Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Frozen Food and the Microwave

VIEWS: 83 PAGES: 22

Illinois State University researchers say a diet for weight loss, the volume of food is one of the factors of weight loss. Nutritious frozen convenience food consumption, as control of food volume method.

More Info
									          Frozen Food and
 
           the Microwave


Carol Freeman, Vice President
ICF Macro

2010 Food Safety Education Conference
March 25, 2010
                         ICF Macro and USDA

•	 Worked to develop consumer campaign 
 strategies that:
                                           
  – focus on the importance of food safety

    messages

  – give consumers the knowledge and tools to 
    change and maintain new food safety 
    behaviors
  – move consumers from awareness to behavior 
    change
                                                             Current Issue
Consumers aren’t following printed directions 
on Not Ready to Eat (NRTE) meals. 
Focus groups conducted in May, 2009 by FDA highlights critical issues:
•Few respondents think that frozen entrees contain raw meat or 
chicken. 
“… usually, a TV dinner has got cooked food in it.  You could eat it frozen if you wanted to.”
Raleigh Focus Group Participant 

•Most thought the purpose of cooking instructions were to improve
the quality of food. 
•Some people just don’t follow directions. 
“I had fish sticks. It was not for microwave. I still microwaved them.”
Bethesda Focus Group Participant 

                                                3
     Frozen Food & Microwave Food Safety

• Microwave Working Group 
  – Membership:  Industry, USDA, FDA, the American Frozen 
    Food Institute (AFFI), the International Food Information 
    Council (IFIC), and the Partnership for Food Safety 
    Education (PFSE)
  – Goal: assess what can be done to reduce the risk of 
    foodborne illness as a result of consumers’ improper use 
    of the microwave when preparing frozen foods.  
                                     ICF Macro’s Task 
Determine consumer communications strategies to reduce 
improper preparation of not‐ready‐to‐eat (NRTE), frozen 
foods with microwave ovens. 

How to educate consumers and support and modify food 
safety behaviors:  

–	 Read and follow package instructions 
   for cooking.
–	 Know microwave wattage.
–	 Use a food thermometer, as appropriate, 
   to judge when food is safe.
–	 Know when it is appropriate to use a microwave and when it is 
   necessary to use a conventional oven.
                                 5
                    Background Research

– Interview industry stakeholders
– Conduct a literature review/media analysis
   
  relative to three priority target audiences

   • Adolescents (Age 15‐18)
   • Young Adults (Age 19‐25)
   • Older Adults (Age 65+)
– Provide recommendations  for a communications 
  outreach initiative
                          Industry Perspective

Preliminary Research
•	 Eight in‐depth interviews with stakeholders
    – Food manufacturers, food retailers, microwave 
       manufacturers, microwave retailers, and a consumer 
       interest organization  
•	 Topics: main food safety issues, roles (government, 
   stakeholders, consumers) key messages, target audiences, 
   willingness to support a communications initiative, and 
   recommendations
                            Industry Perspective

• What are the Main Issues to be Addressed?
  – Educate consumers—overcome misunderstandings and 
    misconceptions
  – Encourage industry use of safer ingredients
     • Precooked vs. raw
  – Reduce microwave complexities
     • Fewer wattages (300‐2200 watts)
     • Ensure wattage output is accurate
  – Ensure cooking instructions are standardized, thorough, 
    clear, consumer‐tested, and easy to understand
     • Include multiwattage directions
                           Industry Perspective

• What is Government’s Role?
  – Provide research that supports the need for an initiative
  – Catalyst for collaboration across stakeholders
  – Establish guidelines and common language
• What is the Food Manufacturer’s Role?
  – Package food that is safe and ready to eat 
                                             
  – Develop/test instructions that are clear

    and easy to follow

  – Support consumer education outreach
     • Address different microwave wattages
                              Industry Perspective

• What is the Food Retailer’s Role?
   – Support consumer education
   – Promote food safety in the community 
      • Post shelf‐talkers
      • Host outreach events, in‐store nutritionists
• What is the Microwave Manufacturer’s Role?

   – Prominently display wattage
   – Reduce the range of wattages/standardize output
   – Ensure wattage claim is accurate and consistent

                         Industry Perspective

• What is the Microwave Retailer’s Role?
  – Post signage and clearly label microwave wattages
  – Provide educational materials to consumers
  – Require manufacturers to apply prominent labels
• What is the Consumer’s Role?
  – Take appropriate responsibility for food safety
  – Understand the importance of using microwaves to cook 
    food safely (not just palatability) 
  – Learn the difference between ready‐to‐eat (RTE) and not‐
    ready‐to‐eat (NRTE) foods
  – Take time to read and follow directions
                           Industry Perspective

•	 Are these the right audiences for a campaign? 
  (adolescents, young adults, and older adults ages 65+)
   –	 Adolescents and young adults
                 •	 Most agreed
                 •	 Several wanted to include key influencers 
                     (moms/caregivers)
                 •	 Several wanted to lower the age to include preteens
                 •	 Some disagreed because this age group is hard; won’t 
                     take the messages seriously
   –	 Older Adults, 65+
                 •	 Some disagreed because this age group tends to use 
                     conventional ovens more frequently
                 • Some disagreed because this age group tends to follow 
                     directions
                 Target Audience Research
•	 Reviewed the literature (within the last 10 years) to 
  gain lessons learned on how to communicate with 
  the target audiences
      •	 Adolescents (Age 15‐18)
      •	 Young Adults (Age 19‐25)
      •	 Older Adults (Age 65+)
   –	 Sources
      •	 Scholarly databases
      •	 Web sites of government, corporate and media research, and non‐
         government organizations
      •	 Social media and user‐generated sites
•	 Media consumption research
                          Adolescents (Age 15‐18)

•	 Message Considerations
   •	 Younger teens are unable to connect to later consequences so 
      messages must focus on the here and now.
   •	 Primary motivators influencing teen food choices:  taste, 
      appearance, and hunger.
   •	 Address perceived time constraints and the convenience of the 
      microwave.
   •	 Include the increased competence of teens to cook safely.
   •	 Address teens’ perceived lack of susceptibility and emphasize self‐
      interest and positive outcomes.
•	 Influencers
   – Parents/peers influence teens about health and food decisions
                                                 Young Adults
Non‐College Students (two‐thirds of this age group)

College Students
•	 Message Considerations
   •	 Address when students should be using conventional ovens rather 
      than microwaves for cooking frozen foods.
   •	 Address the perception of ease with microwaves and the lack of time 
      to cook with conventional ovens.
   •	 Compare the need to read cooking instructions with students’
      increasing smart decision to read nutrition labels.
•	 Influencers
   –	 Peers are important influencers
•	 Channels
                                              
   –	 Social media, user‐created Web content,

      interactive programs, TV

                                                    Older Adults
• Message Considerations

   •	 The ability to understand and interpret food labels decrease over time.
   •	 Be loud, clear, graphical, bright, easy‐to‐read typeface, large print, color 
      and contrast, and use short, simple, direct language.
   •	 Address older adult myths (i.e., touching, pinching food).
   •	 Impart probability of those 65‐to‐80‐year‐olds becoming ill from unsafely 
      preparing frozen food.
   •	 Include where to purchase food thermometers and why it’s important.
   •	 Elicit a sense of personal control and independence.
   •	 Use narratives.
•	 Influencers
   •	 Medical professionals and sources
•	 Channels
   •	 Traditional media combined with

                                      
      interpersonal reinforcement

   •	 TV and newspaper
   Next Steps/Recommended Strategies
Develop integrated marketing campaigns using 
multimedia communication channels
  A. Consumer education media campaign
  B. Community outreach campaign
  C. Stakeholder partnership campaign


Include mothers/caregivers as fourth target audience
   Next Steps/Recommended Strategies

A. Consumer Education Media Campaign
Select multimedia channels to reach each target audience
     1.	 Earned Media/PR: TV, radio, print, online
     2.	 Paid Media: Strategic partnerships with a national media 
         network, educational article marketing, pay‐per‐click algorithmic 
         online marketing, social advertising, specialized media
     3.	 New Media: Text/SMS integration, Web 2.0/social media, online 
         contests 
   Next Steps/Recommended Strategies

B. Community Outreach Campaign
Conduct community outreach to educate each target audience
     1.	 Adolescents: middle schools and high schools
     2.	 Young Adults: colleges, universities, office buildings
     3.	 Older Adults: physicians’ offices and senior residential/community 
         centers
   Next Steps/Recommended Strategies

C.	 Stakeholder Partnership Campaign
    –	 Stakeholder Roles
       •	 Partner Working Group and Information Exchange
       •	 Collaborative Research, Planning and Marketing
       •	 Message and Materials Development and 
          Dissemination
                                                  Conclusions
•	 Conduct additional research
   –	 Validate the need and the approach, and develop effective messages 
      and instructions
   –	 Gain insight on the sizeable young adult, non‐student target audience
•	 Use an integrated marketing campaign
   –	 Reach audiences through media, community outreach, and
   
      partnership activities

   –	 Include comprehensive, multichannel, interactive media campaign,
      with a Web 2.0/social media presence
•	 Consumer education campaign should address mistakes, 
   misunderstandings, and misconceptions
   – Expand target audience to include mothers/caregivers and preteens
•	 Will require an integrated approach with government, 
   industry and other stakeholders
               Questions?

  Carol Freeman

CFreeman@icfi.com

   240‐747‐4901


								
To top