/she has taken an equivalent course in law school within the past five (5) years.
Students who receive a waiver of one or more of the basic courses must still complete
sixteen (16) credits in IP and related coursework.

   B.      Intellectual Property Externship Program

        See Part II. D.

   C.      Student Worksheet for Program Requirements

      Students may use the worksheet set forth in Appendix F to ensure that they have
completed the requirements of the Intellectual Property Law LL.M. Program.




            See also Additional Course Selection and Registration Information
                             for International LL.M. Students.




                                             17
                                  VI.
        ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL LL.M. STUDENTS

   A.        Courses Designed Especially for International LL.M. Students

       Cardozo School of Law has a number of courses specifically designed for
international LL.M. students. For these purposes, “international LL.M. students” are
those students who do not hold a degree from an ABA-accredited U.S. law school.

        1.      Introduction to U.S. Law

       All international LL.M. students are required to take Introduction to U.S. Law
during their first semester of enrollment in the LL.M. program. This two-credit course
introduces students to the basics of the U.S. legal system, including the structure of the
federal system and the use of precedent, and methods of reading and analyzing case
law. Waivers are liberally granted to students from common law countries. Any
requests for waivers for this course should be made in writing to the Assistant Dean for
Graduate and International Programs.

        2.      Advanced Workshop in Legal Research & Writing – International

       All international LL.M. students are required to take two (2) credits of Advanced
Workshop in Legal Research and Writing for International Law Students. This course is
taught over two (2) semesters, with one (1) credit being awarded for each semester. All
international LL.M. students should register to take Part I of this course during their first
semester at Cardozo. Students should register for one section (e.g., Section A, B, or
C). Students remain in the same section for Part II of the course.

      All questions about this course should be directed to the Director of Cardozo’s
Legal Writing Program.

        3.      Fundamentals of New York Law

       This is an optional course designed to provide students with a review of US legal
doctrine , with special attention to the laws of New York. The substantive subjects
covered may include Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Family Law, Real Property,
Torts, UCC Sales and Wills. Working with these subjects, students will hone skills
required to identify legal issues, and analyze and write essays. Periodic exams
throughout the semester and a final exam will test the students' knowledge in these
areas through practical application. The course is taught by the faculty of Pieper Bar
Review, one of the premier commercial Bar Review courses. This course is open only
to LL.M. students and is highly recommended for any LL.M. student who intends to take
the New York State bar exam upon graduation.




                                             18
   B.     Enrollment in Core Doctrinal Courses

       International LL.M. students are permitted to enroll in the following core doctrinal
courses, (known as “first year” courses because they are required during the first year
of J.D. study):
    • Civil Procedure (5 credits)
    • Constitutional Law I (3 credits)
    • Contracts (5 credits)
    • Criminal Law (3 credits)
    • Property (5 credits)
    • Torts (4 credits)

       Contracts is taught over the course of two semesters. In such situations, LL.M.
students are required to take the full course (i.e., Part I and Part II) and in the same
section (e.g., Section A, Section B, Section C). Students may not enroll in only one
semester of a two-semester course. Students should also be aware that the course will
probably not meet at the same time or on the same day during both semesters.
Constitutional Law is taught in two parts, but Part I is not a pre-requisite to Part II.

   C.     A Note on Attending Classes

       Unlike the tradition in some countries, students at U.S. law schools are expected
to attend classes on a regular basis. The class dialogue is extremely important to the
learning process, and materials discussed in class are generally not replicated in the
assigned readings. Your law school experience will be greatly enriched if you read the
assigned materials and attend class.

      Indeed, regular class attendance is required as a condition for receiving credit for
courses. Instructors have the authority to disqualify a student from taking an
examination if the student has not been in regular attendance.

        Students who are in the United States on a visa should be aware that members
of the faculty are required to monitor student attendance and to report unexcused
absences to the U.S. government, under the Student Visitor and Exchange Information
System (SEVIS).

   D.     Information for International Students who Plan to Take the New York
          State Bar Examination

       An applicant with a foreign law degree who is interested in sitting for the New
York State Bar Examination must contact the State Board of Law Examiners directly in
order to have his or her law degree evaluated for duration and substance, and to
receive confirmation of the U.S. legal education requirements that will satisfy eligibility
requirements for the Bar Exam. Please be sure to do this in a timely fashion.
       Corporate Plaza- Building 3
       254 Washington Avenue Extension
       Albany, NY 12203-5195
       518/452-8700 (tel) 800/342-3335 (tel) 518/452-5729 (fax)
       http://www.nybarexam.org

                                             19
         Completion of Cardozo's LL.M. Program does not necessarily guarantee
eligibility to sit for the Bar Exam and Cardozo School of Law makes no representation or
assurance that students who complete the LL.M. program will qualify for the New York
State Bar Exam or the bar examination of any other jurisdiction. Further, our LL.M.
programs are not intended to be bar preparation programs. Most students -- U.S. and
international, J.D. and LL.M. -- take one of the commercial bar exam preparatory
courses in the months before taking the bar exam.

       If you plan to sit for the New York State bar examination, it is your responsibility
to read and understand these provisions and to make certain that you qualify to take the
bar examination.

       1.     Components of the New York State Bar Examination

       The New York State bar examination is composed of three parts: First, a series
of multiple-choice questions, which are the same in all U.S. jurisdictions and hence
called the “multistate” portion of the exam; second, a series of essays and multiple
choice questions on New York State law and procedure; and third, a practice
component called the Multistate Performance Test, which is designed to assess case
planning, problem solving, factual investigation, and other skills that are important to the
competent practice of law. There is a separate exam called the Multistate Professional
Responsibility Exam (MPRE), which is required for admission to the New York bar and
the bars of many other states.

       The multistate portion of the Bar Examination covers Contracts, Constitutional
Law, Criminal Law, Evidence, Real Property, and Torts. The New York State portion of
the examination covers the multistate topics as well as Business Relationships, Conflict
of Laws, New York Constitutional Law, Criminal Procedure, Family Law, Remedies,
New York and Federal Civil Jurisdiction and Procedure, Professional Responsibility,
Trusts, Wills and Estates including Estate Taxation, and Articles 2, 3, and 9 of the
Uniform Commercial Code (UCC).

       2.     Rules for Admission

      The Court of Appeals of the State of New York prescribes rules regarding the
admission of attorneys to the New York bar. The rules can be found at 22 NYCRR Part
520. Among other things, these rules prescribe requirements for foreign-educated
lawyers to sit for the New York bar examination.

       If you plan to sit for the New York State bar examination, it is your responsibility
to read and understand these provisions and to make certain that you qualify to take the
bar examination. We provide the following information for your convenience and
information.

              a.     Legal education requirement

      To sit for the New York bar examination, an applicant must satisfy the legal
education requirement. The requirements for international students depend in large


                                             20
measure upon where you received your first law degree. These rules can be found at
http://www.nybarexam.org/foreign.htm.

                     i.     Graduates of foreign law programs that are
                            “equivalent” in duration & substance to U.S. legal
                            education

        An individual satisfies this requirement if s/he holds a degree from an accredited
foreign law school whose educational program is “equivalent” in both duration and
substance to that of a U.S. law school. Thus, a three-year program in a country “whose
jurisprudence is based upon the principles of English Common Law” along the lines of a
U.S. law school may satisfy this requirement.

                     ii.    Graduates of other foreign law schools

           A graduate of a foreign law school that either (1) offered an educational
program that was substantively equivalent to a U.S. law school education but that did
not last as long as a US J.D., or (2) was accredited but was not substantively equivalent
to a U.S. law school education, can take the bar only after successfully completing
additional education at a U.S. law school.

       Specifically, such an applicant must “successfully complete a full-time or part-
time program consisting of a minimum of 20 semester hours of credit, or the equivalent,
in professional law subjects, which includes basic courses in American law, in an
approved law school in the United States.” 22 NYCRR section 520.6(b)(1)(ii).

      The term “basic courses in American law” requires two courses in basic U.S. law.
Courses that qualify as “basic courses in American law” are listed in Appendix G.

       The term “professional law subjects” are “courses which are typically taught in an
approved law school.” This does not include credits earned for work on a thesis or
independent research; in an internship, clinic, or externship; or for courses taken at
other institutions (e.g., the New School).

              b.     Pre-approval process

       Students who are interested in being admitted to the bar in a U.S. jurisdiction are
urged to contact the appropriate state board of bar examiners for information regarding
the necessary qualifications for admission of international attorneys to the bar. Due to
frequent changes of requirements, only the bar of examiners of a particular jurisdiction
can provide up-to-the-minute information concerning that jurisdiction’s requirements.

         All students who may be interested in taking the New York State bar examination
must contact the State Board of Law Examiners directly to ensure their eligibility to sit
for the exam. The Board is willing to make individualized, advance determinations of
eligibility if you provide a copy of your law school transcript. Contact information for the
Board is above (see VI. D.)



                                             21
               c.    Certification for Bar Examinations

        Students are responsible for applying to jurisdictions in which they plan to sit for
a bar examination. The Office of the Registrar will have information on deadlines and
applications for the New York Bar Exam. Applications and information for the New York
State bar examination are also available by calling the New York State Bar Examiners
directly.

         Students wishing to take a bar examination in another state may want to visit the
visit http://www.abanet.org/legaled/baradmissions/bar.html. The Office of the Registrar
may also have information about eligibility to sit for bar examinations in other
jurisdictions.

   E.        Information on Visas, Employment, and Related Matters

        1.     In General

       With your admission letter, you received information regarding procedures for
obtaining the F-1 student visa and other matters. All inquiries about this process should
be directed to Elaine Thompson, the International Student Advisor. Ms. Thompson is
also available during your time at Cardozo to answer any questions you may have. Ms.
Thompson is normally at the law school on Wednesday mornings in Room 535 and can
also be reached by phone, fax, or email.

                            Elaine Thompson
                            International Student Advisor
                            Yeshiva University
                            500 West 185th St.
                            New York, NY 10033
                            212.960.5480 (tel)
                            212.960.5482 (fax)
                            ethompso@yu.edu

        2.     After Arrival In the U.S.

               a.    Submit copies of student visa and Forms I-20 or DS-2019 and
                     I-94 card to International Student Advisor

       These documents must be submitted within 10 days of arriving in the U.S. and
must be kept as part of your student immigration record. Generally, Ms. Thompson is
available during orientation to assist you with this.

                b.   Travel Outside the U.S.

       Should you plan to travel outside the U.S. during your stay, you will need to have
your Form I-20 or DS-2019 form signed by the International Student Advisor for re-entry
to the U.S. When you leave, the U.S. Immigration Service will take your I-94 card and
re-issue a new card upon your re-entry. If you plan to leave the country during your


                                             22
time as a student, you should discuss this with the International Student Advisor as
early as possible before your departure.

              c.     Obtaining a Social Security Card

       International students will only be able to apply for social security numbers at the
Social Security Administration if they currently have a job offer on-campus.
Unfortunately, very few employment opportunities exist at Cardozo—most come in the
form of research assistantships for faculty members. A social security card is required
for employment purposes. For further information about obtaining a social security
card, contact the International Student Advisor.

              d.     Opening a Bank Account

         It is recommended that all students open a checking account with a U.S. bank as
personal checks are used in the U.S. for many purposes, including payment of rent and
utility bills.

         While some banks require social security numbers, many will not require it if you
identify yourself as an international student. They will require all immigration
documentation, including Form I-20, Form I-94, and a valid passport. Many will also
require proof of address in the United States. This proof can be in the form of a
Registrar’s letter indicating full-time student status and address on file with the school or
a bill that has been received at a local address with the students name on it.

       3.     Employment


       F-1 students are ONLY allowed to work on-campus. They can work part-time
during the academic semester and full-time during winter and summer breaks. This
benefit is only available if the F-1 student is in legal F-1 student status. Students must
obtain a letter from the International Student Advisor stating they are in legal status
each semester and are therefore eligible to work on-campus.

      Students are allowed to participate in paid academic internships off campus
through Curricular Practical Training (CPT) once they have been in the U.S. and
maintained their legal F-1 status for one academic year. Students are limited to no more
than 12 months of CPT during their academic program.

       Once an F-1 student is in their last semester prior to graduating, they are allowed
to apply for post-completion work authorization or Optional Practical Training (OPT).
Students are required to apply for this benefit prior to completing their degree program.

       Additional information on visas and work status is available from Ms. Thompson.




                                             23
                                       VII.
                                 STUDENT SERVICES

A.    Office of Career Services

        Cardozo’s Office of Career Services (“OCS”) is dedicated to assisting students in
articulating, developing, and attaining their professional goals. It offers a range of
traditional and innovative services and programs to facilitate the career-planning efforts
of students and maximize their potential for employment. Counselors are available to
work with LL.M. students on resumes, cover letters, interviewing skills, and job-search
strategies. The OCS maintains a career resource library with a broad range of
reference and career guidance materials, as well as handouts prepared by the OCS.
The OCS also publishes information on employment options and placement
opportunities. Additional information about the services offered by the OCS for Career
Services will be supplied upon your arrival at the law school.

        Special issues also confront students who are not U.S. citizens, permanent
residents, or green card holders vis-à-vis employment in the U.S. Although the rules
are far more complicated than can be set forth here, employment for those who are not
U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or holders of a green card is permitted for one 12-
month period of full-time employment that is directly related to their field of study. For
longer-term employment, these students would need to be sponsored for a visa by an
employer, a process that is expensive and time-consuming and that most employers are
unwilling to undertake.

       Because of the complexity of the issues surrounding the eligibility of most
international students for work in the U.S., LL.M. students who are not U.S. citizens,
permanent residents, or green card holders who may wish to seek employment in the
U.S. should make an appointment to discuss their situation with Elaine Thompson, the
International Student Advisor, early in the semester during which they begin their LL.M.
program.

B.    Office of Student Services

       The Office of Student Services is available for general academic advice and
assistance. Judy Mender, Dean of Students, acts as an ombudsman between the
students and the law school administration. The Office of Student Services is also
involved with issues surrounding course registration, exam scheduling, and related
matters.

C.    Computing

      1. Law School Facilities

             a.     Desktop computers

             The Law Library has 42 desktop PC's as well as printers available for
             student use.


                                            24
     b.     Networks

     The Law School has a wireless network called YUWireless throughout the
     building. For the wireless network, your PC or Mac needs a wireless card
     using WPA-AES encryption. Ask the reference librarians about the initial
     setup. Once your PC or Mac is setup, you will need only log in with
     username and password each time.

     c.     Software

     The Law School uses mostly Word but a few faculty use WordPerfect. The
     Law School can give you a free copy of WordPerfect for the Windows
     environment; you must purchase your own copy of Word. Be sure to buy it
     at an educational discount. The University also provides free Symantec
     EndPoint (anti-virus) software for each student's notebook.

     d.     Help Desk
     Cardozo's Law Library is available to help with email and computer
     problems, including forgotten passwords. Contact the library reference
     desk on the seventh floor, or call 212.790.0220, or IM cardozolawref, or
     email lawref@yu.edu or lawref@law.cardozo.yu.edu.

2. Personal Computers

  The Law School does not have a laptop/notebook requirement; nor does the
  Law School recommend any particular brand of notebook computer. Many
  students use notebooks for note-taking in the classroom. If you elect to use a
  notebook, keep in mind the weight of the notebook (carrying it to and from
  school with your law books), the comfort of the keyboard, and ease in viewing
  the screen.

  If you wish to take exams using your own notebook PC, it must use the North
  American version of Windows XP, Vista or Windows 7, have a USB port, and
  you must provide your own USB jump (thumb) drive. If you use a Mac, it must
  use the OS X operating system. You also need a USB port and USB jump
  drive with the Mac.

  Opportunities to purchase Dell notebooks at discounted student prices can be
  found at the following link:
  http://www.dell.com/yeshiva

  Apple gives a standard discount to anyone showing evidence of student
  status.

  Still have questions? Please contact Lynn Wishart, Associate Dean for Library
  Services, at wishart@yu.edu




                                   25
D.     Law Library

              a.     Location

       The Cardozo Law Library is located on floors 6 through 9 of the law school
building. Students enter the library on the 7th floor and must use the elevators or stairs
on the 12th street side of the building to reach the library.

              b.     Professional staff

        Cardozo's Law Library has a professional staff ready to assist students with
locating and using materials in the library's electronic and print collections. Cardozo's
Law Library has an extensive collection of primary and secondary materials and
research aids.

              c.     Computer-assisted legal research

       Westlaw and LexisNexis, the two most popular providers of computer-assisted
legal research, are available to students. Students are provided with individual
accounts which can be accessed from any location using any computer. In order to use
Westlaw and LexisNexis services, passwords are required. LL.M. students receive
passwords during training provided by the librarians.

              d.     Copy machines and printers

       A copy of the Cardozo Law Library Guide, which contains detailed information
about the law library, its holdings and services, and hours of operation is included in
orientation materials given to all students upon their arrival at the law school.

              e.     Cardozo Law Library Guide

        A copy of the Cardozo Law Library Guide, which contains detailed information
about the law library, its holdings and services, and hours of operation will be given to
all students upon their arrival at the law school.

              f.     Access to other libraries

        Access to both the New School and Cooper Union libraries is available to
Cardozo students upon presentation of a valid Cardozo ID card. Access to other
university libraries requires a pass and requires that certain protocols be followed.
All questions should be directed to the reference librarian on duty as other restrictions
may apply, e.g., no visitors during exam periods at most schools.

              g.     Student course and faculty evaluations

       Current course and instructor evaluations are available on ANGEL in the
Cardozo Community group; older evaluations are available at the library Reserve Desk.
Please refer to them for your fellow students' views on individual courses and
instructors.

                                             26
E.     Bookstore

       A bookstore operated by Barnes & Noble is located on the second floor of the
law school. The bookstore stocks all required and recommended readings for law
school courses. Additional law books are available at any number of local bookstores,
including the Barnes & Noble flagship store at Fifth Avenue and 18th Street, which has
an enormous selection of law materials. You will get a discount on many materials with
your law school ID card.

       The Strand Bookstore, located at Broadway and 12th Street, has new, used, and
rare book collections, including some law-related books and is an excellent store for
browsing. However, you are not likely to find your required course books at this store.

      Campus Shelf (www.campusshelf.com) offers an online forum for Cardozo
students to buy and sell used books, and the Cardozo Student Bar Association may
organize a book swap at the beginning of each semester. Further, www.chegg.com
may have books available for rent during the duration of your studies.

F.     Health and Counseling

       a. Health Services

       Health services for students registered at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of
Law are available through the Beth Israel Occupational Medical Clinic, located at 317
East 17th Street (between 1st and 2nd Avenues), 2nd floor. While clinic services are not
automatically free to Cardozo students, those students enrolled in the AHP Student
Health Insurance Plan will have the deductible and co-insurance waived for primary
care doctor visits at this clinic. Students not enrolled in AHP may also utilize the clinic
services, but will be responsible for all balances not otherwise covered by insurance.
Further details may be found in the Cardozo Student Handbook.

       b. Counseling Services

        Students experiencing high levels of stress and /or other emotional difficulties are
encouraged to speak to an advisor at the Office of Student Services. Students also
have the option to seek professional counseling services at the University Counseling
Center. Yeshiva’s Counseling Center offers short-term individual counseling,
psychiatric assessment and short term medication managements, referral services,
crisis intervention and emergency services. All services are free of charge and
confidential.

              Yeshiva University Counseling Center
              239 East 34th Street, 4th Floor
              917-326-4942 counseling@yu.edu

      Please see the J.D. Student Handbook for further information on health and
counseling services.


                                             27
G.    Student Lounge

       The student lounge is located on the third floor and is generally open to students
when the law school building is open. Students also use this space to meet socially, to
study in groups, or to eat. The student lounge is equipped with wireless internet
access.

H.    Food Services

       Select food services are offered on the third floor and are open weekdays when
the law school is in session.

      There are many nearby restaurants and places from which you can purchase
take-out meals. Food from outside sources may be brought into the law school building.

I.    Notary Services

       Registrar Isabel Balson and Assistant Registrar Cynthia Benolken will notarize
items for students free of charge.

J.    Lockers

       Lockers are located throughout the building. Each student is assigned a locker
by the Office of Student Services during the start of the first semester enrolled.




                                            28
                                  VII.
            STUDENT FINANCE, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FINANCIAL AID

A.   Tuition

     Tuition and fees for part-time and full-time students are posted on Cardozo’s
     website. Tuition and fees increase each May. These increases will apply to all
     students who remain enrolled after May. Students enrolled in the full-time LL.M.
     program are required to take a full-time course load per semester for two
     consecutive semesters. Please visit here to view tuition and fees for 2010-2011:
     www.cardozo.yu.edu/tuition

B.   Making Payments

     1. Important Dates

     Charges for each semester must be paid in full, or you must arrange an
     adequate alternative payment plan with the Office of Student Finance before the
     start of LL.M. Orientation. Payments are due for each semester one week prior
     to the start of that semester.

     2. Methods of Payment

     There are several ways to make payments to the law school, as outlined below:

        •    Personal Check, Money Order (including international money orders)
             drawn on a U.S. bank. Payments should be made out to “Yeshiva
             University”.

             PLEASE NOTE: the University does not accept foreign currency or foreign
             checks as payment for tuition.


        •    Bank Wire Transfer Information:
             Wire Payments can be made directly from your bank to Yeshiva
             University’s account with the following information:

             JP Morgan Chase
             270 Park Avenue
             New York, NY 10017
             For the account of: Yeshiva University
             Account Number: 816595417
             ABA Number: 021000021
             Swift Code: CHASUS33

             Please note: It is crucial that the Student Name and Cardozo ID Number
             are included with the wire instructions. If you do not know what your
             Cardozo Student ID number is, please call or e-mail us. Please review the
             wiring policies with your bank; there may be fees deducted from the

                                          29
            amount of your payment.

            Cardozo Law School does not accept funds drawn on a foreign bank.

        •   Payment Plan - Tuition Management Systems

            Arrangements can be made through www.afford.com/yu online or by
            calling toll-free (800) 722-4867. Annual or term based plans allow you to
            spread your Fall or Spring tuition payments into either 5 monthly
            installments for a single term, or 10 monthly installments for annual plans.
            Please note, TMS is not available during the Summer semester! You may
            schedule the entire cost of Tuition & Fees less any Financial Aid with no
            interest or finance charge, but an enrollment fee of $80 is collected by
            TMS when the plan is established. The Fall Semester’s first payment to
            TMS is due July 25, TMS will in turn send it to Yeshiva University where it
            will appear on the Student’s account the following month.

        •   Credit card payments through Cardozo’s website are temporarily
            unavailable. We hope to have this payment method available in the near
            future. We apologize for any inconvenience.

     4. Late Payment Charges

     A Late Payment Fee of 1.5% per month will be added to all past due tuition and
     fee balances. To avoid any late charges, students should discuss their financial
     situations with the Office of Student Finance.

C.   Scholarships

     Cardozo’s LL.M. program does not provide institutional need-based scholarships.
     Cardozo does offer limited merit-based partial scholarships to select admitted
     LL.M. students. Scholarships generally do not cover the full amount of tuition
     and are extremely competitive. All admitted students are automatically
     considered for these merit-based scholarships, and no separate application
     materials are necessary.

D.   Additional Sources of Financial Aid

     Cardozo’s LL.M. program does not provide institutional need-based financial
     assistance. The majority of LL.M. students fund their education through private
     loans or federal assistance. Applicants needing financial aid are strongly
     encouraged to investigate funding sources early in the application process.

     1. Federal Stafford Loans

     US citizens, permanent residents, or eligible noncitizens with a valid alien
     registration card are eligible to receive a guaranteed Federal Stafford Loan in the
     amount of $20,500 per year.


                                          30
Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA),
indicating the Title IV code number for Yeshiva University: 002903. Students may
file the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. A Financial Aid Award Letter will be
mailed to you along with information and instructions for filing your online Stafford
Loan Request Form. Once you submit the online Stafford Loan Request Form,
the school will process your Stafford loans and you will then be instructed to sign
a Federal Master Promissory Note. Stafford loans will not be disbursed to the
school until the Master Promissory Note is completed.

Students in the United States on a student visa are not eligible to receive federal
Loans! However, they may be eligible for private student loans through bank
lenders. A co-signer may be needed for private student loan approval.

2. Federal Graduate PLUS Loans & Private Loans

US citizens and permanent residents who file a FAFSA and borrow federal
Stafford loans will also be eligible to apply for additional funds for both tuition and
living expenses through the federal Graduate PLUS loan program.

Information on the Graduate PLUS loan can be found on our website:
www.cardozo.yu.edu/studentloans

International students are eligible to apply for a private loan through most
lenders. However, most lenders require that you apply with a creditworthy US
citizen or permanent resident as the co-signer.
For additional information and to apply for a private student loan, please visit
online: www.cardozo.yu.edu/studentloans . If you are having difficulty finding
a private student lending institution, please call the Office of Student Finance
(212-790-0392).

3. Other Scholarship Possibilities

Students can search for 3rd party scholarships online: www.fastweb.com

International students should consult the educational attaché at the United States
Embassy or Consulate in their home country for fellowship information.




                                       31
                                 IX.
              CARDOZO LAW SCHOOL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES

A.    School-Wide Student Programs and Activities

       Cardozo School of Law offers a wide range of activities for students. While it
would be impossible to list the many activities that take place in the law school on a
daily basis, we have set forth below some of the organizations and activities that form
an important part of student life at Cardozo.

Students should check the Cardozo Calendar of Events for specific events and activities
that may be of interest to them. The Calendar is posted weekly in various locations
around the law school.

      1.     Student Bar Association (SBA)

      The Student Bar Association (SBA) represents the Cardozo student body in all
matters. The SBA funds student groups, organizes extracurricular activities,
communicates student opinion on academic and other matters to the faculty and
administration, and selects the student members of and liaisons to faculty committees.

      2.     Other Student Organizations

        Cardozo law school hosts a large number of student organizations. These
organizations are student-run and deal with a variety of issues and groups of students
at the law school. Information on student organizations will be made available when
you arrive at the law school; information on group meetings and events is also posted
on the Calendar of Events. LL.M. students are welcome and encouraged to participate
in student organizations at the Law School.


B.    LL.M. Student Programs and Activities

        The LL.M. program offers a number of special activities for graduate students
geared towards making each LL.M. student’s experience both professionally and
personally rewarding. We welcome the input and participation of all students in these
activities and encourage students to suggest new programs and activities for LL.M.
students.

      1.     LL.M. “Ambassador” Prospective Student Contact Program

       Through the LL.M. “Ambassador” program, the Office of Graduate and
International Programs maintains a database of LL.M. students and alumni who are
available to speak with, correspond by email, or even meet prospective LL.M.
candidates to tell them about their experiences at Cardozo. We believe that those who
have studied in the LL.M. program are in the best position to discuss the program with
and give advice to prospective candidates.



                                           32
      2.     The Graduate Law Society

        The Graduate Law Society (GLS), organized under the auspices of the Student
Bar Association, provides another forum for students to discuss legal, cultural,
educational, and other issues of common concern, to invite guest speakers, and to meet
socially. The Graduate Law Society, in conjunction with the Office of Graduate and
International Students, also organizes visits to local courts, the United Nations, and
other sites of interest. The Graduate Law Society welcomes the active participation of
all students. You can reach the Cardozo Graduate Law Society by email at
glscardozo@gmail.com.

      3.     The Cardozo LL.M. Angel Page

      The LL.M. Community page on Angel lists a calendar of LL.M. events, academic
information for LL.M. students, hosts a discussion board for students to post
announcements of interests, and lists names and email addresses of all Cardozo LL.M.
students, . The LL.M. community page is automatically added to all LL.M. students’
Angel pages.

C.    Continuing Legal Education Programs

       Numerous Continuing Legal Education (CLE) programs are hosted by Cardozo
law school and are open to law students. Students are informed about other CLE
opportunities from time to time. CLE courses provide excellent opportunities for
students to learn about cutting edge issues within their areas of expertise and may also
provide useful networking possibilities. LL.M. students who are already members of the
New York bar may be able to apply credits earned at Cardozo toward their CLE
requirements. Information about CLE programs and credits is available from Casandra
Tolentino, Assistant Director of Alumni Affairs.

D.    Student Memberships in Bar Associations

       There are several professional organizations that offer student memberships for
free or a nominal charge. These organizations provide excellent networking and other
professional and social opportunities. You are encouraged to consider membership in
one or more of these organizations:

      American Branch of the International Law Association
      www.ila.ambranch.org/
      Association of the Bar of the City of New York
      www.abcny.org/
      New York State Bar Association
      www.nysba.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Membership/Law_Student_Membershi
      p/Student/
      American Bar Association
      www.abanet.org/lsd


                                           33
                                        X.
                                   COMMENCEMENT

A.     Timing

      Commencement takes place at the end of the spring semester each year (late
May or early June.) Students who completed their degree requirements in the
preceding May, January, or September are welcome and encouraged to participate in
commencement ceremonies.

B.     Guests

        Each student will receive tickets for members of their family and/or friends to
attend the commencement ceremonies. Additional tickets may be available through a
lottery system. Tickets and invitations are distributed by the Office of Special Events.

       If you will not be in New York or at Cardozo during the spring semester, you
should make arrangements with the Office of Special Events before you leave to
receive your invitations and tickets.

C.     Academic Attire

      Students participating in commencement exercises are required to wear
academic attire. In the spring semester, the Office of Special Events will provide
information on academic attire.

       If you do not plan to be in New York or at Cardozo during the spring semester but
plan to attend commencement exercises, you must make arrangements with the Office
of Special Events, for ordering and receiving your academic attire before you leave New
York.

D.     Awards for Graduating LL.M. Students

      A number of awards are presented at each graduation ceremony for LL.M.
students. Other prizes may also be awarded to LL.M. students.

       1.     The Louis Henkin Award for Academic Achievement and Superior
              Scholarship

     One LL.M. student each year may be awarded the Louis Henkin Award, “for
demonstrating Academic Achievement and Superior Scholarship in the LL.M. Program.”

       2.     Distinguished Performance in the LL.M. Program

      Up to three additional awards may be presented to graduating LL.M. students
“based on available grades, recommendations of faculty who have taught these
students, and overall contributions to the academic and extracurricular life of the law
school community.”


                                            34
                                   APPENDIX A
                      CONTACT INFORMATION FOR LL.M. STUDENTS


For academic matters:                 Amy Sugin
                                      Assistant Dean for Graduate and International
                                      Programs
                                      212.790.0361 (tel)
                                      212.790.0232 (fax)
                                      sugin@yu.edu

For admissions/housing/               E. Selene Steelman
scholarship matters:                  Director of LL.M. Admissions
                                      212.790.0250 (tel)
                                      212.790.0482 (fax)
                                      steelman@yu.edu

For visa/immigration matters:         Elaine Thompson
                                      International Student Advisor
                                      212.960.5480 (tel)
                                      212.960.5482 (fax)
                                      ethompso@yu.edu

For tuition/financial aid matters:    Jon Goldberg
                                      Director of Student Finance
                                      212.790.0392 (tel)
                                      212.790.0366 (fax)
                                      clfinaid@yu.edu
                                      www.cardozo.yu.edu/studentfinance

For Advanced Workshop in Legal        Leslie Newman
Research and Writing, International   Director of Cardozo’s Legal Writing Program
matters:                              212.790.0323 (tel)
                                      212.790.0205 (fax)
                                      newman@yu.edu

For registration matters:             Cynthia Benolken
                                      Assistant Registrar
                                      212.790.0296 (tel)
                                      212.790.0341 (fax)
                                      benolken@yu.edu

For student services matters:         Judy Mender
                                      Dean of Students
                                      212.790.0313 (tel)
                                      212.790.0341 (fax)
                                      mender@yu.edu


                                          35
                                   APPENDIX B
                               ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                              FALL 2010 - SPRING 2011


                                    FALL SEMESTER 2010

Friday, August 20                          Introduction to US Law begins
Thursday-Friday, August 26-27              Orientation for all new students
Monday, August 30                          Classes Begin
Monday, September 6                        Labor Day, no classes
Tuesday, September 7                       Wednesday schedule
Wednesday, September 8                     Friday schedule
Thursday/Friday, September 9 & 10          Rosh Hashana, no classes
Monday, September 20                       Thursday schedule
Wednesday, September 22                    Friday schedule
Thursday/Friday, September 23-24           Succoth, no classes
Tuesday, September 28                      Thursday schedule
                                           Shimini Atzeret and Simchat Torah, no
Thursday/Friday, September 30-Oct. 1
                                           classes
Monday, October 4                          Fundamentals of NY Law begins
Thursday, October 18                       Contracts class begins
Wednesday, November 24                     Friday schedule
Thursday - Friday, November 25-26          Thanksgiving holiday, no classes
Thursday, December 9                       Last Day of Upper-Level Classes
Friday, December 10                        Last day of 1L classes
December 13-22                             Examinations

                                SPRING SEMESTER 2011

Monday, January 17                         Martin Luther King Birthday, no classes
Wednesday, January 19                      Classes begin for all continuing students
April 18-April 26                          Spring break, no classes
Wednesday, April 27                        Monday schedule
Thursday, April 28                         Tuesday schedule
Thursday, May 5                            Last day of classes
May 9-20                                   Examinations
Friday, June 3                             Commencement




                          THIS CALENDAR IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.




                                             36
                                APPENDIX C
                   APPLICATION FOR LL.M. CONCENTRATIONS


Name:                             __________________
Social Security/ID Number:        __________________
Month/Year of Graduation:         __________________
Telephone Number:                 __________________
Email Address:                    __________________


Concentration for which you are Applying: _____________________________


Course and Credit Requirement

Courses Taken in Concentration           Semester/Year Taken        Number of Credits
__________________________               ______________             ___________
__________________________               ______________             ___________
__________________________               ______________             ___________
__________________________               ______________             ___________
_________________________                ______________             ___________
__________________________               ______________             ___________
__________________________               ______________             ___________
__________________________               ______________             ___________

Paper Requirement*

How did you satisfy the paper requirement, through a course or an independent
research or thesis?

_______________________________

If a course, please indicate the course, professor, and semester/year taken.

________________________________

Regardless of whether you satisfied the paper requirement through a course or
independent study, please attach a copy of the paper to this application.

*     A paper is required for all concentrations except the concentration in Corporate
and Securities Law.

 Please return this form and an unofficial transcript to the Assistant Dean for Graduate
                    and International Programs by the following date:

                              For students graduating in:
          June: March 15             September: June 15          January: October 15


                                           37
                                        APPENDIX D
                              GENERAL STUDIES LL.M.
                             PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS WORKSHEET

 Check when                  Requirement                                          Notes
  completed
     □          24 credits
     □          18 in-class credits
                Common Law course requirement              General Studies LL.M. students who hold a law
                                                           degree from a civil law country are required to
        □
                                                           enroll in at least one (1) of the following courses:
                                                           Contracts, Torts or Property.
        □       Introduction to U.S. Law (2 credits)       International LL.M. Students only
                Advanced Workshop in Legal                 International LL.M. Students only
        □
                Research and Writing Part I (1 credit)
                Advanced Workshop in Legal                 International LL.M. Students only
        □
                Research and Writing Part II (1 credit)

                             OPTIONAL CONCENTRATIONS

  Concentration in Alternative Dispute Resolution

                    Requirement                                              Notes
    □   10 credits minimum from required and
        elective courses
    □   Students in this concentration must          The competency/ competencies met by each course
        complete at least one course in three of     is indicated parenthetically below. As noted, one
        the five basic areas of competency:          course may satisfy more than one area of
        Processes; Interviewing and Counseling;      competency.
        Negotiation; Mediation; and Arbitration.
    □   Writing Requirement                          Students may fulfill the writing requirement through
                                                     (a) a related course for which a paper is written; (b) a
                                                     one or two credit independent study, supervised by a
                                                     faculty member and taken for a grade; or (c) a 3-
                                                     credit LL.M. Thesis, supervised by a faculty member
                                                     and taken for a grade

Courses:
     Arbitration                                               Representation in Mediation (2) *
     Domestic Commercial Arbitration (2)                       Mediation and Other Methods of
     International Commercial Arbitration (2)                  Fostering Democratic Dialogue
     International Arbitration Practicum (2)                   (Budapest)**
     Processes                                                 Interviewing and Counseling
     Dispute Resolution Processes (2)                          Interviewing and Counseling (1)
     International Dispute Resolution (2)                      Negotiation
     Mediation                                                 Negotiation Theory and Skills (2)
     Divorce \ Mediation (3)




                                                38
 Concentration in International and Comparative Law

   Check            Requirement                                          Notes
   when
 completed
     □     Comparative Law (3 credits)
     □     International Law (3 credits)
     □     Writing Requirement                Students may fulfill the writing requirement through (a) a
                                              related course for which a paper is written; (b) a one or
                                              two credit independent study, supervised by a faculty
                                              member and taken for a grade; or (c) a 3-credit LL.M.
                                              Thesis, supervised by a faculty member and taken for a
                                              grade
             10 credits minimum from
     □
             required and elective courses

                                              Electives:
   Comparative Constitutionalism (3)                       International Communication (2)
   Comparative Corporate Governance (2)                    International Copyright (2)
   European Legal Insts./Holocaust (2)                     International Criminal Law (2)
   European Legal Theory (2)                               International Dispute Resolution (2)
   European Union Law (2-3)                                International Finance
   Human Rights and Genocide Clinic (2)                    International Human Rights (3)
   Global & Comp. Public Law Theory (2)                    International Organizations (2)
   Immigration Law (2)                                     International IP Topics (2)
   Immigration Law Externship (2)                          International Tax (2)
   International Arbitration Practicum (1)                 International Trade (2)
   International Commercial Arbitration (2)                International Trademark (1)
                                                           Law of War and Contemp. Conflicts (2)
                                                           Selected Decisions of the ICJ (2)


Concentration in Corporate, Commercial, and Securities Law

  Check              Requirement                                      Notes
  when
completed
    □     Corporate Finance (3 credits)             (not required for 2008-09)
    □     Corporations (4 credits)
          10 credits minimum from required
    □
          and elective courses

                                        Electives:
Antitrust (3)                                    International Taxation (2)
Antitrust, Advanced Seminar (2)                  International Commercial Arbitration (2)
Business Reorganizations (2)                     International Trade (2 or 3)
Commercial Law, Payments (2)                     Mergers and Acquisitions (3)
Commercial Law, Secured Transactions (3)         Partnerships and LLCs (2)
Comparative Corporate Governance (2)             Partnership Taxation (2)
Corporate Fraud (2)                              Private Equity (2)
Corporate Internal Investigations (2)            Securities Enforcement and Litigation (2)
Corporate Taxation (3)                           Securities Regulation (3)
Debtors’ & Creditors’ Rights (3)                 White Collar Crime (2)
Distressed Investing (2)
Environmental Concerns Corp. Transact. (2)
International Finance (2 or 3)
                                               39
                                             APPENDIX E
                                  COMPARATIVE LEGAL THOUGHT LL.M.
                                  PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS WORKSHEET

 Check when                   Requirement                                    Notes
  completed
       □         24 credits
       □         18 in-class credits
       □         12 credit minimum in Comparative
                 Legal Thought
       □         LL.M. Thesis                             Students are required to complete a three-
                                                          credit thesis under the supervision of a
                                                          faculty member during the second
                                                          semester of study.
       □         Introduction to U.S. Law (2 credits)     International LL.M. Students only
                 Advanced Workshop in Legal               International LL.M. Students only
       □         Research and Writing Part I (1 credit)
                 Advanced Workshop in Legal              International LL.M. Students only
       □         Research and Writing Part II (1 credit)
                        COURSES IN COMPARATIVE LEGAL THOUGHT

The courses listed below represent an aggregate list of course offerings in this area. Not all courses are
offered each semester, and new courses will be added to this list as they are developed. Courses
marked with an asterisk (*) fulfill course requirements for the Jewish Law Track; check
http://www.cardozo.yu.edu/jlis/ for other courses which fulfill this concentration.

 Advanced Criminal Law (3)                                *Jewish Law and Contemporary Legal Issues (3)
* Comparative Constitutionalism (3)                       Judicial Balancing, Proport. (2)
Comparative Corporate Governance (2)                      Jurisprudence (3)
Comparative Law (2 or 3)                                  *Jurisprudence of Maimonides (2)
Concepts of Justice (2)                                   Justice and Justices (2)
Constitutional Interpretation (2)                         Law and Film (2)
Constitutional Law I (3)                                  *Law and Literature (3)
Constitutional Law II (3)                                 *Law and Religion (2)
Ethics for Social Justice Lawyers (2)                     Law of War and Contemp. Conflicts (2)
European Union Law (2)                                    Law, Philosophyand Literature (2)
European Legal Systems and the Holocaust (2)              Maimonides…Jewish Law (1)
Family Law (3)                                            Man and the Citizen (1)
First Amendment (3)                                       Modern Legal Philosophy (2)
*First Amendment Theory (2)                               Multiculturalism and Women’s Rights (1)
Floersheimer Center Legal Theory Seminar                  *Psychoanalysis and the Law (2)
(topic varies by semester)                                Reproduction Policy and Law (3)
Guardians of the Republic (2)                             Selected Decisions of the International Court of
*Hegel's Logic (2)                                        Justice (2)
Human Rights and Genocide Clinic (2)                      Sexual Orientation, Gender and the Law (3)
International Criminal Law (3)                            Theories of Evidence (2)
International Dispute Resolution (2)                      Theories of Punishment (2)
International Human Rights (3)
International Law (3)
* Jewish Law (3)                                          Select New School Courses
*Jewish Law, Advanced (2)
*Jewish Law and American Legal Theory (2)




                                                    40
                                               APPENDIX F
                                    INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW LL.M.
                                   PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS WORKSHEET

 Check when                    Requirement                                            Notes
  completed
       □          24 credits
       □          18 in-class credits
       □          At least two of the introductory IP          Full-time students are required to take two of these
                  Courses:                                     courses in the first semester of study. A student
                    Copyright (3 credits)                      can request a waiver of the basic course
                    Patent (3 credits)                         requirement by making a request in writing to the
                    Trademark (3 credits)                      Director of Graduate and International Programs, if
                                                               he/she has taken an equivalent course in law
                                                               school within the past five (5) years. Students who
                                                               receive a waiver must still complete sixteen (16)
                                                               credits in IP and related coursework.
       □          16 credits total in Intellectual Property    Includes credits earned in basic Copyright, Patent,
                  Law Courses                                  and/or Trademark
       □          Introduction to U.S. Law (2 credits)         International LL.M. students only
       □          Advanced Workshop in Legal                   International LL.M. students only
                  Research and Writing Part I (1 credit)
       □          Advanced Workshop in Legal                   International LL.M. students only
                  Research and Writing Part II (1 credit)

                             COURSES IN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW
To qualify for the LL.M. in Intellectual Property Law (IP), students must take at least sixteen (16) credits
in IP and related coursework, which must include the basic introductory coursework in at least two of
the three IP areas (Copyright, Trademark, and Patent Law).

The courses listed below represent an aggregate list of course offerings in this area. Not all courses
are offered each semester, and new courses will be added to this list as they are developed.

                                             Basic Courses
Copyright Law (3)                       Trademark Law (3)                       Patent Law (3)

                                            Advanced Courses
  Adv Antitrust (3) or Antitrust & Intellectual Property (2)
  Art Law (2)                                                   International IP Topics (2)
  Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Patents (2)                  International Trade (2 or 3)
  Communications Law (2)                                        International Trademark (1)
  Copyright, Advanced Topics (2)                                Law of Surveillance (2)
  Copyright in the Music Industry (2)                           Music/Copyright and the Intervention of Superior
  Cultural Property (2)                                         Rights (2)
  Cyberlaw (2 or 3)                                             Patent Law, Advanced (2)
  Entertainment and Media Law (2)                               Patent Law Practice (2)
  First Amendment (3)                                           Patent Litigation (3)
  First Amendment Theory (2)                                    Patent Practicum (2)
  Holocaust Claims Restitution Clinic (1)                       Sports Law (2)
  Int’l Business and Transactional Law (2)                      Technology Licensing Agreements (2)
  International Communications (2)                              Transactions Involving Patent Rights (1)
  International Intellectual Property Topics (2)                IP Externship (1)
  Intellectual Property and Globalization (2)                   Graded Independent Research (1-2)
  International Copyright (2)                                   LL.M. Thesis (3)




                                                                                                     8/9/2010
                                 APPENDIX G
                        BASIC COURSES IN AMERICAN LAW


The courses listed below count as “Basic Courses in American Law” for purposes of
foreign student qualifications to take the bar exam without completing the J.D. degree.

Administrative Law                              Evidence
Admiralty Law                                   Family Law
Advanced Workshop in Legal Research and         Federal Courts
Writing, International, Part I                  Federal Income Tax
Advanced Workshop in Legal Research and         First Amendment Theory
Writing, International, Part II                 Introduction to U.S. Law
Antitrust                                       Jusitce & Justices in the Supreme Court
Business Reorganizations                        Land Use Law
Child, Parent and State                         Law & Religion
Civil Procedure                                 LLCs and Partnerships
Conflict of Laws                                Medical Malpractice
Constitutional Decisionmaking                   Mergers & Acquisitions
Constitutional Law I                            New York Practice
Constitutional Law II                           Payments
The Constitution and U.S. Foreign Affairs       Presidential Powers
Contracts                                       Professional Responsibility
Corporate and Partnership Tax                   Property
Corporations/Corporate Accounting               Real Estate Transactions
Criminal Law                                    Remedies
Criminal Law, Advanced                          Secured Transactions
Criminal Procedure                              Securities Regulation
Debtors' and Creditors' Rights                  State & Local Tax
Distressed Real Estate                          Taxation of Real Estate Transactions
Estate and Gift Tax                             Torts
Estate Planning                                 Trusts & Estates
Ethics of Legal Fees                            White Collar Crime
Ethics in Public Interest
INDEX                                                                                   IMMUNIZATION........................................................... 2
                                                                                        INDEPENDENT RESEARCH ........................................... 9
—A—                                                                                     INSURANCE................................................................. 2
ACADEMIC CALENDAR ......................................... 4, 36
                                                                                        INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW PROGRAM............... 17
AMERICAN LAW COURSES ....................................... 42
                                                                                        INTERCESSION COURSES ............................................ 9
—B—
BAR ASSOCIATIONS.................................................. 33                   INTERNSHIPS ............................................................ 10
BUILDING HOURS ....................................................... 5                —L—
                                                                                        LEAVES OF ABSENCE................................................ 13
—C—
CLINICS .................................................................... 10         LIBRARY................................................................... 26
COMMENCEMENT ..................................................... 34                   LOANS ...................................................................... 30
COMPARATIVE LEGAL THOUGHT PROGRAM ............ 16                                       LOCKERS .................................................................. 28
CONTACT INFORMATION .......................................... 35                       —N—
                                                                                        NEW SCHOOL COURSES .............................................. 9
CORE DOCTRINAL COURSES ..................................... 19
                                                                                        NEW YORK STATE BAR EXAMINATION .................... 19
—D—
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS ............................................ 6                      NOTARY SERVICES ................................................... 28
—E—                                                                                     —O—
EMAIL ........................................................................ 3        ORIENTATION ............................................................. 2
EMPLOYMENT .......................................................... 23                —P—
                                                                                        PART-TIME STATUS.................................................... 6
EXTERNSHIPS ........................................................... 10
                                                                                        PAYMENTS ............................................................... 29
—F—
FINANCIAL INFORMATION ........................................ 29                       —R—
                                                                                        REGISTRATION ........................................................... 7
FIRST YEAR COURSESSEE CORE DOCTRINAL COURSES
                                                                                        —S—
FOOD SERVICES........................................................ 28                SCHOLARSHIPS ......................................................... 30
FULL-TIME STATUS .................................................... 6                 SERVICES FOR STUDENTS
—G—                                                                                         CAREER SERVICES ............................................... 24
GENERAL STUDIES CONCENTRATIONS ..................... 15                                     LIBRARY .............................................................. 26
GENERAL STUDIES PROGRAM ................................... 15                              OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICEs ............................ 24
GRADING .................................................................. 13
                                                                                        STUDENT BAR ASSOCIATION (SBA) ........................ 32
GRADUATE LAW SOCIETY ........................................ 33
                                                                                        STUDENT LOUNGE .................................................... 28
GRADUATION CHECK ............................................... 13
                                                                                        STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS ....................................... 32
—I—
ID CARDS ................................................................... 3          —T—
                                                                                        THESIS ........................................................................ 9
                                                                                        TRANSFER CREDIT ................................................... 12
                                                                                        TUITION.................................................................... 29




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