load safety rigging safety

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					Hoist that Safety Line

Look alive and always look up!




         P bar Y Safety Consultants
               Alberta Canada
             First things first
• Have you inspected all lift lines and
  materials first
• Second have you done a hazard
  assessment ( written )
• Third you always need to do a lift plan
  because you need to know weight of
  product how far it is travelling and the lift
  capacities of the lines and units lifting it.
                  P bar Y Safety Consultants
                        Alberta Canada
     Think and Know Safety First
The following are general guidelines for working with hoists:
• Never walk, stand, or work beneath a hoist.
• Isolate hoisting area with barriers, guards, and signs, as appropriate.
• Never exceed the capacity limits of your hoist.
• Wear gloves and other personal protective equipment, as appropriate, when working
with hoists and cables.
• Ensure that hoists are inspected regularly.
• Always hold tension on the cable when reeling it in or out.
• When the work is complete, always rig the hoist down and secure it.
• When the load block or hook is at floor level or its lowest point of travel, ensure that
• at least two turns of rope remain on the drum.
• Be prepared to stop operations immediately if signalled by the safety watch or
    another
• person.



                                 P bar Y Safety Consultants
                                       Alberta Canada
Picking Up Loads with Hoists

• Ensure that the hoist is directly above a load
  before picking it up. This keeps the hoist from
  becoming stressed. Picking up loads at odd
  angles may result in injury to people or damage
  to the hoist.
• Do not pick up loads by running the cable
  through, over, or around obstructions. These
   obstructions can foul the cable or catch on the
  load and cause an accident.

                  P bar Y Safety Consultants
                        Alberta Canada
  Avoiding Electrical
  Hazards with Hoists
• Do not hoist loads when any portion of the
  hoisting equipment or suspended load can
  come within 10 feet of high-voltage
  electrical lines or equipment.
• If you need to hoist near high-voltage
  electrical lines or equipment, obtain
  clearance from your supervisor first.


                P bar Y Safety Consultants
                      Alberta Canada
      Inspecting Hoists
• Hoists should be inspected daily. If there is any question
  about the working condition of a hoist, do not use it.
• Hoist inspectors should note the following:
• The hooks on all blocks, including snatch blocks, must
  have properly working safety latches.
• All hooks on hoisting equipment should be free of cracks
  and damage.
• The maximum load capacity for the hoist must be noted
  on the equipment.
• Cables and wiring should be intact and free of damage.



                      P bar Y Safety Consultants
                            Alberta Canada
               Terminology

• Working Load Limit: The maximum mass or force
  which the product is authorized to support in a
  particular service.
• Proof Test: A test applied to a product solely to
  determine injurious material or manufacturers
  defects.
• Ultimate Strength: The average load or force at
  which the product fails or no longer supports the
  load.
• Design Factor:Products theoretical reserve
  capability, usually computed by dividing the catalog
                           working
  ultimate load by theAlberta Canada load limit.
                    P bar Y Safety Consultants
              Risk Management

• Comprehensive set of actions that reduces the risk of a
  problem, a failure, an accident.
• ASME B30.9 requires that sling users shall be trained in
  selection,inspection,cautions to personnel, effects of
  environment, and rigging practices. Sling identification is
  required on all types of slings.
• ASME B30.26 requires that rigging hardware users shall
  be trained in the selection, inspection, effects of
  environment,and rigging practices. All rigging hardware to
  be identified by manufacturer with name of trademark or
  manufacturer.
                       P bar Y Safety Consultants
                             Alberta Canada
   If It Looks Ugly It’s
Probably Not Rigged Right




        P bar Y Safety Consultants
              Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
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      Alberta Canada
Evaluate the
rigging is it to
code and
design and
training


                   P bar Y Safety Consultants
                         Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
P bar Y Safety Consultants
      Alberta Canada
      RISK MANAGEMENT
MANUFACTURER’S RESPONSIBILITY




          P bar Y Safety Consultants
                Alberta Canada
     Danger to you
Extreme Danger to Others
 NEVER EVER USE NON
   CERTIFIED LIFTING
DEVICES OR HOOKS OR
EYEBOLTS THAT ARE OFF
    MARKET OR NON
 CERTIFIED FOR LIFTING
       P bar Y Safety Consultants
             Alberta Canada

				
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Description: safety