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					                                                                                             ONLINE CREDIT COURSES
                                                                                                        SUMMER 2010
                                                                                                        5/17/10 – 8/10/10

                                                          Cost/credit hour - $695 per credit hour plus $100 nonrefundable access fee for each course
                                                          Business/credit hour - $840 per credit hour plus $100 nonrefundable access fee




                                           ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION
[NOTE: Only officially admitted students are eligible to register for Lehigh University courses for academic credit] Admitted students
must register using LESN GRADUATE REGISTRATION FORM under http://www.lesn.lehigh.edu/ or contact the Lehigh Office of
Distance Education at 610-758-6210/e-mail rjm0@lehigh.edu. Alternate instructions for registration will be sent to MBA AND MSE
students. Follow payment instructions included with registration form
     LESN-Online Summer course registration deadline – Official registration period is April 12 to April 26
     Students seeking admission should contact the Lehigh Office of Distance Education at 610-758-6210, e-mail rjm0@lehigh.edu.
         Summer 2010 admission application deadline – See program listing for specific dates
     Summer semester runs from 5/17/10 thru 8/10/10. Unless otherwise noted, all courses will be available week of 5/17/10
     Textbooks may be ordered directly through the Lehigh University online link to the bookstore from www.lesn.lehigh.edu under
         “forms” or going directly to the website: http://lehigh1.bkstore.com/bkstore/content
    
Please check on www.distance.lehigh.edu for schedule revisions and updates




                                                             BUSINESS
  ECO 045-D10 (CRN#20140). Statistical Methods (3)
  Descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation,
  chi-squared tests. Note: Graduate Student Status only. Limit 20 grad students. Live Web-based sessions (Elluminate) included in the
  course will be held on Monday (grad) and Tuesday evenings beginning May 31 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. Attendance at only one of the
  weekly Elluminate sessions is required. Students will have access to Course Site (web-based courseware) for reading and assignments
  to begin work for the course by May 26.
  This course is approximately 36 hours of recorded lectures, live web sessions and weekly homework problem sets and quizzes. As in
  traditional on-campus courses, CBE faculty generally expect that a student will work at least 6-9 hours outside of class on learning the
  material for any CBE course (2-3 hours per credit hour). Make sure you plan for this level of engagement in addition to viewing
  lectures, quizzes and live Elluminate sessions for this web course.
  Instructor: Prof. Art King,                    e-mail: art.king@lehigh.edu                    Phone: 610-758-5284 (after June 20).
  I will not be on campus until 6/21/10 to answer or respond to voice mail. I will not be available by phone until then. The best way to
  communicate will be via email, the Course Site Forum-Discussion Board or during the live Web sessions. There will be a graduate
  assistant who will be available by email, Course Site, our live weekly Web sessions, and by phone after June 20. There will be no on-
  campus office hours for this course, which is designed to be completely electronically based.
  Graduate Students only are permitted in the distance section (D10) of ECO 045 that we will roster. Undergraduates are eligible for
  other section(s) as available on the Registrar‟s web site for their class registration.
   Course is approximately 36 hours of recorded lectures, live web sessions and weekly homework problem sets and quizzes. In
       traditional on-campus courses, CBE faculty generally expect that a student will work at least 6-9 hours outside of class on
       learning the material for any CBE course (2-3 hours per credit hour). Make sure you plan for this level of engagement outside of
       viewing lectures and quizzes for this web course.
   Textbook required: Anderson, Sweeney and Williams 10th ed.,“Statistics for Business and Economics,” ISBN#0-324-65837-0.
   Software: Microsoft Excel (or similar statistical software) will be required to do some of the homework and exam questions.
       Excel‟s Data Analysis ToolPak add-in will be sufficient. This add-in is not available in recent Mac Excel versions, so a student
       will need to access to a pc with a 2003 or 2007 version of Excel
   SPECIAL DATES: Begin work on the course by Monday, May 26. Weekly Elluminate web sessions begin on Monday,
       May 31; no required Web classes on June 21, 22 due to midterm exam on June 22 (possible optional review session on
       Elluminate on June 21); class ends with the final exam on July 7 or 8




                                                                                                                                                       1
GBUS 401-D10 (CRN#20145). Financial Reporting for Managers and Investors (3)
Corporate financial reporting under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Analysis and interpretation of financial statements:
accrual accounting, balance sheet valuation, income determination and cash flow analysis. Profit manipulation, window dressing and
“creative accounting” through accounting policy choices. Fraudulent financial reporting, uses and limitations of accounting
information. Accounting information as a tool for strategic decision making.
Instructor: Prof. Gary Smith                                   e-mail: gas205@lehigh.edu                    Phone: (610) 758-5963
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbooks Required – “Financial Accounting in An Economic Context”, Jamie Pratt, 6th Ed., by by John Wiley & Sons,
   ISBN#0-471-65528-7
   Optional Textbook: Study Guide to Accompany the above text by Joseph H. Anthony and Robin P. Clement. ISBN#0-471-
    73111-0.

GBUS 450-D10 (CRN#20147). Strategic Supply Management (3)
A course designed to introduce the MBA/MSE student to the vital role played by supply management in today‟s global economy.
The structure of the course includes a framework that shows how leading firms create competitive advantage from supply
management. Topics covered include measurement, organizational design, human resources, information systems, longer-term
contracting, supplier relationship management, cost management, early supplier involvement, global sourcing, and the formation of
supply alliances. The course consists of lectures, web-based discussion, current readings, and case analysis. This class includes four
1.5 hour live web-based discussion sessions using the application Elluminate.
Instructor: Professor Robert Trent                            e-mail: rjt2@lehigh.edu                       Phone: (610) 758-4952
  Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
  Textbook Required: “Strategic Supply Management—Creating the Next Source of Competitive Advantage,” Robert J. Trent,
    ISBN: 978-1-932159-67-7; students should order the book from www.amazon.com or www.jrosspub.com

GBUS 464-D10 (CRN#20148). Business-to-Business Marketing (3) SSI (5/17 thru 6/24)
Business-to-Business Marketing offers a practical foundation for business managers to become successful business marketers. By
addressing current issues that face business-to-business (B2B) marketers as well as the newest developments and insights into this
rapidly changing field, this course provides a practical introduction to this important marketing area. Business-to-Business Marketing
will focus on general business marketing, e-commerce/Internet marketing, research analysis and strategic planning, communication
and delivery, international applications, and business ethics. Extensive use of the forum and blog features on Course Site allows
students and the instructor to assess current headline-making events as they relate to each course topic. Participation in the forums is
also one of the course requirements. The course culminates with the creation of a B2B marketing plan for a product or service of the
student's choosing. Prerequisites: GBUS 406/MBA 402 and GBUS 408/MBA 404
Instructor: Professor Robert Kuchta                      e-mail: rok8@lehigh.edu                              Phone: 610-758-6495
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of lecture, plus assignments
 Text Package Required – “Business to Business Marketing,” Kuchta; Publisher: McGraw-Hill Primis Online,
     ISBN#0-39-0--17921-3



                                                            BIOLOGY
BIOS 371-D10 (CRN#20069)/CHM 371-D10 (CRN#20044). Elements of Biochemistry I (3)
A general study of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and other biological substances and their importance in life processes.
Protein and enzyme chemistry are emphasized. Prerequisite: one year of organic chemistry
Instructor: Prof. Michael Behe                         e-mail: mjb1@lehigh.edu                                 Phone: 610-758-3474
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required – “Biochemistry-w/CD,” Voet; 3rd ed., 04, Wiley. ISBN#047119350X. The solutions manual for end-of-
     chapter problems is optional, 3rd ed., 04

                                                          CHEMISTRY
CHM 336-D10 (CRN#20043). Clinical Chemistry (3)
Applications of analytical chemistry to clinical problems. Discussion of methods in common use and the biochemical-medical
significance of the results. Prerequisite: CHM 332
Instructor: Prof. Sam Niedbala                         e-mail: san204@lehigh.edu                         Phone: 610-758-6506
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content
 Textbook (Reference only): Tietz, “Fundamentals of Clinical Chemistry,” Carl Burtis and Edward Ashwood, ; Publ: Elsevier,
     6th Ed 01

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CHM 371-D10 (CRN#20044)/BIOS 371-D10 (CRN#20069). Elements of Biochemistry I (3)
A general study of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and other biological substances and their importance in life processes.
Protein and enzyme chemistry are emphasized. Prerequisite: one year of organic chemistry
Instructor: Prof. Michael Behe                         e-mail: mjb1@lehigh.edu                                 Phone: 610-758-3474
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required – “Biochemistry-w/CD,” Voet; 3rd ed., 04, Wiley. ISBN#0471468585. The solutions manual for end-of-
     chapter problems is optional, 3rd ed., 04, ISBN#047119350X

CHM 425-D10 (CRN#20045). Pharmaceutical Regulatory Affairs I: Drug Discovery to Approval (3)
This course is one of four courses required to fulfill the requirements for a Certificate in Regulatory Affairs. It may be applied as one
of the 400-level credits in any of the Chemistry or Pharmaceutical Chemistry degree tracks. Coverage includes the stages of the drug
approval process and how these relate to the laboratory activities that provide the scientific basis for the New Drug Application
(NDA). Lectures treat drug discovery, chemical process development of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and
pharmaceutical process development of the drug product. Regulatory issues in screening and testing, the management of the
preclinical trials, and the management of clinical trials will be covered. The regulatory requirements for the production of the drug
substance (API) from bench to pilot plant to full-scale manufacturing will also be covered. Included in the discussions will be Good
Laboratory Practices (GLPs) and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs). The regulatory issues concerning the use of Contract
Research Organizations (CROs) and Contract Manufacturing Organizations (CMOs) will also be treated. The processes for approvals
of diagnostics and devices will also be covered. All topics are presented by practicing professionals in the regulatory affairs area.
This course is one of four courses required to fulfill the requirements for a Certificate in Regulatory Affairs. It may be applied as
one of the 400-level credits in any of the Chemistry or Pharmaceutical Chemistry degree tracks.
Instructor: Prof. Sam Niedbala                           e-mail: san204@lehigh.edu
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbooks Required: (1) “Development of FDA-Regulated Medical Products Prescription Drugs, Biologics, and Medical
     Devices,” Elaine Whitmore, 2nd Ed., ASQC Publ., ISBN#0873896130 and (2) “FDA Regulatory Affairs. A Guide for
     Prescription Drugs, Medical Devices and Biologics,” by Douglas J. Pisano, David Mantus, „03 Ed, CRC Press, #1587160072

CHM 428-D10 (CRN#20046). Pharmaceutical Regulatory Affairs II: Devices & Comb. Tech. (3)
This course is one of four courses required to fulfill the requirements for a Certificate in Regulatory Affairs. It may be applied as 400-
level credit in any of the Chemistry or Pharm Chemistry degree tracks. Technological advancement in the medical and veterinary
fields has fueled research and development of medical devices and products resulting from combination technologies. Each year, over
4,000 devices are reviewed by the U. S. Food & Drug Administration for efficacy and safety before being allowed to enter the
marketplace. This course will review the history of medical device law and regulations in the U.S. It will also define current
requirements of science needed to allow technologies to be developed according to regulations. Case studies will be used to educate
participants on Design Controls, Quality System Regulations, Manufacturing Requirements and International Harmonization. Specific
content may include Nucleic Acid Diagnostics, Cardiovascular Stents, Drug Delivery, Cancer Diagnostics, and Consumer Self-
Testing. Students will also use knowledge gained to prepare class presentations to address current issues within the field.
This course is one of four courses required to fulfill the requirements for a Certificate in Regulatory Affairs. It may be
applied as one of the 400-level credits in any of the Chemistry or Pharm Chemistry degree tracks.
Instructor: Prof. Sam Niedbala                           e-mail: san204@lehigh.edu
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbooks Required: (1) “Development of FDA-Regulated Medical Products Prescription Drugs, Biologics, and Medical
     Devices” by Whitmore, Elaine; (2) “Mastering and Managing the FDA Maze” by Gordon Harnack, ‟99 Edition, ASQC Publ.,
     ISBN#0873894553.




CHM 442-D10 (CRN#20047). Regulatory Affairs III. Analytical Methods, Validation & Data Analysis (3)
Topics to be covered in this course include: introduction to analytical terms and concepts, regulations for pharmaceutical analytical
laboratories (both Food and Drug Administration and the International Conference on Harmonization), setting and evaluating
instrument performance criteria, instrument acceptance, assay design and validation. Specific examples will be given for assay design
and validation, especially for HPLC. This course is one of four courses required to fulfill the requirements for a Certificate in
Regulatory Affairs. It may be applied as one of the 400-level credits in any of the Chemistry or Pharm Chem degree tracks.
Instructor: Prof. Kyle Fliszar                        e-mail:                                                 Phone:
 Approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: “Analytical Method Validation and Instrument Performance Verification,” Chung Chow Chan, Herman

                                                                                                                                        3
     Lam, Y. C. Lee, and Xue-Ming Zhang, eds., Wiley-Interscience, Hoboken, NJ 2004. ISBN#0471259535 (cloth).

CHM 474-D10 (CRN#20048). Regulatory Affairs V: Pharmaceutics (3)
This course covers the development of therapeutic products subsequent to the initial discovery of the active pharmaceutical ingredient
(API) through to the final dosage form. Both small molecule drugs and biotechnological pharmaceuticals will be included. Issues of
API formulation, choice of excipients, control of release, target specificity, mode of delivery, drug-drug interactions, and product
stabilization will be addressed with special reference to the regulatory issues involved at that stage of drug development. This course
builds upon a foundation in organic, analytical, and biochemistry and mastery at entry level of those subjects is expected. Anyone
who took CHM 477 (Pharmaceutics) will NOT be eligible to take this course.
This course is one of four courses required to fulfill the requirements for a Certificate in Regulatory Affairs. It may be
applied as one of the 400-level credits in any of the Chemistry tracks.
Instructors: Prof. Ned Heindel                Moderator: Prof. Christina Ochola             e-mail: christine@avoglobal.com
       Course includes approximately 36 hours of content
       Textbook Required: “Modern Pharmaceutics,” 4th Edition, G. S. Banker and C. T. Rhodes, editors, ISBN 0-8247-0674-9

CHM 477-D11 (CRN#20677). Regulatory Affairs VI – Biologics (3)
Bio-macromolecules are regarded as the most promising therapeutics of the 21st century, supplementing the long-established small
molecule organic drugs. Whether poly-peptide, poly-nucleotide, or even poly-saccharide, properly designed, tested, and registered
(with FDA) bio-macromolecules can regulate blood pressure, glycolysis, immunity, pain, malignancy, inflammation and a host of
other human dysfunctions. Since the first biopharmaceutical approval in 1982 the biotechnology derived product market has been
rapidly growing with introduction of a number of promising advances in medicine such as therapeutic monoclonal antibodies
(humanized and fully human MABs), cancer vaccines, cytokines, anti-sense technology, interference RNA, and growth factors. As
with traditional drugs (small molecules), the regulatory framework for approval of a biotechnology derived product (biologics) is
complicated. In addition, there has been much debate about the introduction of follow-on-biologics (FOBs) or biosimilars using an
abbreviated approval process. An overall biologics-based process map beginning with pre-clinical through the post-marketing stage
will be discussed. Topics such as therapeutic proteins/peptides, gene therapy, stem cells, vaccines, interference RNAs, PK-PD, world-
wide regulatory filings, preclinical IND-enabling studies, BLA/CTD filing, FOBs biologics, immunogenicity, comparability studies,
manufacturing challenges, clinical trials, market exclusivity, and related regulatory guidelines will be discussed.
Instructor: Prof. Ray Bakhtiar                         e-mail: rbakhtiar@msn.com
       Course includes approximately 36 hours of content
       Textbook Required: None Required

CHM 482-D10 (CRN#20163)/CHE482-D10 (CRN#20162)/MAT482-D10 (CRN#20161). Engineering Behavior of
Polymers (3)
Mechanical behavior or polymers. Characterization of experimentally observed viscoelastic response of polymeric solids with the aid
of mechanical model analogs. Topics include time-temperature superposition, experimental characterization of large deformation and
fracture processes, polymer adhesions, and the effects of fillers, plasticizer, moisture, and aging on mechanical behavior.
Instructor: Prof. Ray Pearson                         e-mail: rp02@lehigh.edu                                 Phone: 610-758-3857
       Course includes approximately 36 hours of content
       Textbook Required: "An Introduction to The Mechanical Properties of solid Polymers", 2nd Ed. by Ward and Sweeney
        published by Wiley.

CHM 492-D10 (CRN#20164)/CHE 492-D10 (CRN#20165)/MAT 492-D10 (CRN#20167). Topics in Polymer Science:
Polymer Nanocomposites (3)
Offering improved strength, stiffness, barrier properties, and flame retardancy polymer nanocomposites are valuable as coating,
structural, and packaging materials in a wide range of automobile, civil, and electrical engineering applications. This course on
Polymer Nanocomposites offers a comprehensive review of the main types of polymer nanocomposites and their properties as well as
a comparison to traditional polymer composites.
Instructor: Prof. Ray Pearson                 e-mail: rp02@lehigh.edu                                         Phone: 610-758-3857
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: “Introduction to Nanocomposite Materials:properties, processing, characterization,” by Thomas
     Twardowski, DEStech Publications, Inc. 2007, ISBN# 978-1-932078-54-1

CHM 497-D10 (CRN#20049). Modern Process R & D for the Pharm Industry (3)
Process Research and Development in the Pharmaceutical Industry deals with the large scale preparation/manufacture (scale-up) of
drug substances for the use in preclinical work, clinical work, as well as in marketed drug product. It is a dynamic industry that is
constantly evolving with respect to new chemical and chemical engineering technologies as well as regulatory requirements. The
course consists of 19 lectures. The intro lectures (1-13) are designed to familiarize the student with the basics of modern pharm
                                                                                                                                        4
research and development. Topics covered are: route selection, starting materials, reagents, solvent choices, the utilization of
azeotropes, Green Chemistry (environmentally friendly processes), process safety, polymorphs, and stereo-chemistry (chirality).
Included in the intro lectures are four case studies taken from the literature that illustrate in a practical manner the topics covered.
Following the intro lectures are 6 lectures by “expert‟ lecturers from the pharmaceutical industry. Topics covered: process chrom-
atography applications in scale-up, the role of process automation in process development, the design of kilo labs and pilot plants;
chem reaction hazards (process safety), physical form of drug substances (polymorphism), & the regulatory aspects of process chem.
 Instructor of Record: Prof. N. Heindel          Moderator: Dr. Peter Kennewell e-mail: pete@kennewell5855.fsnet.co.uk
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: “Practical Process Research and Development,” by Neal G. Anderson, Publ:Elsevier, ISBN#0120594757

CHE482-D10 (CRN#20162)/MAT482-D10 (CRN#20161) CHM 482-D10 (CRN#20163). Engineering Behavior of
Polymers (3)
Mechanical behavior or polymers. Characterization of experimentally observed viscoelastic response of polymeric solids with the aid
of mechanical model analogs. Topics include time-temperature superposition, experimental characterization of large deformation and
fracture processes, polymer adhesions, and the effects of fillers, plasticizer, moisture, and aging on mechanical behavior.
Instructor: Prof. Ray Pearson                         e-mail: rp02@lehigh.edu                                 Phone: 610-758-3857
       Course includes approximately 36 hours of content
       Textbook Required: "An Introduction to The Mechanical Properties of solid Polymers", 2nd Ed. by Ward and Sweeney
        published by Wiley.

CHE 492-D10 (CRN#20165)/MAT 492-D10 (CRN#20167)/ CHM 492-D10 (CRN#20164). Topics in Polymer Science:
Polymer Nanocomposites (3)
Offering improved strength, stiffness, barrier properties, and flame retardancy polymer nanocomposites are valuable as coating,
structural, and packaging materials in a wide range of automobile, civil, and electrical engineering applications. This course on
Polymer Nanocomposites offers a comprehensive review of the main types of polymer nanocomposites and their properties as well as
a comparison to traditional polymer composites.
Instructor: Prof. Ray Pearson                 e-mail: rp02@lehigh.edu                                         Phone: 610-758-3857
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: “Introduction to Nanocomposite Materials:properties, processing, characterization,” by Thomas
     Twardowski, DEStech Publications, Inc. 2007, ISBN# 978-1-932078-54-1

MAT 482-D10 (CRN#20161)/CHM 482-D10 (CRN#20163)/CHE 482-D10 (CRN#20162). Engineering Behavior of
Polymers (3)
Mechanical behavior or polymers. Characterization of experimentally observed viscoelastic response of polymeric solids with the aid
of mechanical model analogs. Topics include time-temperature superposition, experimental characterization of large deformation and
fracture processes, polymer adhesions, and the effects of fillers, plasticizer, moisture, and aging on mechanical behavior.
Instructor: Prof. Ray Pearson                         e-mail: rp02@lehigh.edu                                 Phone: 610-758-3857
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: "An Introduction to The Mechanical Properties of solid Polymers", 2nd Ed. by Ward and Sweeney
     published by Wiley.

MAT 492-D10 (CRN#20167)/CHM 492-D10 (CRN#20164)/CHE 492-D10 (CRN#20165). Topics in Polymer Science:
Polymer Nanocomposites (3)
Offering improved strength, stiffness, barrier properties, and flame retardancy polymer nanocomposites are valuable as coating,
structural, and packaging materials in a wide range of automobile, civil, and electrical engineering applications. This course on
Polymer Nanocomposites offers a comprehensive review of the main types of polymer nanocomposites and their properties as well as
a comparison to traditional polymer composites.
Instructor: Prof. Ray Pearson                 e-mail: rp02@lehigh.edu                                         Phone: 610-758-3857
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: “Introduction to Nanocomposite Materials:properties, processing, characterization,” by Thomas
     Twardowski, DEStech Publications, Inc. 2007, ISBN# 978-1-932078-54-1

ME 231-D10 (CRN#20674). Fluid Mechanics (3)
Introductory course. Credits do NOT count towards graduate degree.
 Kinematics of fluid flow and similarity concepts. Equations of incompressible fluid flow with inviscid and viscous applications.
Turbulence. One-dimensional compressible flow, shock waves. Boundary layers, separation, wakes and drag. Prerequisite: Math
205. Course will not count for graduate credit. Instructor Permission Required.

                                                                                                                                      5
Instructor: Prof. Jacob Kazakia                            e-mail: jyk0@lehigh.edu                Phone: 610-758-3785
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: “Introduction to Fluid Mechanics,” by R. W. Fox, P. J. Pritchard, A. T. McDonald. 7 th Ed, Wiley,
     ISBN#13 9780471742999

ME 413-D10 (CRN#20675). Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering (3)
Zeros of functions, difference tables, interpolation, integration, differentiation. Divided differences, numerical solution of ordinary
differential equations of the boundary and initial value type. Eigen problems. Curve fitting, matrix manipulation and solution of
linear algebraic equations. Partial differential equations of the hyperbolic, elliptic and parabolic type. Application to problems in
mechanical engineering.
Instructor: Prof. Jacob Kazakia                                   e-mail: jyk0@lehigh.edu                      Phone: 610-758-3785
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: “Numerical Mathematics and Computing,” 6th Ed., 2008, by Ward Cheney and David Kincaid; Publ.
     Brooks/Cole Publishing Company, ISBN-13:978-0-495-11475-8, ISBN-10:495-11475-8

ME 430-D10 (CRN#20676). Advanced Fluid Mechanics (3)
This course is a first graduate course on compressible fluid mechanics, providing a broad coverage of key areas of viscous and
inviscid fluid mechanics. Topics covered include: Flow kinematics, differential equations of motion, viscous and inviscid solutions,
vorticity dynamics and circulation, vorticity equation, circulation theorems, potential flow behavior, irrotational and rotational flows,
simple boundary layer flows and solutions, and real fluid flows and consequences.
Instructor: Prof. Chuck Smith                                    e-mail: crs1@lehigh.edu                       Phone: 610-758-5532
 Course includes approximately 36 hours of content, plus assignments
 Textbook Required: An online text, authored by Prof. Smith will be provided
 Optional Text: “Intro to Fluid Mechanics,” R. W. Fox, P. J. Pritchard, A. T. McDonald, 7th Ed., Wiley, ISBN#9780471742999

All courses are subject to cancellation or change due to low enrollments.
2/1/11




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