Entrepreneur Harvest Strategies by anr14138

VIEWS: 80 PAGES: 311

Entrepreneur Harvest Strategies document sample

More Info
									PORTFOLIO ID       PORTFOLIO NAME


               2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




               2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


               2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




               2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


               2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




               2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
               2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


               2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




               2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
               2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
               2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
               2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2   Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products


2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products




2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products

2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
2 Processing, Engineering and Technology for Food and Bio Products
KNOWLEDGE AREA CODE     KNOWLEDGE AREA NAME


                  502 New and Improved Food Products




                  502 New and Improved Food Products


                  502 New and Improved Food Products




                  502 New and Improved Food Products


                  502 New and Improved Food Products




                  502 New and Improved Food Products
                  502 New and Improved Food Products


                  502 New and Improved Food Products




                  502   New and Improved Food Products
                  502   New and Improved Food Products
                  502   New and Improved Food Products
                  502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products

502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products

502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products


502 New and Improved Food Products


502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products

502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products

502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products
502   New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products


502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products


502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products


502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products


502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products


502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products


502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products




502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products

502 New and Improved Food Products
502 New and Improved Food Products
PROGRAM NAME


Statewide Goat Research Program




Food and Non-Food Products: Development, Processing, Quality, and Delivery


Tropical Food Processing and Safety




Tropical Food Processing and Safety


Tropical Food Processing and Safety




Food Production Systems: Development, Processing, Quality, and Safety
Food, Nutrition & Health


Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Food Safety
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture

Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture

Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Foods and Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition

Foods and Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition




Foods and Nutrition




Food Production Systems: Development, Processing, Quality, and Safety




Food Production Systems: Development, Processing, Quality, and Safety




Food, Nutrition, and Health




Food, Nutrition, and Health




3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health
3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health


3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health


3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

Evaluating strategies to promote the goat meat industry in Tennessee

Evaluating strategies to promote the goat meat industry in Tennessee
Evaluating strategies to promote the goat meat industry in Tennessee
Evaluating strategies to promote the goat meat industry in Tennessee
Evaluating strategies to promote the goat meat industry in Tennessee
Sustainable Individuals, Families, and Communities




Biobased Products and Processing




Biobased Products and Processing
Biobased Products and Processing




Biobased Products and Processing




Biobased Products and Processing




Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production




Agriculture - Crop Production
Program in the Post Harvest Quality of Fruits and Vegetables




Food Quality, Nutrition, Engineering and Processing




Food Quality, Nutrition, Engineering and Processing
Food Quality, Nutrition, Engineering and Processing




Food Systems and Biological Engineering




Food Systems and Biological Engineering
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production

Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production
Agriculture - Crop Production

Food Safety
Food Safety

Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture
Home Horticulture

Agriculture - Crop Production
Home Horticulture




Food Product Development, Processing and Safety




Value Added Products




Sustainable Individuals, Families, and Communities
Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health




Commercial and Consumer Horticulture




Commercial and Consumer Horticulture




Commercial and Consumer Horticulture
Commercial and Consumer Horticulture




Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Crops


Biotechnology & Genomics

Biotechnology & Genomics

Biotechnology & Genomics
Biotechnology & Genomics




Biotechnology & Genomics




Biotechnology & Genomics

Biotechnology & Genomics




7.Generate and Improve Hawaii's Products, Processes and Market
Food and Non-Food Products
Commercial and Consumer Horticulture
Food Systems-OARDC Led




Food Systems-OARDC Led
Food Systems-OARDC Led
Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health

Food Quality, Nutrition, Engineering and Processing




Food Quality, Nutrition, Engineering and Processing
Food Quality, Nutrition, Engineering and Processing
Biotechnology & Genomics




Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition




Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition




Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition




Program in Biological Systems Engineering
Nutrition and Food
Agromedicine, Nutrition and Food Safety




Food Systems-OARDC Led
Food Systems-OARDC Led




Overall Program




The IMPACT Center




The IMPACT Center
The IMPACT Center




The IMPACT Center


The IMPACT Center




Program in Animal Science

Program in Animal Science




Food Systems
Ag: Dryland Cropping Systems




Development of New Dairy Goat Products




Development of New Dairy Goat Products
Enhanced Goat Production in the South-Central United States




Enhanced Goat Production in the South-Central United States




Ag: High Rainfall and Irrigated Cropping Systems




Development of New Dairy Goat Products
III. NUTRITION AND HEALTH




III. NUTRITION AND HEALTH




III. NUTRITION AND HEALTH
Food Processing, Product Storage, and Food and Product Safety




High Latitude Agriculture- AFES


Maintaining agricultural production systems that are highly competitive in the global economy

Maintaining agricultural production systems that are highly competitive in the global economy

Maintaining agricultural production systems that are highly competitive in the global economy


Assuring the safety, security and abundance of our food supply

Assuring the safety, security and abundance of our food supply

Assuring the safety, security and abundance of our food supply

FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION




FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION
FOOD SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY, AND NUTRITION




Commercial and Consumer Horticulture




High Latitude Agriculture- AFES

Cereals




Food and Non-food Products, Development, Processing, Quality and Delivery

Meat and Dairy Goat Production and Processing
New and Improved Food Processing Systems to Ensure a Safe, Wholesome and High-Value Food Supply




Animal Health and Disease




Animal Health and Disease


New and Improved Food Processing Systems to Ensure a Safe, Wholesome and High-Value Food Supply




New and Improved Food Processing Systems to Ensure a Safe, Wholesome and High-Value Food Supply




Cereals

Cereals

Cereals
Cereals
INSTITUTION NAME 1                INSTITUTION NAME 2


Florida A&M University




Purdue University


University of Guam




University of Guam


University of Guam




North Carolina State University   North Carolina A&T State University
University of Arkansas


University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine




University of Maine




North Carolina State University                 North Carolina A&T State University




North Carolina State University                 North Carolina A&T State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State University   Virginia State University




Cornell University                              NY State Agricultural Experiment Station
Cornell University           NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University           NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University           NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University           NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University           NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University           NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University           NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University
Tennessee State University
Tennessee State University
Tennessee State University
University of Alaska




Montana State University




Montana State University
Montana State University




Montana State University




Montana State University




University of Maine
University of Maine




University of Maine
Washington State University




Michigan State University




Michigan State University
Michigan State University




University of Missouri




University of Missouri
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine
University of Maine

University of Maine
University of Maine




University of Illinois




University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff




University of Alaska
College of Micronesia




College of Micronesia
College of Micronesia




Iowa State University




Iowa State University




Iowa State University
Iowa State University




University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff


University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire




University of Hawaii
Iowa State University
Iowa State University
Ohio State University




Ohio State University
Ohio State University
University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire

Michigan State University




Michigan State University
Michigan State University
University of New Hampshire




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




Washington State University
Louisiana State University
North Carolina A&T State University




Ohio State University
Ohio State University




University of Wisconsin




Washington State University




Washington State University
Washington State University




Washington State University


Washington State University




Washington State University

Washington State University




Prairie View A&M University
Oregon State University




Langston University




Langston University
Langston University




Langston University




Oregon State University




Langston University
Southern University and A&M College




Southern University and A&M College




Southern University and A&M College
Oklahoma State University




University of Alaska


Auburn University           Alabama A&M University

Auburn University           Alabama A&M University

Auburn University           Alabama A&M University


Auburn University           Alabama A&M University

Auburn University           Alabama A&M University

Auburn University           Alabama A&M University

University of Delaware      Delaware State University




University of Delaware      Delaware State University
University of Delaware          Delaware State University




Oklahoma State University




University of Alaska

University of Idaho




South Dakota State University

University of Georgia           Fort Valley State University
Oregon State University




Oregon State University




Oregon State University


Oregon State University




Oregon State University




University of Idaho

University of Idaho

University of Idaho
University of Idaho
INSTITUTION NAME 3   INSTITUTION NAME 4   STATE CODE STATE NAME


                                          FL         Florida




                                          IN         Indiana


                                          GU         Guam




                                          GU         Guam


                                          GU         Guam




                                          NC         North Carolina
                                          AR         Arkansas


                                          AR         Arkansas




                                          AR         Arkansas
                                          AR         Arkansas
                                          AR         Arkansas
                                          AR         Arkansas
AR   Arkansas
AR   Arkansas
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine




ME   Maine




NC   North Carolina




NC   North Carolina




VA   Virginia




VA   Virginia




NY   New York
NY   New York

NY   New York


NY   New York


NY   New York

NY   New York

NY   New York

NY   New York

TN   Tennessee

TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee
TN   Tennessee
AK   Alaska




MT   Montana




MT   Montana
MT   Montana




MT   Montana




MT   Montana




ME   Maine
ME   Maine




ME   Maine
WA   Washington




MI   Michigan




MI   Michigan
MI   Michigan




MO   Missouri




MO   Missouri
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine
ME   Maine

ME   Maine
ME   Maine




IL   Illinois




AR   Arkansas




AK   Alaska
FM   Micronesia, Fed States




FM   Micronesia, Fed States
FM   Micronesia, Fed States




IA   Iowa




IA   Iowa




IA   Iowa
IA   Iowa




AR   Arkansas


NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire
NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire




HI   Hawaii
IA   Iowa
IA   Iowa
OH   Ohio




OH   Ohio
OH   Ohio
NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire

MI   Michigan




MI   Michigan
MI   Michigan
NH   New Hampshire




TN   Tennessee




TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee




TN   Tennessee




WA   Washington
LA   Louisiana
NC   North Carolina




OH   Ohio
OH   Ohio




WI   Wisconsin




WA   Washington




WA   Washington
WA   Washington




WA   Washington


WA   Washington




WA   Washington

WA   Washington




TX   Texas
OR   Oregon




OK   Oklahoma




OK   Oklahoma
OK   Oklahoma




OK   Oklahoma




OR   Oregon




OK   Oklahoma
LA   Louisiana




LA   Louisiana




LA   Louisiana
                      OK   Oklahoma




                      AK   Alaska


Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama

Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama

Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama


Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama

Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama

Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama

                      DE   Delaware




                      DE   Delaware
DE   Delaware




OK   Oklahoma




AK   Alaska

ID   Idaho




SD   South Dakota

GA   Georgia
OR   Oregon




OR   Oregon




OR   Oregon


OR   Oregon




OR   Oregon




ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho

ID   Idaho
ID   Idaho
OUTCOME MEASURE
More use of sustainable production practices; Reduction in feed and health costs; Enhanced
marketable products and markets; Greater profitability and competitiveness; Well-trained
graduate and undergraduate students.




Number of persons gaining knowledge in enology and viticulture


% of participants gaining food processing knowledge and skills




% of participants adopting food processing techniques


# of new value food products on the markets




Number of requests for technical assistance from small business and entrepreneurs for
developing new or expanding food processes or systems.
Number of research projects conducted related to Food, Nutrition & Health

Number of participants who indicated that they increased their knowledge related to Food,
Nutrition & Health following an educational class, seminar, or workshop




Number of Refereed Journal Publications
Number of food processing and safety laboratory services provided
Number of Nutrition labels developed
Number of journal articles accepted
Business start ups
Number of new food businesses started
Adopt appropriate technologies
Adopt practices that maintain long-term productivity
Keep livestock healthy
Use relevant UMCE web-based resources
Access relevant UMCE publications.
Demonstrate how to access community resources
Demonstrate how to locate scientific information
Demonstrate production recordkeeping
Demonstrate sustainable living skills
Describe community resources
Describe HACCP principles
Adopt appropriate technologies
Adopt environmentally sound technologies that improve economic viability
Develop partnerships among organizations or groups
Engage in leadership development
Evaluate the potential of new and non-traditional crops and varieties for profitable
production in Maine
Grow new crop
Grow new variety
Improve production and quality of crops
Increase consumption of locally-grown food
Increase purchase of Maine products
Make appropriate cultivar choices
Pounds of food donated
Provide learning opportunities for groups or organizations
Test new production techniques
Test new varieties
Use relevant UMCE web-based resources
Describe an improved quality of life
Demonstrate effective collaborations skills and techniques
Demonstrate how to analyze records for decision making
Demonstrate how to evaluate the potential of new and non-traditional crops and varieties for
profitable production in Maine
Describe hoop house crop management
Describe hoop house technology
Describe new crops and varieties
Describe practices that improve efficiency, reduce inputs, or increase profitability
Describe solar heating technology
# of new natural antimicrobials developed from fruits and/or vegetables
% of Maine food processors learning about principles of food safety programs
% of Maine food processors establishing their own HACCP plans
% of Maine food processors adopting new technologies to reduce microbial contamination of
food products
# of new crab-protein-based products developed
Reduction in incidence of type 2 diabetes in Maine




New methods to improve the post-harvest quality of fresh-cut and processed Maine potatoes




Number of companies adopting new technologies




Number of new companies in food manufacturing




Food Safety - Number of Virginia food producers and processors to implement (pre and post
harvest) HACCP, quality assurance programs and processing technology that will provide for
increased food safety and processing efficiency




Number of raw food samples tested for increased internet purchase food safety.

# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to food, nutrition
and health topics including: attitudes about healthy eating, healthy food choices, selection of
healthy foods, preparation of healthy foods. (3.1.1e)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to benefits of
physical activity, physical activity recommendations for health and obesity prevention. (3.1.1f)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to healthy weight
gain during pregnancy and breast feeding. (3.1.1g)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to issues that
influence food and health behavior and associated appropriate public/community actions,
programs, and policy. (3.1.1h)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to status of food
security in their communities and possible actions to promote increased food security.
(3.1.2c)
# of program participants documented to have applied dietary and food safety
recommendations daily in meals and snacks. (3.1.1i)
# of program participants documented to have managed food budgets and related resources
to meet family needs. (3.1.1k)

# of program participants who have acted to improve their food security status. (3.1.2e)

Increase in number of goat producers with knowledge of efficient marketing techniques

Increase in number of local restaurants and businesses with knowledge of goat meat qualities
Increase in number of goat producers educated in specific consumer preferences
Percent increase in demand for goat meat in Tennessee
Percent increase in goat meat production in Tennessee
Outcome target 1: Participants in food preservation and food safety classes will improve their
knowledge of food preservation and food safety practices.




Number of SBIR funding proposals submitted to federal agencies




Number of opportunities and value-added programs introduced in Montana through
continued education, research and partnering
Number of new products with value-added potential evaluated per year within Montana




New or expand business and/or partnerships created inside and   outside of Montana




Number of new food safety recommendations developed for consumers, which add value to
Montana's agricultural products
Adopt new crop
Adopt practices that maintain profitability
Develop sustainable networks
Evaluate new cropping systems
Evaluate the potential of new and non-traditional crops and varieties for profitable
production in Maine
Expand and enhance markets
Grow new crop
Improve crop quality and marketability
Improve production and quality of crops
Increase purchase of Maine products
Test new crops
Test new production techniques
Develop partnerships among organizations or groups
Manage business to achieve profit
Adopt appropriate practices
Adopt practices that maintain profitability
Expand and enhance markets
Develop partnerships among organizations or groups
Manage business to achieve profit
Adopt appropriate pest management practices
Adopt appropriate practices
Adopt appropriate technologies
Adopt new crop
Adopt practices that maintain profitability
Evaluate new cropping systems
Evaluate the potential of new and non-traditional crops and varieties for profitable
production in Maine
Expand and enhance markets
Grow new variety
Make appropriate cultivar choices
Test new crops
Test new production techniques
Test new varieties
Grow trialled plants
Please see written paragraph under evaluation.




Number of research projects to identify breeding and genetic improvements related to food
safety, nutrition and processing.
Number of research programs to create a biorefinery for testing concepts, developing
applications, creating prototypes for the bioproducts industry, training the growing work
force, and spurring innovation and engineering of next generation bioproducts equipment and
technologies.
Number of research programs to connect Michigan industries with research, education and
entrepreneurial activity needed in the basic sciences, engineering, plant science and
agriculture to provide the state with a foundation for vigorous development of a new
biobased economic sector.




Develop new uses and products from biomass - food and nonfood (fuels, plastics, acids, etc).




Improve efficiency in conversion processes.
Access relevant UMCE publications
Access relevant UMCE web-based resources
Use relevant UMCE web-based resources
Demonstrate how to test new varieties
Demonstrate new variety performance and potential
Describe the value of networks
Adopt appropriate handling and storage technologies
Enhance the safety, sustainability, and dependability of Maine's food supply.
Improve the lives of Maine citizens through positive human development, healthy lifestyles
and nutrition, and lifelong wellness.
Develop environmentally sound technologies that improve economic viability
Develop sustainable networks
Enroll in and work with Farms for the Future
Expand and enhance markets
Improve crop quality and marketability
Test new crops
Enhance the economic and environmental sustainability of Maine agriculture and
aquaculture.
Enhance the safety, sustainability, and dependability of Maine's food supply.
Improve the lives of Maine citizens through positive human development, healthy lifestyles
and nutrition, and lifelong wellness.
Access relevant UMCE publications
Demonstrate how to create effective partnerships in communities
Reduce the use of high-risk pesticides
Describe the advantages of new technologies to improve crop yield and quality and to reduce
environmental impacts
Test new crops




Percentage Increase In The Use Of Biodegradable Packaging Materials




Increase number of small farmers and producers who adopt UAPB's Fresh-Cut Processing
Technology and utilize it for their fresh-cut process.




Outcome target 2: Participants in food preservation and food safety classes will improve their
food preservation and food safety practices.
Number of program participants who increase awareness of nutrition related health issues.




Number of program participants adopting recommended practices after completing
educational programs.
Annually increase the number of healthy food snacks or lunch programs in schools and
communities.




Increase the number of clients who participate in horticulture programs on production
methods, market outlets, Best Management Practices, and IPM techniques.




Increase the number of new horticulture businesses and the expansion of existing horticulture
businesses assisted through county offices.




Increase involvement of Master Gardener volunteers in their communities. (Measure the
number of volunteer hours per year.)
Increase the quality and quantity of horticulture information accessible to the gardening
public. (Measure number of peer-reviewed extension publications.)




# of people adopted the new foods in their daily diets


Peer Reviewed Publications

Number of Readers of Peer Reviewed Publications

Number in audience of class or scientific meeting
Number of Graduate students trained in laboratories




Number of undergraduate students trained in laboratory; involved in investigations




Number of grant submissions

Number of meetings/workshops attended




Total dollar value of grants and contracts obtained
Number of refereed publications per year.
Number of refereed journal publications per year.
Advance the study of stacking functional foods that have a lower than expected societal
demand (e.g. soy) with more desirable foods such as tomato products as a means of providing
consumers with more access than is currently present.




Expand utilization of products with known functionality or nutraceutical value and give
consumers greater informed consumer choice, including the bioavailability of the desire
substance in the food, than they presently have.
Reduce health risk by releasing at least one major study each five years demonstrating
nutritional health benefits, e.g. carotenoids and cataracts, anthocyanins and colon cancer or
as a substitute for artificial dyes.
Number of graduate students trained


Number of presentations/posters at regional, national or international conferences or
workshops
Number of research programs to identify and isolate beneficial plant compounds that can be
used to make new functional foods.




Number of research programs to develop the processes and technologies to manufacture
functional foods.
Number of research programs to develop new biosensors and DNA chips that can rapidly and
accurately detect a broad spectrum of harmful organisms in food and water, such as E. coli,
Salmonella, Listeria, Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium and
Change in policy




Encapsulation of pharmaceutical compounds




Fruit and vegetable quality


Novel biodegradable and edible films and coatings




Polyunsaturated fatty acids and human health


Process Technology Development at the laboratory bench for first three years; 4th year to the
pilot scale; 5th year to the industry
Participants are knowledgeable about and follow healthy weight management practices
# of companies purchasing licenses for food and food safety related patents




Advance processing techniques, e.g. electrostatic coating, to achieve the desired traits
requested by industrial partners, that are manifested in consumer demand studies, or that are
novel technologies that may meet latent needs
Contribute to the advancement of food packaging technologies, e.g. ultrasonic sealing,
controlled environment packaging, to the extent that, annually, the risk of contamination due
to packaging is reduced measurably.




Outcome measures for this work are both qualitative and quantitative. We will rely on
feedback from stakeholder groups, advisory boards, and individual constituents, as well as
from UW Extension teams on the relevance, importance and impact of our research program.
The output measures listed earlier will also serve as outcome measures in that patents
graduate degrees, and publications all include an element of critical review and assessment of
uniqueness, originality, contribution to the science and knowledge base, or other
performance criteria. Finally, we will use the Thomson ISI Essential Science Indicator for
agricultural science as a measure of impact of our research program. Our target for this
outcome measure is to be ranked in the top 5 institutions in the United States. We will
continue to develop impact statements for individual projects which have shown exemplary
and significant impact.
Publications:




Grants




Expanded knowledge base
Graduate students and post-docs trained




Research Support increased


New personnel in research positions




Enhanced food quality, food safety, consumer acceptance of foods from animal sources and
issues of animal and human health.

Develop mitigation strategies to reduce the impact of animal CAFOs on air and water quality
-Commercialization of methods/technology for improving the quality, safety and use of food
and food products for the reduction of obesity, food borne illnesses and other nutritionally
related diseases.
-Nutrition/exercise intervention programs leading to a reduction in obesity.
-Increase in the dissemination and use of research based information into newsletters and
incorporation into extension and other programs leading to a reduction in nutrition related
and food borne diseases and illnesses.
Percentage of Farmers Using Extension Information.




Number of goat producers learning about techniques for developing new dairy goat products.




Goat producers developing increasing yearly income from new dairy goat products.
Number of goat producers learning new goat production techniques




Number of goat producers using new goat production techniques




Economic Impact of New Varieties Planted (Million $)




Number of goat producers using techniques for developing new dairy goat products.
1. Percent of clients who gained new knowledge/skills, awareness and/or changed attitudes.




2. Percentage of clients who adopt healthy recommendations




3. Percentage of clients who changed behavior
New products produced




Number of new crop and animal markets identified and utilized.

Market value of agricultural products ($ billion) (2002 = $3.26 bil). Program success will be
indicated if market value of AL ag products stay level or increase. (Medium term outcome)
Number of producers (ALFA cites 48,000, Apr. 2006). Program success will be reflected by
little or no change in size of the population of producers. (Long-term)
Average producer age (2002 = 56.6). Program success will be indicated by declining or no
change in the average producer age. (Long-term)
Decreased incidence of cases of food poisoning (AL state stats, % deaths from Salmonella and
other intestinal infections in 2004 = 1.6%). Program success will be indicated by a decline or
no change in this incidence. (Short-term outcome)

New technology(-ies) developed to monitor microbial contaminants. (Medium term outcome)

New professionals in workforce with training in food safety and security. (Long-term)
Safe, new food products that are preserved using innovative technologies designed to
maintain food quality and nutrient content.

Food science and technology: basic and applied research will lead to optimization of
intervention strategies incorporating high hydrostatic pressure processing, ultraviolet light,
ozone treatment, active packaging and low-temperature storage to eliminate or significantly
reduce the source of foodborne disease in food products. Applied food science research and
extension programs in these areas will increase awareness to food producers and consumers
of the most effective strategies for food product safety.
Food safety: research and extension programs will lead to enhanced safety and
wholesomeness of foods as a result of improved understanding of the mechanisms whereby
food pathogens exist, enter, survive, propagate and actuate disease syndromes in individuals
who consume contaminated products. Gene-based methods to rapidly and accurately identify
food-borne pathogens will increase the safety of food products.




Number of horticultural crop producers newly certified as organic




Number of new products and new uses of traditional products available for markets.
O: Participation by clientele at Idaho cereal schools, field days, seminars, re-certification
events.I: Attendance at schools.




Number of producers/processors/end users that have developed and are delivering a product
impacts the economic/quality of life for the people of South Dakota.
Number of research experiments completed on dairy goat products development, food
quality and economic evaluation.
Application of knowledge and new leading-edge food technologies will result in improved
food quality, value and safety with positive impacts on value-added food production,
processing, handling, and distribution systems. Another expected outcome is to provide
intervention strategies to reduce bacterial contamination, increase shelf life, and reduce
occurrences of food-borne illnesses.
Researchers gain information about how viruses and bacteria operate in animals and shellfish:

- the different pathways for influenza occurrence and pathogenesis
- genetic transformation system for C. suis.
- molecular mechanisms underlying Vibrio bacterial-shellfish interaction
- how SPO0A regulates CPE synthesis
- M. paratuberculosis interacts with the intestinal mucosa
Lives would be saved or made safer through recombinant flu vaccine, Chitosan-based
bandages, and reduction/elimination of Vibrio presence in shellfish. Furthermore,
preparedness in anticipation of zoonotic outbreaks of avian influenza and better health
promotion.
Distance and Extension education regarding food safety, food processing, value-added foods,
food packaging. Information targeted to consumers, food processing industry, and
government agency / regulatory decision-makers.

Knowledge generation and databases of food safety and food processing technologies; flavor
/ ingredient databases that relate to food quality parameters. As a result of this program
individuals and industry will modify food production and handling practices. Policy makers
will develop food processing regulations that prevent incidences of food-borne illnesses.




O: An increase in the number of trained graduate students prepared to enter the workforce.
 I: Number of M.S. and Ph.D. candidates relevant to this topic team.
O: Use/awareness of Cereal resource publications.I: Number of cereal extension publications
distributed.
O: Adoption of new crop production methods.I: Survey in meetings with growers, variety
selection, acreage sprayed.
O: Adoption of new varieties by growers.I: Acreage of new varieties greater than previously
grown.
OUTCOME TYPE        KA PERCENTAGE - 1862 EXTENSION        KA PERCENTAGE - 1890 EXTENSION


Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome                                    22


Knowledge Outcome                                    25




Action Outcome                                       25


Condition Outcome                                    25




Knowledge Outcome                                    15                                    15
Knowledge Outcome                                     5


Knowledge Outcome                                     5




Action Outcome                                        5
Action Outcome                                        5
Action Outcome                                        5
Action Outcome                                        5
Condition Outcome   5
Condition Outcome   5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5

Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5

Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome

Action Outcome
Knowledge Outcome
Condition Outcome




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome   15   15




Knowledge Outcome   15   15




Action Outcome      10   10




Action Outcome      10   10




Knowledge Outcome   18
Knowledge Outcome   18

Knowledge Outcome   18


Knowledge Outcome   18


Knowledge Outcome   18

Action Outcome      18

Action Outcome      18

Action Outcome      18

Action Outcome

Action Outcome
Condition Outcome
Condition Outcome
Condition Outcome
Knowledge Outcome   5




Knowledge Outcome




Action Outcome
Knowledge Outcome




Condition Outcome




Action Outcome




Action Outcome      15
Action Outcome      15




Action Outcome      15
Knowledge Outcome




Condition Outcome   17




Condition Outcome   17
Knowledge Outcome   17




Condition Outcome




Condition Outcome
Knowledge Outcome   15
Knowledge Outcome   15
Action Outcome      15
Knowledge Outcome   15
Knowledge Outcome   15
Knowledge Outcome   15
Action Outcome      15
Condition Outcome   15

Condition Outcome   15
Action Outcome      15
Action Outcome      15
Action Outcome      15
Action Outcome      15
Action Outcome      15
Action Outcome      15

Condition Outcome    5
Condition Outcome    5

Condition Outcome    5
Knowledge Outcome    5
Knowledge Outcome    5
Action Outcome       5

Knowledge Outcome   15
Action Outcome       5




Action Outcome       0




Knowledge Outcome        25




Action Outcome       5
Knowledge Outcome   5




Action Outcome      5
Condition Outcome    5




Action Outcome      10




Action Outcome      10




Action Outcome      10
Knowledge Outcome   10




Knowledge Outcome        10


Condition Outcome

Condition Outcome

Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome

Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   15
Knowledge Outcome   10
Action Outcome   20




Action Outcome   20
Action Outcome      20
Action Outcome




Knowledge Outcome

Condition Outcome   17




Action Outcome      17
Action Outcome      17
Condition Outcome




Knowledge Outcome    5   5




Knowledge Outcome    5   5


Knowledge Outcome    5   5




Knowledge Outcome    5   5




Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome   21
Action Outcome




Action Outcome   20
Action Outcome      20




Condition Outcome




Knowledge Outcome




Action Outcome
Action Outcome




Action Outcome


Condition Outcome




Knowledge Outcome

Knowledge Outcome




Condition Outcome
Knowledge Outcome   10




Condition Outcome        100




Condition Outcome        100
Condition Outcome         20




Condition Outcome         20




Action Outcome      10




Condition Outcome        100
Knowledge Outcome   10




Action Outcome      10




Condition Outcome   10
Condition Outcome    3




Knowledge Outcome    0


Action Outcome

Condition Outcome

Condition Outcome


Knowledge Outcome   18

Action Outcome      18

Condition Outcome   18

Action Outcome      10   10




Condition Outcome   10   10
Condition Outcome   10   10




Action Outcome       1




Knowledge Outcome    0

Knowledge Outcome   10




Knowledge Outcome   33

Knowledge Outcome    0    0
Condition Outcome   41




Knowledge Outcome




Condition Outcome


Knowledge Outcome   41




Action Outcome      41




Action Outcome      10

Action Outcome      10

Action Outcome      10
Condition Outcome   10
KA PERCENTAGE - 1862 RESEARCH        KA PERCENTAGE - 1890 RESEARCH        PLAN START YEAR


                                                                     10               2007




                                22                                                    2007


                                                                                      2007




                                                                                      2007


                                                                                      2007




                                15                                                    2007
                                 5                                                    2007


                                 5                                                    2007




                                 5                                                    2007
                                 5                                                    2007
                                 5                                                    2007
                                 5                                                    2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007

 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007

 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
 5   2007
14   2007
14   2007
14   2007

14   2007
14        2007
14        2007




14        2007




15        2007




15        2007




10   10   2007




10   10   2007




18        2007
18        2007

18        2007


18        2007


18        2007

18        2007

18        2007

18        2007

     10   2007

     10   2007
     10   2007
     10   2007
     10   2007
 5   2007




35   2007




35   2007
35   2007




35   2007




35   2007




15   2007
15   2007




15   2007
10   2007




17   2007




17   2007
17   2007




11   2007




11   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007

15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15   2007
15        2007

 5        2007
 5        2007

 5        2007
 5        2007
 5        2007
 5        2007

15        2007
 5        2007




30        2007




     25   2007




 5        2007
25   2007




25   2007
25   2007




10   2007




10   2007




10   2007
10        2007




     10   2007


 2        2007

 2        2007

 2        2007
 2        2007




 2        2007




 2        2007

 2        2007




15        2007
15        2007
10        2007
20   2007




20   2007
20   2007
 1   2007




 1   2007

17   2007




17   2007
17   2007
 2   2007




12   2007




12   2007


12   2007




12   2007




 5   2007
21        2007
     30   2007




20        2007
20   2007




 2   2007




10   2007




10   2007
10         2007




10         2007


10         2007




 5         2007

 5         2007




      10   2007
           2007




     100   2007




     100   2007
 20   2007




 20   2007




      2007




100   2007
10   2007




10   2007




10   2007
 6        2007




 5        2007


 3    3   2007

 3    3   2007

 3    3   2007


18   18   2007

18   18   2007

18   18   2007

10   10   2007




10   10   2007
10   10   2007




 7        2007




 5        2007

10        2007




33        2007

 0    5   2007
41   2007




 1   2007




 1   2007


41   2007




41   2007




10   2007

10   2007

10   2007
10   2007
                           1862 EXTENSION    1890 EXTENSION    1862 RESEARCH
QUANTITATIVE TARGET        OUTCOME MEASURE   OUTCOME MEASURE   OUTCOME MEASURE


                       0




                           y                                   y


                      60 y




                       5y


                       0y




                      30 y                                     y
                      17 y                                     y


                22000 y




                   30                                          y
                   45 y
                  105 y
                   10 y                                        y
     1y
    10 y
       y
       y
    25 y
   100 y
   100 y
 10050 y
       y
       y
    50 y
    50 y
   110 y
   180 y
   150 y
       y
       y

         y
    45   y
   110   y
   305   y
   332   y
         y
   310   y
220000   y
         y
   110   y
    40   y
  1160   y
    80   y
         y
         y

    40   y
    55   y
    70   y
   330   y
   170   y
         y
     2       y
    30       y
    40       y

    10       y
  1         y
  0         y




            y




 30 y       y




 10 y       y




100 y   y   y




  0y        y
    0y    y

    0y    y


    0y    y


    0y    y

32000 y   y

15000 y   y

 7500 y   y

    0

    0
    0
    0
    0
130 y




  0     y




  2     y
1       y




1       y




2       y




    y
    y




    y
0       y




        y




1       y
   8       y




   0       y




   0       y
 170   y
1740   y
5770   y
  85   y
  40   y
  50   y
  25   y
   0   y

   0   y
 230   y
  80   y
  15   y
  30   y
  50   y
 50 y

  0y
  0y

  0   y
170   y
 10   y
 10   y

220 y
 45 y




              y




  0       y




 80 y
900 y   y




600 y   y
    6y    y




 1000 y   y




   10 y   y




80000 y   y
    2y    y




    0


   25     y

  500     y

 6000     y
   25     y




   40     y




   30     y

   55     y




50000 y   y
    5     y
    8     y
1   y




1   y
1   y
6   y




7   y

3   y




3   y
 2   y
10   y




     y




     y


     y




     y




 1   y
200 y
  0




  1     y
  1   y




160   y




  0   y




  0   y
  0         y




  0         y


  0         y




            y

  1         y




  0
 40 y




200     y




  5     y
400    y




 30    y




  1y




 40    y
80   y




50   y




30   y
    0y   y




   50    y


    0    y

47900    y

   56    y


    0    y

    0    y

    0    y

    0    y




    0    y
  0y    y   y




  2y        y




  2         y

550 y




  0y        y

  1
  0     y




  5     y




  0     y


 10     y




  0     y




  2y    y

600 y

200 y
5000 y
1890 RESEARCH
OUTCOME MEASURE   ACTUAL AMOUNT


y                                     0




                                   1400


                                     60




                                     20


                                      2




                                    580
                                     69


                                  30222




                                     82
                                     90
                                     65
                                     83
    9
    9
  106
 3389
   15
37825
 3206
   19
  245
   92
  100
   34
   42
  106
  280
    4
  153

   18
   14
   82
   86
  173
  100
  132
 7053
   63
   47
   35
37825
   31
   78
   37

   85
   53
   31
  190
  107
   23
    2
   30
   40

   10
      3
      0




      0




    120




     54




y   295




y   272




      0
        0

        0


        0


        0

    50594

    27074

    22814

y       0

y       0
y       0
y       0
y       0
471




  0




  2
3




1




2




0
0




0
0




5




0
    6




    0




    0
 3206
86972
37825
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0

    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
       0

       0
       0

       0
    3206
       0
       0

       0
       0




       5




y      0




     110
956




593
   11




 2520




   50




88739
         0




y       20


        17

         0

      4200
         9




         7




        12

        43




    196000
         0
         0
1




1
 1
 9




16

 0




 4
4
0




0




0


0




0




2
    0
y   0




    1
      1




    182




2000000




      0
     26




      0


      0




     11

      0




y     0
     55




    250




    100
y   150




y    70




      3




    150
y   0




y   0




y   0
        8




        2


y       0

y   47900

y      56


y       0

y       0

y       0

y       0




y       0
y     0




      8




      1

    652




     12

y     0
10




 5




 0


 0




 0




 2

 0

 0
0
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - ISSUES




Indiana now has a vibrant wine industry. Between 1991 and 2007, 28 new wineries opened
statewide, bringing the total to 36. As wine grape production has increased in Indiana,
growers and vintners are demanding information on new grape cultivars, pest management,
winemaking techniques and marketing strategies.
There are an increasing need for use of local produces to process value-added food products
on Guam. The high cost of fuel for transporting imported produce has adversely impacted
families and consumers.




Needs for processing local value added food products.
Needs for processing local value-added food products is important to both consumers and
producers. Consumers will have increased choices for local products and producers increase
the varieties of products that are locally made.


Sourcing information, interpreting regulatory requirements and providing technical support to
small businesses and entrepreneurs is vital service provided through the NC Cooperative
Extension Service. Businesses look to Extension Specialists for unbiased information relative
to the safety, quality and processing technologies in food systems.




The need for advanced food research to support Arkansas' vast food processing industries
remains paramount to improving the state's economy. The types of food research include
harvest, storage, processing and nutritional quality.
Keeping abreast of new developments in processing technologists is vital to ensure
competitiveness in today's markets. Businesses rely upon Extension Specialists to provide
technical assistance and advise on new techniques and emerging issues affecting their
businesses.

Many small business and entrepreneurs who obtained technical information and services
through contact with state Extension specialists start new companies based on the
information provided. The need for technical support prior to and during startup of new
business operations is vital to their success. Extension specialists are uniquely qualified to
provide science-based and experience driven technical support services.




HACCP is a leading food safety program in the United States. Implementation of this program
is required by law for juice, meat and poultry, and seafood processors. This program is
voluntary, but widely adopted, for other food processors such as dairy.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that annually, 76 million
people in the United States become sick with foodborne illnesses: 325,000 are hospitalized,
and 5,000 die each year. Foodborne illnesses are typically can be caused by raw food. The
economic cost of foodborne illness is estimated to be between $10 billion and $83 billion
dollars per year. This equates to an estimated cost of approximately $131 to $1,092 per
foodborne illness case. Internet products are sold across the country without necessarily
going through conventional interstate distribution chains. This selling practice in general
reduces the steps associated with getting products to consumers, however it may also bypass
some inspection and testing programs traditionally established by buyer or government
agencies.
Alaska has an abundance of naturally occurring food. Fish, game meat and berries are
plentiful and high in nutritional value. Grocery costs are high due to the low availability of
locally grown foods and the high cost of shipping from the Lower 48. A sizeable percentage of
Alaskans live a subsistence lifestyle, in effect, living off these naturally occurring foods. Many
others routinely supplement their diets with fish and game meat. Proper preservation
techniques are essential to retain the high quality and nutritional value of these foods.

Alaska has the nation's highest rate of botulism, a food-borne illness that occurs in low acid
foods such as fish and game meat. It is particularly important that we teach Alaskans how to
safely preserve fish and game meat, staples in the Alaskan diet.


Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant proposals are prepared by MSU-COA, MSU-
TechLink, and non-university personnel. SBIR funds early-stage R&D at small technology
companies and is designed to stimulate technological innovation, increase private sector
commercialization, increase small business participation in federally funded R&D, and foster
participation by minority and disadvantaged firms in technological innovation. Montana
companies benefit from this available funding source.




Montana stakeholders are interested in the development of new crops and new uses for
crops. MSUs Bioproducts Institute investigates new technology, new crops suitable for
production in Montanas climate and soil conditions, and ways to add value to existing
cropping systems.
The Biobased Institute funds research projects that strive to increase the profitability of
Montana agriculture, enhance the health of the human population, and reduce our reliance
on non-renewable energy product development activities.




Montana and neighboring state industries are seeking innovative markets for new biocontrol
tools and new crops, such as camelina, that have been catalyzed by MSU. These industries
work directly with the Biobased Institute to explore potential licensing for various products.




A major goal of the Biobased Products Institute at MSU is to develop systems for food safety
and agricultural security for US and global consumers.




Maine Highlands Farmers Guild: Small-scale farm producers in rural Maine are challenged to
access traditional markets, and can benefit through diversification to meet the needs of local
markets. Success is enhanced and efficiency realized through collaboration with other
producers.
Maine Organic Milk Producers: The number of dairy farms in Maine has declined dramatically
in the past two decades due to low profitability, development pressure, loss of farmland, and
an aging farm population. One pathway to sustainability for new and existing dairy farms has
been to transition to selling organic milk, which receives higher and more consistent prices in
the marketplace.




Prevent Soft Scald Development in Honeycrisp Apples: Honeycrisp is a relatively new apple
variety for Maine wholesale growers. It is highly prized by consumers and can bring as much
as $35 per bushel, two to three times that of most varieties. Honeycrisp apples, however, are
prone to a storage disorder called soft scald, which quickly makes them unmarketable when
stored. The inability to store for post-season marketing minimizes the profit potential for this
highly desirable variety.




Genetic diversity is required to meet current production needs in plant and animal
agriculture, to allow sustained genetic improvement, and to facilitate rapid adaptation to
changing breeding objectives.




n/a
Michigan, along with many other states, is struggling to revitalize its economy. A critical
component of the state's (and the nation‚s) revitalization effort is to decrease dependence on
foreign oil, while creating jobs and encouraging further alternative energy investments. These
efforts will have a significant impact on agriculture and manufacturing throughout the Great
Lakes region and beyond as sustainable alternatives to petroleum-based products are
developed to help boost the state‚s economy.




Flavor analysis is used to develop new food and improve existing food products.




Soybean is a potential source for fulfilling the protein requirements of a growing world
population. However, it contains antinutritional factors that must be inactivated before its
protein content can be safely and efficiently utilized.
Edible films and coatings are used to prevent quality loss due to moisture, oxygen, oil, and
aroma/flavor migration of complex food systems. Edible films also have the potential to
reduce packaging complexity, waste, and cost.


Value added products gives the producer increased profit for their agricultural product. The
farmer will recieve increased income at the farm gate because the value of the crop will
increase with processing. Increased producer profit will add to community viability.

Safe practices are essential for preserving foods. It is also important that clients are confident
in their abilities to preserve a high quality product. Alaska is a transient state with a large
influx of military population, most of whom have not previously canned or preserved game
meat or fish Since many other Alaskans supplement their diets or rely on game meat and fish,
it is important to provide hands-on courses for clients to preserve foods safely. Clients who
practice these skills will be able to continue preserving foods safely.
The prevalence of non-communicable diseases has been escalating during the past decade.
The population of FSM in fy'07 was estimated at 107,000. In Chuuk State alone, of a
population of 53,595, the number of patients who go to Public Health for diabetes was 6,547
and 9,013 for hypertension. The Needs Assessment Survey conducted in 2003-04; revealed
that 54% of the 851 subjects were overweight and very overweight. More people in the
survey were eating only the energy and body building foods and do not consume vegetables
and fruits. More people combine local as well as imported refined foods in their diet. There is
also big consumption of foods high in saturated fats and sugars. These statistics are
representative of 50% of the FSM population. Everyone cares!

With people's diet too high in sugars, sodium and saturated fats and very low in fruits and
vegetables, the rate of non-communicable disease is escalating everywhere. If this trend
continues, the end results is that there will be more cases of cardiovascular diseases, obesity,
hypertension and significant disability from these chronic diseases. Another problem was
food poisoning or food-borne illnesses. Most of the food consumed in parties, traditional
ceremonies, family and public gatherings, including funerals and important events were
prepared and packed hours before they were actually served without proper storage.

Participants of food technology classes had gained knowledge about processing food products




People who had hands on practice in the processing of food products as well as those who
have evaluated the food items by taste tests, demonstrated interest in increasing their
productivity in food provision, as well as opening their minds to go into food businesses,
having been armed with acquired skills and product ideas for sale.

It has always been difficult to reverse the change in attitudes toward fast and imported
processed food, which has become a habit to so many people in the islands. There is a huge
change in the preference of imported processed food over local food, which has contributed
to an increase in NCDs and the escalating cost of health care.

Surveys showed a high rate of vitamin A deficiency is associated with poor eating habits.
Nutrition agents conducted educational programs on human nutrition in order to raise
awareness among homemakers and promoted balance diets to reduce nutrition related
illnesses.
A dietary study carried out in 2001 in Kosrae (Englberger, 2003) involving a random sample of
65 children and 65 women showed that not a single child or woman met the estimated
Vitamin A requirements. The study examined food preferences and investigation for vitamin A
-rich foods that might be promoted to alleviate the VA deficiency and increasing health
problems in Kosrae. Provitamin A carotenoid-rich foods can protect against VA deficiency.
Epidemiological research suggests that carotenoid-rich food may also protect against chronic
diseases including diabetes, heart diseases and certain cancer.

The processing of local foods gives support to the local tourism industry, the lifeblood of the
economy, by providing foods for tourists for them to consume and patronize. This activity
also addresses the problem of low agricultural productivity and large food importation in
Palau. Production and utilization of local foods will result in self-sufficiency and food security.


Large food importation in the islands is currently decreasing the Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) from the agriculture sector. Processing of local food resources is made available as
outreach services attempt to entice and train women and entrepreneurs to go into food
business enterprise. The development of business enterprises has chain reaction and
synergistic effects in helping people meet the needs of tourists and locals for good quality


Grape Example: Growing grapes for wine production is the most rapidly expanding agriculture
industry across Iowa and neighboring states. However, it requires very high initial invest and
can have high risks because of improper site conditions and cultivar selection, prospective
growers need to thoroughly understand the requirements for a successful enterprise.

Vegetable Crops Example: Growing vegetable, herb, and some fruit crops in high tunnels has
the potential to be profitable for Iowa growers. As with any production system, many
variables exist that can influence production costs, total yields, and ultimately profitability.
Growers need to understand the risks and requirements for a successful enterprise.

As clients make the decision to establish a vineyard, they must determine if their sites are
suitable for growing grapes based on soil conditions and select cultivars suited for their
climatic conditions. Internal soil drainage and mineral composition are important components
that greatly influence the success of an enterprise that need to be evaluated before planting
the crop and optimized if necessary.




Clients are becoming more and more interested in planting and caring for plants around their
homes and communities. The need for sound horticultural information has increased.
ISU Horticulture Extension has a long list of gardening publications in both print and web-
based formats. Horticulture specialists are also highly respected in disseminating unbiased,
research-based information to gardeners and garden enthusiasts. However, because
gardening is so popular and many gardeners are constantly seeking new or more information,
there is considerable gardening information generated that is not as reputable as that from
ISUE. One of our primary objectives in consumer horticulture is reviewing and improving the
quality, quantity, and mode of delivery of gardening information.


Small farmers, gardeners and consumers will have knowledge about the new improved crop
lines/varieties that will have better nutritional, health and economic benefits.

College and University administration, the scientific community, other funding agencies and
proposal reviewers.




Students and scientists in the disciplne who are interested in leading edge information.

Undergraduate students, the college and university, graduate schools and future employers
are interested in a strong undergraduate research program that produces graduates that are
well prepared for graduate school and/or who can fill positions in government, industry and
the private sector.




The project PI, AES, college and university administration, other funding agencies.

Students and scientists in the discipline who are interested in leading edge information.


Warmer temperature in Hawaii provides ample opportunity for bacteria growth in fruit juices,
and thus, increased incidence of food borne diseases.
Anthocyanin-based colorants may protect against chronic diseases and therefore they may
become valuable ingredients for functional foods.


Soft, chewy candies such as gummies are a large part of the US confectionery industry. Starch-
set gummies offer an alternative to gelatin but are associated with shortness, a texture fault
in gummy candies. In another study the issue of gluten free bread is studied. Gluten is a
structural protein found in wheat and provides the viscoelastic properties of dough. It is
critical for adequate hydration and application of shear to cause the proteins to crosslink and
form an interconnected protein film. For gluten-sensitive individuals, gluten generates an
autoimmune response that causes atrophy of the jejunal mucosa lamina and reduces nutrient
absorption. The only form of treatment for this disorder is strict adherence to a gluten-free
diet. As a result, food product developers have introduced several gluten-free alternatives to
a variety of bakery products. However, these products are lower quality and have poor
texture. Gluten-free grains and starches, such as rice flour, can not form a protein matrix like
wheat does. Gluten-free food matrix forms batter rather then dough. 
This project is
designed to target consumers looking for foods that provide nutrients beyond those found in
the typical foods.
1.Consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with reduced incidence of
chronic disease. Animal, clinical and in vitro studies provide compelling evidence that
commodities rich in polyphenolics (such as anthocyanins and isoflavones) are powerful
antioxidants and may be chemoprotective. 2. Likewise a variety of berries have been
identified as having chemoprotective benefits.


It is primarily other scientists in the discipline and some industry researchers that attend
scientific conferences to learn about new and ongoing research and recent discoveries.
Workshops are generally attended by end-users interested in application of research results.

n/a




Dwindling farm acreage, more expensive production and processing costs and increased
consumer expectations have prompted research into creating new and enhancing existing
processes and technologies that manufacture functional foods.
The rapid detection of harmful organisms and disease-causing agents in food and water and
the ability to track and trace sources is critical to human health and well-being.




The pharmaceutical and dairy industries stand to gain from innovative use of milk
components.

The mechanism of calcium-induced firmness is debatable since fungi in general contain little
or no pectin substances. The purpose of this study is to enhance our understanding of calcium
binding to macromolecules in plant and mushroom cells.

The food industry is interested in the design and application of biodegradable and edible films
and coatings based on food biopolymers.

Americans are unlikely to achieve the proposed dietary recommendations of increased long
chain n-3 PUFA by consuming fish. Therefore, agricultural sources of n-3 PUFA must be
investigated as an alternative means to fish (in achieving equivalent health benefit).
The development of technologies in food engineering will improve food processing, making
processed food safer, healthier, and more flavorful. These developments are especially
important in maintaining the competitiveness of the food industry in the United States in the
midst of international competition.
Improving and ensuring the health of Louisiana's citizens is a high priority. Louisiana currently
ranks 4th highest in obesity in the U.S. and the increased risk for diabetes, cardiovascular
disease, osteoarthritis, respiratory diseases and some cancers can be directly related to
obesity. In 2005, Louisiana ranked 1st in the nation for age-adjusted death rate by diabetes
and 6th for age-adjusted death rate by coronary diseases. Louisiana also has one of the
highest poverty rates in the nation and an estimated 23% of children in the state live in poor
families.




1. Advance processing techniques such as electrostatic coating are demand by the industry
and based on consumer demand. Economics, shelf life, nutrition, quality and consumer
acceptance are key factors in growing the knowledge of advanced food coating processes.
2. Soybean oil, having a value of over $140 billion dollars worldwide as a food product, has
been vexed with the problem of flavor reversion or reverted back to a less flavorful product
after packaging. Given that soybean oil represents 71 percent of the food oil consumed
worldwide , flavor reversion effects all sectors of the industry and the consuming public.
1. The improvement of stability and shelf life of fluid milk can contribute to the distribution
and marketing capabilities of milk processing plants that is important to processors and
consumers.
2. Pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) is a promising emerging technology for
production of commercially-sterile low-acid shelf-stable foods with minimal thermal impact
on product quality that is important to processors and consumers.
3.Moderate Electric Field (MEF) treatments hold promise for food sterilization and new
knowledge is needed by processors to better utilize this technology.
The Wisconsin AES has a broad list of stakeholders who potentially benefit from the research
and Extension/outreach from the Wisconsin Formula Research program. This list of
stakeholders includes:
   * General agriculture
   * Food processing and marketing industry
   * Animal and dairy related agriculture
   * Plant and cropping system interests including vegetables
   * Green industry (turf, ornamentals, etc.)
   * Biotechnology
   * Bio-energy and Bio-economy groups
   * Sustainable and organic food producers
   * Environmental groups and interests
   * Consumer and non-traditional groups
   * Governmental agencies and officials
   * Scientific community


Stakeholders seek focused economic analysis of the international market potential for PNW
agricultural goods as well as research on new products, food safety, phytosanitary and other
trade-related issues. Decreasing state and federal support have made it vital to obtain
additional extramural funding to maintain research capacity.




The IMPACT Center's mandate to improve Washington's agricultural exports includes
providing information to stakeholders on market barriers, new products, potential customers,
phytosanitary and other trade issues.
Washington State University is a land-grant university with a principal mission of educating
students. A requirement of each IMPACT project has been the support of a PhD student.

Decreasing availability of state and special grant federal funding has made the search for
extramural funding increasingly important. The IMPACT Center is increasing its search for
cooperative funding from stakeholder sources and from other external agencies.


Decreased funding has hindered IMPACT's ability to hire new research personnel.

Projects are of immediate importance to consumers and producers as they impact food
safety, food quality, and animal and human health issues. Results are used and valued by
commercial beef industry in prevention of beef measles, by leaders in livestock production
using genomic technologies for breeding and selection decisions, and by consumers making
informed decisions about the quality and safety of the meat they consume. External support
for this work further identifies its relevance to industry.

Due to a change in leadership, please look at the added outcomes.




The consuming public.




The consumption of goat milk and cheese and the popularity of goat milk soap in the U.S.
have been on the rise in recent years. To meet the demand for goat milk cheese and goat milk
soap and increase profitability of goat dairying, dairy goat producers need skills and
techniques to produce high quality goat milk products.




The consumption of goat milk and cheese and the popularity of goat milk soap in the U.S.
have been on the rise in recent years. To meet the demand for goat milk cheese and goat milk
soap and increase profitability of goat dairying, dairy goat producers need skills and
techniques to produce high quality goat milk products.
The goal of the project is to facilitate future collaborative research between the American
Institute for Goat Research of Langston University and institutions in Arabic-, Chinese-, French-
, and Spanish-speaking countries, as well as to gain knowledge of goat research and
production practices in other areas of the world. Objectives are to translate and adapt two
web-based goat production and research decision-support tools developed at the American
Institute for Goat Research (goat nutrient requirements and feed intake; goat production
system simulation model) for use and future collaborative research in the Middle East, China,
France and other French-speaking countries, and Central and South America.




The goal of the project is to facilitate future collaborative research between the American
Institute for Goat Research of Langston University and institutions in Arabic-, Chinese-, French-
, and Spanish-speaking countries, as well as to gain knowledge of goat research and
production practices in other areas of the world. Objectives are to translate and adapt two
web-based goat production and research decision-support tools developed at the American
Institute for Goat Research (goat nutrient requirements and feed intake; goat production
system simulation model) for use and future collaborative research in the Middle East, China,
France and other French-speaking countries, and Central and South America.


For many decades Royal Ann and Bing were nearly the only 2 cherry varieties grown in the
Mid-Columbia area. Unfortunately, the profitability of both these cherries has declined. Due
to the decline in prices of traditional varieties growers were looking for other options. New
varieties can extend the harvest season and provide additional returns compared to
traditional varieties.




The consumption of goat milk and cheese and the popularity of goat milk soap in the U.S.
have been on the rise in recent years. To meet the demand for goat milk cheese and goat milk
soap and increase profitability of goat dairying, dairy goat producers need skills and
techniques to produce high quality goat milk products.
The citizens of Louisiana were concerned about the nutritional value, quality, safety of their
diets, and affordability of food. The consumer's knowledge level about the relationship of
food, diet, nutrition, fitness, and disease is vital to maintaining a healthy society. According to
the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA),
the leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2000 were tobacco; poor diet; physical inactivity;
and alcohol consumption. The 2005 Louisiana Health Report Card indicated that of 42,297
deaths in 2003, the leading (64%) causes were: diseases of the heart; cancer; stroke;
accidents; and diabetes. Also, adult obesity in Louisiana rose from 16% in 1991 to 27% in
2004, with the largest jump seen in the 18 to 24 year old age group. However, despite the
increased numbers of individuals receiving governmental assistance (food stamps), there
were still food insecure households in Louisiana. Louisiana ranked fourth in food insecurity
and seventh in hunger-filled households nationally. Most of these households were comprised
of a large percentage of young children and the elderly.

The citizens of Louisiana were concerned about the nutritional value, quality, safety of their
diets, and affordability of food. The consumer's knowledge level about the relationship of
food, diet, nutrition, fitness, and disease is vital to maintaining a healthy society. According to
the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA),
the leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2000 were tobacco; poor diet; physical inactivity;
and alcohol consumption. The 2005 Louisiana Health Report Card indicated that of 42,297
deaths in 2003, the leading (64%) causes were: diseases of the heart; cancer; stroke;
accidents; and diabetes. Also, adult obesity in Louisiana rose from 16% in 1991 to 27% in
2004, with the largest jump seen in the 18 to 24 year old age group. However, despite the
increased numbers of individuals receiving governmental assistance (food stamps), there
were still food insecure households in Louisiana. Louisiana ranked fourth in food insecurity
and seventh in hunger-filled households nationally. Most of these households were comprised
of a large percentage of young children and the elderly.

The citizens of Louisiana were concerned about the nutritional value, quality, safety of their
diets, and affordability of food. The consumer's knowledge level about the relationship of
food, diet, nutrition, fitness, and disease is vital to maintaining a healthy society. According to
the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA),
the leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2000 were tobacco; poor diet; physical inactivity;
and alcohol consumption. The 2005 Louisiana Health Report Card indicated that of 42,297
deaths in 2003, the leading (64%) causes were: diseases of the heart; cancer; stroke;
accidents; and diabetes. Also, adult obesity in Louisiana rose from 16% in 1991 to 27% in
2004, with the largest jump seen in the 18 to 24 year old age group. However, despite the
increased numbers of individuals receiving governmental assistance (food stamps), there
were still food insecure households in Louisiana. Louisiana ranked fourth in food insecurity
and seventh in hunger-filled households nationally. Most of these households were comprised
of a large percentage of young children and the elderly.
Oklahoma has traditionally been a strong agriculture commodity producing state that sends
its products to other states for further processing. The economic impact of Oklahoma‚'s
agricultural sector can be significantly enhanced by increasing the amount of value-added
processing occurring in-state. Developing new products is essential for providing value-added
processing opportunities for new and existing businesses.




The potential for diversification of Alaska's economy lies in the use of its lands. The projects
proposed here show potential for utilization of Alaska's available land base that may provide
entry into new markets for products from the land. There is high potential for value-added
processing of high value products for the food and non-food market.
Organic agriculture is one of the fastest growing segments of agriculture in the United States
today. There are estimates that growth of the organic industry is occurring at about 20% per
year. Markets for organic produce are emerging throughout the country, in both large cities
and small towns. People are seeking organic produce, and certain farmers are modifying their
operations to respond to this demand. In Oklahoma, there is limited information about the
crops that can be grown organically within the state, about the types of problems that are
likely to be encountered, and about the possible organic solutions to problems that may
develop.

In response to the demand for organic products and organic production information,
scientists at the Lane Agricultural Center are developing procedures for organic vegetable
production. Four years of investigation have been completed and work is continuing at this
time. About eight acres have been certified by ODAFF as meeting the organic standards as
outlined by the National Organic Program. The organically certified section of the Lane
Agricultural Center is the only public institution in Oklahoma to have obtained NOP organic
certification.




Alaska's commercial fishing sector is central to the socio-economic well being of the state.
Spiny dogfish are an exciting opportunity for the state to expand its commercial fishing sector
through development of a new directed commercial fishery.




Adding value to a food product through a processing or preparation process requires working
through a regulatory process and gaining knowledge on the risks and safe food handling
practices that must be implemented to reduce the risk of foodborne illness or other related
foodborne safety issues, such as food allergies.
This program will advance fundamental knowledge about food, nutrition and health.




By elucidating the specific survival and adherence mechanisms displayed by Vibrio species in
shellfish, specific treatments could be devised to disrupt that interaction.




The wheat and barley breeding programs in Idaho are a close collaboration among the three
PNW universities and the ARS. One of the goals of this program is to develop varieties with
enhanced resistance to cereal pests. One project at the UI Aberdeen R & E Center determines
the extent of foot rot resistance in currently grown cultivars, to allow barley and wheat
breeders in the PNW to screen for foot rot resistance in advanced lines, and to investigate
resistance mechanisms and disease expression in traditionally bred and transgenically derived
lines.
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - WHAT WAS DONE




The Purdue Wine Grape Team conducts research and extension in viticulture and enology.
Professional training workshops, seminars and tastings are designed to engage the industry
several times each year. The Purdue Wine Team hosts the Vintage Indiana festival that
attracts more than 10,000 wine lovers to Indianapolis. In cooperation with the Indiana State
Fair, the Indy International Wine Competition attracts more than 3,300 entries from around
the world.

Information and materials about canning and dehydration technology as well as technology of
processing functional food such as "noni juice" were provided to individual entrepreneurs.

Food processing information and materials related to canning and dehydration technology as
well as functional noni products was provided individual entrepreneurs.


Food processing information and materials related to canning and dehydration technology as
well as functional noni products were provided to individual entrepreneurs.

Public workshops, individual business assistance and individual entrepreneurial services were
provided state wide to help answer questions related to safety, quality and value-added food
products. Technical services and guidance in conjunction with state and federal agenices
provide an invaluable tool for small businesses and entrepreneurs. Many of these needs
would go upmeet without help from Extension Specialists across the state.




The University of Arkansas Food Science Department of the Bumpers College and the Division
of Agriculture was recently ranked fourth nationally for faculty scholarly productivity by
Academics Analytics.
Two studies were conducted in 2007 to investigate the use of sodium acid sulfate as a dip
application to prevent enzymatic browning of fresh cut potatoes. Potatoes were cut into
French fry slices, dips were applied in various concentrations for one minute.
Extending science-based knowledge through industry specific workshops, trade association
meetings and conferences were conducted throughout North Carolina, the region and nation.
These programs addressed the issues identified by industry through roundtable discussions
with regulatory agencies.


Small business assistance resulting in startup of new companies have resulted from
participation in workshops and through technical support and information services provided.
Many of these startups have benefited from applied research projects that have been
supported through the Extension service specialists with commodity responsiblities.




In 2007, 20 juice processors were trained in Juice HACCP using the FDA approved curriculum.
Additionally, manuals were developed that include approved curriculum and numerous
reference documents. Bilingual HACCP training was provided for 275 individuals representing
six companies focusing on safe production of seafood and juices.


Virginia State University conducted a project that examines the microbial and chemical quality
of raw meats, frozen beans, and honey sold through the internet for food saftey. In 2007 a
total of 272 fillets consisting of aqua-cultured catfish, salmon, tilapia, and trout each from
nine local and nine Internet retail markets were tested. The fillets had total aerobic
mesophiles at 5.7 log CFU/g, psychotrophs at 6.3 CFU/g, and coliforms at 1.9 log MPN/g.
Internet trout had about 0.8-log higher aerobic mesophiles than those pruchased locally.
About 27% of the fillets had Listeria spp. and a positive correlation between the prevalences
of Listeria and Listeria monocytogense was observed. Internet fillets had higher prevalence of
both Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes than those purchased locally.
Agents taught food safety and preservation classes in 17 small and large communities,
including towns accessible only by plane or boat and to military families.

Agents created three DVDs to provide safe food preservation information. These are the first
of a ten-part DVD series that will focus on foods available in Alaska. The series is supported by
a USDA grant.

Agents across Alaska tested 694 pressure canner gauges during the year with a 15 percent
failure rate. Three-quarters required adjustments.

Sixteen entrepreneurs have worked with the small business development specialist to create
new food businesses related to food preservation techniques.
Source of money: USDA grant

During the past year, 412 clients from 24 Alaska communities and a resident of Nevada called
our toll-free food preservation. Additionally, 90 clients used our Ask an Expert resource on the
Extension website.

Monthly newsletters created in the Fairbanks, Palmer, and Anchorage districts contained food
safety and preservation information. Food safety and preservation information was also made
available in district offices, fairs, and dozens of food preservation publications may be
downloaded or ordered from the Extension website.




Through the Bioproducts Institute at MSU, several companies have taken new product
innovations and created viable businesses, including new value-added products, products
from new crops, and other state-of-the-art research.




The MSU Biobased Institute supports cutting-edge research and outreach to improve the
profitability of Montana agricultural through enhancement of current production and
development of new value-added applications and products.
The Biobased Institute funds research projects that strive to increase the profitability of
Montana agriculture, enhance the health of the human population, and reduce our reliance
on non-renewable energy.




MSU Researchers have isolated strains of Bacillus mycoides discovered by MSU personnel and
tested them against numerous diseases of potatoes, sugar beets, cucurbits, and other crops.

Recommendations for food safety are made available to food processors, schools, consumers
through different departments at MSU. Food Safety Works is a food safety education job-
training program targeted to Montana high school students. This program has been very
successful due to the cooperation among high school students, teachers, MSU Extension, and
the food industry. Current and new crops have been evaluated for alternative uses beyond
commodity products.




During the past four years, the UMaine Extension has worked with central Maine farmers in
establishing the Maine Highlands Farmers Guild (MHF) to help producers increase and expand
the variety and marketability of their products, and establish direct-to-consumer marketing
opportunities. During 2007, educational sessions have included regulatory agencies to inform
farmers about production of wine and beer, cheese and milk products, jams, jellies and baked
goods.
In the late 1990‚s, a small group of New England farmers began producing organic milk in an
attempt to increase profits and stabilize the market for organic products. In 2003, these
farmers came to UMaine Extension for help in forming a more effective group. UMaine
Extension helped the group, called the Maine Organic Milk Producers, develop a strategic plan
and design a relevant research and education program to meet their needs as organic
producers within a new and expanding industry.




UMaine Extension, the Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station, and other
Experiment Stations in the United States have participated in collaborative research to test a
technique of delayed pre-storage cooling to prevent soft scald development in Honeycrisp
apples. Based on results of this research an effective strategy for minimizing soft scald was
communicated to Maine commercial apple growers through newsletters, at grower meetings,
and during on-site visits to farms.




MAES scientists are continuously discovering new and more effective ways to develop
improved yield, quality, and disease resistance through the study of breeding and genetic
improvement. Regionally, 420,000 new hybrid potato seedlings were evaluated this past year -
collectively the greatest number of seedlings evaluated in the US. Nineteen replicated yield
trials consisting of standard released varieties and over 500 advanced experimental lines of
dry bean in nine commercial classes and two organic trials were evaluated in Michigan in
2007.




n/a
MAES scientists from various disciplines (e.g.,basic sciences, engineering, packaging, plant
science)are all working to enhance Michigan's economy and environment by providing critical
information and developing new processes and technologies to create new products from
plants and other renewable resources.

Research at MU is directed at characterizing food components with important functional
properties, such as flavorful compounds. In particular, flavor and other attributes are being
analyzed for reduced fat ice cream, including appearance, flavor (aroma and taste), mouthfeel
and aftertaste. Research is focused on developing a scientific approach to analyzing flavor in
lower fat ice creams by determining the release of flavor volatiles from ice creams with
different fat levels. Sensory thresholds and vapor liquid partition coefficients have been
determined. The instrumental and sensory flavor profile of ice creams have also been
determined.

Researchers at MU study the effect of extrusion conditions on trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA)
and nitrogen solubility index (NSI). A laboratory size single screw extruder was used for
extrusion cooking of the soybean implementing a 4x4x4 full factorial design. TIA and NSI of
the soybean were found to be 47.0 TIU per mg and 78% respectively. Trypsin inhibitor
inactivation ranged from 90% of that of raw soybean at lower screw speeds and higher
temperatures to 50% for higher screw speeds and lower temperatures.
In order to maximize the potential of a new technology, it is important to consider consumer
concerns and acceptance. Therefore, a focus group study was conducted to understand
consumer attitudes, opinions, and concerns toward edible film coatings.




We have initiated screening of natural fruit and vegetable anti-oxidants and anit-microbials
for use in fresh cut greens.




110 clients participated in hands-on food preservation workshops, canning 325 pints of food.
A three-week (two hours per day) food technology-training course offered to the public as
outreach services of PCC-CRE was conducted in three States. 44 participants attended these.
Taste tests of food products were conducted during visits of different groups to the R&D
Station, Vocational Education Week, Earth Day Celebration, and Olechotel Belau Fair.

Programs on Adult and Youth EFNEP continued to be conducted by EFNEP staffs throughout
the islands to women groups and school children to educate them on healthy eating, healthy
diet utilizing local food, and proper food handling and storage.

Other training programs were on proper food handling and storage. Through the ADAP HLPI
project, health and nutrition staff continued to provide food safety, nutrition, and health
education programs to youths and families throughout the islands in Micronesia.

Nutrition agent conducted trainings and workshop to homemakers on human nutritional
issues. One major community evaluation and intervention effort was conducted in
collaboration with other agencies in Pohnpei. Results have been published internationally
through the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and through the
Secretariat of the Pacific Community. Nutrition agents collaborated with the FSM National
Government to establish health and nutrition guidelines, food labeling requirements and
nutrition standards for the Micronesian population. The 'Go Local' theme to promote the
value of local produce was promoted by all agencies addressing the nutrition concerns of the
nation.

The participants of the three Food Technology Classes practiced what they have learned by
providing their families with novel foods from abundant local resources like root crops, fish
and fruits. Some participants prepared selected foods for custom practices. Those who have
tasted the food products during civic events signified their interest to learn more about these
local products.

After taking the Food Technology Classes, follow up encounters with participants was
conducted through personal visits and telephone conversations. Linking the processors with
prospective buyers was also explored.

Introduction of new recipes using local food products and demonstrating these new recipes
Nutrition and food safety training workshops were conducted throughout the four states.
Group members shared tips and knowledge in preparing healthy food for daily consumption.
The 'Go Local' theme to promote the value of local produce was accepted by and promoted
by all agencies addressing the nutrition concerns of the nation. Nutrition education classes
were given in schools and as support for the Early Childhood Development programs. Where
lunch programs are available in the schools and communities there is a greater offering of
local produce.

In order to keep track of the teaching activities conducted among the participants, changes in
condition outcome measures was investigated. List of participants and food products learned
from the courses that are being marketed were determined.




Grapes Example: Workshops aimed at prospective grape growers were conducted in various
regions of Iowa and at a regional conference in Minnesota.

Vegetable Crop Example: Research was conducted to determine the profitability of tomatoes,
peppers, basil, and primocane raspberries and blackberries in high tunnels. Information from
these and other research trials were disseminated to attendees of a two-day workshop in St.
Joseph, MO.




Pre-plant soil test results were interpreted for 50 clients and recommendations made to
optimized soil pH, phosphorous, potassium and zinc content, and adjusting the nitrogen
fertilizer program based upon the soil organic matter content.

Delivering the Master Gardener program using Adobe Connect, an interactive web broadcast,
has allowed more participants in more remote sites to view and ask questions from
presenters on campus. Supplemental programs such as the Native Plants Workshop have also
been held to add to participant's knowledge base of popular and timely horticultural topics.
In 2007, 550 participants went through the Master Gardener training sessions.
Consumer extension specialists answered over 3500 phone calls and 1000 emails, trained
over 500 Master Gardeners, and presented talks to over 2000 attendees of field days,
symposia, or workshops across the state. ISU Horticulture Extension specialists helped
coordinate at least 5 symposia that attracted over 2000 attendees. Information was also
delivered to diverse audiences via publications, radio, television, pod-casting, webcasts, and
websites. During the 2006-2007 year, eight new publications were created, eighteen
publications were revised, and seven publications were reprinted on horticulture topics
targeting primarily consumer horticulture audiences.


Field experiments were conducted, a research publication on eggplant varieties was
submitted, and a Field Day and group meeting were conducted.

Results of the projects have been published in 17 peer reviewed publications, 3 MS theses,
and 6 PhD Dissertations, and numerous symposium abstracts.
We have no way of assessing this. It should not have been included as an output or outcome
measure.
Project results have been presented in the classroom and at 39 regional, national and
international symposia with audience up to several hundred.




Seven undergraduate students were involved in 4 of the 11 projects

PI have been encouraged by NH AES and college administration to use AES funding to address
immediate issues in agriculture and to conduct research that will increase their ability to
attract additional funding for synergistic studies from other sources.
Project results have been presented in the classroom and at 39 regional, national and
international symposia with audience up to several hundred.


A two-color fluorescence assay based on integrity of the cell membrane has been establshed
to deterimine the viability of bacterial cells.
This OARDC study investigated what anthocyanins may be selected for application in
functional foods and crop and cultivar selection when looking for health benefits.




Two projects eminating from this line of inquiry are 1) gummy confections made with fruit
juice concentrate (grape, pomegranate and strawberry have been used thus far), with soy
protein isolate substituting half of the wheat starch, and 2) gluten-free bread with the high
quality of traditional wheat breads.
1.With more than 5000 flavonoid structure present in nature, and close to 600 different
structures among anthocyanins alone, there is a need to increase understanding
structure/function relationships. OARDC scientists have been focused on increasing the
understanding of the role that non-volatile compounds from fruits and vegetables play on
health promotion.
2. This study investigates black raspberries (BR) and subsequent clinical preparations and
processed products as chemopreventive agents for various forms of aero-digestive cancers.
As part of an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental and inter-institutional team, we continue to
develop procedures for identifying the bioactive components of black raspberries via a
metabolomics-based approach using high-field NMR spectroscopy and statistical modeling




Sixteen conference and workshop presentations were made.

n/a




Research to develop improved methods for the design and operation of thermal processing
systems for protein foods; develop food-grade specialty soybean varieties for Michigan;
increase the nutritional composition of nutraceuticals; evaluate the efficacy of processes and
ingredients that impact known safety hazards in muscle foods; identify, develop and/or apply
postharvest technology to support the Michigan fruit, vegetable and chestnut industries; and
develop technologies to support management systems for quality grains and oilseeds.
Significant research has been undertaken to develop biosensor technologies and rapid
identification systems assure food supply chain security, quality and safety.


We investigated casein micelle from bovine milk was as a nano-carrier system for Triclosan
(TCS), and results present the casein micelle as a suitable biopolymer for the potential
encapsulation of pharmaceutical compounds.

Stepwise extraction of apple, cucumber and mushroom tissues resulted in a set of fractions,
which were analyzed for protein, neutral polysaccharides, pectins and chitin content, and
binding of calcium.

We tested crystallinity, metal-binding capacity, and antibacterial efficiency of thick, thin, and
ultra-thin films using different chitosan/PEO blend ratios.

We previously established a mathematical model for allometric scaling of caloric intake in a
rodent that would mimic a human equivalent dose, and we tested it in rodents comparing it
to human archival data.
The use of microwave heating in food processing is proceeding toward making a request for
Food and Drug Administration approval of this technology. The use of pulsed electric fields
(PEF) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) are under study with regard to milk, flavored milk,
yogurt, and other dairy products.
Educational materials were developed to teach nutrition for health, especially to low-income
families and youth. These were complemented with Smart Bodies, a comprehensive nutrition
and physical activity program developed for children (K-5). The Smart Portions Program
helped adults learn healthy lifestyle habits. Research with functional foods investigated the
health benefits of resistant starch and other potential food bioactives were extracted and
identified. Clinical trials for bioactives were planned




1.Advanced electrostatic studies were conducted on various food products that require
coating before packaging.
2. OARDC scientists, and other collaborating scientists, discovered a method for preventing
flavor reversion in soybean oil.
1. It was reported that that ultrapasteurized milk packed in light-protected polyethylene
terephthalate (PET) bottles had a refrigerated shelf life of 90 days without detectable changes
in flavor and milk. This knowledge was confirmed and industry personnel were engaged with
the new findings.
2. The inactivation and recovery of PATP-treated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in selected
low-acid foods (egg patty mince and green pea puree) during extended storage was studied.
The study increased the knowledge of the dairy industry personnel.
3.Kinetics of bacterial growth during Moderate Electric Field (MEF) treatments was studied.
The intention is to determine kinetic parameters for verification of an in-package sterilization
process.




Each year through a competitive, investigator-driven, peer-reviewed process, the Wisconsin
AES funds approximately 160 research and integrated activity projects focused on national,
regional and local issues and priorities linked to stakeholder interests. In addition to serving
stakeholder needs through these competitively funded projects, which address critical applied
research as well as basic science questions, this program sets a priority on training our next
generation of applied and science based professionals through its graduate-student training
mission.




IMPACT scientists and faculty have secured an additional $2 million in grants to supplement
core funding.




Cutting edge research in the fields of food safety and security, market economics, foreign and
domestic policy analysis, international trade and economic theory has been shared with
stakeholders through popular media, and peer-reviewed journal articles.
Twenty-six PhD students have been supported in full or in part by IMPACT Center funding
during the past year. Funding is not permitted for post-docs, but many of the individual
projects have post-docs supported from alternative funding sources working on the project.
IMPACT has one post-doc supported by administrative funding.


IMPACT Center scientists have applied for a variety of commodity commission, federal and
industry grants.
With reprioritization of existing funds, a new assistant research professor and a new associate
for research were hired to conduct IMPACT Center research, outreach, and engagement
activities.




Methodology to quantify fatty acids associated with meat quality has been developed and is
currently evaluated for commercial applications. Identification of genetic markers that are
associated with meat quality traits and animal health are being investigated. Management
strategies to reduce the incidence of a costly feedlot parasite are being defined.




Developed information briefs.


We have conducted much-needed training courses for goat milk cheeses and goat milk soap
production; in addition to our annual cheesemaking workshops. To promote the dairy goat
industry and add value to goat milk, 3 cheesemaking workshops and 1 soapmaking workshop
were conducted on and off campus. Hands-on cheesemaking and soapmaking procedures
and techniques were demonstrated to goat producers, school teachers, physicians and 4-H
members. Different varieties of cheese and soap were made for diversified audiences. Milk
quality control measures, practical skills, and product development evaluation basics were
presented to goat producers.

We have conducted much-needed training courses for goat milk cheeses and goat milk soap
production; in addition to our annual cheesemaking workshops. To promote the dairy goat
industry and add value to goat milk, 3 cheesemaking workshops and 1 soapmaking workshop
were conducted on and off campus. Hands-on cheesemaking and soapmaking procedures
and techniques were demonstrated to goat producers, school teachers, physicians and 4-H
members. Different varieties of cheese and soap were made for diversified audiences. Milk
quality control measures, practical skills, and product development evaluation basics were
presented to goat producers.
In China, translations of the web-based goat nutrient requirement calculation system
(WBGNRCS) and the goat production system simulation model (GPSSM) are complete. The
Chinese websites are under construction, with completion expected by the end of the year. A
website for the WGBNRCS with both English and Chinese is
http://210.27.80.20/goatsite/goat/calc/nutreqgoats.html. Translation into Spanish of the
WBGNRCS in Mexico is essentially complete, with only a few pop-up windows in English
remaining (available at
http://www.chapingo.uruza.edu.mx/cabrasesp/calc/nutreqgoats.html). Translation of the
GPSSM into Spanish has commenced as well. Translation of the WBGNRCS into French in
Rwanda is approximately half-way completed, as is also the case for the GPSSM in Cote
d'Ivoire. In Jordan, translation of the WBGNRCS into Arabic is nearly complete, and that of
the GPSSM will begin in early August.

In China, translations of the web-based goat nutrient requirement calculation system
(WBGNRCS) and the goat production system simulation model (GPSSM) are complete. The
Chinese websites are under construction, with completion expected by the end of the year. A
website for the WGBNRCS with both English and Chinese is
http://210.27.80.20/goatsite/goat/calc/nutreqgoats.html). Translation into Spanish of the
WBGNRCS in Mexico is essentially complete, with only a few pop-up windows in English
remaining (available at http://www.chapingo.uruza.edu.mx/cabrasesp/calc/nutreqgoats.html.
Translation of the GPSSM into Spanish has commenced as well. Translation of the WBGNRCS
into French in Rwanda is approximately half-way completed, as is also the case for the GPSSM
in Cote d'Ivoire. In Jordan, translation of the WBGNRCS into Arabic is nearly complete, and
that of the GPSSM will begin in early August.
In the mid-1990s a variety trial was planted to evaluate important varieties and selctions from
around the world. Currently 57 varieties and selections are in the field trial and were
evaluatled for numerous key quality parameters including size, firmness, storability and rain
cracking potential. An Extension publication provided growers with a comprehensive
summary of variety characteristics that helped determine the best variety for their orchard.
Grower presentations and journal articles also provided the findings for grower decision
making.

We have conducted much-needed training courses for goat milk cheeses and goat milk soap
production; in addition to our annual cheesemaking workshops. To promote the dairy goat
industry and add value to goat milk, 3 cheesemaking workshops and 1 soapmaking workshop
were conducted on and off campus. Hands-on cheesemaking and soapmaking procedures
and techniques were demonstrated to goat producers, school teachers, physicians and 4-H
members. Different varieties of cheese and soap were made for diversified audiences. Milk
quality control measures, practical skills, and product development evaluation basics were
presented to goat producers.
In FY 2007 SUAREC conducted the following activities: research on the effects of diet on
obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The aim were to develop early nutrition intervention
strategies for elementary school teachers, expand nutritional knowledge and food label use
among college students, and assess consumer acceptance of value-added alternative meat
products. SUAREC promoted focus groups; advisory committees; mentor program; use of
nutrition curriculum; school food nutrition curriculums; health tips during school activities. It
also conducted the following activities: school in-Service, kids cafe(c), FF-NEWS, EFNEP, and
youth health fair. Also, food demonstrations, publications such as fact sheets, newsletters,
technical bulletins, and research reports were disseminated. Collaboration, cooperation and
partnership with local, state and federal agencies, institutions, groups, and private
organizations/associations were utilized in seeking and delivering services to citizens.




In FY 2007 SUAREC conducted the following activities: research on the effects of diet on
obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The aim were to develop early nutrition intervention
strategies for elementary school teachers, expand nutritional knowledge and food label use
among college students, and assess consumer acceptance of value-added alternative meat
products. SUAREC promoted focus groups; advisory committees; mentor program; use of
nutrition curriculum; school food nutrition curriculums; health tips during school activities. It
also conducted the following activities: school in-Service, kids cafe(c), FF-NEWS, EFNEP, and
youth health fair. Also, food demonstrations, publications such as fact sheets, newsletters,
technical bulletins, and research reports were disseminated. Collaboration, cooperation and
partnership with local, state and federal agencies, institutions, groups, and private
organizations/associations were utilized in seeking and delivering services to citizens.




In FY 2007 SUAREC conducted the following activities: research on the effects of diet on
obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The aim were to develop early nutrition intervention
strategies for elementary school teachers, expand nutritional knowledge and food label use
among college students, and assess consumer acceptance of value-added alternative meat
products. SUAREC promoted focus groups; advisory committees; mentor program; use of
nutrition curriculum; school food nutrition curriculums; health tips during school activities. It
also conducted the following activities: school in-Service, kids cafe(c), FF-NEWS, EFNEP, and
youth health fair. Also, food demonstrations, publications such as fact sheets, newsletters,
technical bulletins, and research reports were disseminated. Collaboration, cooperation and
partnership with local, state and federal agencies, institutions, groups, and private
organizations/associations were utilized in seeking and delivering services to citizens.
The Robert M. Kerr Food and Agricultural Products Center works with clients to help them
create, commercialize, and market new food and other agricultural products. This assistance
takes the form of product formulation, development and evaluation of processing techniques,
production of test batches, business planning and marketing assistance, and so on.




Two agricultural crop opportunities that have resulted from recent research are high quality
reindeer meat and peony crops for the floral market.
The following is a summarization of work pertaining to the organic industry that is being
conducted at the Lane Agricultural Center. Tomatoes, watermelon, southern peas, and sweet
corn were grown in a study certified as organic under the USDA National Organic Program.
The final year of this initial four crop-four year rotation was completed. Economic
comparisons were developed for each of the four crops using treatments and yields from the
study. All four crops were grown organically using poultry litter as a fertilizer, and using
various organic supplements and techniques for pest control. In a separate study, tomatoes
are currently being grown for the potting plant market in a greenhouse experiment using
synthetic fertilizers, organic fertilizers, and humic acid supplements. In these studies, shoot
and root size as well as shoot and root weights are being determined.

In another study, twelve types and cultivars of melons (cantaloupe and honey dew) were
grown with both synthetic fertilizer (13-13-13) and organic fertilizer (raw poultry litter). Both
treatments received 100 lbs of N per acre. All fertilizers were applied pre-plant due to
restrictions in the National Organic Program certification that require manure-based fertilizers
to be applied 120 days prior to harvest. Yields from synthetic fertilizers were greater than
yields from poultry litter fertilizer. The highest yielding cultivars were "Achapparal" and
"Tamdew Improved".

An heirloom variety of "Hickory Cane" corn was grown with both organic (poultry litter) and
conventional synthetic fertilizers. Six treatments consisting of two rates, two application
Data collected by the Observer Program was obtained from the National Marine Fisheries
Service (NMFS), Alaska Region. The bioeconomic model will use historical landing data from
the U.S. Atlantic coast dogfish fishery which includes the amount of dogfish landed annually,
annual ex-vessel prices, target species and gear type used to harvest, harvest area, and time
of year when harvested.




Fifteen specialty food processors/preparers utilized the information and expertise through the
SDSU Extension Service, Nutrition Food Science and Hospitality Department and SDSU testing
labs to assist specialty food entrepreneurs. SDSU Extension Food Safety Specialists has
become a food processing authority for acidified foods. SDSU Graduate Student tested a
marketing tool to assist growers in direct marketing to restaurants. Extension Educators
provide a direct contact in the field to link to expertise on the SDSU campus.
Investigators in this program conducted experimental approaches to develop new and
improved food processing systems to ensure a safe, wholesome and high-value food supply.
Specific focus was placed on the following food products: fish and shellfish, fresh and
processed berry fruits, and wine and beer. In the fish and shellfish subprogram, investigators
developed value-added products through applied research and product development
activities. Further research continues into production of salmon-waste and sardine products.
Investigators also conducted studies to investigate foodborne illnesses from raw shellfish
consumption, specifically, V. parahaemolyticus, the leading cause of human gastroenteritis, in
oysters and histamine producing bacteria (HPB), the leading cause of scombroid poisoning, in
fish. Studies looked into the effects of temperature depuration on V. parahaemolyticus and
electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) treatments on HPB. The fresh and processed berry fruits
investigators developed methods to reduce incidence of foodborne illnesses through
intervention processing technologies. They worked to determine the effect of EOW as a
surface disinfectant on the suface microflora of fresh strawberries and blueberries. They also
developed edible coatings to extend the shelf life of these products. The enology research




Investigating the different cellular processes that are activated in bacteria when they
associate with shellfish




Thirty-one transgenic barley and thirteen transgenic wheat lines were tested. Lines and
cultivars of spring wheat (39) and barley (61) submitted for 2007 performance testing in the
variety trials or for these experiments were tested for resistance or tolerance to dryland foot
rot. Plots were measured for yield, test weight, stand and number of whiteheads per plot, a
symptom of disease expression. Permits were obtained from APHIS to allow planting of
selected transgenic lines for testing in the field. Tolerance (yield in the presence of high
disease pressure) of transgenic wheat and barley lines was determined in the field, following a
split-plot statistical design.
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - RESULTS




Wine grape and wine production is the fastest growing segment of Indiana value-added
agriculture and agritourism. The Purdue Wine Grape Team supports the wine industry
through extension, research, marketing and promotion activities. Through Purdue's
engagement, Indiana's wine grape acreage has increased from 55 acres to over 400 acres in
the past ten years, with more wineries and acreage planned. Wine production surpassed
700,000 gallons a year in 2007, a 17-fold increase since the Purdue Wine Grape Team began
its efforts in 1990. Indiana wine sales have grown by more than 15 percent every year. The
Purdue Wine Grape Team provides extension leadership for viticulture and enology programs
nationwide. Our wineries are the number one agritourism destination in the state of Indiana
with hundreds of thousands of visitors annually, while wine has emerged as a prime example
of a value-added agricultural commodity made in Indiana.


Sixty individuals increased knowledge in home food processing and technology.




Twenty individuals applied the knowledge in processing their food products.

One entrepreneur used a canning technology to make hot pepper sauce, another
entrepreneur produce a noni leaf tea made for tourists.


Sustainable small business and start up of new entreprenerial businesses are the larger
segment of the North Carolina food industry. Many of these businesses are the direct result of
the technical services and information provided during workshops and followup contacts
provided through the state Extension Service programs.




The UA Food Science Department's ranking testifies to its productivity in food research in
aiding food processing in Arkansas. In addition, the well-trained Food Science Department
graduates are hired by food processors in Arkansas assuring the continued success of
Arkansas food processing industries. Peer-review articles appeared regularly in the Journal of
Food Science and Journal of Food Protection.
Three varieties of crab appetizers were developed: Curry, Jalapeno cheese, and Italian. Sixty-
six consumers evaluated each using a 9-point hedonic scale to evaluate appearance, flavor,
crab flavor, texture, and overall acceptability. The results show that minced meat by-products
from Jonah crab can be used to create a consumer acceptable crab appetizer product. This
research is likely the first to show that cooked crustacean proteins can form gels upon further
treatment, and that the crab mince can be used as a primary ingredient in new value-added
food products.


The three percent sodium acid sulfate concentration appeared to have the least browning,
maintained textural properties, and had comparable microbial counts over a refrigerated
storage time of two weeks, compared to the control and citric acid treated samples. Since the
three percent concentration seemed to be effective, this concentration was used in our
current after-cooking darkening studies.

North Carolina businesses increased their knowledge in development of new technologies and
have adopted many of these techniques to optimize their processing systems thereby
increasing profits and creating new jobs.

New business startups and expansion of small to medium sized businesses have resulted from
direct involvement with state Extension personnel. The startups have provided new job
opportunities and increased business across the state. Many of the busineses continue to
utilize the expertise of state Extension specialists during the critical startup phase in the food
processing opertions.

HACCP workshops aid processors by delivering the training required to support existing
programs in their companies. Since HACCP is required by law for juice and seafood products,
this education allows companies to be in compliance with federal and state regulations. These
trainings have resulted in better understanding, application and monitoring of HACCP
regulations and application of sanitation procedures. These trainings have become required
attendance by the employees at some of the processing plants.




This study shows that Internet fish products are either equally or more likely to have
excessive microbial contamination, including L. monocytogenes, than locally purchased fillets.
Effective educational and/or regulartory interventions are needed to support the healthy
development of this emerging market.
Approximately 90 pressure canner gauges were replaced, resulting in safely canned foods.

Two publications were written featuring the results of the antioxidant study on Alaskan wild
berries. Agents also have presented programs to get the word out on the high antioxidant
level in Alaskan berries.

Nine preserved products are being produced by small businesses with seven more products in
the planning stages.

Because of the high number of Alaskans who depend on or supplement their diets with fish
and game meat, and Extension history of providing information about food preservation and
food safety, people know that Extension is an excellent resource in this area.




Montanans and others have benefited from profits made from new products, new markets,
and new dietary products made from new Montana crops (e.g. gluten-free flour) and long-
established agricultural commodities.

The Institute strives to be innovative and responsive to the developing needs of the State of
Montana and the Pacific Northwest/ Northern High Plains regions. The primary objective of
our research is to develop value-added, agriculturally based end-use products with a
competitive edge in the global market that are suitable for production in rural Montana.
Current value-added products being evaluated include biocontrol agents on plant diseases,
biobased highway de-icer, biodiesel, biofuel pellets, cellulosic ethanol, and gluten-free crops.
One project has successfully produced alternatives to solid wood (log and chip) using
agricultural crop residue in making biobased pellet fuels for residential stove and commercial
boiler burning. Biobased processed engineered fuels can be manufactured to take advantage
of materials that are common to Montana agricultural areas. The oilseed crop, camelina, can
be added to boost the BTU output. Research conducted at the Western Agricultural Research
Center (WARC) is investigating production methods for specialty crops that can be used in
value-added biobased products. The production of essential oils, culinary and medicinal herbs,
and spice crops provides an opportunity for Montana farmers to diversify their agricultural
operations particularly with small acreage landowners in western Montana.

Two Bacillus mycoides disease biocontrol agents (isolate BmJ and isolate Bp16-5) have been
developed by MSU and are licensed to Montana Microbials, Inc. (Missoula, MT). Isolate Bmj is
currently approved under EPA experimental use permits on 10,000 acres of sugar beets in MT,
ND, MN and MI. MSU researchers are working with Wyoming Biodiesel to manufacture
composite coal pellets (Bio-KoalTM). These pellets are composed of 70% coal residue and 30%
camelina oil and generate approximately 10,400 BTU/pound, whereas, the original coal
generates 8,400 BTU/pound. The pellets have reduced carbon emissions relative to 100% coal
and can be used in any coal-burning generator.

In addition to publications, researchers have developed food products for individuals who
may not be able to consume traditional grains. The development of flour from Indian ricegrass
(Montina flour) at MSU is now produced and distributed by a Montana cooperative. The
development of gluten-free crops, such as high-protein oat and timothy grass, will provide
food options for those sensitive to gluten. Timothy flour is highly nutritious, gluten-free and
can be used to produce a variety of baked products.




Results: At a recent meeting of the MHF, all farmers said that since the Guilds inception they
have increased incomes, reduced costs, increased product offerings, and increased sales to
consumers. One farmer noted that spring sales revenues doubled when compared to the
previous year. Individuals reported increased revenues of up to 60 percent due to their
expanded products, direct marketing opportunities, collective buying power, improved
understanding of farm management, and collaborative approaches to problem solving. The
group has also incorporated a gleaning program in support of regional food banks that has
been supported by a grant of $7,500 from the Maine Community Foundation.
Maine now leads the country in the percentage of organic dairy farms, with more than 20
percent of dairy operations being certified, and is a national leader in organic dairy systems
research. The Maine Organic Milk Producers are innovators and have become research
partners with the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire, and the USDA Agricultural
Research Service laboratory. Collaboratively, the partnership has been awarded more than
$1.4 million in grants for research, development, and Extension education throughout the
Northeast. A cost of production research project was conducted within the partnership and
produced data that helped producers negotiate an increase in the prices paid to them,
resulting in a nearly 25 percent increase or an average net increase of about $44,000 per
farmer ‚— a cumulative impact of $2.6 million directly to Maine‚s organic farming community.




Results: Research has determined that holding fruit at temperatures between 50 and 70
degrees F for a minimum of seven days prevents the development of soft scald. With most
Maine growers adopting the new pre-storage cooling techniques in 2007, an estimated 5,000
bushels were stored for wholesale marketing during the fall and winter, generating an
additional $175,000 in revenues. Expanded production of the highly desirable Honeycrisp
apples will continue to help growers maximize their profits.


Potato cultivar research at MSU has resulted in the public disclosure and/or release of 18
potato lines since 2001.

Yields of tested bean varieties averaged 25 cwt per acre and the best lines exceeded 30 cwt
per acre, indicating great promise especially for the navy and black bean lines.

An MSU line of soft, white wheat (D8006W) earned the highest ratings of its class in the 2007
quality evaluation by the Soft Wheat Quality Council. It scored higher than other submissions
because of its moderate resistance to viruses such as Stripe Rust and Wheat Spindle Streak
Mosaic, its superior milling and baking properties, and its low water absorption and gluten
strength.




Projects in this area have been transferred and are now under the umbrella of the U.S.
Department of Energy (DOE) - funded Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, one of three
new DOE Bioenergy Research Centers.
Soy meal and natural rubber blends were successfully processed to create a biocomposite
that not only helps environmentally -- because it incorporates excess distillers dried grains
produced from corn ethanol industries beyond what the animal feed industry can use -- but
creates a new, value-added commercial product.

A comprehensive program was developed to conduct energy audits for the farmstead portion
of a dairy farm, including an energy audit manual, a training program to prepare personnel to
conduct dairy farm energy audits and criteria for certifying farm energy auditors. Complete
farmstead energy audits were conducted for 12 dairy farms in Michigan, and 14 energy
auditors completed training and were certified. A Web site was developed for the program,
which provides forms and materials, contact information and energy audit calculators.

The development of biosenors for pathogen detection relevant to biomedical and food
process engineering (multiple patents applied for).




Results provide information that can be used to reformulate lower fat ice cream that is better
tasting and establish a more economical way of determining the changes required in
flavorings when fat levels are reduced. Inferences from this work has broader application to
other food products as well.




Results indicate that reduction in TIA occurred mainly in the compression and metering
sections of the extruder and confirm the efficiency of extrusion cooking for trypsin inhibitor
inactivation. This model can be used to optimize extrusion conditions for food and feed
purposes, thereby adding value to raw soybeans.
Four independent focus groups (n=27) were conducted with each group consisting of 5 to 8
consumers who are frequent grocery shoppers. Consumers were concerned about the types
of products that are coated, safety of the coating materials, sensory qualities of the resulting
products, end benefits of EFC and the cost of the food products packaged with EFC.
We have found that fruit stage of maturity affects the quality of fruit extracts for use as anti-
oxidants.
A blackberry planting has been established. We have identified black berries as a good crop
for value added processing. The planting will be used to the best cultivar for production and
the fruit will be used in value-added experiments.




It is difficult to quantify our impact here, but as more Alaskans learn the proper methods of
preserving foods safely the risk of botulism decreases. Clients who learn food preservation
skills also become more self-sustaining because of the high transportation costs associated
with importing food.
Results showed that participants in formal Food Technology Training Course have learned
how to process about 50 products from local resources like root crops, fish, banana and
coconut. Food product evaluators of different age groups, genders and affiliations increased
their awareness on the utilization of local crops into value-added processed food products.

According to CRS5 Behavior Checklist Summary Report, 27% or 15 of 56 adult participants
showed improvement in planning meals, making healthy food choices, preparing foods
without adding salt, reading nutrition labels and having children eat breakfast. For youth,
91% of 68 increased their ability to select nutritious foods.

About 30-50% of homemakers started to apply learned knowledge to their families, especially
on food preparation by adding fruits and vegetables to the family meals depending on group
and location. About fifteen percent already learned how to read food labels by doing this in
the stores and sharing with the storekeepers the problem of selling expired food to
customers. About fifty percent of the school children and out of school youths learned the
names of the different kinds of local food and the nutrient content of each food by sharing
with other family members.




As a result of the follow up activities, two participants working at the PCC Cafeteria started
preparing some of the food products that they have learned from the class. These processed
foods were served to the students and those who take their meals at the Cafeteria. A
storeowner prepared foods for sale. One participant prepared tapioca pancake mix and
served them to 50 LEEP students during a 4-week camping activity. Eight other participants
prepared some of the foods for traditional events such as funerals and birth ceremony.

People have come to appreciate the value added products from their staple food crops as a
result of their gained knowledge in processing them.

Thirty percent of the homemakers started to apply learned knowledge to their families
especially on food preparation by adding fruits and vegetables to their family meals. About
fifteen percent already learned how to read food label by doing this in the stores and sharing
with the storekeepers the problem of selling expired food to customers. About fifty percent of
the school children and out of school youth learned the different kinds of local food and the
content of each food by sharing with their families and friends.
There was an increase in the number of healthy food snacks or lunch programs in schools and
communities. Observations of local markets and quick lunch stands indicate a greater
demand for local produce.

One participant has successfully embarked on the commercialization of Taro Sub Sandwich.
Another continued to prepare taro wine and selling the product. Tapioca steamed cakes were
sold at the Bethlehem market during payday weeks. A participant sold tapioca cookies and
cakes during civic events like Tourism Week. One participant is producing tapioca starch for
sale at grocery stores. A manager of a big hotel indicated interest in serving local foods to
their guests after they tasted the food products that were taught to the participants of the
Food Technology Course.

Different recipes of local food content are now being accepted by an increasing number of
people in the communities. Varieties of banana and taro that have a high nutrient and Vitamin
A content and easy to cultivate have been widely accepted for their taste, which is
contributing to a healthy and well-nourished population.




Grapes Example: The number of new grape enterprises has been increasing at the rate of
about 50 per year.

Vegetable Crop Example: An exit survey of participating conference growers (over 425)
indicated they strongly agreed with the following statements: will change production
practices (62%); will adopt new marketing strategies (48%); will try a new crop or new market
(46%); and 88% of attendees indicated the dollar value of their horticultural enterprise
increased.




The number of new grape enterprises has been increasing at the rate of about 50 per year.
Soil nutritional problems have been identified that require further study.




A research study including participants and coordinators was conducted to determine the
acceptance or rejection of the Adobe Connect system in February of 2007. It was found that
participants (95%) and coordinators (96%) are accepting of this mode of delivery.
In 2006-2007 the Home Landscaping publication received a national award from the American
Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) as an outstanding extension bulletin. ISU Horticulture
Extension publications have regularly been nominated for awards from ASHS, GWA (Garden
Writers Association), and ACE. Another indirect measure of quality is the number of
publications requested by gardening consumers. During the 2006-2007 year over 75,000
horticulture publications were distributed by ISUE Publications.
In the preliminary tests, 66 hot pepper lines were evaluated and 40 selected; 50 ornamental
pepper lines were evaluated and 45 selected for further test. Nutritional and phytochemical
analyses are being planned in collaboration with the Tuskegee University Department of Food
and Nutritional Sciences.
In addition to disseminating knowledge, publications are an indication of productivity. They
enhance the reputation of the NH AES and increase the competitiveness of research proposals
for further studies.


Presentation of research result in the classroom and at scientific meetings are an important
way of distributing new knowledge in a timely fashion.


In most cases, the student developed a research report and prepared a presentation for the
UNH Undergraduate Research Conference. In some cases, the work was used to prepare an
undergraduate honors thesis.

Submission of proposals to competitive programs in the USDA and other funding agencies is a
way of leveraging AES formula funds. It has allowed us to find additional resources to solve
issues that are central to the mission of the AES.
Presentation of research result in the classroom and at scientific meetings are an important
way of distributing new knowledge in a timely fashion.
This assay has been successfully applied to both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria
isolated from juice samples. This method is critical for investigating the survivability of
Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes in pineapple and guava
juices.
Study results provide insight into what anthocyanins may be selected for application in
functional foods and crop and cultivar selection when looking for health benefits. In addition,
the structure/function study should provide structural targets to study behind mechanisms
that enable anthocyanins to exhibit their chemoprotection. This study provides important
information that may increase the market value of anthocyanin-containing commodities.
Identification of health promoting components in anthocyanin extracts would increase the
demand of these commodities by consumers and the food industry expanding the market of
fresh and processed anthocyanin-containing foods. Additionally, incorporation of these
compounds in more foods as part of the regular diet may help improve health. The added
value of these commodities would open a new window of opportunities for use of these
extracts in a variety of food application.
Soft, chewy candies such as gummies are a large part of the US confectionery industry. Starch-
set gummies offer an alternative to gelatin but are associated with shortness, a texture fault
in gummy candies. This study has resulted in discovering how to make gummy confections
using fruit juice concentrate such as grape, pomegranate and strawberry along with soy
protein isolate substituting half of the wheat starch. This nutritionally enhanced product
provides anthocyanins, isoflavones, and soy protein. Oral health can also be targeted with
these gummies and further product development and human clinical trials are planned to
ascertain their effectiveness. An invention disclosure, fruit juice and soy gummy confection,
has been filed at OSU's Office of Technology Licensing and Commercialization. For the soy
bread study, OARDC scientists have collaborated with a bakery in Columbus, Ohio to develop
the gluten-free bread. Gluten-free food matrix, per se, forms batter rather then dough. To
increase structural integrity of the batter, many ingredients such as gums, protein, and lipids
have been utilized. While these ingredients improve the gluten-free bread structure, the
bread is still inferior to wheat bread. Until recently, there has been little research on the
rheological study of gluten-free batter. By using dynamic rheometry and thermo-analytical
techniques, the changes due to shear and temperature can be ascertained. Those that suffer
from gluten intolerance will benefit from a baked product that is highly acceptable yet gluten-
1. OARDC scientists have characterized new plant materials, and determined content and
profiles of anthocyanins and other phenolics. They have found a new berry, Berberis
boliviana, with a pigment content comparable to that of commercial color extracts. A berry
with such high concentration offers great potential to the food industry as it would not
require color extraction to be applied into food systems. Berries were incorporated into foods
typically colored with synthetic dyes, and representing challenging applications for natural
pigments: yogurt and candy. The study shows that these foods can be successfully enriched
with polyphenolics with acceptable stability for commercial applications. The in vitro and in
vivo studies are providing compelling evidence of the chemoprotective effects of anthocyanin-
rich extracts against colon cancer. Anthocyanin rich extracts (AREs) from different plant
materiasl were evaluated. Purple corn, chokeberry, bilberry, purple carrot, grape, radish, and
elderberry were tested for growth inhibition using a human colorectal adenocarcinoma
(HT29) cell line. All AREs suppressed HT29 cell growth to varying degrees. Purple corn ARE
showed the highest growth inhibition (GI50~14 microg/mL as cy-3-glucoside equivalent),
followed by chokeberry and bilberry. Elderberry and radish AREs showed the lowest growth
inhibition (GI50:~130 microg/mL; ~108 microg/mL). ACN played a major role in AREs'
chemoprotection and exerted an additive interaction with OPF. AREs at these concentration
ranges and under similar conditions had little effect on NCM460 normal colon cells. Statistical
analyses demonstrated that type of anthocyanin aglycone, glycosylation, and/or acylations
affected growth inhibition activity. These findings should be considered for development of




The audiences gained up-to-the-minute knowledge in their respective disciplines.
Two of the programs under this outcome measure were completed in FY 2006; the third was
incorporated into another outcome measure.
A new biosafety processing plant was established at MSU to provide researchers with the
opportunity to conduct pilot scale studies to validate many of the models developed over the
past five years. Tests in 2007 quantified the efficacy of low-energy x-ray irradiation for
pasteurization of ground beef patties and verified inactivation rates for innoculated, whole
muscle beef.

A novel method to estimate thermal kinetic parameters of neutraceuticals was developed and
spray-dried powders from grape pomace and cull blueberries were produced successfully on
a pilot-size spray drier.

The continued study of new approaches to improve cooling effectiveness and efficiency in
post-harvest handling of tart cherries has resulted in improvements in cooling and indicators
of product quality.
A proof-of-concept electrochemical biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus was developed,
tested and validated on selected food products. A data acquisition system to develop a multi-
array biosensor was also created.

MSU opened a new Automatic Identification Research & Testing Center to further work in the
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) arena. The newest product is a computer program that
automatically collects, sorts, stores, analyzes and develops graphical representations for
display of the RFID test results.

Multiple biosensor platforms have been developed to assure food safety and postharvest
quality of commodities. These platforms have contributed to the advancement of science and
engineering and in multiple patents. An annual national meeting is held at rotating sites to
share technology updates and knowledge. The project also provides educational
opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students.

No policy changes were reported by PIs

This research enables the use of dairy-based ingredients for new rheological/binding
application in food products and the development of carrier/delivery systems for hydrophobic-
low molecular-weight molecules in the pharmeceutical industry.

Understanding the capacity of various macromolecules in plant and mushroom tissues in
binding of calcium will provide novel and more efficient pre- and post-harvest practices to
enhance quality of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables.
Addition of natural polysaccharide, chitosan, to synthetic PEO films would increase the
functionality and biodegradability of the material, and at the same time partially reduce use
of petrochemicals for polymer production.

Our data (based on the established mathematical allometric scaling model) support the FDA's
policy decision that alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) cannot be used as a viable substitute for
eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

Installation of microwave heating equipment is nearly complete and the project is on
schedule for submitting data to the FDA for approval of the use of the technology. Both PEF
and HHP showed substantial promise in the processing of dairy products.
Nutrition education increased consumption of vegetables, whole grains and fruits and
increased physical activity and decreased consumption of foods high in saturated fats. Smart
Bodies was recognized as a National 4-H Youth Development Program of Distinction. Ninety
(90) elementary schools statewide participated and 35,642 youth experienced the Body Walk.
Evaluations on Smart Portions indicated 80% of the 1300 adults became more physically
active; 80% made changes in food choices; 60% doubled daily vegetable consumption; 40%
increased whole grain and fruit consumption; and 40% reduced foods high in saturated fat.
Recipients of EFNEP programs demonstrated improved resource management and food-
related practices. Faculty and paraprofessionals in the food stamp nutrition education
program held nutrition programs with ~11,697 low-income adult and 37,315 youth. Resistant
food starch reduced food intake in the animal model and the bioavailable glucose (BAG) test
was developed as a simple method for assessing glycemic index of foods. Numerous
bioactives have been isolated and tested in animal models and some demonstrate health
potential.

1.Electrostatic powder coating increased the adhesion of most food powders onto most food
targets. Some correlation was found between effectiveness of the process and resistivity or
oil content of the target, resistivity of the powder, and particle size. At low relative humidities,
electrostatic adhesion lasted for several weeks, long enough to be valuable. Microwaving was
faster than frying which was faster than baking. Non-electrostatic transfer efficiency increased
to a maximum before leveling-off with increasing particle size. Electrostatic transfer efficiency
either decreased or increased then decreased with increasing particle size. Powders became
more free flowing as particle size increased. Since transfer efficiency increases as powders
become more free flowing, transfer efficiency increased with particle size for both
nonelectrostatic and electrostatic coating. For electrostatic coating, the effect of charge
decreases with increasing particle size. Transfer efficiency increased as particle size, density or
charge increased or as air velocity decreased. Evenness increased as particle size or density
decreased, as velocity increased, or as charge increased to a peak. Electrostatic coating
produced higher transfer efficiency and evenness than nonelectrostatic coating. Improvement
in transfer efficiency and evenness due to electrostatics increased as NaCl size, density,
1. Dairy industry personnel learned that depending on the processing temperature-time
combination, endogenous (from the cow) and exogenous (from psychrotrophic bacteria)
enzymes can be reactivated during storage. Active enzymes under refrigeration, plasmin and
lipoprotein lipase (LPL), are considered the most important endogenous enzymes responsible
for milk protein and lipid degradation over the product shelf life. Unless the bacteria count
exceeds 106 CFU/mL, it was found that psychrotrophic bacterial enzymes do not significantly
contribute to lipolyisis and proteolysis of milk components. Therefore, the above mentioned
processing, packaging and storage conditions significantly slowed the rate at which this
chemical changes occur in food systems. The results of the study showed that milk samples
were chemically stable, and thus bitter off flavors in milk as a result of proteolysis, could have
been avoided. Ultra high temperature processing combined with light-protected PET bottles
can further improve the shelf life of skim and 3.25% milk. The improvement of stability and
shelf life of fluid milk can contribute to the distribution and marketing capabilities of milk
processing plants.
2. The study found that pressure (700 MPa) treatment in combination with heat (105-121C)
beyond selected pressure holding times decreased B. amyloliquefaciens populations to
undetectable levels by the enrichment procedure. In-situ properties (thermal conductivity,
reaction volume and density) of food materials under pressure were studied. Thermal




For FY2007, Wisconsin AES Hatch funded projects resulted in 182 publications, 6 patents
disclosures and 1 patent, and 62 graduate students trained. The Wisconsin AES also tracks
the Thompson ISI Essential Science indicator as a measure of impact. Our goal is to remain in
the top five and we were ranked first in the last published ranking. Examples of
representative impacts resulting from individually funded projects within our portfolio are
described, to the extent possible, in the Summary of this Annual Report.




Additional research has been funded to supplement core funding from state and federal
sources.

Results include a cost-effective fiberboard product from wheat straw; new preservation
technology for Washington's fruits and berries; a mechanical harvester for Washington sweet
cherries; cost-effective production of Omega-3 fatty acids from cull potatoes; development of
a new class of Hard White Wheat to produce bread and noodles for the Asian market; new
tests for measuring safety of food products and for E. coli contamination; and high-pressure
thermally sterilized vegetables and others.
PhD level students and post docs are working on all IMPACT-funded projects.


Scientists were able to obtain $2 million in external funding relating to IMPACT-funded
research projects in 2007.

Research projects focusing on targeted economic research are being planned and conducted
by IMPACT Center staff personnel.




10 refereed publications, 1 patent application




Public awareness.




Goat producers without cheesemaking and soapmaking experiences were taught basic skills.
Most of them have recently started cheesemaking and/or soapmaking at home and several
are going commercial. By making goat milk products and adding value to goat milk, goat
producers are increasing their income in goat production.




Goat producers without cheesemaking and soapmaking experiences were taught basic skills.
Most of them have recently started cheesemaking and/or soapmaking at home and several
are going commercial. By making goat milk products and adding value to goat milk, goat
producers are increasing their income in goat production.
The dissemination of the WBGNRIC and GPSSM by installation and translations at foreign
institutions will increase potential collaboration with Langston University, elevate the level of
production and (or) decrease costs for greater profit to farmers around the world raising
goats, enhance product availability and lower costs for consumers, increase other benefits
from rearing goats such as weed and brush control, and increase knowledge of personnel at
Langston University in the area of goat production in other countries. This will strengthen the
University's domestic research and extension programs. The web-based decision support aids
will be used at collaborating foreign institutions in research activities and for training of
extension officers, graduate students, and leader farmers.




The dissemination of the WBGNRIC and GPSSM by installation and translations at foreign
institutions will increase potential collaboration with Langston University, elevate the level of
production and (or) decrease costs for greater profit to farmers around the world raising
goats, enhance product availability and lower costs for consumers, increase other benefits
from rearing goats such as weed and brush control, and increase knowledge of personnel at
Langston University in the area of goat production in other countries. This will strengthen the
University's domestic research and extension programs. The web-based decision support aids
will be used at collaborating foreign institutions in research activities and for training of
extension officers, graduate students, and leader farmers.




Growers dramatically increased their profit by growing alternative varieties. During a four-
year period, growers received $3,266,807 more per year on average than they would have if
they had not converted to these new varieties.




Goat producers without cheesemaking and soapmaking experiences were taught basic skills.
Most of them have recently started cheesemaking and/or soapmaking at home and several
are going commercial. By making goat milk products and adding value to goat milk, goat
producers are increasing their income in goat production.
The "Serving Food Safely" Curriculum developed as part of the program was taught in three
states, Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas. Program staff in ten parishes made contacts
through the FF-NEWS program, 2,047 families enrolled who attended classes or participated
in workshops and acquired new knowledge and skills. Respondents to a survey indicated that
information provided was pertinent and that they will utilize it. The EFNEP program was in its
first year of implementation, 800 individuals benefited by gaining knowledge and awareness
of important food and health issues. During the pilot phase of the sisters-together program,
some success stories that ranged from weight loss to individuals being taking off medications
for hypertension and diabetes were recorded. Preliminary results on alternative meat
products suggested that goat patties and sausages were highly accepted by consumer
panelists when compared to beef patties and sausages. Goat hams were only moderately
accepted. Panelists indicated that they would purchase goat products if offered in the
market.

When surveyed, 100 percent of the participants at the program classes indicated that their
health knowledge and awareness were improved. The also indicated that they will use




A survey of participants in SU Ag Center nutrition and health activities indicated that 50
percent met and/or exceeded their goal of a healthy weight. Also, when surveyed, 100
percent of the participants at the program classes indicated that their health knowledge and
awareness were improved. The also indicated that they will use knowledge gained to improve
the health conditions of their family members and friends. Additionally, with escalating health
care costs, and an average cost of $80 - $100 per primary care visit, the program saved
citizens especially the socially and economically disadvantaged thousands of dollars in health
and related care costs.




A survey of participants in SU Ag Center nutrition and health activities indicated that 50
percent met and/or exceeded their goal of a healthy weight. Also, when surveyed, 100
percent of the participants at the program classes indicated that their health knowledge and
awareness were improved. The also indicated that they will use knowledge gained to improve
the health conditions of their family members and friends. Additionally, with escalating health
care costs, and an average cost of $80 - $100 per primary care visit, the program saved
citizens especially the socially and economically disadvantaged thousands of dollars in health
and related care costs.
Team members were instrumental in helping to develop processing techniques and in locating
commercial processing facilities for a variety of products, including baked goods such as
cinnamon rolls and various condiment sauces. In addition, commercial product formulations
were devised for a number of further-processed products, including unique cuts of beef, and
cooked and frozen entrees such as chili. A number of test batches of other products ‚- such as
waffle mix, juice, salsa, and so on ‚- were produced in the Robert M. Kerr Food and
Agricultural Products Center pilot processing facilities for feasibility assessment and test
marketing purposes. Two of the new products developed, the cinnamon rolls and a
condiment sauce, are currently in commercial production.

Reindeer: By using enclosures and supplemental feed reindeer quickly socialize to humans.
This allows producers increased control of free-ranging animals. Socialized reindeer are easily
penned which reduces losses to migrating caribou and predators. Supplemental feed
improved body condition and reproduction when green forage was not available. The use of
enclosures and supplemental feeding shows promise to increase the productivity of free
ranging reindeer herds in Alaska. Peonies: Mayesh Wholesale Flower Distributor evaluated a
sample of Alaska-grown peonies when they were harvested in early July. Our trial cutting of
peonies was received favorably by Mayesh. They offered to purchase peonies next year for
$1.25 per stem.
Research results have been used to determine key problems, pests, and protocols for
production of four vegetable crops in Oklahoma. Problems of soil maintenance and
improvement have been determined, and procedures have been developed to maintain soil
productivity. Presentations and on-site field days have been given to state and regional
farmers, homeowners, agricultural extension employees, and agri-business personnel
concerning organic vegetable production. Approximately 580 people attended a field day at
the Lane Agricultural Center in 2007 which included presentations and information exchange
with data presented from the organic research studies. Approximately 400 people attended
the Oklahoma-Arkansas Horticulture Industries Show in 2007 which also included
presentations on organic vegetable production. As a result of field days and educational
meetings held for producers and county extension educators, dialogue has been established
among scientists and producers. Four additional public presentations were made to growers,
agri-business personnel, and extension educators. The results obtained from demonstration
and research plantings of certified organic vegetable production and studies to evaluate weed
control for organic vegetable production were presented. A total of approximately 250
people attended these presentations. Results of studies were also presented at the
Interamerican Society for Tropical Horticulture Meetings in 2006 and 2007 to growers and
scientist from fourteen countries.

Eight new productors/production units were added to the rolls of certified organic producers
in Oklahoma last year.


An interview survey that will be administered to dogfish producers is being developed to
determine the types of dogfish products being produced, the wholesale supply chain, product
grades, product recovery rates, and physical attributes associated with each product grade.




Food entrepreneurs utilize the information provided to guide them through the process of
meeting the regulation requirements through the state of SD and the FDA. This is a growing
need. And future programs are being developed.
Low-temperature depuration appears to be a simple and inexpensive process for reducing
contamination in oysters without adverse effects on the oysters. The process can easily be
adopted by the industry for producing raw oysters for safe consumption. Scombroid
poisoning, caused by histamine intoxication, is one of the most prevalent illnesses associated
with seafood consumption in the U.S. Treatments of EO water completely inactivated the
inoculated bacteria on food contact surfaces. The development of specific intervention
processing technologies will provide mechanisms to ensure not only safe products but also
products of the highest nutritional value and of desirable sensory characteristics. Outbreaks of
foodborne illness associated with fresh and minimally processed fruits have raised interest to
develop alternative food disinfectantion systems. Acidic EO water has attracted interest from
the food industry as a promising technology for sanitation and microbial inactivation. Other
investigative work suggested that edible coatings may be beneficial for retaining quality of
fresh blueberries. This technology provided potential to develop ready-to-eat fresh blueberry
for the commercial market. The key to the continued economic health of the Oregon wine
industry is the high quality of its wines, as the relatively small scale of production in the state




It is likely that, in nature, vibrios encounter a variety of stimuli (including self-generated
quorum sensing signals) that trigger differential gene expression.




Varieties and breeding lines demonstrated significant differences in trials for yield, test weight
and stand. Initial identification of varieties with tolerance to Fusarium foot rot was made
among those varieties where inoculated plots yielded as well or better than control plots.
These resistance or tolerance lines are now being used used to improve resistance in breeding
programs. In addition, we now have a mechanism to identify the best lines to grow in areas
with high disease pressure and which allow reduced environmental impacts due to reduced
fungicide treatments to control disease.

								
To top