Essay Formal Tone in Report

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					Report on Pupil Questioning
Using the Pupil Questions in three schools during the Summer term 2003


One of the most effective ways in which we will find out about how a
department is doing is by asking the people most involved in the
process, the ‘consumers’, if you like. So during the Summer of 2003 Juli
Sims devised a series of questions which could be used in a variety of
ways in school to ask the pupils about their knowledge and
understanding and about their experience of the teaching and learning
process.

These questions were then trialled in three Leicestershire schools to see
how effective they were.

The Questions
The questions were devised to link to the Objectives in The Framework
for teaching English Years 7, 8 & 9, as well as looking at the attitudes
that the pupils have towards their learning. A series of questions have
been written for each year group. These have then been separated into
a section of questions on Speaking and Listening, on Reading and on
Writing. In each section, for each year group the questions are split into
a section on Skills and Knowledge and a section on Attitudes.


The Skills and Knowledge based questions are linked to the learning
objectives for the year group and area of learning. They have been
developed to show progression over the three years of Key Stage 3 so
that teachers can see whether or not they have built in progression into
their planning over the key stage.


The Attitudes questions are open-ended questions which are similar for
each year group and the responses will vary according to the student.


Copies of the questions can be found in the appendix to this document.
The copies have ‘answers’ to accompany them, giving the kind of
responses that teachers would expect to see for the Skills and
Knowledge based questions. Also in the appendix are copies of the
sheets of questions laid out with spaces for pupil responses to be
included.
Initially no questions were devised for use in upper schools but one of
the schools in the trial wanted to ask questions of their Year 10 pupils
and a set of questions were adapted for this purpose. These can also be
found in the appendix.

The Trial
The trial was not completely scientific as it was decided that schools who
had expressed an interest in using pupil questions at a Heads of English
meeting should be used and that the process of questioning should be a
useful one for the schools involved.


Each of the three schools wanted to use the questions in a slightly
different way but each school found the activity to be enlightening and
useful.

Conclusions
Asking pupils about their experiences is very enlightening for the
department and gives an excellent picture of what has been taught and
learnt by the pupils.


It is very useful to have two people involved in the process, one to ask
questions and one to take notes.


This can be an extremely interesting thing for the Head of Dept to be
involved in. Not only do they hear the areas for development but they
also hear about the successes and the positive comments that the pupils
make about their experience of English.


However it is important that the person taking the notes/listening does
not have expectations about what they are likely to hear and is prepared
to act upon the information gleaned.
A day is a good amount of time in which to question the number of pupils
involved in the trials, when one area is being concentrated upon. It is not
really enough to cover questions in all of the areas.


The arrangements for the day need to be carefully planned, and pupils
need to be made aware of the time they are expected. This can be work
for the Head of Dept and will require contact with other depts who will be
affected by pupils leaving their lessons.


It seems that boys would prefer not to be taken out of their PE lessons to
talk about grammar!


Time is needed at the start of each interview if the questions are being
asked by the consultant for that person to introduce themselves and
explain what they are doing and why.


There can be some embarrassment from the pupils when answering
some questions when they feel that they may be ‘told off’ by the second
person in the room and this needs to be addressed in the introduction.


A whole day listening intently to what pupils are saying and giving as
much attention to the last pupils as the first, is very tiring.


But finally, it is marvellous to talk with pupils and listen to what they have
to say. I have greatly enjoyed the process and have met some wonderful
kids.



How to use the Questions
   Set aside time for the activity as part of your monitoring and
    evaluation process.
   Decide which area of questions you will use. Ideally this should tie in
    to your action plan objectives.
   If you are doing questioning at the start of the year it will provide
    information to feed in to your action plan. At the end of the year the
    questions will form a way of monitoring how well you have
    progressed towards your target.
   Decide which pupils you will use. A good start is a boy and girl from
    the top, middle and lower end of the year, for each year group.
    However you may want to target a specific group, for example,
    underachieving pupils, the more able, boys, EAL students,
    depending on your school curricular targets.
   Plan a timetable for the interviews. This can be done with a group of
    pupils together or with pairs of pupils at specific times. You will need
    to co-ordinate this with colleagues whose lessons will be affected.
   Have a second colleague in the interview with you to take notes of
    what is said. Together you can analyse the results at the end of the
    interviews. This could be another member of the dept, or a member
    of SMT, or a consultant.
   Explain to the pupils what you are doing and put them at their ease
    so that they feel confident enough to answer the questions honestly
    and not with what they think you want them to say.
   Listen to what the pupils have to say and be prepared to act upon it.
    You should be prepared to adjust the teaching and learning in the
    dept.
   You can do the questioning in conjunction with other activities such
    as work sampling, pupil tracking and data analysis to give you a
    picture of how the dept is doing and what you need to do to move
    forward.
         Appendix 1
Pupil Questions Years 7, 8 & 9
       With ‘Answers’
                                  Year 7 ‘Answers’

Speaking and Listening
Skills and Knowledge
The skills and knowledge questions are tied in to the objectives for each
year group, looking for whether these have been taught and how well the
pupils have learnt the information. In some instances it is looking at how
well that knowledge can be applied in other circumstances.
   If someone was telling a story to the class, what would they have to
    remember to make it good?
Content/ voice control/gestures/understanding of audience/involvement of audience/tone of
voice/volume/hand gestures/facial expressions

   What do you think is different between a spoken and a written
    account?
Understanding of the conventions of speaking compared to those of writing and the need for
control in writing- e.g structuring written pieces, order of sentences, crafted written pieces,
eliminating hesitations – um/er, writing in information to give detail to tone of voice and
gesture, formality of language

   Can you give me three good rules for working together as a group
    when you are discussing a topic?
Looking for a sense of the ground-rules required when speaking and listening- e.g. everyone
should have the chance to speak and be heard, don’t interrupt, build on the ideas of others,
be prepared to change your ideas and opinions, give reasons for what you think, tolerance,
eye contact when listening, ascribe roles to each member of the group, don’t always work in
friendship groups, keep the task in mind, don’t get side tracked, ask questions to clarify
ideas,

   How do you remember things when you are listening?
Has there been teacher input into planned listening here?
Is the task well planned? Do you use prompt sheets? Listening grids to record information,
make notes? Defined roles for the group members? Frameworks for listening and recording
information. This also links to listening done when watching videos/tv etc

   Can you tell me about a time you changed your mind because of
    what someone else had said?
Applying the ideas of speaking and listening to a particular occasion. Also using them to
recount an anecdote
   Can you tell me how to find the headteacher’s office?
Use of clear instructions – chronological, simple sentences, clear and concise, connectives
such as first/ then/ next/after
   What does your teacher look for in your speaking and listening?
The role of the teacher in setting up groups and assessment of the work- how well I work in
the group, if I stay on task, how I listen, how I develop my ideas, how I ask questions, how I
involve others, how well I perform my role (scribe, chair, envoy), if I can report back my
ideas, if I can apply what I have heard in another task


Attitudes
   Do you think that speaking and listening activities help you to learn
    things?
Perceived value of speaking and listening and its role in learning

   Tell me about a group activity you have done recently and the part
    you played in it.
Use of explanation to describe the activity and the variety of roles that could be played.
Speakers own involvement

   When do you use speaking and listening skills?
Speaking and listening across the curriculum and as a transferrable skill

   Are you a good speaker and listener?
   What makes a good speaker and listener?
   What are the conditions in school that help you achieve your best in
    speaking and listening?
The role of the teacher in creating an appropriate climate for speaking and listening to take
place in english and across the curriculum
   What do you think would help you to improve your speaking and
    listening?
                                            Year 7

Reading
Skills and Knowledge
   What kinds of things have you read this year?
Range and variety, and across the curriculum- fiction in English,including different genre –
sci-fi, horror, romance, animal, thriller, teenage; fiction for pleasure; non fiction – diaries,
descriptions, accounts, arguments, poetry, drama; non-fiction across the curriculum –
descriptions, explanations, accounts, diaries, evaluations, arguments, instructions; non-
fiction for pleasure – hobby books, sports books, history, science etc
Other ‘reading’ – video, tv, films, media, web pages, diagrams, illustrations, graphs, maps,
data
   How do you choose what to read?
Strategies and support for choosing materials,
Knowledge about favourite authors, how to use the library, what to look for on the shelves
and how to browse, reading the ‘blurb’, reading the first paragraph, looking for particular
genres, taking a chance on something new, recommendations from friends or teachers or
parents or other people, looking at the cover – colour, layout etc, knowing where to look in
the library, library lessons, class book boxes, class library, home library, books at home,
   Do you keep a record of your reading? How do you remember what
    you have read?
Possibly reading journals and their format, is reading being assessed, recorded, in what
form?
Reading sheet in diary/exercise book/folder; a book for keeping record of thoughts and ideas
on reading done in class and at home, reviews of what has been read, mind maps, character
outlines, through speaking and listening – telling someone else about the book; teacher
working with individual pupils or guided groups to assess reading done,
   Tell me about a book you have read recently. What was good about
    it?
   Tell me about a book you have read that you haven’t enjoyed. Why
    didn’t you enjoy it?
Both looking at the role of reading and the pleasure gained, as well as the understanding of
what makes a text appeal to a reader. Will also get an idea of the types of books that are
being read and the level of challenge that these represent.
Looking for comments on – plot, structure – flashback, chronological, twists and turns,
keeping information from the reader, complex/simple, length of chapters, sentences and
vocabulary; character – realistic, well imagined, detailed, descriptive, insight into their
thoughts and feelings, use of dialogue; use of tension and suspense – mixing sentences
(complex and simple); empathy with ideas and characters, endings and how they tie up what
has gone before
   Can you explain the difference between fiction and non-fiction to me?
This gives another chance to explore the range of reading done by pupils, not just in English
and how they are supported in the reading across the curriculum.
Fiction- imaginative, usually past tense, for pleasure, use of dialogue, driven by character,
requires empathy with the characters, variety comes through different genres and styles.
Non fiction – true, can be in different forms – recount, evaluation, argument, description,
analysis, explanation, instructions, each have conventions for writing
   What do you think is meant by the expression ‘reading between the
    lines’?
Understanding of inference and deduction – writers give clues and hints in writing which is
not always obvious, this leaves the reader having to work out what is meant, to make
associations, sometimes to guess. The information is not always presented in a literal
fashion, it is often implied. For example – you can get clues about how a character is feeling
from the way they say something or characters can sometimes say things in one way but
mean something quite different.
   What kinds of things do writers do to make you want to read their
    books?
Understanding of how writers keep interest, techniques
   What strategies do you use to help you read?
Range of strategies – close reading, skim and scan, continuous reading, visualising,
predicting, empathising, relating to own experience, using contents pages, using index,
understanding the conventions of the text you are about to encounter, inferring – looking
beyond the literal, retrospection – looking back at what has been read, asking questions of a
text, text marking, highlighting, activating prior knowledge, listening to taped versions,
checking the illustrations;
 strategies for dealing with new words, difficult words, visualising, the word in context, break
it into sounds, break it into syllables, break it into affixes, look for links to other similar words,
   Tell me about the reading that you do in other subjects.
Reading across the curriculum and the support received, transferrable use of reading
strategies, understanding of non fiction
   What does your teacher look for in your reading?
Role of teacher in supporting learning of teaching, providing variety of materials, assessing
reading.
Fluency and control, tone of voice, ability to read new vocabulary, reading and
understanding not just decoding, reading more challenging pieces, range and variety of
reading, having a range of strategies to use ( as listed above), understanding of how writers
write to influence an audience, use of appropriate vocabulary to describe reading and writing
– e.g. setting, character, plot, simple sentences, complex sentences etc; being able to apply
knowledge of reading to writing.
Attitudes
   Tell me about the reading that you do when you are not in school.
Range of reading done, role of reading at home…is it done?
   When do you use your reading skills?
At home and across the curriculum
   Do you ever reread books or texts?
The value of looking at texts again, what can be gained from a second reading
   What are the conditions in school that support your reading so that
    you can achieve your best?
The role of the teacher and environment in supporting learning in reading, may also include
thoughts on the use of the library
   Are you a good reader?
   What makes a good reader?
   What do you think would help you to improve your reading?
   Where do you get interesting reading material in school?
   How do you get hold of good reading material out of school?
                                           Year 7

Writing
Skills and Knowledge
   Can you tell me about the kinds of writing you have done this year?
Range and variety – planning, drafting, notes, mindmaps, stories, different genre stories,
poetry, drama – scripts, diaries, arguments, instructions, descriptions, journals, evaluations,
reports, accounts, ‘essays’, explanations, graphs, data, maps, etc etc
   How do you plan for a new piece of writing?
Understanding of planning formats and the importance of structuring work- understanding
that it will depend what the task is, what kind of writing is required and what the conventions
are for that piece of writing, have different planning styles – bullet points, mind maps, grids,
chronological notes, flow charts, spider diagrams etc; understanding of the audience and
purpose of the piece of work
   Can you tell me why paragraphs are important in a piece of work?
To structure the flow of ideas and cohesion of a piece of writing, to group ideas together, to
make points in a chronological or persuasive fashion, to show a shift in topic, time or
viewpoint, to show a new person speaking in fiction, to develop the detail in a piece of
writing, to help the reader orientate themselves when reading the writing.
   Can you tell me about the different types of sentences you use?
Simple sentences, compound sentences- balanced sentences using ‘and’, ‘or’ and ‘but’, ‘if,
‘because’ and ‘after’; complex sentences- containing clauses and phrases to add more
detail. You may also get information on the kinds of punctuation which might appear in
sentences - statements, questions, exclamations, commands;
   What do you do when you check/edit/redraft your work?
Think about the audience and purpose of the work, check for meaning, logic, sense; check
whether it puts across the information needed; check content; check style; check if it follows
the conventions for that piece of writing; check punctuation, grammar and spelling; check
kinds of sentences used and variety; check legibility and handwriting
   Do you use computers to help with your writing? How?
Use and role of ICT, will give some indication to the access the pupils have to computers in
school and at home
   In which subjects would you use these kinds of writing?
                   Information
                   Explanation
                   Instructions
                   Evaluation
This is looking at a more specific question on the use of writing across the curriculum and
    pupil understanding of these forms of writing being transferrable skills. It should give
    some indication of whether the expressions are recognised and in which other subjects
    they are being used :
e.g. History, science, geography, D&T, art, PE etc will all use some or all of these styles of
     writing.
   What techniques do poets use to make their poems interesting?
Technical aspects of poetry and the range of poetry covered:
Simile/metaphor/personification for visual effects; alliteration/assonance/onomatopoeia for
sound effects; repetition; emotive vocabulary; choice of words for effect; structure of poems
– following patterns e.g. ballads, sonnets, rhyming, non rhyming
   How do you remember spellings?
Personal strategies for remembering spellings and the value of spelling
Break it into sounds/ break it into syllables/ break it into affixes/ use a mnemonic/ refer to
words in the same family/ say it as it sounds/ words within words/ refer to etymology/ use
analogy/ use key words for patterns/ apply spelling rules/ learn by sight/ look cover write
check/ draw the word/




Attitudes
   Tell me about a piece of writing you have done recently. What was
    good about it? What wasn’t good about it?
Self evaluation of work done, linked to teacher ideas also
   When do you use your writing skills?
   Are you a good writer?
   What makes a good writer?
   What do you think would help you to improve your writing?
   What are the conditions in school that help you to achieve your best
    in writing?
   What does your teacher look for in your writing?
                                            Year 8

Speaking and Listening
Skills and Knowledge
The questions in this section are based on the objectives for year 8 looking at how well they
    have been taught and learnt and in some instances how well these skills are applied
    elsewhere.
   What kinds of speaking and listening do you do?
Group work, pair work, to teacher, different kinds of groups – jigsaw, envoy; discussions,
question and answer, drama, role play, tell stories, formal presentations, recounts, tell
anecdotes,jokes etc; problem solve, speculate, synthesise,
   What is the difference between standard English and dialect?
This may also have been explored in reading and writing as well.
Dialect has its own forms which are recognised as part of speech. Standard English is a way
of speaking and writing that is recognised no matter where you are from. Dialect is used in
writing to create an effect, to tell us something about characters.

   If you had to persuade me to come to your school, how would you do
    it?
Looking for the use of some persuasive techniques – selecting material, list of three,
repetition, appropriate for audience, emotive language, rhetorical questions, anticipate
objections and responses,

   If you are watching video or TV at school, how do you remember
    what it is about and the important points?
The use of planned listening formats across the curriculum, how information is recorded and
what is done with it afterwards. Listening frameworks or grids, focussed listening – you will
listen out for….; bullet points, note making formats – mind maps, spider diagrams, bullet
points

   When you are in a group and you have to an agreement by the end
    of your talking, how do you get every one to agree?
Opinion – showing some understanding of working together, even in groups which are peer
based rather than friendship based, allowing everyone to have a say, summarising the
information, trying to persuade others, being prepared to change your mind, maybe
someone has to take a lead and make a decision.

   What kind of roles have you had in group work? Which role do you
    prefer?
Chair, scribe, listener, kinds of groups.. envoy, jigsaw, listening triads etc

   Tell me about the drama you have been involved in.
Is drama being used in English, is it a discrete subject, which of the drama objectives are
being taught? Improvisation, role play, scripted work, exploration of ideas through role play,
exploration of themes and relationships.
   What do you learn through role play?
Understanding and empathy with characters, issues and relationships, understanding of the
role of visual gestures and expressions to reflect emotions and feelings, how body language
can contradict what is being said.

   What does your teacher look for in your speaking and listening?
Work in groups, pairs, with friends, with peers, play a variety of roles in groups, reflect,
hypothosise, speculate, ask questions, listen for a sustatined period, use vocal techniques –
tone, emphasis, concise, clarity, stay on task, build on others contributions, higher order
thinking skills – evaluate, analyse, synthesise




Attitudes
These questions are looking at the perceived value of speaking and listening as a learning
   tool and the conditions which exist in class to support speaking and listening
   Are you a good speaker and listener?
   What makes a good speaker and what makes a good listener?
   What would help you become a better speaker and listener?
   Does it matter if some people don’t contribute to group work or class
    discussion?
   Do you think speaking and listening is an important skill to have?
   When do you use your speaking and listening skills?
   What are the conditions in school that support you in speaking and
    listening?
                                           Year 8
Reading
Skills and Knowledge
   What kinds of reading have you done this year?
Range and variety – fiction, non fiction, web pages, videos, genre, reading across the
curriculum, reports, evaluations, accounts, material from different sources, multi - cultural
materials, etc etc etc
   How is it different to the reading you did last year?
Progression and maturity of response
   How do you decide what to read next?
Knowledge about favourite authors, how to use the library, what to look for on the shelves
and how to browse, reading the ‘blurb’, reading the first paragraph, looking for particular
genres, taking a chance on something new, recommendations from friends or teachers or
parents or other people, looking at the cover – colour, layout etc, knowing where to look in
the library, library lessons, class book boxes, class library, home library, books at home,
   How does rereading a novel change your ideas about it?
Opinion – but looking for the fact that re reading is a good thing to find out more details
about atext, also that it makes a text a ‘classic’, your response to a text changes and devlops
as you get older,
   Can you tell me about a novel or a text this year where you were
    impressed by the way the writer put across their message? How did
    they do it?
Should have moved beyond descriptions of character and plot level. Now looking at style
and technique in the way the story is told – possibly flashback, with holding information, use
of sentences, short sentences for tension, long ones for descriptive detail, cliffhangers,
feelings for the characters involved - empathy
   Can you tell me about genre?
Range and variety – kinds of writing – animal, sci-fi, romance, teenage, war, horror, thriller,
fantasy, school, fairy tales. Which of these have they come across? Which are the ones they
enjoy? This could also be linked to their understanding of films.
   Can you explain what these words mean?
                   Fact
                   Opinion
                   Bias
   What do you think the problems might be for film makers who want to
    adapt a book into a film e.g. ‘Harry Potter’ or ‘Lord of the Rings’?
Understanding of what the differences are between the styles and what may be done better
in books or in films, looking at different media – turning a long text into a short film, people
have their own ideas from descriptions of what things look like, things will have to be missed
out, subplots might not be covered, minor characters could go, films can make good pictures
clear,




Attitudes
   Where and when do you read?
   Are you a good reader?
   What makes a good reader?
   What would help you to become a better reader?
    What does your teacher look for in your reading?
   Do you have a favourite author? Who? What is it you like about
    them?
This does not necessarily have to be a fiction author.
   What are the conditions in school that support your reading and help
    you achieve your best?
   Do you think technology has made a difference to the way we read?
   Where do you get hold of good reading material in school?
   Where do you get hold of good reading material outside of school?
   When do you use your reading skills?
                                           Year 8

Writing
Skills and Knowledge
   What kinds of writing have you done this year?
Range and variety – planning, drafting, notes, mindmaps, stories, different genre stories,
poetry, drama – scripts, diaries, arguments, instructions, descriptions, journals, evaluations,
reports, accounts, ‘essays’, explanations, graphs, data, maps, etc etc
   How is it different to the writing you did last year?
Progression- opinion
   What do you need to think about when you start a piece of writing?
Understanding of planning formats and the importance of structuring work- understanding
that it will depend what the task is, what kind of writing is required and what the conventions
are for that piece of writing, have different planning styles – bullet points, mind maps, grids,
chronological notes, flow charts, spider diagrams etc; understanding of the audience and
purpose of the piece of work, who is it for – audience, what is it for - purpose
   When you write what do you do to keep the reader interested?
Dependent on the kind of writing being done but – planned, carefully structured, giving
information, with holding information, addressing the reader directly, choice of language,
figurative techniques, tone – ironic, indignant, calm; content appropriate to task and
audience, possibly formality of language

   If you were writing an argument how would you structure your
    writing?
Balance, use of connectives for cohesion and reasoning, both sides, a conclusion with some
opinion, emotive/persuasive vocabulary; opening statement with point of view, paragraphing
to organise ideas logically, organisation of main points first leading to least important points
both for and against, connectives – some might argue, on the other hand

   What do you understand by the term ‘formal language’?
Awareness of audience, standard forms of English, appropriate writing for appropriate
audiences

   What kind of writing might use formal language and what kind of
    writing might use informal language?
Formal – explanations, essays – discursive writing, evaluations, descriptions
Informal – narrative, drama,

   What is a complex sentence? Can you tell me when you would use
    them?
Sentences using clauses to extend the detail.

   What are connectives? Can you tell me when you would use them?
Variety of different connectives for different purposes
Adding- and also, as well as. Moreover; cause and effect- because, so, therefore, thus,
consequently; sequencing- next, then, first second third, finally, meanwhile, after; qualifying-
however, although, unless, except, if; emphasising- above all, in particular, especially,
significantly, indeed, notably; illustrating – for example, such as, for instance, as revealed
by, in the case of; comparing- equally, in th same way, similarly, likewise, as with like;
contrasting- whereas, instead of, alternatively, otherwise, unlike, on the other hand
Use for connecting paragraphs to create a logical cohesive piece of writing
Can be used within sentences also

   When might you use ‘figures of speech’?
In poetry, in narrative writing, in descriptive writing – metaphor, simile, alliteration,
assonance, onomatopoeia, rhyme, rhythm




Attitudes
   Are you a good writer?
   What makes a good writer?
   What are the conditions in school that help support your writing?
   What would help you become a better writer?
   What does your teacher look for in your writing?
   When do you use your writing skills?
   How does ICT/computers help with your writing?
                                             Year 9

Speaking and Listening
Skills and Knowledge
These questions are based on the objectives for year 9 and the fact that year 9 aim to be
   working more independently.
   What would you say is different about the speaking and listening you
    do in year 9 compared to year7?
Ability to evaluate and review work done and own progress. The progression in the range of
activities but still involving group work, pair work, working with peers, working in friendship
groups, or gender groups. The content of discussions and the depth of discussion should
have matured. Pupils should be able to comment and evaluate, justify ideas and explain in
detail and depth, using illustrations, examples, anecdotes. The extending of a response
should be evident. There should be signs of being able to reflect on what has been said and
review ideas and opinions in the light of this, to put forward a case, evaluate conflicting
evidence and to structure talk. There will be a greater sense of problem solving and the
ability to work independently on a task without the need for tasks to be as scaffolded by the
teacher.
   How have your drama skills helped you to understand your
    Shakespeare play?
Role playing characters to understand motives and feelings; understanding the difference in
what has been said and what can be shown through voice and gesture; trying out ideas and
hypotheses in role; considering differing interpretations; empathising with characters; trying
out the language out loud; recognising the conventions of a visual format rather than a
written one; understanding of the rhythms of the language;
   What do you have to do when your role in a group discussion is the
    chair person?
Structure the task, support the members of the group, allow all group members to have a
say, assign roles to other group members, summarise, move the discussion forward,
establish that the task has been completed well.

   If you had to persuade your teacher to use more ICT in English
    lessons how would you do it? What techniques work well when you
    have to persuade someone?
Use of rhetorical devices, list of three, repetition, alliteration, involve the audience, rhetorical
questions, emotive language, structuring the argument to make most important points
first,omission of some information, or with holding information to have an effect, considering
what will be effective for a particular audience.

   What does your teacher look for in your speaking and listening?
The role of the teacher in setting up groups and assessment of the work- how well I work in
the group, if I stay on task, how I listen, how I develop my ideas, how I ask questions, how I
involve others, how well I perform my role (scribe, chair, envoy), if I can report back my
ideas, if I can apply what I have heard in another task, ability to evaluate and justify ideas
and opinions, ability to reflect on what I have done well and what could be improved,
understanding of different evidence and information and how it is processed
Attitudes
   Are you a good speaker?
   Are you a good listener?
   What makes a good speaker and a good listener?
   What are the conditions in school that support your speaking and
    listening so that you can achieve your best?
   When do you use your speaking and listening skills?
   What would help you become a better speaker and listener?
   Do you think that speaking and listening should be tested in the
    SATs? Why?
                                            Year 9

Reading
Skills and Knowledge
   What would you say are your reading preferences now and how have
    they changed from year 7?
Review and evaluate – any responses are valid. Ideally of course, you are looking for range
and variety and pupils who still read for pleasure!!! It would be worth looking at whether they
are gender issues here. Value should be given to all reading that occurs e.g. also web sites,
hobbies, manuals, books related to interests etc. Possibly there will be pupils who have
favourite authors and can explain why they have these. It will give some idea about the kinds
of texts read by Year 9 pupils and what they have had access to.

   Can you tell me about a writer you have read this year who was
    writing before 1914? What is different about the way they write
    compared to a more recent writer?
Range of reading and experience of texts writing in different language. This could be a
dramatist or poet , fiction writer or someone writing texts like diaries, travel, information etc.
Preferably not Shakespeare..as this will have been studied for SATs.
Understanding of the way that language and vocabulary have changed over time;
understanding of writers using more complex sentences, complexity of clause phrases and
needing to find the main clause in sentences to follow the sense, some understanding that
content may be different – what could be said when,

   What do you understand by the term ‘literature’?
The objectives are looking in year 9 for pupils to have an idea of ‘literary heritage’ so here
would be looking for responses that show a feeling for why texts remain popular, possibly a
view on who tells us what is part of the literary heritage and what might be omitted from the
‘canon’.

   Tell me about a poet whose work you like. Why do you like it?
Range and variety and understanding of the way poetry is written. Try to establish whether
the poet was studied this year or if the pupil is talking about someone studied in past years.
Again looking for the ability to evaluate, make judgements and justify ideas. The poet may
be liked for their content – message, story, description; or for their style – use of simile,
metaphor, personification, assonance, alliteration, rhyme, rhythm; or because of the feelings
and emotions that the work conveyed to the pupil. Ideally the pupil may be able to compare
the work of their favoured poet to another poet, explaining why they like one in comparison
to the other.

   How do you think that writer’s meet the needs of readers?
Audience and purpose, techniques used, understanding of the kind of writing that is being
done and what the intended effect on the audience is going to be. Use of structuring to give
or with hold information; use of vocabulary to move, affect the emotions, persuade, draw the
reader in to the writing; description of characters, setting, events in fiction; use of figures of
speech, rhetorical devices; appropriate messages for appropriate audiences; organisation of
writing; planning; reworking;
   What do you think makes a good piece of descriptive writing?
Use of the senses, adjectives and adverbs, simile, metaphor, alliteration, assonance,
inclusion of telling details, some use of eye witness accounts

   We talk about ‘reading’ the media. What do you think this means?
    What do we have to consider when we see media texts?
Experience of media texts, understanding of messages conveyed in different media,
understanding of bias, fact, opinion, interpretation, points of view etc; how different media
can be used to convey messages in different ways; how visual images can support or
contradict what might be being said; the way that newspapers work – broadsheets and
tabloids; that messages might have a ‘side’ to them;

   Tell me about a book you have read this year – what did it tell you
    about the way we live or the society we live in?
The role of themes in writing – looking for responses which go beyond a description of the
plot and characters to look at the themes and messages of the story; some understanding of
why the story was written and what the purpose of the author was in writing it;




Attitudes
   Are you a good reader?
   What makes a good reader?
   What are the conditions in school that help you achieve your best in
    reading?
   What does your teacher look for in your reading?
   What would help you become a better reader?
   When do you use your reading skills?
   What role do you think reading will play as you move into Upper
    school and then into your life?
   Where do you get hold of good reading materials in school?
   Where do you get hold of good reading materials out of school?
                                            Year 9

Writing
Skills and Knowledge
   How do you think the writing that you do in year 9 is different to the
    writing you have done previously?
Review and evaluation – development of depth of detail required in writing content; and the
variety of writing forms; particularly the development of being able to write about other
writing – critical writing. More developed understanding of writing for particular audiences
and having a purpose for writing; possibly development in vocabulary and the ability to use
terminology to write about writing.
   What is it important to remember when you are writing a formal
    critical essay?
Formal tone, PEE (point, evidence, explain) structure, use of quotations, some
understanding of writing critically for GCSE?, standard English, often writing in the present
tense about texts as the events are still happening

   What is different about writing in timed conditions?
Preparation for SATs- importance of careful planning, still important to consider audience
and purpose, writing concisely, checking work quickly and being able to recognise errors and
do something about them. Understanding what is being asked.

   For what kinds of writing do you need to think about the layout of the
    piece, and what things do you need to think about?
Understanding of different forms of writing and the layout required for reports, newspapers,
diaries, poems, articles, explanations; ideas on headings and sub-headings, diagrams and
illustrations, captions, bullet points, letters etc. Pupil could take one of these to describe in
detail the layout.

   Why do you need to think about the purpose and audience for your
    writing?
Evaluate and give reasons for the need to make the task appropriate to the audience and
that this will affect the kind of language used, the length of the piece of writing, the way that
the piece is constructed- e.g. a leaflet on looking after your bicycle written for year 6 pupils
would be different to one written for adults.

   What is ‘rhetorical language’? When would you use it?
Language used to create an effect – often used when trying to persuade, or argue or sell.
Uses devices such as figures of speech – metaphor, simile, repetition; the list of three –
patterns of three things together; rhetorical questions; emotive or biased language; involving
the audience; the use of evidence and examples, statistics and anecdotes;

   How would you use quotation?
Quotation should be used to back up points that are being made, not to repeat them. Choice
of the right quotation is important; they should be short and concise, they should reinforce
your main topic sentence – the point of the PEE structure; longer quotes should be laid out
indented from the main body of text, with quotation marks; shorter quotes should be included
in the body of the text but with quotation marks. The explanation which follows a quote
should develop you main point further not translate the quotation.

   How does ICT support your writing?
Opinion and evaluation of ICT skills at this level, giving some idea of the access that pupils
have to ICT at school and at home. Issues about presentation for essay type work but other
ICT skills could be mentioned – software which supports study of texts e.g Shakespeare,
use of web materials for revision, for research;

   Is spelling important? Why?
The main reason for spelling to be accurate is to make language clear so that
communication can take place. I have included this question because it allows pupils to put
forward a point of view which may change over the next few years. It will also give an
indication of the value placed on spelling by the teachers/parents/pupils themselves

   What does your teacher look for in your writing?
Content – ideas, development of ideas, depth of ideas, appropriate to the task, appropriate
to the audience, planned, structured
Style – using the conventions appropriate to the form e.g. for instructions/explanation/a
newspaper; use of language, figures of speech, rhetorical language, breadth of vocabulary,
use of connectives, use of different sentence forms, variety in style, use of paragraphs,
standard English, use of adjectives, adverbs,
Correct – spellings, grammar, punctuation




Attitudes
   Are you a good writer?
   What makes a good writer?
   What are the conditions in school that help you to achieve your best
    in writing?
   What would help you become a better writer?
   When do you use your writing skills?
   The English Language is changing all the time, do you think this is a
    good thing?
   What will be important about writing when you start GCSEs?
            Appendix 2
   Pupil Questions Years 7, 8 & 9
With blank spaces for pupil response
Year 7

Speaking and Listening
Skills and Knowledge
   If someone was telling a story to the class, what would they have to
    remember to make it good?




   What do you think is different between a spoken and a written
    account?




   Can you give me three good rules for working together as a group
    when you are discussing a topic?




   How do you remember things when you are listening?
   Can you tell me about a time you changed your mind because of
    what someone else had said?




   Can you tell me how to find the headteacher’s office?




   What does your teacher look for in your speaking and listening?




Attitudes
   Do you think that speaking and listening activities help you to learn
    things?
   Tell me about a group activity you have done recently and the part
    you played in it.




   When do you use speaking and listening skills?




   Are you a good speaker and listener?




   What makes a good speaker and listener?




   What are the conditions in school that help you achieve your best in
    speaking and listening?
   What do you think would help you to improve your speaking and
    listening?




                                Year 7

Reading
Skills and Knowledge
   What kinds of things have you read this year?




   How do you choose what to read?




   Do you keep a record of your reading? How do you remember what
    you have read?
   Tell me about a book you have read recently. What was good about
    it?




   Tell me about a book you have read that you haven’t enjoyed. Why
    didn’t you enjoy it?




   Can you explain the difference between fiction and non-fiction to me?




   What do you think is meant by the expression ‘reading between the
    lines’?




   What kinds of things do writers do to make you want to read their
    books?
   What strategies do you use to help you read?




   Tell me about the reading that you do in other subjects.




   What does your teacher look for in your reading?




Attitudes
   Tell me about the reading that you do when you are not in school.




   When do you use your reading skills?
   Do you ever reread books or texts?




   What are the conditions in school that support your reading so that
    you can achieve your best?




   Are you a good reader?




   What makes a good reader?




   What do you think would help you to improve your reading?
   Where do you get interesting reading material in school?




   How do you get hold of good reading material out of school?




                                 Year 7

Writing
Skills and Knowledge
   Can you tell me about the kinds of writing you have done this year?




   How do you plan for a new piece of writing?
   Can you tell me why paragraphs are important in a piece of work?




   Can you tell me about the different types of sentences you use?




   What do you do when you check/edit/redraft your work?




   Do you use computers to help with your writing? How?




   In which subjects would you use these kinds of writing?
               Information
               Explanation
               Instructions
               Evaluation
   What techniques do poets use to make their poems interesting?




   How do you remember spellings?




Attitudes
   Tell me about a piece of writing you have done recently. What was
    good about it? What wasn’t good about it?




   When do you use your writing skills?




   Are you a good writer?
   What makes a good writer?




   What do you think would help you to improve your writing?




   What are the conditions in school that help you to achieve your best
    in writing?




   What does your teacher look for in your writing?
                                Year 8

Speaking and Listening
Skills and Knowledge
   What kinds of speaking and listening do you do?




   What is the difference between standard English and dialect?




   If you had to persuade me to come to your school, how would you do
    it?




   If you are watching video or TV at school, how do you remember
    what it is about and the important points?
   When you are in a group and you have to an agreement by the end
    of your talking, how do you get every one to agree?




   What kind of roles have you had in group work? Which role do you
    prefer?




   Tell me about the drama you have been involved in.




   What do you learn through role play?




   What does your teacher look for in your speaking and listening?
Attitudes
   Are you a good speaker and listener?




   What makes a good speaker and what makes a good listener?




   What would help you become a better speaker and listener?




   Does it matter if some people don’t contribute to group work or class
    discussion?




   Do you think speaking and listening is an important skill to have?
   When do you use your speaking and listening skills?




   What are the conditions in school that support you in speaking and
    listening?




                                  Year 8
Reading
Skills and Knowledge
   What kinds of reading have you done this year?




   How is it different to the reading you did last year?
   How do you decide what to read next?




   How does rereading a novel change your ideas about it?




   Can you tell me about a novel or a text this year where you were
    impressed by the way the writer put across their message? How did
    they do it?




   Can you tell me about genre?




   Can you explain what these words mean?
              Fact
              Opinion
              Bias
   What do you think the problems might be for film makers who want to
    adapt a book into a film e.g. ‘Harry Potter’ or ‘Lord of the Rings’?




Attitudes
   Where and when do you read?




   Are you a good reader?




   What makes a good reader?




   What would help you to become a better reader?
   What does your teacher look for in your reading?




   Do you have a favourite author? Who? What is it you like about
    them?




   What are the conditions in school that support your reading and help
    you achieve your best?




   Do you think technology has made a difference to the way we read?




   Where do you get hold of good reading material in school?





   Where do you get hold of good reading material outside of school?




   When do you use your reading skills?




                                   Year 8

Writing
Skills and Knowledge
   What kinds of writing have you done this year?




   How is it different to the writing you did last year?




   What do you need to think about when you start a piece of writing?
   When you write what do you do to keep the reader interested?




   If you were writing an argument how would you structure your
    writing?




   What do you understand by the term ‘formal language’?




   What kind of writing might use formal language and what kind of
    writing might use informal language?




   What is a complex sentence? Can you tell me when you would use
    them?
   What are connectives? Can you tell me when you would use them?




   When might you use ‘figures of speech’?




Attitudes
   Are you a good writer?




   What makes a good writer?




   What are the conditions in school that help support your writing?




   What would help you become a better writer?
   What does your teacher look for in your writing?




   When do you use your writing skills?




   How does ICT/computers help with your writing?
                                Year 9

Speaking and Listening
Skills and Knowledge
   What would you say is different about the speaking and listening you
    do in year 9 compared to year7?




   How have your drama skills helped you to understand your
    Shakespeare play?




   What do you have to do when your role in a group discussion is the
    chair person?




   If you had to persuade your teacher to use more ICT in English
    lessons how would you do it? What techniques work well when you
    have to persuade someone?
   What does your teacher look for in your speaking and listening?




Attitudes
   Are you a good speaker?




   Are you a good listener?




   What makes a good speaker and a good listener?




   What are the conditions in school that support your speaking and
    listening so that you can achieve your best?
   When do you use your speaking and listening skills?




   What would help you become a better speaker and listener?




   Do you think that speaking and listening should be tested in the
    SATs? Why?




                                 Year 9

Reading
Skills and Knowledge
   What would you say are your reading preferences now and how have
    they changed from year 7?
   Can you tell me about a writer you have read this year who was
    writing before 1914? What is different about the way they write
    compared to a more recent writer?




   What do you understand by the term ‘literature’?




   Tell me about a poet whose work you like. Why do you like it?




   How do you think that writer’s meet the needs of readers?




   What do you think makes a good piece of descriptive writing?
   We talk about ‘reading’ the media. What do you think this means?
    What do we have to consider when we see media texts?




   Tell me about a book you have read this year – what did it tell you
    about the way we live or the society we live in?








Attitudes
   Are you a good reader?




   What makes a good reader?
   What are the conditions in school that help you achieve your best in
    reading?




   What does your teacher look for in your reading?




   What would help you become a better reader?




   When do you use your reading skills?




   What role do you think reading will play as you move into Upper
    school and then into your life?
   Where do you get hold of good reading materials in school?




   Where do you get hold of good reading materials out of school?




                                  Year 9

Writing
Skills and Knowledge
   How do you think the writing that you do in year 9 is different to the
    writing you have done previously?




   What is it important to remember when you are writing a formal
    critical essay?
   What is different about writing in timed conditions?




   For what kinds of writing do you need to think about the layout of the
    piece, and what things do you need to think about?




   Why do you need to think about the purpose and audience for your
    writing?




   What is ‘rhetorical language’? When would you use it?




   How would you use quotation?
   How does ICT support your writing?




   Is spelling important? Why?




   What does your teacher look for in your writing?




Attitudes
   Are you a good writer?




   What makes a good writer?
   What are the conditions in school that help you to achieve your best
    in writing?




   What would help you become a better writer?




   When do you use your writing skills?




   The English Language is changing all the time, do you think this is a
    good thing?
   What will be important about writing when you start GCSEs?
      Appendix 3
Pupil Questions Year 10
    With ‘Answers’
                                            Year 10

Speaking and Listening
Skills and Knowledge
These questions are based on the objectives for year 9 and the fact that year 9 aim to be
   working more independently.
   What would you say is different about the speaking and listening you
    do in year 10 compared to year 9?
Ability to evaluate and review work done and own progress. The progression in the range of
activities but still involving group work, pair work, working with peers, working in friendship
groups, or gender groups. The content of discussions and the depth of discussion should
have matured. Pupils should be able to comment and evaluate, justify ideas and explain in
detail and depth, using illustrations, examples, anecdotes. The extending of a response
should be evident. There should be signs of being able to reflect on what has been said and
review ideas and opinions in the light of this, to put forward a case, evaluate conflicting
evidence and to structure talk. There will be a greater sense of problem solving and the
ability to work independently on a task without the need for tasks to be as scaffolded by the
teacher.
   What kind of speaking and listening do you do in school?

   Is the way you do speaking and listening organised in different ways
    in different lessons?

   If you had to persuade your teacher to use more ICT in English
    lessons how would you do it? What techniques work well when you
    have to persuade someone?
Use of rhetorical devices, list of three, repetition, alliteration, involve the audience, rhetorical
questions, emotive language, structuring the argument to make most important points
first,omission of some information, or with holding information to have an effect, considering
what will be effective for a particular audience.

   What does your teacher look for in your speaking and listening?
The role of the teacher in setting up groups and assessment of the work- how well I work in
the group, if I stay on task, how I listen, how I develop my ideas, how I ask questions, how I
involve others, how well I perform my role (scribe, chair, envoy), if I can report back my
ideas, if I can apply what I have heard in another task, ability to evaluate and justify ideas
and opinions, ability to reflect on what I have done well and what could be improved,
understanding of different evidence and information and how it is processed
Attitudes
   Are you a good speaker?
   Are you a good listener?
   What makes a good speaker and a good listener?
   What are the conditions in school that support your speaking and
    listening so that you can achieve your best?
   When do you use your speaking and listening skills?
   What would help you become a better speaker and listener?
   Do you think that speaking and listening should have been tested in
    the SATs? Why?
                                           Year 10

Reading
Skills and Knowledge
   What would you say are your reading preferences now and how have
    they changed from KS3?
Review and evaluate – any responses are valid. Ideally of course, you are looking for range
and variety and pupils who still read for pleasure!!! It would be worth looking at whether they
are gender issues here. Value should be given to all reading that occurs e.g. also web sites,
hobbies, manuals, books related to interests etc. Possibly there will be pupils who have
favourite authors and can explain why they have these. It will give some idea about the kinds
of texts read by Year 9 pupils and what they have had access to.

   What strategies do you use to read a new piece of text?
Skim, scan, close reading, continuous, visualising, predicting, retrospection, looking for
evidence, asking questions of a text, inferring, deduction, empathising

   Tell me about a poet whose work you like. Why do you like it?
Range and variety and understanding of the way poetry is written. Try to establish whether
the poet was studied this year or if the pupil is talking about someone studied in past years.
Again looking for the ability to evaluate, make judgements and justify ideas. The poet may
be liked for their content – message, story, description; or for their style – use of simile,
metaphor, personification, assonance, alliteration, rhyme, rhythm; or because of the feelings
and emotions that the work conveyed to the pupil. Ideally the pupil may be able to compare
the work of their favoured poet to another poet, explaining why they like one in comparison
to the other.

   How do you think that writer’s meet the needs of readers?
Audience and purpose, techniques used, understanding of the kind of writing that is being
done and what the intended effect on the audience is going to be. Use of structuring to give
or with hold information; use of vocabulary to move, affect the emotions, persuade, draw the
reader in to the writing; description of characters, setting, events in fiction; use of figures of
speech, rhetorical devices; appropriate messages for appropriate audiences; organisation of
writing; planning; reworking;

   What do you think makes a good piece of descriptive writing?
Use of the senses, adjectives and adverbs, simile, metaphor, alliteration, assonance,
inclusion of telling details, some use of eye witness accounts

   We talk about ‘reading’ the media. What do you think this means?
    What do we have to consider when we see media texts?
Experience of media texts, understanding of messages conveyed in different media,
understanding of bias, fact, opinion, interpretation, points of view etc; how different media
can be used to convey messages in different ways; how visual images can support or
contradict what might be being said; the way that newspapers work – broadsheets and
tabloids; that messages might have a ‘side’ to them;

   Tell me about a book you have read this year .
   What reading do you do in other subject areas?




Attitudes
   Are you a good reader?
   What makes a good reader?
   What are the conditions in school that help you achieve your best in
    reading?
   What does your teacher look for in your reading?
   What would help you become a better reader?
   When do you use your reading skills?
   Where do you get hold of good reading materials in school?
   Where do you get hold of good reading materials out of school?
                                           Year 10

Writing
Skills and Knowledge
   How do you think the writing that you do in year 10 is different to the
    writing you have done previously?
Review and evaluation – development of depth of detail required in writing content; and the
variety of writing forms; particularly the development of being able to write about other
writing – critical writing. More developed understanding of writing for particular audiences
and having a purpose for writing; possibly development in vocabulary and the ability to use
terminology to write about writing.

   What kind of writing have you done in school this year?
   What is it important to remember when you are writing a formal
    critical essay?
Formal tone, PEE (point, evidence, explain) structure, use of quotations, some
understanding of writing critically for GCSE?, standard English, often writing in the present
tense about texts as the events are still happening

   What is different about writing in timed conditions?
Preparation for GCSE- importance of careful planning, still important to consider audience
and purpose, writing concisely, checking work quickly and being able to recognise errors and
do something about them. Understanding what is being asked.

   For what kinds of writing do you need to think about the layout of the
    piece, and what things do you need to think about?
Understanding of different forms of writing and the layout required for reports, newspapers,
diaries, poems, articles, explanations; ideas on headings and sub-headings, diagrams and
illustrations, captions, bullet points, letters etc. Pupil could take one of these to describe in
detail the layout.

   Why do you need to think about the purpose and audience for your
    writing?
Evaluate and give reasons for the need to make the task appropriate to the audience and
that this will affect the kind of language used, the length of the piece of writing, the way that
the piece is constructed- e.g. a leaflet on looking after your bicycle written for year 6 pupils
would be different to one written for adults.

   What is ‘rhetorical language’? When would you use it?
Language used to create an effect – often used when trying to persuade, or argue or sell.
Uses devices such as figures of speech – metaphor, simile, repetition; the list of three –
patterns of three things together; rhetorical questions; emotive or biased language; involving
the audience; the use of evidence and examples, statistics and anecdotes;

   How would you use quotation?
Quotation should be used to back up points that are being made, not to repeat them. Choice
of the right quotation is important; they should be short and concise, they should reinforce
your main topic sentence – the point of the PEE structure; longer quotes should be laid out
indented from the main body of text, with quotation marks; shorter quotes should be included
in the body of the text but with quotation marks. The explanation which follows a quote
should develop you main point further not translate the quotation.

   How does ICT support your writing?
Opinion and evaluation of ICT skills at this level, giving some idea of the access that pupils
have to ICT at school and at home. Issues about presentation for essay type work but other
ICT skills could be mentioned – software which supports study of texts e.g Shakespeare,
use of web materials for revision, for research;

   Is spelling important? Why?
The main reason for spelling to be accurate is to make language clear so that
communication can take place. I have included this question because it allows pupils to put
forward a point of view which may change over the next few years. It will also give an
indication of the value placed on spelling by the teachers/parents/pupils themselves

   What does your teacher look for in your writing?
Content – ideas, development of ideas, depth of ideas, appropriate to the task, appropriate
to the audience, planned, structured
Style – using the conventions appropriate to the form e.g. for instructions/explanation/a
newspaper; use of language, figures of speech, rhetorical language, breadth of vocabulary,
use of connectives, use of different sentence forms, variety in style, use of paragraphs,
standard English, use of adjectives, adverbs,
Correct – spellings, grammar, punctuation




Attitudes
   Are you a good writer?
   What makes a good writer?
   What are the conditions in school that help you to achieve your best
    in writing?
   What would help you become a better writer?
   When do you use your writing skills?
   The English Language is changing all the time, do you think this is a
    good thing?
             Appendix 4
       Pupil Questions Year 10
With blank spaces for pupil responses
                                Year 10

Speaking and Listening
Skills and Knowledge

   What would you say is different about the speaking and listening you
    do in year 10 compared to year 9?




   What kind of speaking and listening do you do in school?




   Is the way you do speaking and listening organised in different ways
    in different lessons?




   If you had to persuade your teacher to use more ICT in English
    lessons how would you do it? What techniques work well when you
    have to persuade someone?
   What does your teacher look for in your speaking and listening?




Attitudes
   Are you a good speaker?




   Are you a good listener?




   What makes a good speaker and a good listener?




   What are the conditions in school that support your speaking and
    listening so that you can achieve your best?
   When do you use your speaking and listening skills?




   What would help you become a better speaker and listener?




   Do you think that speaking and listening should have been tested in
    the SATs? Why?
                                Year 10

Reading
Skills and Knowledge
   What would you say are your reading preferences now and how have
    they changed from KS3?




   What strategies do you use to read a new piece of text?




   Tell me about a poet whose work you like. Why do you like it?




   How do you think that writer’s meet the needs of readers?
   What do you think makes a good piece of descriptive writing?




   We talk about ‘reading’ the media. What do you think this means?
    What do we have to consider when we see media texts?




   Tell me about a book you have read this year .




   What reading do you do in other subject areas?
Attitudes
   Are you a good reader?




   What makes a good reader?




   What are the conditions in school that help you achieve your best in
    reading?




   What does your teacher look for in your reading?
   What would help you become a better reader?




   When do you use your reading skills?




   Where do you get hold of good reading materials in school?




   Where do you get hold of good reading materials out of school?
                                 Year 10

Writing
Skills and Knowledge
   How do you think the writing that you do in year 10 is different to the
    writing you have done previously?




   What kind of writing have you done in school this year?




   What is it important to remember when you are writing a formal
    critical essay?
   What is different about writing in timed conditions?




   For what kinds of writing do you need to think about the layout of the
    piece, and what things do you need to think about?




   Why do you need to think about the purpose and audience for your
    writing?




   What is ‘rhetorical language’? When would you use it?




   How would you use quotation?
   How does ICT support your writing?




   Is spelling important? Why?




   What does your teacher look for in your writing?




Attitudes
   Are you a good writer?
   What makes a good writer?




   What are the conditions in school that help you to achieve your best
    in writing?




   What would help you become a better writer?




   When do you use your writing skills?
   The English Language is changing all the time, do you think this is a
    good thing?

				
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