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									                    ORGANIZACION INTERNACIONAL DEL TRABAJO
                OFICINA REGIONAL PARA AMERICA LATINA Y EL CARIBE
           Programa Internacional para la Erradicación del Trabajo Infantil – IPEC




            Sistema de Información Regional sobre Trabajo Infantil – SIRTI-
Tel: 511-2150341 / 511- 221-2565, Fax: 511- 4215292. Correo electrónico: sirti@oit.org.pe
           Las Flores 295 San Isidro, Lima 27. Casilla Postal 14-124, Lima 14.
                                    IPEC Sudamérica
                                                                                            1
                  INTERNATIONAL LABOUR OFFICE (ILO)
    INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME FOR THE ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOUR
                                    (IPEC)
               Multilateral Programme of Technical Cooperation




USDOL Appropriation No.   01-K100-RWBR-4143-SC601-000

Countries                 Colombia

Programme Number:         COL/01/P50/USA

Programme Title:          Prevention and Elimination of Child Labour in Small-Scale
                          Mining in Colombia
Duration:                 24 months

Proposed Starting Date:   November 1, 2001

Geographical Coverage:    Departments of Boyacá, Cundinamarca y Chocó

Language:                 English/Spanish

Executing Agency:         ILO-IPEC

Collaborating Agencies:   MINERCOL, Inter-institutional Committee for the Elimination
                          of Child Labour, Ministries of Labour, Education, Health,
                          Workers’ and Employers’ Organisations, Local NGOs, Local
                          Communities IPEC Colombia

Donor:                    United States of America – Department of Labour

Donor Contribution:       US$ 800,477

Local Contribution:       US$ 847,875

Document Preparation:     15.06.01
TABLE OF CONTENTS

            Executive summary ………………………………………………………                                                                     4

1           Background and justification ............................................................                    6

     1.1.   The problem .........................................................................................        6
     1.2.   National Context ...................................................................................         8
     1.3.   Legal Framework ..................................................................................           9
     1.4.   Prior ILO-IPEC actions…………………………………………………….                                                                 10

2.          Target groups and partners ..............................................................                   11

     2.1.   Direct Beneficiaries ..............................................................................         11
     2.2.   Indirect Beneficiaries ............................................................................         12
     2.2.   Other Beneficiaries ...............................................................................         13
     2.3.   Implementing Agencies ........................................................................              13
     2.4.   Collaborating Agencies ........................................................................             14

3.          Project approach and strategy .........................................................                     15

     3.1.   Narrative ...............................................................................................   15
            a) Institutional Capacity building ..........................................................               16
            b) Legalisation of the mining sector and
               adoption of Codes of Conduct prohibiting child labour .....................                              17
            c) Direct Action Programmes for prevention and effective withdrawal
            of children from mining .........................................................................           18
            Project components…………………………………………………………                                                                    21
     3.2.   Objectives and Indicators…………………………………………………..                                                              24
     3.3.   Outputs and Activities……………………………………………………….                                                                26
     3.4.   Assumptions………………………………………………………………….                                                                       31

4.          Institutional and Management framework .......................................                              32

     4.1.   Institutional Arrangement .....................................................................             32
     4.2    Collaborating and Implementing Institutions and Responsibilities……                                          32
     4.3    Project Management …………………………………………………… ...                                                                 34

5.          Inputs ................................................................................................ …   35

     5.1.   Inputs provided by the Donor ...............................................................                35
     5.2.   Inputs provided by the ILO………………………………………………..                                                              35
     5.3.   National Contribution ............................................................................          35


6.          Sustainability ......................................................................................       37

7.          Project Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation ..................................                              38

8.          Project/Programme Workplan and activities ...................................                               42

9.          Budget .................................................................................................    49
ACRONYMS


CENSAT            National Health, Environmental and Work Centre
                  (NGO)
COMPES            Social and Economical Policy National Council
CONSUDESARROLLO   Consulting society for the Economic, Social and
                  Institutional Development. (NGO)

COOPTRABAJO       Enterprise consultants and Advisers (Consulting)
DANE              National Bureau of Statistics
DNI               Defensa de Niños Internacional
ECOCARBON         Colombian Coal Enterprise
ECLAC             Economic Commission for Latin America and the
                  Caribbean
ICBF              Colombian Institute of Family Welfare
ICONOS            Colombian NGO
ILO               International Labour Organisation
IPEC              International Programme for the Elimination Child
                  Labour
MINERCOL          National Public Company responsible for legal
                  regulation and restructure of mining activity in
                  Colombia
NGOs              Non Governmental Organisations
NPC               National Programme Coordinator
SOCOLPE           Corporation Colombian Society of Pedagogía.
TESA              Technical, Economic, Social and Environmental
                  criteria
UNICEF            United Nations Children’s Fund
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Child labour in the mining industry of Colombia is a widespread phenomenon, especially
in coal mining, traditional clay deposits, traditional gold mining and partially also in
emerald mining. Mining exposes children and adolescents to many physical risks that
harm their development, such as extreme temperatures, poor ventilation, toxic gases
and materials, risk of accidents, and drowning caused by floods. Also in mining areas,
there is often a high incidence of illness such as malaria, acute respiratory disease, skin
rashes, and scoliosis.
This project will contribute to the elimination and prevention of child labour in the
traditional mining sector in Colombia.

To achieve the long-term objective of the project, three strategic lines of action are
proposed:
    Capacity building through awareness raising and institutional strengthening;
    Legalisation of mining and adoption of Codes of Conduct prohibiting child
     labour;
    Direct Action Programmes for the prevention and effective withdrawal of children
     from mining work.

The project aims at coordinating efforts between all actors, such as the National Public
Mining Company (MINERCOL -- responsible for the legal regulation and restructuring of
mining activities in Colombia); the Ministry of Labour; the Coordinating Agency of
Colombian Non-Governmental Organisations; Local NGOs; and Collaborating Agencies,
such as the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Education, the Colombian Institute for
Family Welfare (ICBF), and Worker and Employer Organisations.

The Programme’s activities will affect approximately 2,313 children and adolescents
under the age of 18 from target communities in the municipalities of Sogamoso,
Nemocón, Muzo and Condoto. Of this total, 1,647 will be withdrawn from work in the
mines, and 666 will be provided with safer working conditions and shorter working hours
as a “first step” transitional measure until they can be withdrawn entirely from work. The
focus will be on the immediate withdrawal of boys and girls between the ages of 5 and
13 and the improvement of working conditions for boys and girls between the ages of 14
and 18, which will precede their final withdrawal from work.

The proposed budget is set at US$ 800,477. The Government of Colombia will
contribute to the Programme both financially and in-kind, with a value estimated at
approximately US$ 847,875.




                                                                                          5
1. BACKGROUND AND JUSTIFICATION


1.1.    The Problem

Child labour in the mining industry of Colombia is a widespread phenomenon. It can be
found in diverse settings, and its specific features vary according to the sector and the
socio-economic and cultural characteristics of the different areas. Nevertheless, some
common patterns can be observed.

Mining tasks directly related to extraction, collection and processing are mainly
performed by boys and male adolescents, although the participation of girls is not
negligible, particularly in alluvial gold, clay and emerald mining. Generally, boys work
with gold, clay and emeralds, and their scopes of work include activities such as:
extraction, collection and processing of ore, while girls work in the collection of ore but
not in the extraction.

Apart from working long hours in the mines, children and adolescents are exposed to
many physical risks that harm their development, such as: exposure to extreme
temperatures, poor ventilation, toxic gases and materials, carrying heavy loads, risks of
accidents such as landslides, mudslides, rockslides, and drowning caused by floods or
river swells. Moreover, their long hours in unhealthy environments result in a high
incidence of illnesses such as malaria, acute respiratory disease, and skin rashes.

In coal mining, children are involved in different activities such as hauling ore on their
backs, ore extraction, washing and drying that involves the use of nitric acid, and the
packaging of various materials. The physical illnesses/risks associated with this type of
mining are acute respiratory disease, skin rashes, and scoliosis.

In traditional clay deposits, children carry out different activities such as: mud
preparation1, brick stacking, furnace operation and the manual transportation of
materials. They work long hours (an average of 8 hours a day) and suffer from different
illnesses and physical problems caused by these harmful activities.

In traditional gold mining, boys carry out the underground mining activities2, above
ground transportation and even ore processing, and in most cases they suffer
irreversible physical damage from mercury contamination. In this sector, another type of
child labour is linked to alluvial gold mining, where children work long hours on the
riverbanks sieving sand, drying the ore by burning it in small home-made furnaces, and
finally selling it in the informal trade market.



1
 Collecting mud, mixing it with water and moulding it with feet and hands.
2
 Cleaning the galleries inside the mine, and carrying the ore, with several instruments such as lamps,
picks, shovels.



                                                                                                         6
There is hardly any data available on the emerald sector. Child labour in emerald
mining is usually a hidden sector where the working conditions are not visible for the
labour inspection system. The employers choose remote areas, sometimes even where
armed conflicts take place. Mining of emeralds takes place underground and usually
involves whole families who are in charge of finding the esmeral ore. Some hazardous
child labour occurs in the mines, but normally it is found above ground (breaking rocks,
transportation, cleansing of the mineral).

Starting from the preliminary data obtained in the studies carried out by IPEC 3, the
baseline surveys carried out in several municipalities of the departments of Boyacá,
Cundinamarca and Chocó, a total of 3,407 boys and girls between the age of 5 and17
years were identified working in emeralds, coal, clay and traditional gold mining.


In the gold mining sector of Condoto (Department of Chocó), the survey has identified
772 boys and girls linked to small-scale mining. In relation to coal, in Sogamoso
(Department of Boyacá) 604 boys and girls have been identified. As for emeralds, it has
been found that in Muzo (Department of Boyacá), 1,301 boys and girls younger than 18
years work in the extraction of the mineral. As for clay, surveys were carried out in the
municipality of Nemocón (Cundinamarca), where 730 working girls and boys were
identified.


In terms of gender, the participation of children in activities directly related to mineral
processing is quite similar for boys and girls (52.1% for boys and 47.9% for girls). The
boys are usually more involved in all typical mining activities, such as extraction,
collection and processing. The girls are generally in charge of the collection and
processing, but not the extraction.

Differences are observed in specific types of activities. For instance, in coal mining in
the municipality of Sogamoso, 77.6% of the minors who work piling up or carrying the
mineral are boys, while 22.4% are girls. As for gold miningin the municipality of Condoto,
the job of cart drivers is carried out mainly by boys (88%), and in a lesser percentage by
girls (12%).

The studies carried out allow us to observe that a high percentage of families linked to
traditional mining have children who work not only in mining activities, but also at home
for more than 15 hours a week. Some 2,025 children were identified under these
conditions, and 52.4% were girls.

Access to basic education and health services is very limited for working children, and
school attendance and academic performance are negatively affected by the difficulties
brought on by reconciling work and school. Children’s participation in work, although not
always required by parents or relatives, constitutes a significant means of support for the
3
 USDOL has financed the baseline surveys. These surveys serve to identify the intervention zones,
proportion, and characteristics of child labour.



                                                                                                    7
family4. Further, in most cases, the income that a child earns working in the mines
represents the source of income that allows him/her to attend school. The Colombian
Constitution guarantees compulsory and free education, but parents are often expected
to provide cash contributions (enrolment fees, for instance, do not include uniforms,
books or other school materials.)

Work also affects school attendance: 51.1% of boys and girls surveyed in the
municipalities of Sogamoso, Muzo, Nemocón and Condoto exclusively work or combine
their labour activities with school. About 10% of working children under 14 do not attend
school, while this percentage increases (40.59%) for children between 14 and 17. These
data show that at an early age children combine school and work and tend to drop out of
school during adolescence (beginning at age 14 ).

In addition, working girls and boys are not protected by the health and social welfare
system. Just 2.1% of working boys and girls acknowledge having access to health
services as regular adult workers.


1.2. National Context

According to the 1996 National Household Survey, the total population of Colombia is
42.299.301, of which 42% are under 18 years of age.

A child labour study5 (based on the National Household Survey) estimated that there are
1.5 million working children in Colombia between the ages of 12 and 17. Of this total,
37% are located in urban areas and 63% in rural areas. According to the same source,
the informal sector absorbs almost 90% of labour under 18 years. In urban areas, they
are concentrated in the services sector, while in rural areas most of the working children
participate in uncompensated family agricultural activities6. The study also revealed that,
in both urban and rural areas, one out of every ten children under the age of 18 works
in hazardous activities and on average, their work weeks exceed the legally permissible
six hours per week for 14-16 year olds and 8 hours per week for 16-18 year olds. In
addition, workers between 12 and 17 receive approximately 50% of the minimum legal
wage per work hour (see section 1.3 for more information).

Regarding education, the COMPES (Social and Economical Policy National Council),
document7 (1998) showed that, while 85% of the elementary school age population have
access to schools, attendance is inadequate. For example, on average, countrywide,
dropouts accounted for 71.4% of all minors between the ages of 14-18. Therefore, one
may deduce a clear relationship between labour participation and school attendance 8.

4
  The baseline surveys done by IPEC demonstrate that the economic support to the family is non-
significant in the case of minors under 14, but for the adolescents between 14 and 17 the average income
reaches 62% of the minimum wage.
5
  Child-adolescent workers, Elisa Flores, C. Colombia, 1997.
6
  It is in this category where the child participation in mining activities falls.
7
  COMPES document defines the public priorities of the country, within the National Development Plan.
8 “Niñas, niños y jóvenes trabajadores, Colombia 1996”, CEDE-IPEC, Bogotá, 1998




                                                                                                       8
Another negative influence that child labour has on children’s academic and professional
development can be observed in a salary comparison between child labourers at age 18
and other 18 year olds who have completed at least 7 years of schooling. Child
labourers on average earn an income 20% lower than their more educated peers. 9 It is
worth noting that the Political Constitution of 1991 declares education to be universal,
free and compulsory for children between the ages of 7 and 14.

Headed by the Ministry of Labour, the National Commission for the Elimination of Child
Labour was created in 1995 by Decree 859. Its participants include other public entities
such as the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Health, the Statistic Institute, the
Colombian Institute of Family Welfare, workers’ and employers’ organisations and
NGOs. With the support of IPEC, a First National Plan of Action was developed for the
period 1996-1999. In March 2000, within the context of the Second National Seminar on
Child Labour, the Second National Plan of Action for the period 2000-2002 was
approved. The progress achieved in Colombia is largely due to the decentralisation of
activities to Local Committees10, the development of training courses (in association with
IPEC) for trade unions, public officials and municipalities, national campaigns on the
prevention of child labour, and the implementation of Baseline surveys for the
identification of working children. In addition, intervention Programmes have been
developed in sectors such as child sexual exploitation (Cartagena and Barranquilla),
agricultural child labour, and the elimination of child labour in urban markets (Cúcuta
and Bucaramanga).

This extensive process of social mobilisation has led to the recent ratification of ILO
Convention 138 by Parliament on the Minimum Age for Admission to Employment (the
minimum age for Colombia is 14 years). Convention 182 on the Worst Forms of Child
Labour is scheduled for discussion by Parliament in the near future (the bill has already
been introduced in the Congress for ratification).

1.3. Legal Framework

The Colombian Labour Code, in force since 1950, establishes regulations on working
children and adolescents. With Law 12 of 1991, Colombia ratified the UN Convention on
the Rights of the Child. In addition, Title IX of the Minor’s Code, enacted in November
1989, states that minors under the age of 14 are prohibited from working and that those
between the ages of 14 and 18 require a written work authorisation from the labour
inspectorate. Twenty-three types of labour considered harmful and dangerous,
(including mining) are also prohibited for children under Colombian law. Article 242 of
the Minor’s law states that children between the ages of 14 and 16 are allowed a
maximum working period of six hours per week, while the working period cannot exceed
8 hours per week for those between the ages of 16 and 18.



9
 ECLAC, 1996
10
  The local committees are made up of departmental and municipal authorities in Departments and
Municipalities of the country



                                                                                                  9
1.4. Prior ILO-IPEC actions

IPEC in South America has already had significant experience with the implementation
of projects aimed at eliminating child labour in the traditional mining sector, two of them
located in the Andean Sierra region of Peru. In addition, an IPEC Programme on the
elimination of child labour in the small-scale mining of Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia is
ongoing with funds from the US Department of Labour since August 2000.

Since 1995, different organisations in association with IPEC have been working to
eliminate child labour in the mining sector. For example, the Empresa Colombiana del
Carbon11 (ECOCARBON), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), National
Health, the Environmental and Work Center (CENSAT12), and the Colombian Institute of
Family Welfare (ICBF). With IPEC assistance and the collaboration of ICBF and
UNICEF, ECOCARBON and CENSAT allocate technical and financial resources to
support educational and recreational Programmes that affect more than 1,000 child
workers in the Boyaca Region.

In June 2000 a seminar on strategies and intervention methodologies for the prevention
and elimination of child labour in the mining sector was held in Bogotá. Representatives
from the Ministries of Labour, Health and Education, MINERCOL, the Colombian
Institute of Family Welfare, NGOs and IPEC participated in this event. The seminar
established the general guidelines of this project document and defined a national
political and financial commitment towards the issue.

Previous actions, baseline surveys and a nation-wide assessment have been carried out
using IPEC’s Rapid Assessment13 methodology with USDOL support. The results have
been very important to raise awareness of the magnitude and characteristics of child
labour in traditional mining in Colombia. The study has provided both quantitative and
qualitative data on these subjects, including the number of boys and girls involved in
mining activities, their ages, the types of labour in which they are involved, economic
remuneration, number of working hours, salary/compensation, education information
such as level of instruction, dropout rates, availability of basic services, number of
immediate family members, occupational safety and health risks, and physical and
emotional effects of the work they do. Academic institutions in Colombia have
participated in these studies. The results will be entered into a database and then be
used for various purposes, such as background information for a meeting to discuss
these issues and suggest actions to be taken by the Programme, as well as to measure
the project’s success.

Colombia has signed an agreement with the ILO/IPEC SIMPOC Programme and the
Departamento Nacional de Estadística (DANE: National Bureau of Statistics)14 which
11
   ECOCARBON, up to 1999, was the public company responsible for the regulation of the coal-mining
sector. Subsequently, it was integrated into MINERCOL
12
   Colombian NGOs working in areas of intervention.
13
   Instrument developed by IPEC and UNICEF for rapid analysis of information that gives quantitative and
qualitative data about child labour.
14
   The Agreement was signed in May 2001.



                                                                                                      10
ensures that a module on child labour will be included in the National Household
Survey15.Relevant questions on high-risk child labour activities including mining are also
being incorporated into the surveys16.

The present proposal is aimed at strengthening and expanding these initiatives as well
as facilitating the Government of Colombia’s implementation of the International
Conventions related to the elimination of child labour.



2.      TARGET GROUPS AND PARTNERS

2.1.    Direct Beneficiaries

The programme’s activities will affect approximately 2,313 children and adolescents
under the age of 1817 from target communities in the municipalities of Sogamoso,
Nemocón, Muzo and Condoto: 1,647 of them will be withdrawn from work in the mines,
666 of them will be provided with safer working conditions and shorter working hours as
a transitional measure until their final withdrawal from work. These areas were chosen
because of the large number of children involved in the gold, coal, emerald and clay
mining and marketing processes and because of the high-risk work that they perform.
The focus will be on boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 13 who will be withdrawn
and between 14 and 18, who will be provided with safer working conditions, also as a
transitional measure until their final withdrawal from work.

824 children between 5 and 17 from Condoto, Sogamoso and Muzo will be supplied with
non-formal or basic literacy. 666 children between 14 and 17 years of age will be
involved in vocational, pre-vocational or skill training. 137 children under 17 years of age
will be involved in the formal education system. 1.647 children will be supplied with
counselling, health services and nutrition. 650 children will be supplied with legal aid.




15
   Official statistical instrument of Colombia that compiles semi-annual information about population, basic
services, income, and types of labour.
16
   The national household surveys are carried out every three months. This means that the next one will
be carriedout in October 2001.
17
   The number is based on the baseline studies that are indicated in the context done by IPEC



                                                                                                          11
DIRECT AND INDIRECT BENEFICIARIES – POPULATION EXPECTED TO BE
REACHED
                                                       GIRLS               BOYS               TOTAL
S.                    IMPACT                      as beneficiaries    as beneficiaries     Beneficiaries
No                                                Direct   Indirect   Direct Indirect    Direct Indirect
1      Children withdrawn from (exploitative)    747                  900                1647
       work/rescued/ intercepted from being
       trafficked
2      Children with safer working conditions    266                  400                666
       and shorter working hours
3      Children supplied with non-formal or      374                  450                824
       basic literacy education
4      Children supplied with vocational, pre-   266                  400                666
       vocational or skills training
5      Children mainstreamed to formal           45                   92                 137
       education system
6      Children (younger siblings) prevented              942                 786               1570
       from entering work
7      Children supplied with                    747                  900                1647
       counselling/health services/nutrition
8      Children supplied with legal aid          250                  400                650



2.2.     Indirect beneficiaries

The Programme will aim at benefiting 1570 children (younger siblings) prevented from
entering work. The Programme will also aim at benefiting 545 families of children
withdrawn from mining work, by improving their income through small credits schemes
and production improvement workshop.


                                                                            TOTAL
             S.                      IMPACT                         Direct        Indirect
             No.                                                beneficiaries beneficiaries
             1        Number of families benefiting from        545            1000
                      vocational training
             2        Number of families benefiting from        545             1000
                      income generating activities and/or
                      credit schemes
             3        Number of families benefiting from        215             200
                      basic literacy training
             4        Number of families benefiting from        1545
                      medical check-ups
             5        Female-headed households benefiting       50
                      from above services
             6        Number of parents’ groups formed          10
             7        Number of self-help groups formed         10
             8        Number of District/City/ vigilance        4
                      groups & boards & task forces formed




                                                                                                       12
2.3. Other beneficiaries

This target-group will comprise public officials from the Ministries of Health, Education
and Labour, the Colombian Institute of Family Welfare and the Municipal Governments
in the intervention zones. These will benefit from the awareness raising and special
training components of the Programme, as will community leaders, teachers, youth
groups and other grassroots organisations participating in the Programme’s different
activities. MINERCOL will not only benefit from this training, but also from the
identification of appropriate technologies for small-scale mining.           Training and
management efficiency of all these entities will be essential for creating a wide strategic
alliance with the common goal of eliminating and preventing child labour in the mining
sector.

2.3. Implementing Agencies

The implementing and collaborating agencies will work under the direct management
and supervision of the National Programme Coordinator (NPC) of the IPEC Programme.
There will be a specific National Programme Coordinator for this project who will
coordinate the activities with the general IPEC National Coordinator in Colombia, Ms.
Liliana Obregon. They will perform the following tasks:

MINERCOL

MINERCOL is a national public company responsible for legal regulation and
restructuring of mining activity in Colombia in order to modernise the sector.
MINERCOL, which was created in 1995, participates actively in the National
Commission for the Elimination of Child Labour. Since 1999, MINERCOL has developed
and implemented activities to eradicate child labour in the mining sector. It has recently
committed both financial and human resources to an IPEC Programme. Its role in the
Programme will be, jointly with the Ministry of Labour, to regulate and formalise the
traditional mining sector; to apply the Code of Conduct; to grant a Product label; to
provide technical assistance relating to the above, as well as to introduce appropriate
technologies.

Ministry of labour

This Ministry presides over the National Commission for the Elimination of Child labour
and is therefore expected to play an important part in the Programme through this given
structure. In addition, its labour Inspectors will participate in the mixed monitoring teams
that will be created to supervise the withdrawal of children from the areas of intervention
(see chapter on Monitoring).




                                                                                          13
Coordinator of Colombian Non-Governmental Organisations

The Coordinator of Colombian Non-Governmental Organisations is a non-profit civil
entity that speaks for the majority of NGOs in the country. Its role will be to implement
the activities on awareness raising and cultural transformation, as well as to participate
in the National Committee.

Local Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs)

There are no established NGOs in the areas of intervention due to difficulties of access
and security problems. IPEC has made contact with many national NGOs, inviting them
to participate in the Programme’s different activities. A possible list of participants is
National Health, Environmental and Work Centre (CENSAT), Consulting society for the
Economic, Social and Institutional Development. (CONSUDESARROLLO), La
Corporación Minuto de Dios, Defensa de Niños Internacional (DNI), Enterprise
consultants and Advisers (COOPTRABAJO), ICONOS and Corporation Colombian
Society of Pedagogía. (SOCOLPE) These NGOs have developed various initiatives
related to child labour in other parts of the country, (for example, in markets and
agricultural activities) some in collaboration with IPEC. The role of these NGOs in the
Programme will be to develop and implement Action Programmes in intervention areas.

2.4. Collaborating Agencies

The following entities will also participate in the Programme:

Ministry of Health will be responsible for providing health care, promotion and
prevention services to the beneficiary groups of children in the zones of intervention. (Do
health centers already exist in these mining communities? If not, will the Ministry provide
the infrastructure for them?Provision of these services will be based on the agreements
mentioned in the chapter on strategy, as well as an undertaking to continue funding the
services once the Programme terminates.

Ministry of Education will participate in the Programme by developing educational
services described in the section on strategy (i.e. enough primary schools and teachers,
adjustment of curricula to match students’ needs, and adequate basic classroom
materials, furniture, water and electricity) for areas targeted by the Programme. Initially,
the IPEC Programme will contribute towards these expenses, but the Ministry will be
expected to take over these by the end of the Programme, so that the Programme
impact is maintained. The Ministry will also establish secondary schooling in the zones
of intervention.

Colombian Institute for Family Welfare (ICBF) is responsible for child-related policies
in Colombia. In cooperation with the Programme, it will develop activities on local
communities in the zones of intervention. More specifically, the Institute will design
Programmes which focus on the nutritional and recreational needs (including school
meals and nutrition workshops) of the Programme’s beneficiary children.



                                                                                          14
Workers’ Organisations will contribute to the Programme through their on-going
participation in the National Commission for the Elimination of Child Labour. They will
also help in prevention and elimination of child labour in mining, through the
development of awareness-raising activities amongst their affiliates (mine workers, who
many of them have children workers, and other workers) and in the development of the
Code of Conduct.

Employers’ Organisations will contribute to the Programme through their on-going
participation in the National Association of Industrialists (ANDI) and the National
Commission for the Elimination of Child labour. In addition, they will help in the
development of the Code of Conduct and its implementation among their members. For
this reason, they will be part of the planned Sub-Committee for the Elimination of Child
labour in Traditional Mining.


3. PROJECT APPROACH AND STRATEGY

3.1. Narrative

To achieve the long-term objective of the Programme, (i.e. to contribute towards the
prevention and elimination of child labour in the traditional mining industry of Colombia)
three strategic lines of action are proposed:

The first line of action is to assume the struggle against child labour in the mining sector
as a political priority and to strengthen the national capacity to fight it by promoting
Programmes, plans and activities, by creating and/or strengthening the necessary public
and private institutional structures, and through campaigns, awareness raising activities
and promotion of the transformation in attitudes and traditional beliefs that motivate child
work.

The second line of action is to start activities that take measures against three of the
most important structural causes of child labour in mining, i.e. informality of traditional
mining, lack of adequate legal regulations, and weak grassroots organisations. This will
be done by formalising mining activities and promoting the adoption of private sector
codes of conduct which would prohibit child labour18; promoting legislation that shows
public determination to eliminate child labour and provide the legal basis to support
projects, and strengthening the capacities of organisations and institutions that can take
appropriate action and continuously monitor the situation both during and after the
Programme ends.



18
  The regulation on child labour is established in the Code of Minor and in the labour Legislation. The
mining legislation does not include specific regulations on the work of children. Therefore, the Code of
Conduct would encourage companies to interpret the labour legislation as also prohibiting child labour;
and to define self-inspection mechanisms and controls to verify this commitment.



                                                                                                           15
The third line of action is to develop and implement projects to prevent and effectively
withdraw 3.050 children from mining. The award of school support 19 to ensure school
attendance and the promotion of market-oriented income-earning activities for their
immediate families would be important means to achieve this. Lessons learned from
each Programme action will be used/adapted to other areas of the country.

a) Institutional capacity building

Child labour in the mining sector is neglected because of the lack of capacity and
knowledge to develop an effective methodology, and to enable public and private
institutions to prepare and put policies, Programmes, and activities aimed at its
elimination into practice.

The Programme will therefore concentrate its efforts on strengthening public and private
institutions (Employers’ and Workers’ Organisations, Municipalities, Ministries of Labour,
Education and Health, MINERCOL, NGOs) through meetings, seminars and training
workshops on topics such as: legislation, international conventions, intervention
methodology and the policies of ILO/IPEC on the administrative and financial
Programme management.

A Sub-Committee on Child Labour in the Traditional Mining Sector will be formed within
the National Commission for the Elimination of Child labour. The sub-committee will take
into account the guidelines of the National Plan of Action (2000-2002) and will report to
the National Commission on progress and results of efforts to eliminate child labour. Its
members will be drawn from MINERCOL, the Instituto Colombiano de Bienestar Familiar
(The Colombian National Institute of Family Welfare), the Ministries of Labour, Health
and Education, local NGOs, and the IPEC National Programme Coordinator.

 Awareness raising and cultural transformation

One of the causes of child labour is the traditional belief in some communities that the
participation of children in work plays an important role in character formation and work
discipline. A social and institutional change in attitude must be promoted to counteract
this belief. Activities will highlight the problems in the sector, the reality of children
engaged in mining, the causes and consequences of their work, and the need to
eliminate child labour. The Programme will feature three types of action:

       First, a national campaign will be launched to provide clear messages on the risks of
        child labour and the rights of children, particularly with regard to education. For this
        purpose the Programme will prepare and finance TV spots, radio messages, didactic
        materials and workshops aimed at teachers/professors, families and children in general.
       Second, at the local level (in the zones of intervention), the campaigns will be specifically
        designed, in consultation with all the stakeholders concerned, for the Programme’s
        beneficiary children and families. Campaigns will explain the risks of child labour in
        mining and the relevance of education for the child’s future economic and social
        opportunities. Radio spots will also reach the general public in the intervention zones
19
     The award of school support will be in kind: educational materials, transport, uniforms, etc.



                                                                                                     16
       through messages and programmes explaining the negative effects of child labour, not
       only for the children themselves, but also their families and local communities, as well as
       society in general.
      Finally, several awareness-raising materials (videos, posters, and informational
       newsletters) will be prepared and disseminated on a large scale among the Programme’s
       beneficiaries.

For the preparation and technical design of campaign materials, IPEC will rely on
specialised institutions such as advisory service centres, journalists, and local
organisations experienced in similar programmes. Implementing Agencies and other
organisations involved in the IPEC Programme will of course be associated with this
exercise.

b) Legalisation of the mining sector and adoption of Codes of Conduct prohibiting
child labour.

 Legalising the mining sector

In general, obtaining a license for small-scale mining presents insurmountable
obstacles, which condemn most of the mines to informality and illegality (70% of small-
scale mines in Colombia are informal and illegal20) and increase work risks. Obstacles
often arise from disagreements concerning the concession or ownership of the mines;
the lack of legal status of the mining communities (the land they inhabit); the lack of
labour safety and hygiene21; difficulties in accessing and/or communicating with the
mining site; and violence-related security problems in Colombia.

Mining licenses are granted by MINERCOL. Although MINERCOL should be working on
preventing illegal mining, it lacks sufficient capacity to carry out labour inspection in the
small scale and traditional mining activities. In reality, therefore, labour inspection only
covers the formal sector. The legalisation of the mining activity will introduce important
benefits to the mining communities since it lets them get the legal status of the mining
concessions, credit facilities and improve the commercialisation level.

The Programme will facilitate a mining legalisation agreement with MINERCOL and the
Ministry of Labour, which will involve an institutional guidance and supervision
component. This will help managers/owners of informal mines to become eligible for
legalisation, i.e. to fulfil the officially established22 technical, economic, social and
environmental (TESA) criteria. These criteria include aspects such as: appropriate low-
cost technology, occupational health and safety, environmental protection and use of
non-polluting products, social community organisation and legal working conditions.


20
   Social and labour issues in small-scale mines. The International labour Organization, Geneva, 1999.
21
   Problems originated because of the lack of ventilation of the mines, lack of geological studies, lack of
training on use of explosives, insufficient use of protective masks.
22
    TESA (technical, economic, social and environmental) criteria agrees with the diagnosis of the
difficulties of informal mining mentioned earlier (legalization of the mines, legal capacity of the
communities, safety, occupational health)



                                                                                                        17
Starting with the target areas of the Programme, MINERCOL will provide financial and
technical support23 for this, legalising those that fulfil the criteria.

MINERCOL will be responsible for providing legal and technical assistance to miners
working illegally to convert their operations into formal enterprises or co-operative
associations.

The results of the legalisation procedures and experiences will be systematically
documented, analysed, put into a computerised database and made available to all
Programme participants. A manual will be drawn up to facilitate replication of the
legalisation of small mines to other mining areas in the country.

 Codes of conduct

The adoption of a socially responsible code of conduct will be promoted within trade
unions, trade associations, and the small mining units, particularly those participating in
the Programme. The code will discourage the hiring of children in any mining production
process.

The code will be initiated by the National Committee for the Elimination of Child Labour ,
after consultation and with inputs from members of the Sub-Committee on Child labour
in Traditional Mining, and Implementing Agencies of the Programme. MINERCOL, as
the official institution in charge of regulating mining activities in the country, will be
responsible for its implementation24. This responsibility will include establishing contact
with companies, mining associations, Local Committees and the Programme’s
implementing and cooperating agencies to explain the stipulations and content of the
code as well as promoting its adoption by all such authorities.

c) Direct Action Programmes for prevention and effective withdrawal of children
from mining work

This activity aims at implementing four interventions at the local level to prevent and to
withdraw children from mining work in target areas of the Programme. Direct Action
Programmes will be developed in the following areas and will comprise components
listed in items (a) and (b) below:


                                    AREAS OF INTERVENTION
Department          Boyacá          Boyacá       Chocó       Cundinamarca
Municipalities      Sogamoso        Muzo         Condoto     Nemocón
Minerals            Coal            Emerald      Gold        Clay




23 See   section 5.3 National Contribution
24 See   section 7 monitoring and following up



                                                                                         18
 Project components

a. Improvement of social services

Education: One of the main weapons in the struggle against child labour is quality
education. In traditional mining sites, the availability of primary school education is
limited25 where the educational infrastructure is poor, teaching staff limited and the
curricula does not meet the reality of the mining children’s lives. Having to combine work
and school is also a double burden for the children.

The Action Programmes will address the educational component in local communities
as follows:

Formal Education: IPEC will establish an agreement with the Ministry of Education to
increase the number of teachers at schools in the targeted areas. This agreement will
not only cover the primary school level but also the secondary level to ensure the
continuation of the children’s’ education. School support will be granted (in-kind) to
cover items such as school fees, nutrition and school materials: (books, stationary,
furniture and scholar library). The Programme will improve schools by providing
classroom equipment, school libraries, and water and electricity units. The main
beneficiaries will be children between the ages of 6 and 14. Activities will be co-
ordinated with the Programme’s Implementing Agencies who will work jointly with
teachers and recipient families.

Vocational Training: The beneficiary group, minors between the ages of 14 and 18, will
be selected from the local communities. The National Learning Service (SENA) will
execute the programmes, under an agreement with IPEC26. In consultation with the
main stakeholders, SENA will design appropriate vocational training proposals27 for
adolescents identified by Implementing Agencies. This agreement will incorporate
beneficiaries into some of the regular courses they offer. The design will include an
assessment of market demand and an assessment of the trainees’ areas of potential.
To ensure that beneficiaries fully participate in vocational training, the Programme will
provide them with school support to cover enrolment fees and the transportation to the
course centres.

Health: To ensure adequate provision of health services in the target areas, the IPEC
Programme will establish an agreement with the Ministry of Health and will finance basic
health equipment, essential medicines, and electric and water units. The Programme will
also work with the Ministry of Health to guarantee that these services continue once the
intervention has concluded.
25
   As mentioned before, even though education is compulsory and free by constitution, parents still have to
pay enrolement fees and school materials which can be an obstacle to sending their children to school.
26
    SENA is a public organization responsible for professional training in Colombia. The SENA’s
Administrative Committee is made up of representatives from Ministries of Labor and Education, Workers
and Employers’ Organizations.
27
   Some of them, properly orientated, could become mechanics, electricians, workers in the food industry,
carpenters or computer experts.



                                                                                                        19
The health staff from these target areas will develop health promotion and disease
prevention campaigns for the communities, an individual medical follow-up process for
beneficiary children, early pregnancy and childbearing health care, primary health care,
dental care and the forwarding of urgent cases to the nearest public hospital.

Improvement of family income: In line with its aim of encouraging families to remove
their children from mining work and give priority to their education, the Programme will
help increase family income in the following ways:

Increased efficiency and productivity of the mining system: To prevent the need for child
labour in tasks related to ore extraction and to improve security conditions and
productivity levels of miners above the age of 18. These beneficiaries will be educated
and trained28 in special workshops, demonstrations and on-the-job application will be
provided to learn how to use appropriate mining techniques. Introduced technologies will
include: mechanical ore extraction systems, small ore processing micro plants, brick
burning furnaces, and clay processing and drying equipment. The Programme will enter
into cooperation agreements with experienced research centres (COLCIENCIAS) 29 to
introduce, and where necessary adapt, these technologies.

Diversification of economic activities: After conducting studies, determining the
economic feasibility of existing products and identifying new-market orientations, two
types of interventions will be considered:

      Production workshops: In each target community a group will be chosen
       according to the following criteria: mothers of beneficiary children; heads of
       household; existing skills and abilities; enrolment of their children in full-time
       school; and a formal undertaking with the Local Committee stating that they will
       not allow their children to work. Production workshops will be set up for activities
       identified by the feasibility studies as having good market potential. The
       Programme will provide skills training, production equipment, and help to trade
       the resulting products. Local NGOs selected by the Programme will be
       responsible for the development of these initiatives.
       Priority will be given to improving existing income-earning activities where there is
       proven market demand or to developing new activities, if possible based on
       existing skills that can be updated. New skills will be developed when existing
       activities have shown to be unfeasible or where alternative procedures provide
       better income possibilities to meet families’ basic needs.

      Micro credits: This component will be geared towards adult beneficiaries in the
       target zones, selected according to criteria established on a priority basis. Such


28
   It will cover aspects such as: use of personal protective equipment, ventilation ducts, explosive
handling, safe use of mercury.
29
   “Comisión Nacional de Investigación y Ciencia” (National Commission for Research and Science), is a
public institution responsible for Research and Technology Development in Colombia.



                                                                                                     20
       criteria will include the following: women in production groups set up under the
       Programme; families with a large number of children working30; people with lower
       incomes whose proposals are economically viable and who have basic skills for
       these. NGOs will be responsible for the management of micro credits and for
       training the beneficiaries in savings and the successful use of the credit for
       productive activities.

       The micro-credit facility will be set up according to IPEC’s regulations31. It will
       include a revolving fund to enable the refund of credits and increased coverage of
       beneficiaries. The management of the fund will be transferred to the selected
       grassroots organisations in order to ensure that the micro-credit lending process
       continues after the end of the IPEC Programme.

       PROJECT COMPONENTS
                 COMPONENT                    ELEMENTS OF THE              TYPE OF IMPLEMENTING
                                                COMPONENT                   PARTNER PROPOSED

                                            Awareness raising and         Ministry of Labour
         Capacity building                   cultural changes              MINERCOL
                                            Institutional strengthening   National Committee
                                                                           NGOs


         Legalisation of mining and         Legalisation of mining        MINERCOL
         adoption of Codes of               Codes of Conduct and the      Employers’ organisations
         Conduct prohibiting child           label                         Ministry of Labour
         labour


         Direct Action Programmes           Improvement of social         NGOs
         for prevention and effective        services: Education,
         withdrawal of children from         Health
         mining work                        Improvement of family
                                             income: Increased
                                             efficiency and productivity
                                             of the mining system
                                            Diversification of economic
                                             activities



Inspection and child labour monitoring

This section will be presented in three parts: the composition and characteristics of the
monitoring team; the monitoring team’s work plan and the activities it will develop; and

30They will make the commitment of withdrawing their children from work.
31
 The guidelines used by IPEC program for micro credits deal with the following issues: account
management, amortisation term, repayment, beneficiary selection, and use of revolving funds.



                                                                                                      21
the type of information gathered, its analysis and possible measures to be taken in
response to the report results.

(1) Monitoring Team Composition and characteristics: Given the multidisciplinary
characteristics of this Programme, the team will be made up of monitors from labour,
economic-legal and social areas. Its composition will be the following:

   -   A monitor from the Ministry of labour, or a Labour Inspector, who is specialised
       and trained in child labour issues.
   -   A monitor from MINERCOL appointed by its Board of Directors and specialised in
       legalisation-legalisation processes.
   -   A monitor from the Ministry of Education.
   -   A monitor from the Ministry of Health.
   -   A monitor from the Colombian NGOs Coordination entity.
   -   The National Programme Coordinator of the Programme or a person designated
       by him or her.

(2) Activities to be developed: Once the team is formed, a detailed work schedule will
be made and will include the following elements:

   -   Areas to visit: the three regions where interventions will be carried out.
   -   Frequency of visits. As a general guide, each monitoring team would make a visit
       every three months for the duration of the Programme. The visits will be
       unannounced and aim at verifying the education and health components as well
       as the working conditions and the legalisation of the mining activities
   -   Aspects to be monitored and responsibilities:

       - Labour. The labour inspector will be in charge of supervising the labour
       participation with regard to the mineral extraction activity, its processing and
       transport. The inspector will draw reports and gather data on children who take
       part of these activities.
       - Legal Mining. The representative of MINERCOL will study the legal aspects
       related to mining companies, licenses, the use of explosives, environmental
       conditions, and the legalisation process.
       - Education. The representative from the Ministry of Education will visit the
       schools and record school enrolment information, school drop out rates, and
       quality of the teachers training. He/she will also assess school support, library
       systems and aspects related to the educational infrastructure and school
       equipment.
       - Health. The representative from the Ministry of Health will visit local public
       health care centres, supervise the primary health care provided to children
       beneficiaries of the Programme, as well as the prevention and immunisation
       campaigns and the transfer of emergency cases to hospitals. The health
       representative will also critically examine the infrastructure and equipment used
       and the performance of the medical staff of the health centres.




                                                                                      22
- NGOs. The representative of the NGOs will establish approaches with local
NGOs participating in the Programme.                He/she will also assess their
Programme’s performance, the level of beneficiary involvement, management of
services and activities, and their staff attitude and capacity.
- The Programme Coordinator will accompany the above team members on
selected visits in order to ensure compliance with procedures for such visits and
to obtain an objective evaluation from the beneficiaries of the Programme’s
service performance.

(3) Types of information and their uses: The information compiled in
connection with the visits of the monitoring team will be organised in three
groups:

a) Reports by level of intervention. For each visit, each team member will be
   responsible for filling out cards with information on such aspects as: numbers
   and working conditions of child workers, education and health information on
   them, and activities of local NGOs. A standard form will be prepared for each
   component by the NPC, in consultation with all concerned.
b) General Reports: All data contained in the records will be included in a
   Consolidated Report for each visit summarising the most outstanding aspects.
   The report will have an evolutionary configuration that will measure the
   progression or regression observed from one visit to the next. A standard
   format will be prepared by the NPC, in consultation with all concerned.
c) Computerised Database. All information from the specific and the general
   reports will be included in a simple computerised database. The Programme
   NPC will design, manage and control this database.

The information described above will be published and disseminated to the
   following:

      The Sub-Committee on the Elimination of Child labour in Mining to enable
       it to formulate effective measures according to the results or problems
       encountered.
      At the sector level, the NPC will submit the relevant reports and
       recommendations to the qualified authorities so that the measures can be
       taken to: extend labour inspection coverage; improve the legalisation
       system; encourage greater technical and financial support from the
       Ministries of Education and Health; strengthen the capacities of local
       NGOs.
      The donor as part of the periodic reports submitted by ILO.




                                                                               23
         3.2. OBJECTIVES - INDICATORS
           DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE                  To contribute to the elimination and prevention of child
                                                  labour in the traditional mining sector in Colombia
                IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVE                      INDICATORS                         MEANS OF
                                                                                          VERIFICATION
                                                                                   (If it can be determined at
                                                                                           design stage)

           I/O 1: Strengthened national           Integration of child labour in      National Committee’s
           capacities to formulate and            mining in the agenda of the          acts.
           implement policies, programs, and      National Commission for
           activities aimed at eliminating and    the Elimination of Child            Official documents of
           preventing child labour in the         labour and of the key                key organizations
           traditional mining sector of           Colombian organizations in           (public sector, NGOs,
           Colombia.                              the sector.                          workers’ and
                                                                                       employer’s
                                                                                       organizations).
           Component: Capacity building
                                                  Number of key                       Seminars and
                                                  organizations that have              workshops
                                                  received training or other           attendance lists
                                                  type of direct benefits from
                                                  IPEC

           I/O 2 1,647 children removed from      Number of children under         Tracking system: follow
           work in mining activities and 1,570    18 years removed from            up sheet of each
           prevented from starting working.       hazardous work in small-         beneficiary
           This will be accomplished through      scale mining (target: 1,647)
           the provision of social services and
           the development and generation of      Number of children under         Tracking system: follow-
           viable economic alternatives for the   18 years prevented from          up sheet of each
           families.                              starting work in the small-      beneficiary.32
                                                  scale mining sector (target:
           Component: Direct Action               1,570).
           Programmes for prevention and
           effective withdrawal of children       Number of children               Certificates of enrolment
           from mining work                       supplied with non-formal or      of non-formal education
                                                  basic literacy education         centres (and attendence
                                                  (target: 824)                    records to measure if
                                                                                   children are actually
                                                                                   benefiting from
                                                                                   increased access to
                                                                                   education).
                                                  Number of children with          Tracking system: follow-
                                                  safer working conditions         up sheet of each
                                                  and shorter working hours        beneficiary.
                                                  (target: 666)



32
 The tracking system will include follow-up sheets for both working children and children at risk. The
monitoring system will provide information on working and schooling status for all the targeted children.



                                                                                                              24
                                                     Number of children               Tracking system: follow-
                                                     supplied with legal aid          up sheet of each
                                                                  33
                                                     (target 650)                     beneficiary.

                                                     Number of children ages          Enrolment certificates of
                                                     14-18 enrolled in vocational     vocational training centres
                                                     training (target: 666)           (and attendence
                                                                                      records)
                                                     Targeted children ages 5 to      Enrolment certificates of
                                                     14 enrolled in the education     education institutions
                                                     system (target: 100%).           (and attendence
                                                                                      records)
                                                     Beneficiary children that        Registries of Health
                                                     have access to health care       Centres
                                                     centres (target: 100%).
                                                     Targeted children                Registries of Health
                                                     participating in the             Centres
                                                     immunisation and health
                                                     prevention campaigns
                                                     (target: 100%).
                                                     Number of adolescents                Programme
                                                     between 14 and 18 years               monitoring system
                                                     that receive school support
                                                     to participate in vocational
                                                     training courses (target:
                                                     100%).
                                                     Number of mines legalised            MINERCOL registry
           I/O 3: The mines in the zones of          as a result of the
           intervention are legalised and            Programme
           socio-economic models are                 Number of families                   Attendance Acts of
           established so that families are          benefiting from basic                 literacy training
           motivated and committed to remove         literacy training (target:            centres
           their children from work.                 545)
                                                                                          Follow-up and
                                                     Number of families                    management sheets
                                                     benefiting from income                of the micro credits
           Component: Legalisation of mining         generating activities and/or          schemes
           and adoption of Codes of Conduct          micro credits (target: 545).
           prohibiting child labour                                                       Meeting Acts of
                                                     Number of parents’ group              parents groups
                                                     formed (target: 10)
                                                                                          Meeting Acts of self-
                                                     Number of self-help groups            help groups
                                                     formed (target: 10)




33
   The project helps to regulate the childre’s legal situation because very often there does not exist any
official registration of the children or there are no birth certificates, which will later impede their access to
basic social services.



                                                                                                                    25
3.3. OUTPUTS and ACTIVITIES

 DEVELOPMENT             To contribute to the elimination and prevention of child labour in the
 OBJECTIVE               traditional mining sector in Colombia
    IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES                     OUTPUTS                         ACTIVITIES
 I/O 1: Strengthened national          1.1. A “Sub-Committee      1.1.1. Undertake negotiations with
 institutions to formulate and         for the Elimination of     relevant public and private
 implement policies, programmes        Child Labour in            institutions and with the members
 and activities aimed at eliminating   Traditional Mining”        of the National Commission to
 and preventing child labour in the    created and in             promote the creation of the Sub-
 traditional mining sector of          operation (integrated      Committee.
 Colombia                              in the National
                                       Commission for the         1.1.2. Convene at least four
                                       Elimination of Child       meetings of the Sub-Committee
 Component: Capacity building          Labour).                   for the Elimination of Child Labour
                                                                  in Traditional Mining. The
                                                                  NPNPCwill be in charge of
                                                                  convening the meetings,
                                                                  presenting a report on
                                                                  Programme implementation, and
                                                                  summarising the minutes.
                                       1.2. Relevant NGOs,        1.2.1. Conduct national
                                       trade unions,              workshops with NGOs on the
                                       employer’s                 child-mining problem (planning,
                                       organizations and          implementation, management,
                                       public officials trained   and evaluation of projects) and on
                                       on issues linked to        the need of its elimination.
                                       child labour elimination
                                                                  1.2.2. Conduct workshops with
                                                                  workers’ organizations on child
                                                                  labour in the mining sector and
                                                                  some possible intervention
                                                                  strategies.
                                                                  1.2.3. Conduct workshops for
                                                                  employers’ organisations to
                                                                  motivate them to adopt the Codes
                                                                  of Conduct related to mining
                                                                  activities in the country.
                                                                  1.2.4. Conduct workshops for
                                                                  officials: members of the National
                                                                  Commission for the Elimination of
                                                                  Child Labour and the Sub-
                                                                  Committee on Child Labour in
                                                                  Traditional Mining; officials of the
                                                                  Ministries of Education, Health
                                                                  and Labour; officials of
                                                                  MINERCOL.. The objective will be
                                                                  to raise awareness and to
                                                                  improve the effectiveness of their
                                                                  contributions to the Programme.




                                                                                                  26
                                                                1.2.5. Organise a regional
                                                                meeting with the participation of
                                                                representatives from institutions
                                                                associated with the Programme
                                                                and representatives from
                                                                institutions associated to the
                                                                “Programme for the elimination
                                                                and prevention of child labour in
                                                                traditional gold mining in South
                                                                America” in order to exchange
                                                                experiences and methodologies.
I/O 2: 1,647 children removed         2.1. 1,490 children and   2.1.1. Award IPEC school support
from work in mining activities and    adolescents linked to     to the Programme’s target
1,570 prevented from starting         the traditional mining    children between the ages of 5
working. This will be                 sector receiving formal   and 14, covering school materials
accomplished through the              education or              and food expenses as well as
provision of social services and      vocational training       sport and didactic materials for
the development and generation                                  recreational activities during
of viable economic alternatives for                             holidays.
the families.
                                                                2.1.2. Negotiate with the National
Component: Direct Action                                        Service of Learning (SENA) the
Programmes for prevention and                                   organisation of vocational training
effective withdrawal of children                                courses for adolescents in the
from mining work                                                areas of the project
                                                                2.1.3. Award IPEC school support
                                                                to adolescents between the ages
                                                                of 14 and 18 to attend vocational
                                                                training courses.
                                      2.2. Four schools in      2.2.1. Create a school library in
                                      the intervention areas    each four schools in the chosen
                                      better equipped to        communities. The libraries will
                                      provide quality           include scholarly texts and
                                      education to children     materials for elementary and high
                                                                school level students.
                                                                2.2.2.. Construct a water tank and
                                                                rest room facilities in each of the
                                                                four schools in the local
                                                                communities.
                                                                2.2.3. Review curricula, make
                                                                necessary changes, and train
                                                                teachers to use these.




                                                                                                27
2.3. Improved health        2.3.1. Coordinating and
and nutrition               negotiating with the Ministry of
conditions for all          Health and other departments and
beneficiary children        municipalities to obtain improved
available in the four       health facilities and medical
communities.                services in target areas
                            (infrastructure, materials and
                            staff).


                            2.3.2 Implement and/or support
                            the school meals in collaboration
                            with Ministries of Education,
                            Health and Family Welfare, other
                            departments and municipalities.
                            2.3.3. Set up a preventive
                            immunisation campaign, including
                            check-ups and preventive health
                            through agreements between
                            local health care centres and the
                            Ministry of Health.
2.4. A system to            2.4.1. Conduct market studies to
promote the                 determine feasibility of present
generation of               income-earning activities of
additional income for       beneficiaries’ families, and to
parents of working          identify other market-oriented
children (including         activities that would result in
micro-credit and            improving their income.
training) in place in the
four communities.           2.4.2. Identify existing products,
                            capacities and skills of beneficiary
                            family members and needs for
                            training and other related actions
                            to improve these, or to reorient to
                            new activities.
                            2.4.3. Analyse the capacity of
                            NGOs to manage a micro-credit
                            facility, and their needs for
                            management and other training to
                            effectively implement this facility.
                            This analysis will include their
                            ability to offer technical assistance
                            to borrowers.
                            2.4.4. Devise a regulatory system
                            for micro-credits.
                            2.4.5. Select and train NGOs for
                            their role in managing the micro-
                            credit facility and in offering
                            relevant technical assistance to
                            borrowers.




                                                             28
                            2.4.6. Grant micro-credits to
                            target families (see section on
                            production workshops, under item
                            b. of section 2.3) as part of the
                            economic initiatives development
                            of the Programme
                            2.4.7. Based on the outcome of
                            the feasibility studies set up at
                            least 12 production workshops to
                            address the income needs of
                            parents, particularly single
                            mothers of child workers. Local
                            NGOs will be responsible for the
                            operation and organisation of
                            such workshops. The IPEC
                            Programme will finance the
                            equipment and facilities needed to
                            set these up.
2.5. Technological          2.5.1. Select and contract
alternatives to improve     specialised technological centres
working conditions and      to Identify, adapt and introduce
income of miners and        technological alternatives, in
to eliminate the need       association with MINERCOL and
for child labour,           chosen NGOs.
especially in the most
hazardous processes         2.5.2. On-the-Job training of the
of traditional mining, in   miners to use the new
place in the four           technologies. MINERCOL will be
communities                 responsible for providing
                            technological assistance.
2.6. Models,                2.6.1. Create a video and a
experiences and             publication of each intervention
methodologies for the       that systematise the strategy and
prevention and              the impact achieved during the
elimination of child        programme.
labour available for
dissemination in other      2.6.2. Carry out a final
areas of the country        assessment of each intervention
                            project.
                            2.6.3. Create and regularly update
                            a file for each intervention project.
                            2.6.4. Disseminate all the
                            aforementioned materials to all
                            participant institutions of the
                            Programme as well as other
                            national and international
                            institutions that might be
                            interested and/or involved in the
                            fight against child labour.




                                                             29
          I/O 3: The mines in the zones of     3.1. Conditions to           3.1.1 Production of a report on the
          intervention are legalised and       facilitate legalisation of   technical, economic, social,
          socio-economic models are            mines in the                 environmental and legal viability
          established so that families are     intervention areas           of legalisation the mining units in
          motivated and committed to           secured.                     the four selected areas
          remove their children from work.                                  (responsibility: MINERCOL).
                                                                            3.1.2 Training and provision of
                                                                            legal and technical assistance to
                                                                            miners working illegally to convert
          Component: Legalisation of                                        their operations into formal
          mining and adoption of Codes of                                   enterprises or co-operative
          Conduct prohibiting child labour                                  associations. MINERCOL will be
                                                                            responsible for providing this kind
                                                                            of assistance through its legal and
                                                                            technical departments.
                                               3.2. A Code of conduct       3.2.1. Developing of a draft Code
                                               prohibiting the use of       of Conduct (IPEC, in collaboration
                                               child labour in the          with MINERCOL and other
                                               productive mining            institutions) The Code will be
                                               process elaborated           adopted by informal
                                               with and agreed on by        entrepreneurs, mining
                                               all stakeholders.            communities and formal
                                                                                                           34
                                                                            enterprises at national level.
                                                                            3.2.2. Conduct informal
                                                                            awareness raising campaigns
                                                                            targeting mining enterprises,
                                                                            employers’ associations, formal
                                                                            co-operative societies and
                                                                            community leaders to explain the
                                                                            benefits of the adoption of the
                                                                            Code of Conduct (responsibility:
                                                                            MINERCOL)
                                               3.3. A product label         3.3.1. Design of a product label
                                               issued by MINERCOL           identifying enterprises that do not
                                               designed and awarded         use child labour in mining
                                               to all companies             activities (responsibility:
                                               fulfilling all the           MINERCOL).
                                               requirements set in the
                                               Code of Conduct              3.3.2. Inspection visits to the sites
                                                                            to identify companies / enterprises
                                                                            to be awarded the product label
                                                                            (responsibility: MINERCO and the
                                                                            Ministry of Labour).




34
  It is the final aim to ensure that associated entrepreneurs, mining cooperations or formal companies
adopt this code, renouncing the utilization of child labour (under 18 years) in the mining sector.



                                                                                                             30
3.4. ASSUMPTIONS


   The mining communities accept the legalisation of the mines.

   The mines in the areas of intervention are legalized.




                                                                   31
4. INSTITUTIONAL AND MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

4.1. Institutional Arrangement

The guide lines of this Programme have been discussed with the National Committee
and included in the work plan which is incorporated in the National Plan of Action for the
eradication of child labour. The national contributions were already approved by the
administrative staff of MINERCOL.

In June, a National Workshop will be held in Bogota to present the baseline surveys
already done with USDOL support and establish a work plan for the Programme. This
workshop will be organised by IPEC, who will invite representatives from the main public
institutions (Ministry of Labour, Education, Health, MINERCOL, ICBF), workers’ and
employers’ organisation and NGOs.


4.2. Collaborating and Implementing Institutions and Responsibilities

Collaborating Agencies

The following entities will participate in the Programme’s different activities:

Ministry of Health will be responsible for the provision of health care, the promotion
and prevention to services to the beneficiary groups of children in the areas of
intervention. The provision of these services will be based on the agreements mentioned
in the chapter on strategy on the continuation of funding the services once the
Programme terminates.

Ministry of Education will participate in the Programme by developing educational
services described in the section on strategy (i.e. enough primary schools and teachers,
adjustment of curricula to match students’ needs, and adequate basic classroom
materials, furniture, water and electricity) for areas targeted by the Programme. In the
beginning, the Programme will contribute to these expenses but the Ministry of
Education is expected to take over these expenses by the end of the Programme, so
that the services continue to be maintained at the same level. The Ministry will also
establish secondary schools in the zones of intervention.

Colombian Institute for Family Welfare (ICBF) is responsible for child-related policies
in Colombia. In cooperation with the Programme, it will develop activities in local
communities in the zones of intervention. More specifically, the Institute will design
programmes which will focus on nutritional and recreational needs (including school
meals and nutrition workshops) of the Programme’s beneficiary children.

Workers’ Organisations will contribute to the Programme through their on-going
participation in the National Commission for the Elimination of Child Labour. They will



                                                                                        32
also contribute to the prevention and elimination of child labour in mining, through the
development of awareness-raising activities amongst their affiliates (mine workers, who
many of them have children workers, and other workers) and in the development of the
Code of Conduct.

Employers’ Organisations will contribute to the Programme through their on-going
participation in the National Association of Industrialists (ANDI) and the National
Commission for the Elimination of Child labour. In addition, they will help in the
development of the Code of Conduct and its implementation among their members. For
this reason, they will be part of the planned Sub-Committee for the Elimination of Child
labour in Traditional Mining.

Implementing Agencies

The implementing and collaborating agencies will work under the direct management
and supervision of the NPC of the IPEC Programme. They will perform the following
tasks:

MINERCOL

This is a national public company responsible for legal regulation and re-structuring
mining activity in Colombia in order to provide the required modernisation in this sector.
MINERCOL participates actively in the National Commission for the Elimination of Child
Labour created in 1997. Since 1999, MINERCOL has developed and implemented
activities to eradicate child labour in the mining sector. It has recently committed both
financial and staff resources to participation in the IPEC Programme35. Its role in the
Programme will be, jointly with the Ministry of Labour, to regulate and formalise the
traditional mining; application of the Code of Conduct; granting of a Product label;
provision of technical assistance relating to the above, as well as the introduction of
appropriate technologies.

Ministry of Labour

This Ministry presides over the National Commission for the Elimination of Child labour
and is therefore expected to play an important part in the Programme through this
structure. In addition, its labour Inspectors will participate in the mixed monitoring teams
that will be created to supervise the withdrawal of children from the areas of intervention
(see chapter on Monitoring).

Coordinator of Colombian Non-Governmental Organisations

The Coordinator of Colombian Non-Governmental Organisations is a non-profit civil
entity that speaks for the majority of NGOs in the country. Its role will be to implement

35
   To date, MINERCOL finances some previous data collection activities in the areas of intervention where
the child is employed. The proposal is prepared to be submitted to the Board of Directors as a counterpart
to the IPEC program for 1.2 millions of dollars.


                                                                                                       33
the activities on awareness raising and cultural transformation, as well as its
participation in the National Committee.

Local Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs)

There are no established NGOs in the areas of intervention due to difficulties of access
and security problems. IPEC has made contact with many national NGOs, inviting them
to participate in the Programme’s different activities. A possible list of participants is
CENSAT, CONSUDESARROLLO, La Corporación Minuto de Dios, CORPOSOL,
Defensa de Niños Internacional (DNI), COOPTRABAJO, ICONOS and SOCOLPE.
These NGOs have developed various initiatives related to child labour in other parts of
the country (e.g. in markets, agricultural activities) some in collaboration with IPEC in
Colombia.

The role of these NGOs in the Programme will be to develop and execute Action
Programmes in intervention areas.


4.3. Project Management

A National Programme Coordinator (NPC) will be appointed to manage the Programme
during a period of 24 months, located in Bogotá (Colombia). The NPC will work in close
coordination with the Sub-Regional Coordinator of IPEC in Lima.

The NPC will be responsible for the Programme’s political and institutional aspects as
well as its technical and financial management, planning of activities, follow-up action,
and counterpart training programmes.

An administrative assistant will perform logistic, documentary and financial control and
follow-up functions inherent to the Programme.

The small-scale mining project in Colombia will be included in the general mining project
scheme, which is being developed in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia to create better synergy
between the four projects.




                                                                                        34
5. INPUTS

5.1. Inputs provided by the donor


In addition to project staff, office equipment, documentation, training workshops,
evaluations and media programmes, donor funds will be used to finance preparatory
activities (workshop), and bring together various stakeholders to develop the
Programme described in this document.


Other key inputs worth mentioning here and referred to in various parts of the text are:
production workshops for selected family members of beneficiary children; a micro-credit
and revolving fund facility to enable such production workshops to function effectively;
fellowships to enable these very poor children beneficiaries to attend school and
abandon work; basic equipment of schools and health centres in the project zones to
facilitate necessary basic health and psycho-social care; basic appropriate technology to
improve productivity of miners in the Programme areas and thus avoid the use of
children in mining activities, especially those of a hazardous nature; one regional
workshop to exchange experiences with other Andean countries.

5.2. Inputs provided by the ILO

In addition to backstopping and advisory services to the Programme by Headquarters
and field staff, ILO will also test methodologies, study reports and technical papers
related to child labour. Legal expertise concerning relevant ILO-and other International
Conventions and best practices will also be available. ILO will likewise disseminate
results and experiences of this Programme to other countries, both in the region and
elsewhere.

ILO’s close contacts with Workers’ and Employers’ Organisations will help the follow up
of the Programme after its formal termination.

Finally, ILO will contribute to the sustainability of the Programme through follow up of
relevant statistics through country labour statistics reports, and in reports on
implementation of ILO Conventions.

5.3. National Contribution

The Government of Colombia will contribute to the Programme both financially and in
kind. It will make staff and appropriate materials for training available. The relevant
government institutions will help distribute educational and information materials
produced by the Programme, as well as participate in national awareness raising
campaigns. The institutions that apply the legislation related to child labour will
contribute to the success of the Programme through: discussion and ratification of the
relevant ILO Conventions; adjustment/development of related labour legislation; making



                                                                                       35
technical inputs concerning these; releasing staff for workshops, awareness raising
campaigns, coordination meetings, etc.

In addition, a number of implementing agencies, Workers’ and Employers’ Organisations
and other entities involved in the Programme will bring some of their own resources.
Finally, local communities in Programme areas and civil society groups will participate,
either in cash or in kind, and these resources will be identified and tapped under
extended partnership arrangements, formal or informal, for instance financing the
construction of water tanks and rest rooms in schools (activity 2.2.2).


                                                                       NATIONAL
                                                                     CONTRIBUTION
AWARENESS RAISING
Awareness raising national campaigns                                        10,000
Awareness raising workshops with institutions                                7,500

Awareness raising materials (posters, videos etc)                            7,500
Publication and dissemination of assessments                                 5,000
National seminar (with NGOs, Employers, Workers, Minercol,                   5,000
Congressmen)
Subtotal Awareness Raising                                                  35,000


CAPACITY BUILDING

Training workshops with NGOs                                                 5,000
Training workshops with MINERCOL                                             2,500
Sub-regional workshop                                                       20,000
Subtotal Inst. Strengthening                                                27,500


LEGALIZATION OF MINING ACTIVITIES

Awareness raising campaigns on the advantages of the legalisation           40,000
Enterprise support and advisory                                             40,000
Business organisation                                                       40,000
Legal assistance                                                            20,000
Manual of legalisation processes                                            20,000
Manual distribution                                                         10,000
Subtotal Legalisation                                                      170,000

DIRECT ACTION
Awareness raising workshops in communities                                  12,000
Workshops with local committees                                             12,000
Education                                                                   90,000
Health                                                                      60,000
Generation of alternative income                                           120,000
Technological update/modernisation of the mining system (technical         200,000
improvements, machinery design, purchase, construction, productive
technology installation)
Technical assistance, alternative economic activity development             45,000
Subtotal Direct Action                                                     539,000


                                                                                      36
MONITORING
2 monitors                                                                                       12,750
Labour inspector                                                                                  1,500
Part-time administrative assistant                                                                1,000
1 driver                                                                                          6,375
Monitoring Training                                                                               2,000
1 vehicle                                                                                        12,500
Monitoring Subtotal                                                                              36,375

EVALUATION
Mid-term evaluation: Stakeholder’s workshop                                                       5,000
Final evaluation                                                                                 15,000
Evaluation Subtotal                                                                              20,000

SYSTEMATIZATION
Videos and publications                                                                          20,000
Subtotal Systematization                                                                         20,000

                                 GRAND TOTAL                                                   847,875


6. SUSTAINABILITY


The following are factors that will contribute to the sustainability of the Programme:

As previously mentioned, one of the main outputs of the Programme is a permanent
Sub-Committee on Child labour in Traditional Mining. This Sub-Committee will co-
ordinate its actions with the National Commission for the Elimination of Child Labour,
which has been operating in Colombia since 1995.

In its strategy, the IPEC Programme concerning small mines in Colombia will establish
clear agreements with the Ministries of Health and Education, and with the Colombian
Institute of Family Welfare. These agreements will ensure that these institutions provide
adequate technical and financial assistance through public health care centres, a
sufficient number of qualified teachers, enough elementary and high schools to cover
the school population in the Programme areas, and the provision of food and
recreational services for the beneficiaries of the Programme. Consequently, the
challenge for the Programme’s technical staff will be to obtain the commitment and
implementation of these agreements to ensure the sustainability of the Programme.

    The incorporation of specific discussions on mining child workers in the National
     Committee. Such discussions will promote the inclusion of child labour in the mining
     sector issue on a medium-term basis in the National Plans of Action36. This will result
     in the flow of stable technical and financial resources toward the ultimate goal of
     preventing and eliminating child labour in the mining sector.

36
   National Action Plans are prepared with IPEC methodology and developed based on the objectives, activities, and
resources that public and private institutions dedicate to the elimination of child labour.


                                                                                                               37

    The programme will continue discussions with the Ministry of Education on their
    progressive take over of the various costs and services provided by the Programme,
    such as coverage of indirect costs as school support and food supply.
   Similarly, the programme will establish agreements with the public health centres to
    ensure free permanent primary care and prevention and health promotion services
    for children beneficiaries of the programme. Emphasis will be placed on establishing
    agreements with the existing health services, the training of their staff and the
    inclusion of other interested agencies.
   With regard to training for employment, agreements will be established with existing
    vocational training centres (SENA) and the Ministries of Labour and Education to
    ensure annual fellowship grants for this target group.
   The Programme will monitor closely the repayment ratio of the micro-credit fund to
    guarantee the maintenance of the fund and to analyse the possibility to increase the
    coverage of beneficiary families in the future.
   The Programme’s intensive training component that targets local Non-Governmental
    Organisations will enable these to continue to develop, monitor and evaluate similar
    programmes in the future, either with public funding or in collaboration with bilateral
    and/or multilateral donors targeting this sector.



7. PLANNING, MONITORING AND EVALUATION

IPEC-established procedures for programme planning, monitoring, reporting and
evaluation, which are based on ILO procedures for technical cooperation projects, are
used throughout the cycle of the programme.

Overall project level

A planning meeting with all partner agencies will be organised at the beginning of the
Programme. Upon completion of the baseline, a programme monitoring plan will be
prepared revising the list of indicators to ensure that indicators are detailed, quantifiable,
and result-oriented, based on the baseline and an assessment of feasibility of means of
verification. US DOL will be provided with a copy of the revised list of the indicators and
the baseline document as part of the progress reporting.

The workplan for the programme will be updated, including information on timing for the
development and implementation of action programmes and individual components. A
copy of the updated workplan will be submitted to US-DOL within one month after the
implementation of the project.

Regular review meetings will be organised with all partner agencies in order to appraise
progress, review obstacles and define strategies for improvement.

ILO will report quarterly to the donor on progress achieved, problems faced and
proposed corrective action based on programme monitoring activities and the regular
progress reports required by ILO-IPEC established procedures. This will include


                                                                                            38
reporting on indicators as established in the Programme-monitoring plan. Reporting will
be in accordance with the reporting schedule and format agreed on with the donor and
will include four Progress reports (March, June, September and December). In addition
ILO will submit detailed financial reports on a bi-annual basis.

ILO-IPEC will undertake field missions to project sites, including Action Programme
sites, to monitor programme implementation.

The NPCNPC and the IPEC Regional Adviser in consultation with the respective ILO
Area Director and IPEC headquarters may approve minor revisions of work plans and
line item allocations of partner agencies. Where it is decided that programme changes
are large enough to require revision in the approaches, strategies and outputs of the
programme document, such revisions will follow ILO/USDOL standard procedures.

A mid-term evaluation (nature to be determined by IPEC/USDOL) will be carried out as
agreed upon by the donor and ILO/IPEC. A final external evaluation will be conducted at
the end of the programme implementation. The nature of these evaluations (purpose,
timing, issues to be addressed, approach and methodology etc.) will be decided in
consultation with partners, including donors. The evaluation unit at IPEC headquarters
will coordinate the final evaluation. US DOL will receive a copy of both evaluations and
will be given the option of participating in them. US DOL will be informed of and invited
to participate in all major events related to this programme.

The National Steering Committee and related national mechanisms will be involved in
the process as appropriate, including receiving a copy of the evaluation reports.

The US DOL reserves the right to request that the ILO’s external auditor undertake a
financial audit of this project. In the eventuality that such audit is requested, additional
terms of reference governing the audit would be agreed upon by the donor and the ILO,
and attached as Addendum to this Document, and additional funds would be set aside
to meet the costs of the audit.




                                                                                          39
Action Programme Level

The implementation of the Programmes will be partly subcontracted to implementing
agencies. In line with regular ILO-IPEC procedures, formal agreements between the
implementing agency and the ILO will include an Action Programme Summary Outline
(APSO, i.e. project document in the logical framework format, together with an overall
work plan) and a detailed budget. This will be developed by the implementing agencies
in consultation with the ILO/IPEC field staff. IPEC Geneva will obtain the approval of the
relevant ILO departments. Within one month of signature of the subcontracts between
the implementing agencies and the ILO, the implementing agencies will submit a
detailed Work plan, which will include a Programme-monitoring plan.

Copies of Action Programme Summary Outlines for Action Programmes with more than
$ 100,000 budget approved in the period will be included with the technical progress
reports to US DOL.

Implementing agencies will be required to organise regular consultations with their target
groups, including at the design stage of the action programme.

Progress and financial reports and expenditure forecasts will be prepared by the
implementing agencies on a fourth-monthly basis.

Programme monitoring and self-evaluations (mid-term and final) will be carried out for
each Action Programmes by the implementing agencies according to ILO-IPEC
procedures. External evaluations of specific Action Programmes can be carried out by
mutual agreement and with provision of additional funds.

Relations with Implementing Agencies

As mentioned before, the execution of the different components of the Programme will
be partially subcontracted to Implementing Agencies who, together with ILO-IPEC, will
make summary outlines, agreements and budgets according to the procedures set forth
by ILO-IPEC. IPEC Geneva will obtain the approval of the relevant departments of the
ILO. Once the subcontracts are signed between the Implementing Agencies and the
ILO, the former will submit a detailed work plan and an expenditure estimate within three
months; disbursement by ILO will follow.

Throughout the duration of the Programme, both financial and progress reports as well
as new expense estimates will be presented to the NPCNPC by the Implementing
Agencies. Reports will be submitted on a quarterly basis if continuous monitoring and
assistance is needed, on a six-monthly basis for agencies that have proven they have
no difficulty in complying with IPEC requirements.

For each contract issued under the project, a contractor capability statement must be
provided to USDOL. The USDOL reserves the right to request that the ILO’s external
auditor undertake a financial audit of this project. In the eventuality that such an audit is


                                                                                           40
requested, additional terms of reference governing the audit would be agreed upon by
the donor and the ILO, and attached as an Addendum to this Document, and project
funds would be set aside to meet the costs of the audit.

An annual work plan will be submitted to the NPCby the Implementing Agencies, and
six-monthly review meetings convened with them to identify possible areas for
improvement of strategy, obstacles encountered and progress made to date. The
Implementing Agencies will, in turn, regularly report to the target group.




                                                                                  41
8. PROJECT/PROGRAMME WORKPLAN1 AND ACTIVITIES
               Objectives/Outputs/Activities              Start Date     Finish Date Responsible                         Remarks
    (As listed in Project Document or Summary Outline)    (planned)        (planned)         Person
  IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVE 1: Strengthened national capacities to formulate and implement policies, programmes and activities aimed at eliminating and
  preventing child labour in the traditional mining sector of Colombia

  Output 1.1: Sub-Committee for the Elimination of Child             01.12.01    30.11.03        NPC
  Labour in Traditional Mining” created and in operation
  (integrated in the National Commission for the Elimination of
  Child Labour)..

  Activity 1.1.1: Undertake negotiations with relevant public        15.01.02    15.05.02        NPC
  and private institutions and with the members of the National
  Commission to promote the creation of the Sub-Committee.
  Activity 1.1.2: Convene at least four meetings of the Sub-         15.05.02    30.11.03        NPC
  Committee for the Elimination of Child Labour in Traditional
  Mining. The NPC will be in charge of convening the meetings,
  presenting a report on Programme implementation, and
  summarising the minutes.
  Output 1.2: Relevant NGOs, trade unions, employer’s                01.03.02    01.04.03        NPC
  organizations and public officials trained on issues linked to
  child labour elimination
  Activity 1.2.1. Conduct national workshops with NGOs on the        01,03.02    01.07.02        NPC
  child-mining problem (planning, implementation, management,
  and evaluation of projects) and on the need of its elimination.
  Activity 1.2.2.Conduct workshops with workers’ organizations       01.08.02    30.08.02        NPC
  on child labour in the mining sector and some possible
  intervention strategies.
  Activity 1.2.3: Conduct workshops for employers’                   01.06.02    15.06.02        NPC
  organizations to motivate them to adopt the Codes of Conduct
  related to mining activities in the country.

       1
          Project/Program Managers should note that this is the minimum level of information required for the Donor. A more detailed WorkPlan with a month-by-month
timeline and projected and actual cost of activities should be developed for managing project implementation at the field level.



                                                                                                                                                                      42
              Objectives/Outputs/Activities                       Start Date    Finish Date    Responsible                     Remarks
  (As listed in Project Document or Summary Outline)              (planned)      (planned)       Person
Activity 1.2.4: Conduct workshops for officials: members of       Workshop 1                   NPC
the National Commission for the Elimination of Child Labour       01.04.02     05.04.02
and the Sub-Committee on Child Labour in Traditional Mining;      Workshop 2:
                                                                  01.04,03     05.04.03
officials of the Ministries of Education, Health and Labour;
officials of MINERCOL.. The objective will be to raise
awareness and to improve the effectiveness of their
contributions to the Programme.
Activity 1.2.5: Organise a regional meeting with the             01.06.02      05.06.02         NPC
participation of representatives from institutions associated
with the Programme and representatives from institutions
associated to the “Programme for the elimination and
prevention of child labour in traditional gold mining in South
America” in order to exchange experiences and
methodologies.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVE 2: 1,647 children removed from work in mining activities and 1,570 prevented from starting working. This will be
accomplished through the provision of social services and the development and generation of viable economic alternatives for the families.
Output 2.1: 1,490 children and adolescents linked to the         01.05.02      30.10.03         NPC
traditional mining sector receiving formal education or
vocational training

Activity 2.1.1: Provide school support to the                     01.05.02      30.10.03       NPC
Programme’s target children, particularly those between
the ages of 5 and 14. These This school support will
cover school materials and food expenses as well as
sport and didactic materials for recreational activities
during holidays.

Activity 2.1.2: Negotiate with the National Service of Learning   01.05.02      30.10.03       NPC
(SENA) the organisation of vocational training courses for
adolescents in the areas of the project
Activity 2.1.3: Award IPEC school support to adolescents          01.06.02      30.11.03       NPC
between the ages of 14 and 18 to attend vocational training
courses.
Output 2.2: Four schools in the intervention areas better         01.05.02      30.10.02       NPC



                                                                                                                                             43
              Objectives/Outputs/Activities                          Start Date   Finish Date   Responsible                Remarks
   (As listed in Project Document or Summary Outline)                (planned)     (planned)      Person
equipped to provide quality education to children
Activity 2.2.1: Create and install a school library in each four     01.05.02     30.10.02      NPC
schools in the chosen communities. The libraries will include
scholarly texts and materials for elementary and high school
level students.
Activity: 2.2.2:Construct a water tank and rest room facilities in   01.06.02     30.08.02      NPC           Financed with local contributions,
each of the four schools in the local communities. Nine                                                       see Chapter on inputs
schools in the local communities in order to provide electricity.
Activity: 2.2.3:Review curricula, make necessary changes, and        01.05.02     30.11.02      NPC
train teachers to use these.
Output 2.3 Improved health and nutrition conditions for all          01.02.02     30.08.03      NPC
beneficiary children ensured in the four communities.
Activity 2.3.1 Coordinating and negotiating with the Ministry        01.04.02     01.08.02      NPC
of Health and other departments and municipalities to obtain
improved health facilities and medical services in target areas
(infrastructure, materials and staff).
Activity 2.3.2 Implement and/or support the school meals in          01.03.02     30.11.03      NPC
collaboration with Ministries of Education, Health and Family
Welfare, other departments and municipalities.
Activity 2.3.3. Set up a preventive immunisation campaign,
including check-ups and preventive health through                    30.06.02     01.07.03      NPC
agreements between local health care centres and the
Ministry of Health.
Output 2.4: A system to promote the generation of additional         01.05.02     30.11.03      NPC
income for parents of working children (including micro-credit
and training) in place in the four communities.
Activity 2.4.1:Conduct market studies to determine feasibility       01.05.02     30.11.02      NPC
of present income-earning activities of beneficiaries’ families,
and to identify other market-oriented activities that would
result in improving their income.
Activity 2.4.2. Identify existing products, capacities and skills    01.05.02     30.11.02      NPC
of beneficiary family members and needs for training and
other related actions to improve these, or to reorient to new
activities.
Activity 2.4.3. Analyze the capacity of NGOs to manage a             01.01.02     30.06.02      NPC


                                                                                                                                                   44
              Objectives/Outputs/Activities                            Start Date   Finish Date   Responsible   Remarks
   (As listed in Project Document or Summary Outline)                  (planned)     (planned)      Person
micro-credit facility, and their needs for management and
other training to effectively implement this facility. This
analysis will include their ability to offer technical assistance to
borrowers.
Activity 2.4.4. Devise a regulatory system for micro-credits.          30.06.02     01.11.03      NPC
Activity 2.4.5. Select and train NGOs for their role in                01.02.02     30.06.02      NPC
managing the micro-credit facility and in offering relevant
technical assistance to borrowers.
Activity 2.4.6. Grant micro-credits to target families (see            30.06.02     01.11.03      NPC
section on production workshops, under item b. of section 2.3)
as part of the economic initiatives development of the
Programme
Activities 2.4.7. Based on the outcome of the feasibility              01.10.02     30.08.02      NPC
studies set up at least 12 production workshops to address the
income needs of mothers of child workers. Local NGOs will be
responsible for the operation and organisation of such
workshops. The IPEC Programme will finance the equipment
and facilities needed to set these up.
Output 2.5: Technological alternatives to improve working              01.05.02     30.08.03      NPC
conditions and income of miners, especially in the most
hazardous processes of traditional mining, in place in the four
communities
activity :2.5.1. Select and contract specialised technological         01.05.02     30.08.02      NPC
centres to Identify, adapt and introduce technological
alternatives, in association with MINERCOL and chosen
NGOs.
Activity 2.5.2. On-the-Job training of the miners to use the           02.09.02     30.08.03      NPC
new technologies. MINERCOL will be responsible for
providing technological assistance.
Output 2.6: Models, experiences and methodologies for the              01.06.03     30.08.03      NPC
prevention and elimination of child labour available for
dissemination in other areas of the country
Activity 2.6.1. Create a video and a publication of each               O1.08.03     01.08.03      NPC
intervention that systematise the strategy and the impact
achieved during the programme.



                                                                                                                          45
               Objectives/Outputs/Activities                Start Date     Finish Date    Responsible                   Remarks
  (As listed in Project Document or Summary Outline)        (planned)       (planned)       Person
Activity 2.6.2. Carry out a final assessment of each        O1.08.03       01.08.03       NGO
intervention project.
Activity 2.6.3.Create and regularly update a file for each       01.05.02 01.08.03      NPC
intervention project.
Activity 2.6.4. Disseminate all the aforementioned materials to 01.06.02  30.08.03      NPC
all participant institutions of the Programme as well as other
national and international institutions that might be interested
and/or involved in the fight against child labour.
IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVE 3: The mines in the zones of intervention are legalised and socio-economic models are established so that families are
motivated and committed to remove their children from work.
Output 3.1: Conditions to facilitate legalisation of mines in    01.02.02 30.11.03      Minercol
the intervention areas secured.
Activity 3.1.1 Production of a report on the technical,          01.06.02 30.10.02      Minercol
economic, social, environmental and legal viability of
formalising the mining units in the four selected areas
(responsibility: MINERCOL).
Activity 3.1.2 Training and provision of legal and technical     01-05.02 30.11.03      MINERCOL
assistance to miners working illegally to convert their
operations into formal enterprises or co-operative
associations. MINERCOL will be responsible for providing this
kind of assistance through its legal and technical departments.
Output 3.2:. A Code of conduct rejecting the use of child        01-05.02 01.10.03      NPC
labour in the productive mining process elaborated with and
agreed on by all stakeholders.
Activity 3.2.1. Developing of a draft Code of Conduct
(MINERCOL and other institutions) .                              30.04.02 01.03.03      Minercol
Activity 3.2.2. Conduct informal awareness raising campaigns 01.03.03     30.11.03      MINERCOL
targeting mining enterprises, employers’ associations, formal
co-operative societies and community leaders to explain the
benefits of the adoption of the Code of Conduct (responsibility:
MINERCOL)
Output 3.3:. A product labelproduct label issued by                                     MINERCOL
MINERCOL designed and awarded to all companies fulfilling        30.04.02 01.03.03
all the requirements set in the Code of Conduct



                                                                                                                                             46
              Objectives/Outputs/Activities                      Start Date   Finish Date   Responsible   Remarks
   (As listed in Project Document or Summary Outline)            (planned)     (planned)      Person
Activity: 3.3.1. Design of a product labelproduct label          30.04.02     01.07.02      MINERCOL
identifying enterprises that do not use child labour in mining
activities (responsibility: MINERCOL).
Activity: 3.3.2Inspection visits to the sites to identify        01.07.02     30.10.03      MINERCOL
companies / enterprises to be awarded the product
labelproduct label




                                                                                                                    47
Summary timeline chart - outputs


               2001                           2002                                            2003
             Nov-Dec   Jan-March   April-June    July-Sept   Oct-Dec   Jan-March   April-June     July-Sept   Oct-Dec
    Output
    1.1
    Output
    1.2
    Output
    2.1
    Output
    2.2
    Output
    2.3
    Output
    2.3
    Output
    2.5
    Output
    2.6
    Output
    3.1
    Output
    3.2




                                                                                                                        48
9. BUDGET
                          Budget Line                     Total                     2001                    2002                     2003
Code      Title                                   W/M        $              W/M        $            W/M        $             W/M        $
10        Project Personnel
13.01     Assistant to NPC (24w/m @ 1,875 $)       24.0            45.000     2.0           3,800    12,0           22.500    10,0           18,700
13.02     Administrative Regional Assistant         6.0            12,000                             6.0           12,000
          (6w/m @ 2,000 $)
15.01     Official Travel NPC (local)                              17,000                   3,000                    7.000                    7,000
15.02     Monitoring visits (local)                                10,000                                            4,000                    6,000
16.01     Monitoring visits (Subregional                           16,000                   3,000                    6,500                    6,500
          Coordination) - 5 intern. Missions @
          2,000$ & 1 mission from HQ @ 6,000$
16.50     Mid Term Evaluation                                       5,000                                            5,000
16.50     Final Evaluation                                         15,000                                                                    15,000
17.01     NPC (24 w/m @ 3,687 $)                   24,0            88,491                   7,294                   44,097                   37,100
17.03     Legal Specialist (2 w/m @ 1,500$)         2.0             3,000                             2.0            3,000
17.50     Micro Credit Specialist (8 w/m @          8.0            16,000                             4.0           11,000     4.0            8.000
          2,000$)

17.99 Total National Professional Personnel         8             107,491                   7,294     4.0           55,097     4.0           45,100
19. Total Project Personnel                                       227,491                  17,094                  112,097    14.0           98,300
20. Sub-Contracts
21.01    Action Programme (AP) Coal                                85,000                                           40,000                   45,000
         (Sogamoso)
21.02    AP Emeralds (Muzo)                                        85,000                                           40,000                   45,000
21.03    AP Clay (Nemocon)                                         85,000                                           40,000                   45,000
21.04    AP Gold (Condoto)                                         85,000                                           40,000                   45,000
21.99   Total Sub-Contract
29 Total Sub-Contracts                                            340,000                                          160,000                  180,000
30 Training
32.01     2 Workshop for educators, (@ 3,500$),                     7,000                                            3,500                    3,500
          50 participants, duration: 2 days
32.02     1 Regional Workshop in Bogota (@                         12,000                                           12,000
          10,000$) for 12 participants from
          Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru
          in Bogota, duration: 2 days
32.03     2 Workshops on Labour Inspection, (@                      5,000                                            2,500                    2,500

                                                                                                                                                      49
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       2,500$), 10 participants, duration: 2
       days,
32.04 4 Local Workshops (@ 2,000$) in the                8,000                           8,000
       zones of intervention, 20 participants,
       durantion: 2 days
32.05 1 Monitoring Workshop (@ 5,000$) in                5,000                           5,000
       Bogota, 8 participants, duration: 3 days
32.06 1 National Workshop (@ 5,000$), 50                 5,000                           5,000
       participants from public institutions,
       NGOs, workers and employers,
       duration: 2 days
32.07 1 NGO Workshop (@ 4,000$), 18                      4,000                           4,000
       participants (8 NGOs from the zones of
       intervention, 10 national NGOs),
       duration: 2 days
32.99 Total Seminars                                    46,000                          40,000            6,000
39. Total Training                                      46,000                          40,000            6,000
40. Equipment
41.01   Equipment (two computers, one                   10,000          6,000            4,000
        printer, office furniture)
49. Total Equipment                                     10,000          6,000            4,000
50. Miscellaneous
51.01     Office Rental NPC                             22,500          2,500           12,000            8,000
51.02     Operation & Maintenance                        5,000            500            3,000            1,500
51.99     Total Operation & Maintenance of              27,500          3,000           15,000            9,500
          Equipment
53.01     Miscellaneous                                 25,000          2,000           15,000            8,000
59.       Total Miscellaneous                           52,500          5,000           30,000           17,500
                    Sub-Total                     38   675,991   2     28,094   22,0   346,097   14,0   301,800
60. Support Costs
68      Programme Support al 13%                        87,879          3,652           44,993           39,234
69. Total Support Costs                                 87,879          3,652           44,993           39,234
                    Sub-Total                     38   763,070   2     31,746   22,0   391,090   14,0   341,034
70. Provisions
71        Provision for cost increase                   36,607             0            19,555           17,052

99. Project Grand Total:                          38   800,477   2,0   31,746   22,0   410,645   14,0   358,086


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