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									                                                                                                    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
                                                                                                         Office of Risk Management



                                    FIELD TRIP RISK MANAGEMENT:
                                       A GUIDE FOR ORGANIZERS


INTRODUCTION..........................................................................................................................1
LIABILITY - DEFINED ...............................................................................................................1
AVOIDING FIELD TRIP LIABLITY ........................................................................................1
STUDENTS ....................................................................................................................................2
  Important Basics ........................................................................................................................2
  Sponsoring Department’s Responsibilities ................................................................................2
     Acknowledgment of Risk (AOR) Forms .............................................................................2
     Releases and Waivers - Why UW Doesn’t Use Them ........................................................3
     Selecting Vendors ................................................................................................................3
     Other Considerations ...........................................................................................................3
  Optional Field Trip Insurance ....................................................................................................3
MINOR STUDENTS .....................................................................................................................4
  Special AOR Form Needed .......................................................................................................4
  Assessing Risks..........................................................................................................................4
  Premises .....................................................................................................................................4
  Activities ....................................................................................................................................5
     Supervision ..........................................................................................................................5
     Security ................................................................................................................................6
EMPLOYEES ................................................................................................................................6
  Acknowledgment of Risk Forms - Not Needed.........................................................................7
OTHERS .........................................................................................................................................7
  Certificates of Coverage ............................................................................................................7
  Losses Caused by UW to Third Parties .....................................................................................8
  Liability Program Coverage.......................................................................................................8
  Indemnification Agreements......................................................................................................8
  Claims ........................................................................................................................................8
  Losses Caused by Third Parties to UW .....................................................................................9
PROPERTY....................................................................................................................................9
  Vehicle Insurance.......................................................................................................................9
     University-Owned Vehicles .................................................................................................9
     Rental Vehicles ..................................................................................................................10
     Privately-Owned Vehicles .................................................................................................10




                                                                                                                                         3/2006
                                                                                                     UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
                                                                                                          Office of Risk Management


SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS .................................................................................................11
   Disability Accommodations.....................................................................................................11
   First Aid ...................................................................................................................................11
   Exposure to Animal and Insect-Borne Diseases in the United States .....................................11
   Fatalities ...................................................................................................................................12
   Out of State Trips .....................................................................................................................12
   Travel by Non-Commercial Aircraft and Boats.......................................................................12
FOREIGN TRIPS ........................................................................................................................12
  Immunizations and Other Health Concerns .............................................................................12
  Road Safety ..............................................................................................................................13
  Security ....................................................................................................................................13
  Equipment Insurance ...............................................................................................................10
  Transit Insurance......................................................................................................................11
  Travel Documents and US Customs Information ....................................................................13



                                                           APPENDICES

     Appendix 1:            Field Trip Risk Assessment Checklist

     Appendix 2:            Acknowledgment of Risk Form for Field Trip Participants

     Appendix 3:            Acknowledgment of Risk Form for Minor Field Trip Participants

     Appendix 4:            Sample Participant Agreement for Out of State Trip

     Appendix 5:            Sample Participant Agreement for Extended Field Research

     Appendix 6:            Optional Field Trip Insurance Information and Enrollment Form

     Appendix 7:            Sample UW Certificate of Insurance

     Appendix 8:            Sample UW Indemnification Agreement with Property Owners




                                                                                                                                          3/2006
                          FIELD TRIP RISK MANAGEMENT
                            A GUIDE FOR ORGANIZERS


INTRODUCTION
Field or research trip planning frequently raises questions about liability or insurance. Should
waivers be used? What insurance coverage is there for rental vehicles? Are employees covered
for injuries out of state? Finding answers to these specialized questions in addition to the many
other logistical and academic preparations can be time consuming and difficult. This guide is
intended to provide quick answers to the most commonly asked questions, and make it easier to
find answers to the more uncommon ones.
The guide is organized by the four major categories of risks associated with field trips: injuries to
students; injuries to employees; damage to others; and damage to University property.
Appendices in the back of the guide provide sample forms and additional information regarding
insurance. If you choose to skip directly to the Appendices, please review the checklist in
Appendix One first, to make sure you’re addressing all the risks associated with your field trip.
One last note: the term ‘field trip’ as used in this guide encompasses all trips by University
faculty, staff and students in support of the University’s educational and research missions.
‘Field trips’ which last longer than one quarter are probably out of state or foreign business
operations, and you should contact the Director, Risk Financing, Office of Risk Management at
(206) 543-2033, for specific liability and insurance information pertaining to them.
LIABILITY - DEFINED
The term ‘liability,’ although commonly used, is complex and frequently misunderstood.
‘Liability’ means the legal obligation to pay for another party’s expenses or damages. Liability is
determined by legal principles that consider statutes, regulations, case law, contracts, and the
nature and cause of any damages. Liability can rarely be determined without a thorough review
of all the facts surrounding a particular situation or claim. The Office of Risk Management exists
to help University faculty, staff, students and volunteers identify and reduce liability associated
with their activities, and to provide prompt, effective help when claims occur.

AVOIDING FIELD TRIP LIABILITY
The best and most obvious way to avoid field trip liability is to avoid accidents. Good safety
practices are the most effective means of liability prevention. However, many University field
research and educational activities involve risks that University personnel cannot control, even
with the most prudent planning and management. For example, weather or political conditions
may cause unforeseen hazards. University personnel or others may make mistakes. Machinery
may fail or vendors may renege on promised transportation or lodging. Risk management before
and during a trip can help turn such potentially contentious, expensive ‘crises’ into more
manageable ‘situations.’




                                               Page 1                                         3/2006
Four important areas of potential liability need to be considered when planning research and field
trips:
       •     Student injuries;
       •     Employee injuries;
       •     Injury and damage to others;
       •     Damage to University property.
Checklists, guides, resources and tools to help you avoid or limit liability in each of these areas
are included below.


STUDENTS

Important Basics
       •     It’s important to distinguish between minor (under 18) and adult students. Increased
             legal duties may arise from a minor’s participation, and additional planning is
             needed (see section on ‘Minors’ below).
       •     It is also important to understand that NO STUDENTS automatically have accident
             insurance coverage for injuries or illnesses that occur during field trips. Also, it is
             illegal for the University to require health insurance for participation in any
             University activity.
       •     The University is not legally responsible for controlling the actions of adult
             students, nor for ensuring their safety at all times. In fact, case law has established
             that adult students are considered a special kind of ‘third party,’ similar to
             customers or visitors. The University IS responsible, however, for providing a
             reasonably safe environment, and warning students of known risks.

Sponsoring Department’s Responsibilities
Before and during a field trip, the sponsoring department has a duty to know as much as
reasonably possible about the field trip conditions and service vendors. It also has a duty to
inform students of any risks in advance, so students can make informed decisions about whether
or not to participate.

Acknowledgment of Risk (AOR) Forms
The Acknowledgment of Risk (AOR) form is an effective tool for informing students about risks
and documenting their decisions to assume them (Appendices 2 and 3). An AOR form should be
completed by each student field trip participant. Keep the signed forms on file in your
department for a minimum of three years (the statute of limitations for tort claims in Washington
is three years). Depending on the circumstances, another state may have jurisdiction, or in the
case of minors, the statute of limitations may be longer.



                                              Page 2                                          3/2006
Releases and Waivers - Why UW Doesn’t Use Them
Because the University has an unequal bargaining position vis-à-vis students, attempts to enforce
releases and waivers of liability from students would most likely be ineffective.
Many waivers and releases used by commercial enterprises have been struck down by the
Washington courts. The UW AOR form, however, is based on language the courts have found
acceptable, and if used correctly and consistently, provides the University with a degree of
protection, and informs the students of risks while simultaneously protecting their rights of
recovery against the University for its negligent actions.

Selecting Vendors
The Purchasing Office can help select competent and financially sound vendors, and take care of
the contractual language and insurance needed to minimize liability. Call their main number at
(206) 543-5810 for referral to the buyer who handles the services you will need for your trip or
see the list of buyers on their web site at www.washington.edu/admin/purchasing.
Purchasing or Risk Management may require certificates of insurance from vendors providing
services for hazardous trips, such as white water rafting, where the vendor has substantial control
over a hazardous activity and provides equipment. The University requires the certificate of
insurance to prove that the vendor has the financial resources to pay any liability claims resulting
from its negligence. It generally takes vendors a minimum of two weeks to produce a certificate
of insurance, so build this timeframe into your planning.

Other Considerations
It is inadvisable to make any significantly risky field or research trip a ‘required’ or ‘mandatory’
class activity. Instructors should consider alternative assignments or activities in case a student
declines a field trip for risk, expense, disability or health-related reasons.
Exclude extra hazardous activities such as skydiving, scuba diving, white water rafting,
kayaking, technical rock climbing and bungee jumping from your field trips. If a trip includes
substantial risks due to strenuous or unusual physical activity, lasts longer than a week, or
includes travel out of state, a participant agreement instead of an AOR form should be used so
that conditions and risks are explicitly described (see Appendices 4 and 5 for examples from the
UW-Tacoma Business school and the UW-Seattle Anthropology Field School)

Optional Field Trip Insurance
Optional field trip insurance (see information in Appendix 6) can be purchased by either
individual students, or the sponsoring department. Purchasing field trip insurance will not
prevent liability, however, prompt payment for medical treatment may prevent liability claims.
Departments cannot require students to purchase this insurance as a prerequisite for participation
in an educational activity. They can, however, recommend the coverage and provide information
about it in all materials relating to the field trip, or purchase coverage for all students
participating in the field trip.




                                               Page 3                                         3/2006
MINOR STUDENTS
Although many field trip organizers assume that no one under the age of eighteen (18) will be
involved in their event, this is not a safe assumption. ‘Young’ freshmen, early admittance
programs, and the University’s increasing partnership with K-12 schools means that more minors
are on campus and taking part in University activities.
Minors cannot legally waive their own rights or assume liability. Although a minor’s parents or
guardians can agree to assume some responsibility on their behalf, the scope is more limited than
in agreements with adults. The University is, therefore, automatically exposed to greater risk of
liability in all activities involving minors.
In addition, a higher standard of care is imposed by the courts when minors are involved in any
activity. In general, the younger the person, the greater the expected standard of care. This can be
problematic in a university setting, because the premises, activities and level of supervision are
designed for adults, not minors. A thorough risk assessment of all activities involving minors is
therefore crucial to minimize the impact of increased liability exposure.

Special AOR Form Needed
As mentioned above, minors cannot enter into binding legal agreements on their own behalf, nor
can their parents or guardians waive their rights for them. Therefore, AOR forms for minors have
a more limited scope than for adult participants. The AOR form can still be used for minors, but
requires special language, and the parent or guardian must sign instead of the student. See
Appendix 3 for this version of the AOR form.

Assessing Risks
The majority of claims filed nationwide by minors between 1987 and 1997 against colleges and
universities alleged injuries related to premises. Crime and athletic event injuries were the
second and third most common cause of claims, respectively. Risk assessment of activities
involving minors should therefore be focused on safety of premises and activities, supervision,
and security issues.

Premises
The most serious claim to date against the UW for a premises-related injury occurred when a six-
year old child visiting the Burke Museum climbed up a piece of sculpture displayed on a
pedestal. The sculpture fell on the child, causing a permanent leg injury. The courts found the
UW liable for the injury, even though the parents were accompanying the child and may not
have provided adequate supervision. This is an excellent example of how active (and
unsupervised) children can turn even ‘safe’ premises and activities into a hazard.
If possible, familiarize yourself and your staff with the premises and activities before the field
trip. Stair railings, windows, moving machinery, fountains or other pools are just some of the
myriad features which could be a problem with groups of children. Many injury claims involve a
child falling from a height, so look carefully for this type of hazard.



                                               Page 4                                         3/2006
Premises safety includes limiting access to outsiders who could harm children. See the section on
security (below) for a more detailed discussion.

Activities
The risks and benefits of activities involving minors should be carefully weighed, in view of the
unavoidable increased liability exposure.
The University’s risk management philosophy is to liberally assume reasonable risks related to
educational and research activities, and to aggressively avoid risks that are not inherently related.
High risk activities that have been known to result in severe permanent injury, disability or death
should, therefore, be totally avoided. Exceptions can be made for activities that offer unique
educational benefits. For example, adding a ‘fun’ whitewater raft trip to a forest hike needlessly
increases the risk of the trip without adding much to the educational value. However, a raft trip
to explore geological features inaccessible by foot might be an acceptably ‘risky’ activity for
minors.
If you are considering a high risk activity for a group of minors, review the section on selecting
vendors (above), and consider purchasing optional field trip insurance for the entire group. Call
the Office of Risk Management at (206) 543-2033 if you need help assessing the risk of the
activity, or thinking of ways to reduce risk.

Supervision
Minors are not legally expected to have the judgment and reasoning needed to assess hazards
correctly. Instead, their parents, or other responsible adults, are expected to do this for them. That
is the legal meaning of ‘supervision.’ In a field trip setting, this translates to: 1) having enough
adults to adequately monitor and control each individual’s, as well as the group’s, activities;
2) knowing the age group well enough to understand what they’re capable of; and 3) controlling
activities and premises as much as possible to maintain safety.
Plan to have at least one adult per three to four children for groups that are predominately
younger than six years of age. Groups of older children may have proportionately less
supervision as the age of the group increases. If you plan to use students or volunteers to
supervise, see the section on security for information regarding background checks.
Make sure the student or volunteer has experience working with similar age groups, or provide
training about what to expect.
Good supervision includes planning for accidents and emergencies. Make sure you and other
supervisors know what to do in case of an accident. Also, make sure that someone with at least
basic first aid certification will be accompanying your group. See UW Administrative Policy
Statement 10.5 or call Environmental Health & Safety at (206) 543-7262 for information on first
aid requirements and certification or view their web site at EH&S Training Courses.




                                                Page 5                                         3/2006
Security

Minors need to be protected from the actions of others in addition to being protected from their
own actions. The duty to protect has been liberally interpreted to include time not directly spent
in school or educational activities, such as lunch or break times. Recent litigation has even
extended school duties to provide a secure environment to surrounding bus stops and crossings.
Dormitories, meal areas, drop-off and pick-up points for field trips involving minors all need to
be supervised, and assessed for safety and security.

It is an unfortunate fact that child sexual predators may be attracted to volunteer opportunities
involving children. It is therefore extremely important to carefully screen employees and
volunteers. It is even more important to limit unsupervised access to children as much as possible
during all field trip activities. Again, the younger the children, the greater the number of
supervisors needed. In general, it is advisable to have at least two adults with children at all
times. Be aware that public restrooms, showers and changing rooms are frequently sites where
children are assaulted, and make plans for handling these situations.

If substantial unsupervised access to children under sixteen is unavoidable (due to staffing levels
or program design), criminal background checks are advisable (and may be required) for new
employees and volunteers. Contact Recruitment & Employment Services at (206) 543-2354 for
information.


EMPLOYEES
Workers’ Compensation

University employees, including faculty, are automatically covered for work-related injuries by
workers’ compensation insurance. Coverage is in effect twenty-four hours a day while traveling.
Employees are typically covered the day they start work for UW. No special arrangements need
to be made for research or field trips, except as noted on the checklist below.

Coverage for employees based in Washington State is provided through the Washington State
Department of Labor & Industries. Contact the Office of Risk Management at (206) 543-0183, or
email claims@uw.edu for coverage information on employees based overseas or in other states.

Make sure you have answered the following questions about employee coverage before your trip
begins:



YES        NO

                Will all the people participating in this trip be on the UW payroll? (If NO, see
                sections on students and third parties)
                Are all employees based in Washington? (If NO, call Risk Management at 206-
                543-2033 for special claim filing information).


                                              Page 6                                         3/2006
                Do I have current information on how to file workers’ compensation claims out of
                state? (If NO, email claims@uw.edu or phone 206-543-0183)
                Will this trip involve work out of state for more than 6 months? (If YES, special
                insurance may be needed. Call Risk Management at 206-543-2033).
                Do I have blank copies of the UW Incident/Accident Report to take on the trip?
                (If NO, check with your department administrator, or call EH&S at 206-543-
                7262) or obtain online at UW Incident/Accident Report.

Acknowledgment of Risk Forms - Not Needed
The University is legally obligated by the workers’ compensation statutes (RCW Title 51), to be
financially responsible for any employee injuries that occur in the course of employment. The
same statute prevents employees from waiving their rights to these benefits. Therefore, AOR
forms are unnecessary for employees.


OTHERS
Others, also known as “third parties,” are individuals, institutions or other entities which may
experience losses from, or cause losses to, the University and its employees or students in the
course of a field trip.
Typical third parties in field trip scenarios include:
        •     Participants who are not UW faculty, staff or students;
        •     Other drivers;
        •     Property owners;
        •     Host institutions;
        •     Service providers, such as hotel, tour companies or guides.

Proof of Coverage
Third parties, such as property owners, sometimes want to be assured that the University will be
responsible for any damages to them or their property resulting from field trips. In these cases,
the University will provide an ‘Indemnification Agreement’ and/or a ‘Certificate of Insurance’ to
the third party. Examples are provided in Appendices 8 and 9.

Certificates of Coverage
A certificate of coverage is proof that the University has the financial ability to pay for any liability
claims. These documents are generated by the Office of Risk Management, and can usually be
provided in one to two days. Please call the Office of Risk Management at (206) 543-2033 if a
certificate has been requested by landowners or others involved in your field trip. See Appendix 8
for an example which can be used in initial negotiations with property owners, hosts or other third
parties.



                                                 Page 7                                           3/2006
Losses Caused by UW to Third Parties
Sometimes, University employees or students on field trips cause damage to others, such as
automobile accidents or damaging a building. University employees and students automatically
have general and automobile liability coverage for such accidents through the University’s
liability program, as long as they: 1) are in the course and scope of University duties; 2)
participating in programs sponsored by the University; and 3) acting in good faith.

Liability Program Coverage
The University’s liability program covers damages caused by the negligent acts of University
employees and students which cause harm to third parties. Coverage is unlimited and there is no
expiration date, since it is a statutory program backed by the resources of the State of
Washington. Coverage does not apply if the student or employee is not acting within the course
and scope of their assigned duties, is under the influence of alcohol or other controlled
substances, willfully violates the law or University policy, or commits an act that was
intentional, reckless or malicious in nature. Full information regarding the liability statute and
indemnification and defense of employees and students can be found in the RCW 28B.20.250 et
seq., and in the University Handbook, Volume 1, Chapter V.

Indemnification Agreements
Indemnification agreements determine what liabilities the University and a third party each agree
to assume. If vendor services are contracted through Purchasing, they will handle all the
paperwork, including any necessary insurance requirements. If an activity involves the use of a
landowners property the Attorney General’s Office review’s these documents. See Appendix 9
for an example indemnification letter for use in initial discussions with property owners or other
third parties.
Departments which negotiate or sign indemnification agreements without review by the Office of
Risk Management or the Attorney General’s Office may obligate their departments for liabilities
which are not covered by the University’s liability program.
University employees or students who are injured by third parties during field trips may have
rights to pursue third parties that are separate from the University’s rights. Agreements between
the UW and third parties cannot waive these rights on behalf of students or employees, nor can
the University agree to indemnify a third party for these types of recoveries. Please review any
agreements containing this type of language with the Office of Risk Management or the Attorney
General’s Office.

Claims
If you or your department is contacted by a third party about a claim arising from a research or
field trip, please refer them to the Office of Risk Management at (206) 543-3657 immediately.
DO NOT ADMIT LIABILITY, regardless of the circumstances - this could prejudice the
University’s ability to appropriately manage a claim.



                                              Page 8                                        3/2006
Losses Caused by Third Parties to UW
If others cause harm or damage to UW employees, students or property during a field trip, it’s
important to take care of emergency needs (such as medical care or repairs) first and worry about
claims against the third party later. Documentation of the circumstances, however, such as on a
UW Incident/Accident Report, is important to preserving information which may help the
University and other parties involved in the incident with future claims. Call the Office of Risk
Management, (206) 616-3455 as soon as possible to check on applicable insurance coverage, and
on necessary documentation.
Remember that UW employees and students may have individual causes of action against third
parties who cause them harm. Do not sign any releases or agreements without checking with the
Liability Claims Program in the Office of Risk Management at (206) 543-3657.


PROPERTY
The University of Washington does not automatically provide insurance coverage for equipment
or vehicles owned or on loan to the University. Neither is there any insurance coverage for
students’ or other participants’ property.
UW-owned or borrowed equipment can be insured through the University’s equipment insurance
program, which is described below. Students and other participants, however, are responsible for
purchasing their own insurance coverage. Please note that the UW equipment insurance coverage
is not available for students’ or participants’ property.

Vehicle Insurance

University-Owned Vehicles
If you are using Motor Pool vehicles for your trip, the cost of physical damage repair costs is
already incorporated into the rates charged to users. However, the Motor Pool may charge a
department directly for extraordinary costs. Contact the Motor Pool at (206) 685-1566 for details
about extraordinary costs, and for information on arranging for any necessary repairs to Motor
Pool vehicles during the field trip.
Department-owned University vehicles do not automatically have physical damage (a.k.a.,
‘comprehensive and collision’) coverage. Application for optional physical damage insurance
must be made through the Office of Risk Management by calling (206) 543-3419, at least one
week prior to the time coverage is needed. The application must include the following:
       •     Pertinent vehicle description information;
       •     Purchase price, when new;
       •     Description of how the vehicle will be used;
       •     Owner’s or lesson’s name and address;
       •     Where the vehicle is garaged (by city);


                                              Page 9                                       3/2006
       •     List of authorized drivers with driver’s license numbers and birth dates; and
       •     Department budget information for recharge of premium, if coverage is approved.
If the vehicle meets the requirements and criteria for commercial insurance, Risk Management
will obtain coverage and charge the premium to the department. Notify Risk Management of any
changes of vehicles, uses, ownership or new drivers take place. In the event of an accident, notify
the Office of Risk Management at (206) 543-3657 in addition to all other required accident
reports. The Office of Risk Management will provide instructions on obtaining estimates and
filing claims.

Rental Vehicles
UW accident statistics concur with national trends: accidents are more likely to occur when
driving an unfamiliar vehicle, on unfamiliar roads and traffic rules, and the stress of travel are
added to the equation, the chances for an automobile accident skyrocket. These are important
risk factors to remember when driving a rental vehicle on University business.
Unless coverage is provided under the State Automobile Rental Agreement (see UW
Administrative Policy Statement 75.3, “State of Washington Car Rental Contract”) the UW
officer employee authorized agent, or student renting the vehicle must accept the collision
damage waiver (CDW or LDW) offered by the rental company. See APS 75.3 for information on
renting a car using the state contract and the Car Insurance Coverage Table located on the travel
web site.
All costs of the CDW, deductibles (if any) and uninsured losses to the rental vehicle are either
the responsibility of the UW officer, employee, agent or student renting the vehicle, or their
employing department. Departments may, however, reimburse employees for rental vehicle
damage expenses from discretionary accounts.

Privately-Owned Vehicles
There is no University insurance or self-insurance coverage for privately-owned vehicles that are
damaged while being used on University business. Instead, the car mileage rates paid to
University travelers are structured to include an amount for insurance costs and deductibles. The
personal automobile coverage carried by the officer, employee, agent or student is the exclusive
coverage for losses to privately-owned vehicles. It is advisable for the University driver to
confirm with their insurance agent that comprehensive or collision coverage will apply to
business uses before using their personal vehicle on University business.

Equipment Insurance
The Equipment Insurance Program is available to insure equipment that will be used on a field
trip. Most types of scientific, computing and technical equipment can be covered. The coverage
has a $250 deductible per domestic loss, $750 for laptops and $1,000 per foreign loss or items in
transit. Detailed information is available on the equipment insurance website, Equipment
Insurance.




                                              Page 10                                        3/2006
Departments are responsible for deciding if equipment is eligible for insurance coverage and
then requesting it. Either domestic or foreign coverage can be requested through the equipment
insurance website, or by calling the Office of Risk Management at (206) 221-2984. Domestic
coverage applies only within the Continental United States, Alaska, and Canada. All other
locations are considered foreign locations.

Transit Insurance
Equipment or goods being shipped by U.S. or overseas mail, by marine cargo, and/or are valued
at more than $50,000 US, are excluded from coverage by the UW Equipment Insurance
Program. Contact the Office of Risk Management at (206) 543-3419 for information about these
exclusions, and for information about purchasing additional transit insurance.


SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Disability Accommodations
Faculty, students or employees with disabilities may require special accommodations for field
trips. Students can request help from their instructor, or from the Disabled Student Services
Office, (206) 543-8924. Employees and faculty may request help from the Disability Services
Office, (206) 543-6450.
Remember that employees, faculty and students are not required to tell you the nature of their
disability or other medical information when requesting an accommodation. If you need help
arranging an accommodation, or have questions about the reasonableness of the request, contact
either Disabled Student Services or the Disability Services Office at the numbers above.

First Aid
It’s advisable for at least one person (preferably UW faculty or staff) on outdoor or challenging
field trips to have basic first aid certification. Some extensive field and research trips may have
additional first aid certification needs. Contact Environmental Health and Safety at
(206) 543-7262 or visit their website at EH&S Training Courses for information and to arrange
first aid training.

Exposure to Animal and Insect-Borne Diseases in the United States

Field trips that may involve working with, or exposure to bites from, bats and other wild animals
increase the risk of contracting rabies. Field trips involving camping in areas inhabited by
rodents increase the risk of contracting hantavirus. Trips in tick infested area increase the risk of
Lyme disease. For more information on prevention and detection of these diseases, and for a
more complete list of risks involving animals and insects in the field, contact the Occupational
Health Nurse at Environmental Health and Safety, (206) 543-7388. The Centers for Disease
Control (CDC) website is also a good resource for general information.




                                               Page 11                                        3/2006
Fatalities

If the worst happens, and a UW employee, student or field trip participant is killed during a field
trip, it is imperative that UW Environmental Health and Safety, (206) 543-7388, be notified as
soon as possible. If there is time and opportunity, it is also advisable to notify the Office of Risk
Management at (206) 543-2033. The University Police (206) 543-9331 can help notify the next
of kin, if needed. Any of these offices can help you in managing the emergency and getting help
for you and the other field trip participants.

If UW actions (e.g., a motor vehicle accident) cause or may have caused death to a third party,
then also notify the Office of Risk Management Liability Claims Program at (206) 543-3657 as
soon as possible after the incident. Remember not to admit liability, regardless of the
circumstances, as this may impair the UW’s ability to effectively defend you and the University
against a claim or legal action brought by the injured party.

Out of State Trips
Out of state trips require special language regarding transportation, medical facilities, and any
special conditions of the trip on the AOR form. When using commercial carriers, travel agents,
or hotels, include language that protects the University from liability for the vendor’s actions
(see Appendix 4 for an example from the UW-Tacoma Business Program).
If the field trip involves driving in other states, it is important to check road laws and traffic
conditions, as many accidents nationwide are caused by drivers unfamiliar with the terrain.
Automobile clubs, such as AAA, and state websites often provide traffic information guides. The
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety website also provides an excellent summary of traffic and
road condition information for all fifty states. Limit cell phone use while driving, especially in
unfamiliar vehicles and roads.

Travel by Non-Commercial Aircraft and Boats
For trips involving flights in or leasing non-commercial aircraft or boats, special contractual
terms and additional vendor insurance is needed. Please contact the Office of Risk Management
at (206) 543-2033 at least six weeks in advance of the trip to discuss coverage.


FOREIGN TRIPS
Immunizations and Other Health Concerns

The Centers for Disease Control have an excellent website (Traveler's Health) containing
immunization requirements and information on travel hazards for all areas of the world. The
International Travel clinic at Hall Health center on the UW-Seattle campus also offers pre-travel
counseling, health advice, and immunizations for both students and employees. You can contact
them for information or an appointment at (206) 616-2495 or view their travel clinic web site at
Hall Health Travel Clinic.



                                               Page 12                                        3/2006
Road Safety
Road accidents are the leading cause of death for Americans traveling abroad. Accidents in
developing countries are 20 to 70 times more likely to result in death or serious injury than
accidents in the United States. Knowing foreign road conditions and traffic laws is therefore an
important risk reduction technique. Many travel guides contain information on road conditions
and traffic laws, and some auto clubs have information as well. The Association for Safe
International Road Travel (ASIRT) website provides information on road conditions and driving
tips for various countries for a small fee.
Security
Over the last few years, several attacks during university sponsored trips has resulted in serious
injuries and fatalities to students. It is therefore crucial that sponsoring departments provide
students the latest and most accurate information regarding security in the field trip area.
The US State Department website (International Travel) has the most up to date information on
travel warning, security concerns and political situations for every country in the world. This site
also provides contact information for local American consulates in each country, an invaluable
resource during an emergency.
Travel Documents and US Customs Information
The State Department website has information and downloadable forms for passport ordering at
Passports. The “Travel Warnings’ section of the website (mentioned above) has individual
country profiles which include information on visa requirements and where to obtain visas.




                                              Page 13                                         3/2006
                                         QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE


               OFFICE                       PHONE #                  E-MAIL AND/OR WEB PAGE ADDRESS

Office of Risk Management
    Director, Risk Financing, Office      (206) 543-2033      bbullock@uw.edu
    of Risk Management

    Field Trip Insurance-Domestic         (206) 543-3419      http://f2.washington.edu/treasury/riskmgmt/insure/fieldtrip
    Workers’ Compensation                 (206) 543-0183      claims@uw.edu
    Equipment Insurance                   (206) 543-3659      http://f2.washington.edu/treasury/riskmgmt/insure/EIS
    Claims                                (206) 543-3657      claims@uw.edu

Association for Safe International Road                       http://www.asirt.org
Travel (ASIRT)

Car Insurance Coverage Table                                  http://f2.washington.edu/fm/travel/carinsurance

Centers for Disease Control                                   http://www.cdc.gov

Criminal Background Checks                (206) 543-2354      www.washington.edu/admin/hr/
(Recruitment and Employment
Services)

Disability accommodation for faculty      (206) 543-8924      dso@u.washington.edu
and staff (Disability Services Office)                        http://www.washington.edu/admin/dso/

Disability Accommodation for students (206) 543-8924          uwdss@u.washington.edu
(Disabled Student Services)                                   http://www.washington.edu/admin/dso/


First Aid/CPR classes,                    (206) 543-7262      www.ehs.washington.edu/index.shtm
Incident/Accident Reports
(Environmental Health & Safety)

Occupational Health Nurse & Travel        (206) 543-7388      http://depts.washington.edu/hhpccweb/index.php?ClinicID=11
Clinic (Hall Health Primary Care
Center)

Passports                                                     travel.state.gov/passport/passport_1738.html

University Police                         (206) 543-9331      uwpolice@u.washington.edu

US State Department                                           travel.state.gov/travel/travel_1744.html

Vendor Selection (Purchasing Office)      (206) 543-5810      http://f2.washington.edu/fm/ps/




                                                           Page 14                                                    3/2006
                                                                                                   Appendix One


                                         FIELD TRIP
                                RISK ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST

Answering these questions will help you identify risks associated with your field trip. The page numbers after
each question correspond to sections in the Field Trip Risk Management Guide.

PLEASE CHECK ALL ANSWERS THAT APPLY:
Who is going?

YES NO
            UW students (p.4)
            UW employees/volunteers? (p.9)
            Minor students or participants? (p.6)
            Employees or students from other institutions, or members of the public? (p.11)
            Participants who require disability accommodation? (p.14)

Where are you going?

          Within Washington state?
          Other US locations? (p.17)
          Outside the USA? (p.15)
          In an area experiencing civil or political unrest, or natural disasters? (p.15)

What transportation will you use?

          Driving University vehicles? (p.12)
          Driving privately owned vehicles? (p.12)
          Driving rental vehicles? (p.12)
          Traveling via commercial carriers (i.e., plane, train, bus)?(p.17)
          Traveling by air or water in privately owned aircraft or boats? (p.14)

What are you doing on the trip?

          Will there be any exposure to animals? (pp.5 & 17)
          Will there be any exposure to insects or poisonous plants? (pp.5 & 17)
          Do the activities require strenuous exertion? (pp.5 14 & 17)
          Are field conditions or activities challenging (i.e., rough terrain, high crime urban area, epidemic area,
          exposure to hazardous substances, or using heavy machinery)? (p.5)
          Are you or others driving an unfamiliar vehicle or in areas where the traffic laws are unfamiliar? (p.15)
          Do road or traffic conditions in this area present special problems? (p.15)

What are your emergency plans?

          Has a near-by medical facility or medical provider been identified?
          Will first aid be available on site? With the group leader? (p.15)




                                                                                                             3/2006
                                                                                           Appendix Two

                                UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
  ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RISK AND CONSENT FOR TREATMENT FOR ADULT
                   FIELD TRIP PARTICIPANTS

Section 1 (To be completed by field trip leader)

Class:   _____________________________________________________________________________
Field trip leader: ___________________________            Telephone: ____________________________
Address: ____________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________
Field trip date(s): _____________________________________________________________________
Equipment/supplies to be provided:
    by participant: ____________________________________________________________________
    by field trip leader: _________________________________________________________________
Immunizations required: _______________________________________________________________
Physical activities to be undertaken include: ________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________
Risks inherent in this field trip include bodily injury due to: ___________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________

Section 2 (To be completed by adult field trip participants)
I acknowledge that there are certain risks inherent in field trips, including but not limited to those
indicated in Section 1. I acknowledge that all risks cannot be prevented and I assume those risks beyond
the control of the University staff. I represent that I am able, with or without accommodation, to
participate in this field trip, am able to use the equipment and/or supplies described above, and have
obtained the required immunizations. I also agree to assume all risks of personal trips or activities
undertaken at my own initiative during travel to and from or during the course of the field trip.
Should I require emergency medical treatment as a result of accident or illness arising during the field
trip, I consent to such treatment. I acknowledge that the University of Washington does not provide health
and accident insurance for field trip participants and I agree to be financially responsible for any medical
bills incurred as a result of emergency medical treatment. I acknowledge that I have been given the option
to purchase field trip insurance through the University. I will notify the trip leader in writing if I have
medical conditions about which emergency medical personnel should be informed.
 ______________________________________________________                    _________________________
 Signature                                                                            Date

Section 3 (General Information)
• To request disability accommodations for this field trip, please contact Disabled Student Services at
    least 10 days in advance of the trip by calling (206) 543-8924 (voice): (206) 543-8925 (TTY): or
    (206) 616-8379 (FAX).
• To purchase optional field trip insurance, please call (206) 543-3419.
• Immunizations may be obtained through the Hall Health Primary Care center (206) 685-1011 or your
    primary care physician.



                                                                                                     3/2006
                                                                                          Appendix Three

                                UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

  ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RISK AN CONSENT FOR TREATMENT FOR MINOR
                  FIELD TRIP PARTICIPANTS

Section 1 (To be completed by field trip leader)

Class:   _____________________________________________________________________________
Field trip leader: ___________________________            Telephone: ____________________________
Address: ____________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________
Field trip date(s): _____________________________________________________________________
Equipment/supplies to be provided:
    by participant: ____________________________________________________________________
    by field trip leader: _________________________________________________________________
Immunizations required: _______________________________________________________________
Physical activities to be undertaken include: ________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________
Risks inherent in this field trip include bodily injury due to: ___________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________

Section 2 (To be completed by parents or guardians of minor field trip participants)
I acknowledge that there are certain risks inherent in field trips, including but not limited to those
indicated in Section 1. I acknowledge that all risks cannot be prevented and I assume those risks beyond
the control of the University staff. I represent that my minor child is able, with or without
accommodation, to participate in this field trip, is able to use the equipment and/or supplies described
above, and have obtained the required immunizations.
Should my minor child require emergency medical treatment as a result of accident or illness arising
during the field trip, I consent to such treatment. I acknowledge that the University of Washington does
not provide health and accident insurance for field trip participants and I agree to be financially
responsible for any medical bills incurred as a result of emergency medical treatment. I acknowledge that
I have been given the option to purchase field trip insurance through the University. I will notify the trip
leader in writing if my minor child has medical conditions about which emergency medical personnel
should be informed.
In case of emergency, please contact me at area code ______tel. ____________ ext._______

______________________________________________________                     _________________________
Signature                                                                             Date

Section 3 (General Information)
• To request disability accommodations for this field trip, please contact Disability Services Office at
    least 10 days in advance of the trip by calling (206) 543-6450 (voice): (206) 543-6452 (TTY); or
    (206) 543-3885 (FAX); or access@u.washington.edu (email).
• To purchase optional field trip insurance, please call (206) 543-3419.



                                                                                                     3/2006
                                                                                  Appendix Four



                       UW-TACOMA BUSINESS PROGRAM

  TRIP TO SOUTHWEST AIRLINE’S GENERAL OFFICES IN DALLAS

  Participant Agreement, Acknowledgment of Risk and Consent for Treatment
The Purpose of this trip is to gain firsthand exposure to and knowledge of the cutting edge
management practices used by Southwest Airlines (SWA). The managers SWA and the total
organization have been recognized in the professional management literature and the popular
business press for their innovative and highly successful approach to managing a service business.

SWA is the only airline to ever win the Triple Crown-best on-time performance; best baggage
handling and fewest customer complaints for any major airline. In addition, SWA is the only
airline that has been profitable each year for the last twenty years.

This agreement and acknowledgment is entered into by the undersigned as a condition of
participating in the travel and visit to SWA’s General Office in Dallas, Texas, scheduled for the
period May 13 through May 15 1996. The travel will be from Seattle, Washington to Dallas,
Texas, and return.

One whole day will be devoted to the visit at the General Offices. This visit has been carefully
planned. I understand that I will meet and attend formal presentations conducted by high level
managers (including Vice Presidents) regarding such topics as schedule planning, customer
relations, personnel practices, and community service, as well as spending time with managers
from SWA’s University for Learning and Development to be told about the leadership training
offered to SWA managers

An important part of the experience is to observe and experience SWA’s service delivery system
and the service SWA customers receive. The opportunity to travel on SWA will serve as the
basis for identifying the outcomes that SWA’s practices and procedures create.

I acknowledge that my participation in this activity is wholly voluntary, and is not a course
requirement in TMGMT 445, or any other course, and that my course grade and evaluation is not
dependent on my participation in this activity.

I further acknowledge that my part in this activity entails, but is not limited to, the following
condition, circumstance and risks:

   1. Travel is to be provided by SWA between Seattle, and Dallas, and return, on a no-cost,
      space-available basis. This means that my travel may be delayed by non-availability of
      space on the various legs of the trip, and that I have been advised to carry a sleeping bag
      in case I am stranded at an airport overnight in a city served by SWA, or any other city,
      in case of emergency. In such circumstances, as well as in all other circumstances
      associated with this travel and visit, I understand that I am responsible for my own
      personal safety and security.




                                                                                           3/2006
                                                                                     Appendix Four


   2. Routing on SWA may be subject to change depending on space availability. This means
      that my travel may involve many stops, plane changes and extended layovers at any city
      served by SWA, including but not limited to overnight stays, for which I will not be
      compensated and for which accommodations will not be provided by anyone.

   3. My meals and lodging during the trip will be at my own expense. Since SWA does not
      serve meals on its flights, I have been advised to bring along some food for the trip.

   4. While in Dallas, I will be staying at the Clarion Hotel, and will be traveling between the
      hotel and SWA’s General Offices in a hotel van. I agree to pay at the time of my stay at
      the Clarion Hotel the prearranged rate of $ ________ per night, plus applicable taxes, and
      acknowledge that all costs of my hotel stay are my personal responsibility. I further
      understand that I may be sharing a hotel room at the hotel with a fellow student of the
      same gender, and that I will make arrangements with that individual to fulfill my
      financial responsibility for all my expenses at the hotel.

   5. All ground transportation and parking will be at my own expense.

   6. I have been advised, because of the stand-by status of the travel arrangements, that I pick a
      departure time that will ensure my participation in the General Office visit. Travel time
      between Seattle and Dallas on SWA, given the best possible connections, will require a
      minimum of ten (10) hours. I realize that I am responsible for the timing of my travel.

I further acknowledge that I am responsible for.

   1. Carrying enough funds to cover my personal expenses on the trip, as well as unforeseen
      expenses that might arise;

   2. Conducting myself in a professional manner at all times during the trip, including while
      in airports and SWA’s planes, in the hotel and hotel van, and while in SWA’s General
      Office;

   3. Making arrangements with my professors in any other course where the class meeting
      time conflicts with the time period for this trip. I understand that this trip does not relieve
      me of my responsibilities in other courses;

   4. Gaining the greatest benefit from my travel and visit. To maximize my learning from the
      experience, it has been suggested that I read a number of articles about SWA, as well as
      the current SWA annual report. In addition, I have been told to start immediately to set up
      and keep a journal relating to the preparation, conduct and follow-up of the trip. Included
      in this journal should be a list of questions that I might raise while meeting with SWA
      managers, a list of what I expect to find while at the corporate office of SWA and list of
      my observations and the conclusions I draw from the trip.

I acknowledge that I am engaging in the trip for my own personal benefit and that, as with any
travel program, participants may encounter unexpected risks. These risks include (but are not
limited to) sickness, exposure to disease, political upheaval, accident, the forces of nature, travel
dangers on the ground or in the air, and property loss and damage, and I agree to assume such


                                                                                              3/2006
                                                                                       Appendix Four


risks. I represent that I am physically capable, with or without reasonable accommodation, of
undertaking this activity. Should I require emergency medical treatment as a result of accident or
illness arising during the trip and be unable to consent to such treatment at the rime, I hereby
consent to emergency medical treatment. I am aware that the University of Washington does not
provide health and accident insurance for field trips and that I will be financially responsible for
any bill incurred.

I acknowledge that apart from the academic content of the study tour, the University for
Washington acts only as an agent for suppliers and contractors providing services for this trip,
and in not responsible for acts of third parties which cause injury, death, property loss or
damage. I further acknowledge that the University of Washington is not responsible for travel or
accommodations disruptions beyond its control, and makes no representation as to the
availability or level of medical facilities at any of the destinations on the itinerary. I agree not to
claim against the University of Washington for injuries, damages or losses other than those
arising from the negligent acts or omissions of the University of Washington, its employees,
students and agents in the course and scope of their University-imposed duties.



___________________________________________________                    ________________________
 Participant’s Signature (Legal guardian must sign if under 18)                  Date



___________________________________________________
 Print Name



___________________________________________________                    ________________________
 Emergency Contact (optional)                                            Contact’s Phone Number




                                                                                                3/2006
                                                                                      Appendix Five

                           UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

               CENTRAL MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FIELD SCHOOL

THE WORK
The field school is designed to give students with a serious interest in archaeology a broad
spectrum experience in archaeological field techniques and can accommodate students with
varying degrees of previous experience. Approximately one-quarter of the field effort will be
directed toward surface investigations designed to generate quantitative land use information for
an ancient surface. The remainder of the season will be spent excavating a Woodland settlement
where we intend to recover information on structures, paleobotanical data, and link geophysical
and traditional surface characterizations to subsurface remains. All students will spend
approximately three-quarters of their time in the field and the remaining time will be spent in the
field laboratory doing initial curation, selected analyses, and data entry.
Archaeological fieldwork is destructive; the archaeological record is a nonrenewable resource,
parts of which are protected by law. As a result, all students have an ethical responsibility toward
the resource that does not admit carelessness or inattention. All work is done in accordance with
a set of written protocols which students must commit to memory early in the field season and
upon which they may be tested. While participation is an archaeological field school can be very
enjoyable indeed one of the most memorable experiences you may associate with college, it is a
serious business. Students whose behavior constitutes a threat to the integrity of the
archaeological record will be dismissed from the field school summarily. Fees/tuition will not be
refunded under these conditions.
STAFF
The general design and direction of the field school is being done by Dr. Robert C. Dunnell who
will be in site during much of the summer session as well and directly supervise all ARCHY 591
students. He has worked in the local area every year since 1979. Day-to day instruction will fall
to Patrick T. McCutcheon whose dissertation research was done in the local area and who has
field experience in the area as well. In addition, their will be two graduate student teaching
assistants in the field and one in the laboratory (all with previous experience in the local area and
with local materials), insuring close supervision and help for students at all times.
SCHEDULES
The field season will commence on 12 June 1996 and end 7 August 1996. The early part of the
season will be devoted to the surface work to accommodate crops; excavation will dominate the
last six weeks. Students will be in the field or lab 5 days a week, Monday through Friday.
Optional field trips to major archaeological sites in the Central Valley will be arranged for some
weekends. Trips will also be made to Kennett (nearest town of any size) each weekend to do
laundry and run errands. Field time lost to inclement weather will be spent in the lab (if materials
permit) or will be made up on Saturdays and Sundays. Because of the climate, it is essential that
work begin early (5:30 AM [June], 6:00 AM [July/August]) and terminate early (2:30 -3:00 PM)
with a couple of long breaks late in the work period. There will be one evening meeting each
week in which plans, progress, questions will be discussed.



                                                                                              3/2006
                                                                                      Appendix Five

TRAVEL
Students must arrange their own transportation to the field location or to Hayti, MO where they
can be picked up at the bus station. Students may bring their won vehicles but parking is strictly
limited at the field facility and vehicles will be registered with the local authorities.
FIELD CONDITIONS
The climate in the central Mississippi Valley is best described as brutal. High temperatures
routinely exceed 100°F with humidity over 80%. Conditions for heat exhaustion and heat stroke
in normal individuals occur for at least some part of nearly every day. Skin temperatures,
because there is no shade, run 25°-30° higher than air temperatures. During the surface phase of
work, students will be required to walk upwards of 26 miles/day in soft earth, a task that will
cause temporary discomfort to almost anyone no matter how “fit.” Excavation, while not
demanding as survey in most regards, is hard manual labor that at the same time demands
concentration. Participants must be prepared to deal with these conditions. The area also boasts a
rich insect and arachnid fauna and individuals with allergies to insect/spider bites should be
aware that some bites are inevitable. Individuals who experience severe reactions to insect bites
should review this information packet thoroughly with their physician participation before
registering for this class.
It is essential that all personnel irrigate themselves thoroughly; indeed, a goodly part of
afternoons and evenings is spent replacing the 10-15 pounds of water that may be last on a “bad”
day. In these matters students will be expected to follow the directions of the field school staff to
the letter. Students will want to bring waterproof sun screen (elevation is about 265’msl, but
there is almost no shade anywhere), insect repellents for mosquitoes/flies, insect repellents for
ticks, anti-itch medications, a hat, a couple of pairs of cotton work gloves, and work boots at
least ankle high. Good clothing choices are cotton, loose, long-sleeved, and neutral colored
(khaki -- mosquitoes and many other insects see well in the UV, bees see yellows and reds). Plan
on keeping as much of your body covered as you can bear.
The field school will be provided air-conditioned dormitory space in the form of a 40’ x 60’
section of a Quonset hut with a concrete floor, temporarily subdivided in two sections for
male/female sleeping space. Toilet facilities are also provided. Temporary showers will have to
be built by the field school. Students should bring sleeping bags and/or cots as no bedding is
provided. Privacy will be severely curtailed under these conditions. The laboratory consists of a
20’ x 40’ area, also air-conditioned and with a full kitchen where limited cooking can be done.
Both areas must be well policed at all times and students will be expected to take turns at general
maintenance tasks.
We will be living in a small (200), southern, farming community founded in the last century
1882. It is very conservative (indeed, we would not be permitted to stay in the town were there
not established genealogical connections between the director and the community) and low key.
What we are doing there is not going to be widely understood. The interaction between the field
school and the community must take these facts into account; we are guests. Student behavior
must accommodate local standards at all times. Likewise, you must be cognizant at all times
that we are working in fields from which the farmers make a living and the crops must be treated
with respect. Our work in the area requires that we secure innumerable permissions from owners
and tenants that would be jeopardized by inappropriate behavior. Such behavior will not be
tolerated.

                                                                                              3/2006
                                                                                     Appendix Five

There are two restaurants in town, several grocery stores of variable comprehensiveness, a
doctor, a bank, and a gasoline station. Food prices are only 60-70% of those in major
metropolitan area like Seattle. There is also a city park, post office, and police station. Other
businesses service the agricultural economy. Any place in town can easily be reached on foot
from the American Legion Hall where we will be staying.
INSURANCE AND RESPONSIBILITY
The University of Washington is not responsible for personal illness or injury, nor does it make
any representation as to the availability or level of medical facilities at the field location.
Participants are responsible for their own transportation to and from the field site, health
insurance coverage, and you may wish to apply for optional field trip medical accident/sickness
insurance coverage available through the University of Washington on a voluntary basis.
Students should be advised that since the archaeological field school starts before the official
beginning of Summer quarter, students not enrolled at the University in Spring quarter will not
have student insurance coverage until 17 June leaving an uninsured period from 12 June through
16 June. Optional insurance to cover this period can be obtained through the University of
Washington.
As with any field program, Participants may encounter unexpected risks. These include, but are
not limited to, sickness, exposure to disease, accident, travel dangers, forces of nature, and
property loss and damage. Apart from the academic content of the field school, the University of
Washington acts only as agents for suppliers and contractors providing services for this field
school. The University is not responsible for acts of third parties that cause injury, property loss
and damage, or death, nor is it responsible for travel/accommodation disruptions beyond its
control.
APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Three courses are available to meet individual needs. Enrollment in ARCHY 270 is open to al
undergraduates regardless of major or prior experience. ARCHY 571 is intended to
accommodate graduate students in archaeology with limited or no previous field experience.
ARCHY 591 is designed for archaeology graduate students with significant field experience but
which wish to undertake a short-term project within the larger field program where they are
involved in project design and supervision. Enrollment in ARCHY 591 requires the permission
of Prof. Dunnell and development of a plan of action, duration of project in advance. Academic
credits and duration of such projects are variable and must also be agreed in advance.
To apply for admission to the field School Application, Supplemental Data, and UW Department
of Anthropology Field School Participant agreement forms must be completed. Applications
must also be accompanied by a copy of the applicant’s transcript. Applications received before 1
April will be given priority. Enrollment is strictly limited by facilities, so early application is
recommended. If at any time after submitting an application you should decide not to attend the
field school, please notify us immediately so that students on the alternate list may be given
timely notice of acceptance. Applicants will be notified of the admission decision by 15 April or
within two weeks of application if the application was received later than 1 April.




                                                                                              3/2006
                                                                                    Appendix Six


                         UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

              OPTIONAL DOMESTIC FIELD TRIP COVERAGE
                 Includes Continental U.S., Alaska & Hawaii


PERSONS INSURED

      Students, employees and guests of the policyholder of participating departments for whom
      application has been made and premium remitted for optional domestic field trip coverage.

BENEFITS

Accident Medical Expense Benefit

      The company will pay the Usual and Customary costs for medical and surgical treatment,
      hospitalization, lab charges, X-ray charges, prescriptions, emergency room care, and
      services of a licensed physician and nurse for treatment of injuries commencing within 90
      days of the date of the accident and incurred within one year from the date of the first
      treatment. Charges above the Usual and Customary costs will not be covered. There is a
      $100 deductible, then services are covered at 100% if the Usual and Customary level. The
      plan will pay a maximum of $6,000 per person for covered services.

      Accidental Death and Dismemberment Benefit

      If, within 90 days from the date of accident, injuries result in death, dismemberment, or
      loss of sight, the following benefits will be paid in the event of loss. A maximum of
      $15,000 would apply if more than one loss occurs.

             Life                                                    $15,000
             Both hands, feet, eyes or any combination thereof       $15,000
             Either one hand, one foot, or the sight of one eye       $7,500

      Dental Coverage

      The company will pay up to $250 per tooth for services following the injury to sound
      natural teeth only. The maximum coverage of the policy per person is $500 for dental care.

COST*

             $0.85 per person per day

EXCLUSIONS

      This insurance does NOT cover:

      1.    Suicide or attempted suicide by the insured person, while sane or insane.


                                                                                          3/2006
                                                                           Appendix Six


2.   Infections

3.   War or any act of war

4.   Expenses for eyeglasses, eye examinations or other vision care unless an injury has
     caused impairment of sight.

5.   Participating in team sports or other athletic activities.

6.   The insured’s being intoxicated or under the influence of any narcotic unless
     administered on the advice of a physician.

7.   Any claims in which benefits are payable under any other insurance plan. This plan
     would be the secondary payor.




After March 31, 2007, please confirm premium rate with the Office of Risk Management
(206) 543-3419.

If any discrepancies occur between this summary and the contract, the contract shall
prevail.




                                                                                  3/2006
                                                                                    Appendix Six



                          UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
                      Application for Optional Domestic Field Trip
                              Accident/Medical Insurance
                      (Includes Continental U.S. Alaska & Hawaii)


Present this application and premium payment to:
        Cashier
        129 Schmitz Hall

If Premium is being paid by UW department, return this form directly to the Office of Risk
Management, Box 351276.



Date: _______________________________

Please enroll me for ______ days of "Field Trip" Accident/Medical Insurance. Coverage dates:

Begin: _____________________________          End: _____________________________________

Total premium for this coverage is $ ____________ (Number of days of coverage times .85)
After March 31, 2007, confirm rate with the Office of Risk Management (206) 543-3419

Name of person to be insured (print): _________________________________________________

Signature: _______________________________________ Phone # _______________________

Field Trip for Department of: ________________________________________________________

Departmental Contact: _________________________ Phone # __________            Box # _________

Budget Name & # to be charged (if applicable) _________________________________________


Cashier:      1.      Deposit premium in Field Trip Insurance suspense account #14-3401,
                      revenue code 949999. After March 31, 2007, please confirm premium
                      rate with the Office of Risk Management (206) 543-3419.
              2.      Forward this application to the Office of Risk Management, Box 351276.
              3.      For questions, call (206) 543-3419.




                                                                                           3/2006
                                                                                 Appendix Seven




                  SAMPLE CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE

              EVIDENCE OF GENERAL LIABILITY COVERAGE

Regarding:          Field Trip to Terminal 18 at the Port of Seattle
                    June 26, 2005

Covered Entity:     The University of Washington - Jackson School of International
                    Studies

Term:               1/01/2005 through 12/31/2007

Limits:             Coverage is unlimited per occurrence and in the aggregate

Policy Number:      Not applicable; this is a statutorily self-insured program

Form:               Occurrence

Conditions:         Coverage applies to the negligent acts or omissions of the University of
                    Washington and its employees, students, and agents acting in the course
                    and scope of their University duties. The term “agent” includes
                    volunteers to authorized University programs.

Contact:            Katrina Day at (206) 543-3659, fax (206) 543-3773


                                  Date Issued: January 1, 2006
                                                                                Appendix Eight




   SAMPLE INDEMNIFICATION LETTER FOR PROPERTY OWNERS


June 1, 2005



Lee McGregor
Terminal Manager
China Ocean Shipping Company
1601 Fifth Avenue, Suite 850
Seattle, Washington 98101

RE:    University of Washington Access to Terminal 18 for June 26, 2005 Field Trip

Dear Mr. McGregor:

Except as provided for herein, the University of Washington agrees to defend, indemnify and
hold China Ocean Shipping Company harmless from and against all claims arising from injuries
to University students, faculty and staff visiting your property as part of a field trip for
educational purposes. This indemnification does not cover injuries arising from your intentional
acts, or from any dangerous artificial latent condition known to you for which warning signs
have not been conspicuously posted.

Very truly yours,



Weldon E. Ihrig
Executive Vice President


Approved as to form:

______________________________________________________
Assistant Attorney General

								
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