Employee Satisfaction Feedback Form

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					Tides Family Services’
Annual Continuous Quality Improvement Report FY 2008-2009
Respectively prepared and submitted by Heather Ferro, LICSW, VP of Quality
Management to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees

August 5, 2009
Narrative Summary of CQI Activities for FY 2008-2009

Fiscal Year 2008-2009 marked the first year the Agency implemented a full scale Continuous Quality
Improvement (CQI) Program which provides oversight of quality care, client access and quality services
by making programmatic decisions based on information that is quantified, analyzed, monitored in a
conscious, rational and systematic manner. The program processes improve through data driven
decision making. The Continuous Quality Improvement Program is structured to:

1.   Identify and monitor risk management activities;
2.   identify personnel training and professional development needs;
3.   implement initiatives that focus on the continual improvement of service delivery;
4.   develop standardized methods to analyze, monitor and manage program outcomes;
5.   assist in the development and monitoring of short term and long term goals; and
6.   develop and manage strategies for data collection and client follow-up.

This Annual Continuous Quality Improvement Report is structured to present to stakeholders the CQI
activities Tides Family Services has utilized this fiscal year to help inform decision making so as to
continue to improve upon the quality of services provided by Tides. This report also serves as a
guideline for the Board of Trustees and the Steering Committee in terms of strategically planning the
goals and objectives for the agency.

This report includes Stakeholder Feedback results, Program Evaluations (including follow-up data
on closed cases), Committee Reports and an update on the Steering Committee’s Annual Strategic
Objectives for 08-09. The report also recommends goals and objectives in each of these preceding
categories for the 09-10 Fiscal Year.


Stakeholder Feedback
Three stakeholder feedback forms were sent out in the beginning of January 2009, the Family
Satisfaction and Feedback survey, the Community Stakeholder Satisfaction and Feedback survey and
the Employee Satisfaction survey.

In addition to these surveys, Tides was nominated for and awarded one of the ―Best Place to Work in
Rhode Island‖ by Providence Business News. This award was the result of an independent evaluation
by the Best Companies Group, located in Harrisburg, PA. The Best Companies Group provided Tides
with an Employee Feedback Report as well as benchmarking data (see attached report – Appendix A)
that can be used for setting goals for the coming year.

Family Satisfaction & Feedback Survey Results
A total of 127 surveys were reported sent to families throughout the agency and 44 were returned for a
34% return rate. The instrument consisted of eleven questions, seven relating to staff and four relating
to services s well as a narrative section requesting feedback on how the agency can make improvements
to our services. Responses to questions were set on a Likard scale of Strongly Agree, Agree, No
Opinion, Disagree, and Strongly Disagree. (See Family Satisfaction & Feedback Survey 2009 Results
Form – Appendix B)


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Goals for FY 09-10 - Family Satisfaction Feedback

Based on the results of the Family Satisfaction and Feedback surveys, I recommend the following goals
for the 09-10 Fiscal Year:

1. Tides will increase the number of Family Satisfaction and Feedback survey sent by 70% and the
   return rate by at least 50%.
2. Tides will decrease the percentage of No Opinion, Disagree and Strongly Disagree responses by
   20% from this year.

Community Stakeholder Satisfaction & Feedback Survey
A total of 41 surveys were reported sent to community stakeholders and 25 were returned for a 61%
return rate. The instrument consisted of 5 questions, 3 relating to the relationship the stakeholder has to
the agency (demographics) and 2 referring to their satisfaction with their experience with Tides and a
solicitation for narrative feedback on improvements. Respondents were asked, but not required, to
provide their name or specific involvement with Tides in order to best address specific areas for
improvement in Stakeholder satisfaction. (See Community Stakeholder Satisfaction & Feedback Survey
2009 Results Form – Appendix C)

Goals for FY 09-10 - Community Stakeholder Feedback

Based on the results of the Community Stakeholder Satisfaction and Feedback surveys, I recommend the
following goals for the 09-10 Fiscal Year:

1. Tides will increase the number of surveys sent out to stakeholders (during FY 09-10 community
   stakeholder surveys should be sent to all names on the COA community stakeholder list).
2. Tides will increase the return rate on the survey to at least 70%.
3. Administrators will meet with supervisors to review specific recommendations and suggestions from
   community stakeholders.

Employee Satisfaction Surveys
Tides Family Services’ Employee Satisfaction Survey

A total of 101 surveys were reported sent to employees and 44 were returned for a 47% return rate. The
instrument consisted of a demographic section and three satisfaction sections, ―Communication &
Supervision‖, ―Professional Development‖ and ―Work Atmosphere & Workload‖. Responses to
satisfaction questions were set on a Likard scale of Strongly Disagree, Disagree, Neutral, Agree, and
Strongly Agree. (See Employee Satisfaction & Feedback Survey 2009 Results Form – Appendix D)

The return rate on the employee satisfaction survey was low (49%). In reviewing the data collected, I
specifically reviewed all questions that received an average score of under 80%, as well as the ―low‖
building scores that were below a 3.5/5 (70%). Based on the results of the employee satisfaction and
feedback survey, I recommend the following goals for the 09-10 Fiscal Year:

1. Tides will increase the return rate on the survey to at least 70%.
2. Administrators will meet with supervisors and/or staff (particularly in West Warwick and
   Pawtucket) to discuss ways to increase agency-wide communication. Discussions will be

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   documented and specific actions steps developed. Tides will increase it’s employee response to
   question # 02 to at least 80% (both average and building specific).
3. Administrators will meet with supervisors and/or staff (particularly in Providence – scored 68%) to
   discuss ways to increase office comfort, cleanliness and availability of appropriate workspace.
   Discussions will be documented and specific actions steps will be developed and brought to the
   Building Safety Committee for follow through. Tides will increase it’s employee response to
   question # 12 to at least 80% (both average and building specific).
4. The Personnel Committee will review the remaining questions and develop specific goals to increase
   employee satisfaction to at least 85% in FY 09-10.

The Best Companies Group Employee Feedback Report
The Best Companies Group sent electronic surveys to all employees who had a Tides Family Services’
email address (111, both full and part-time) and 44 were returned for a 40% return rate. The survey
consisted of a demographic section, eight core domains; Leadership and Planning, Corporate Culture
and Communications, Role Satisfaction, Work Environment, Relationship with Supervisor, Training and
Development, Pay and Benefits, Overall Engagement; and a section for narrative comments. (See Best
Companies Group Reports 2009 (1, 2 & 3– Appendix E, F, & G)

                                          Report Summary

Tides’ overall survey average score was 94% positive agreement for the survey. The rankings for the
eight domains were as follows:

       Domain                       Percentage of Agreement

Relationship with Supervisor               98%
Leadership & Planning                      97%
Role Satisfaction                          97%
Corporate Culture & Communication          96%
Overall Engagement                         94%
Work Environment                           91%
Training & Development                     89%
Pay & Benefits                             89%

The high/low scores within each domain were as follows:

Relationship with Supervisor

Low score: 98%
 My supervisor treats me fairly
 My supervisor handles my personal issues satisfactorily
 My supervisor acknowledges when I do my work well
 My supervisor tells me when my work needs improvement
 My supervisor is open to my opinion and feedback
 My supervisor helps me develop to my fullest potential

High Score: 100%
 My supervisor treats me with respect
 My supervisor handles my work related issues satisfactorily
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   I can trust what my supervisor says

Leadership & Planning

Low Score: 95%
 There is adequate planning and follow through on corporate objectives

High Score: 98%
 I understand the long-term strategy
 I have confidence in the leadership
 Leadership cares about employees
 Leadership is open to input from employees

Role Satisfaction

Low Score: 95%
 Deadlines are realistic

High Score: 100%
 I like the type of work I do

Corporate Culture

Low: 91%
 Staffing levels are adequate to provide quality services

High: 100%
 I believe there is a spirit of cooperation at this company

Work Environment

Low: 86%
 There is adequate noise control to allow me to focus on my work

High: 93%
 My general work area is adequately lit
 I feel physically safe in my work environment

Training & Development

Low: 86%
 This organization has provided me as much initial training as I needed
 This organization provides as much ongoing training as I need
 I trust that if I do good work, my company may increase my pay

High: 91%
 This organization provides the information, equipment, and resources I need to do my job well
 My company clearly tells me what is expected for advancement
 I trust what the company tells me it takes to advance my career

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Pay & Benefits

Low: 86%
 I am satisfied with the tuition reimbursement

High: 100%
 I am satisfied with the amount of vacation or Paid Time off
 I am satisfied with the sick leave policy
 I am satisfied with the sick leave policy
 I am satisfied with the retirement plan benefits

Goals for FY 09-10 - Employee Feedback

Based on the results of the Best Companies Group survey, I recommend the following goals for the 09-
10 Fiscal Year:

1. Tides will continue to use the survey in 09-10.
2. Tides will increase the return rate on the survey to at least 70%.
3. The VP of Quality Management will review the survey results with the Steering Committee,
   Personnel Committee and Clinical Committee and develop recommendations for improving on
   scores below 95% agreement. Recommendations will be documented in the appropriate committee
   minutes/reports.
4. The Personnel Committee will review the benchmarking data and make recommendations for future
   improvements in employee satisfaction/agreement.




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Program Evaluations
Each program supervisor develops, in cooperation with their director and/or supervising vice-president,
quarterly program objectives that are based on program specific goals, census and demographics
expected in the program, as well as short-term program goals which are developed annually through the
program evaluation process, to measure progress and goal attainment. The following is a summary from
each program supervisor on the program’s achievements, barriers to achievements and potential goals
for the coming fiscal year.

         Youth Outreach Program – Kent County & Pawtucket/Central Falls
                                    Meredith Correia, Supervisor

Program Description

The Youth Outreach Program (YOP) is an early intervention, preventative counseling program designed
to keep youth, ages 9-17, out of the juvenile justice and child welfare systems and in their homes. YOP
services approximately 80 clients and their families monthly in the areas of Kent County, Pawtucket,
and Central Falls. The program consists of one full time supervisor to oversee both locations, and four
full time Bachelor’s level counselors. Each staff person maintains an individual caseload of 15-20
clients, seen weekly. YOP clients are not involved with Family Court of the Department of Children,
Youth, and Families. Clients are most often referred by parents, schools, local police departments,
community hearing boards, and Family Court diversion.

The program addresses a wide variety of needs, specifically truancy, disobedience, family conflict,
anger management, poor peer choices, and academic performance. Each client has a specific treatment
plan developed by the counselor in conjunction with the family. The counselor conducts a strength
based, family focused four week assessment in order to develop an effective treatment plan. In addition
to individual counseling, the Youth Outreach Program provides family and group counseling,
Wayward/Disobedient assessments, and educational advocacy.

Accomplishments

1. During the 2008/2009 Fiscal Year, 98% of clients were discharged to their homes—an increase of
   4% from the previous year.

2. The program developed an objective to increase the discharge reason of ―Client Goals
   Accomplished‖ of 50% at closing. This goal was exceeded by the end of the fiscal year, with a
   percentage of 59% of clients achieving treatment goals, leading to successful discharge from the
   program.

3. The Youth Outreach Program worked very diligently to continue established community
   provider/stakeholder relationships through regular face to face contacts, and collaboration. The
   nature of these relationships were reflected through numerous positive stakeholder feedback surveys
   returned to the agency. In addition, YOP began receiving monthly referrals from the Pawtucket
   Hearing Board through building a strong working relationship with the new Juvenile Officer in
   Pawtucket.

4. 98% of families remained ―unknown‖ to DCYF and Family Court at time of closing from the Youth
   Outreach Program, illustrating the program’s ability to successfully divert and prevent involvement
   with the System. This objective was exceeded by 8% from the previous year.
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Barriers/Goals for the Youth Outreach Program

1. Over the last year, YOP has seen a significant increase in higher end, mental health needs and an
   increased number of clients that require more intensive and frequent interventions. These cases can
   be extremely time consuming and make it difficult for staff to keep up with basic job responsibilities
   due to constant crisis interventions, meetings, and incidences of explosive outbursts. Many of these
   clients also have Axis 1 diagnoses, but because they are not involved with DCYF or Family Court,
   cannot be referred to more intensive services such as Outreach and Tracking or Preserving Families
   Network. Contractual issues are a major barrier to providing the most effective and appropriate
   services to families. It would be tremendously helpful if YOP had the ability to internally refer cases
   when more intensive services are needed.

2. Both office locations have a history of extremely lengthy waitlists. Referrals may sit on the waitlist
   for several months, as presenting problems escalate. It would be extremely helpful and beneficial for
   YOP to have an additional staff person to divide time between both locations to provide assessments
   for referrals and to facilitate groups to minimize waitlist time. The supervisor will continue to
   explore this addition in the upcoming year.

3. YOP will work to maintain progress on current strategic objectives over the next fiscal year, and will
   assess areas that require more attention and care during the upcoming months.



                    Tides Outreach Project – Pawtucket & Woonsocket
                             Patrick Costello & Erin Diorio, Supervisors

This narrative represents the Pawtucket Outreach and Tracking Program’s first annual report on its
overall progress and recommendations for goals moving forward. The narrative will briefly explain the
program’s purpose and function, and will serve as a baseline reference point for future Continuous
Quality Improvement (CQI) annual reports.


Program Description

The Tides Outreach Project consists of two teams of three BA level trackers, and one supervisor to
oversee both teams in Pawtucket and two BA level trackers and one supervisor in Woonsocket . The
program in Pawtucket services 50 youth and their families living in Pawtucket or Central Falls and 20-
25 youth and their families in Woonsocket. All families in the TOP programs are involved with the
Department of Children Youth and Families (DCYF) or Family Court. The youth are at high-risk to be
placed outside of the home, and are seen in school, at home, and in the community multiple times a day,
six days a week with 24/7 on call service to maintain our clients in their homes and communities.

Each client has an individual treatment plan based on program goals in the areas of therapeutic
recreation, educational performance and attendance, community service and individual and family
functioning. Treatment goals are based on a comprehensive assessment of the needs in these areas and
progress is monitored on a three-month basis through the utilization review process.

Accomplishments

Based on the TOP Quarterly Objectives for fiscal year 2008/2009 the following was accomplished:

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1. An assessment of the Pawtucket TOP service recipient population revealed that 47% are Hispanic; as
   a result, three out of six of the TOP Pawtucket Caseworkers are Spanish-speaking. In Woonsocket
   the service recipient population revealed that 18% are Hispanic; as a result, the next vacant position
   was filled by a Spanish-speaking staff to ensure that the team is culturally reflective of the
   community we serve.

2. Successful management of financial resources used during periods of time when staff transition in
   and out of the program due to the position lasting one year by contract, by planning a new hire’s
   orientation with an outgoing staff’s final two weeks to limit the payroll expenses.

3. Both TOP programs in Pawtucket and Woonsocket focused on maintaining community
   relationships already formed while fostering new partnerships over the past year. Developing new
   positive relationships in the schools and the courts an has led to relationships with other community
   agencies, Magistrates, and school administrators, teachers, and social workers. This objective has
   been beneficial to progress within three other program objectives: obtaining mental health services,
   receiving new referrals, and reducing disciplinary actions within the schools and the Truancy or
   Family Court level.

4. By meeting or exceeding contractual client contacts, 67% of clients referred to Pawtucket TOP
   remained at home when their cases were closed and 96% of clients in Woonsocket remained at home
   when their cases were closed.

5. Through educational advocacy and partnerships with community employment agencies, 96% of
   clients referred to Pawtucket TOP were enrolled in school or employed while receiving services and
   95% of clients referred to Woonsocket TOP were enrolled in school or employed while receiving
   services.

Barriers/Goals for the Tides Outreach Project

1. A decrease in referrals occurred for multiple reasons, one being confusion that was caused by the
   addition of a similar outreach and tracking program within the agency (Preserving Families
   Network) that has a different referral process. Both TOP Pawtucket & Woonsocket will continue to
   outreach the referral sources to educate and update the workers to provide the information needed
   and answer any questions that may arise.

2. Inconsistent behavioral support in some of the schools can be difficult for the clients, families and
   staff to understand as certain rules or consequences are not predictable. Both TOP Pawtucket &
   Woonsocket will utilize the agency’s educational advocate in a more proactive manner to increase
   the reduction of disciplinary actions in school.

3. More youth were placed outside of the home while involved with TOP Pawtucket due in part to a
   major increase in out-of-home placements from Truancy and Family Court at the beginning of the
   year. Pawtucket TOP will continue to foster the relationships made with Magistrates and Judges in
   both courts to ensure the steady decrease in out-of-home placements as observed in the middle and
   towards the end of this fiscal year.

Conclusion

Both Pawtucket & Woonsocket TOP will continue to monitor the program’s progress, barriers to
progress, and objectives to overcome those barriers every quarter, and communicate those needs to the
VP of Quality Management and the Administration in an organized manner, in order to assure that
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quality services are delivered to the clients and their families, and maintain the Tides Family Services
overall CQI plan.

       Youth New Futures (YNF)/Youth Transition Center (YTC) – Pawtucket
                                Central/Falls
                                       Charles Gibbs, Supervisor

This narrative represents the Pawtucket Youth New Futures Program’s first annual report on its overall
progress and recommendations for goals moving forward. The narrative will briefly explain the
program’s purpose and function, and will serve as a baseline reference point for future Continuous
Quality Improvement (CQI) annual reports.

Program Description

Pawtucket Youth New Futures (YNF) consists of one team of three caseworkers, and one BA level
supervisor to provide program oversight. The program services 35-40 youth and their families living in
Pawtucket or Central Falls involved with the Department of Children Youth and Families’ Division of
Juvenile Parole, Juvenile Probation, the RI Training School, or Family Court. The youth are at high-risk
for placement outside of the home in shelters or at the RI Training School as probation or parole
violators, and require intensive community supervision to maintain their status at home and in the
community. Thus, YNF caseworkers track the youth in school, at home, and in the community multiple
times a day, six days a week, along with 24- hour on call cell phone service. Caseworkers attend
probation/parole meetings and provide educational and Family Court advocacy to provide support to the
clients and their families during difficult times.

Each client has an individual treatment plan based on program goals in the areas of therapeutic
recreation, educational performance and attendance, community service and individual and family
functioning. Treatment goals are based on a comprehensive assessment of the needs in these areas and
progress is monitored on a three-month basis through the utilization review process.

Accomplishments

Based on the Pawtucket YNF Quarterly Objectives for fiscal year 2008/2009, the following was
accomplished:

1. An assessment of the Pawtucket YNF service recipient population revealed that at least half are
   Hispanic or Cape Verdean; as a result, two out of the three caseworkers speak either Spanish or
   Creole.

2. The development, implementation, and maintenance of two 12-week focus groups: Conflict
   Resolution and Violence Prevention; provided support and structure for youth struggling with anger
   issues and assaultive behavior, aided in Family Court advocacy efforts, and promoted progress
   across many clients’ treatment plans. Furthermore, the groups, created in January and February
   respectively, proved to be successful as both continue to receive referrals from Family Court and
   will continue to meet throughout the following fiscal year.

3. To ensure continuity of referrals, Pawtucket YNF focused on maintaining community provider
   relationships already formed while fostering new partnerships over the past year. Developing new
   positive relationships in the schools and the courts and has led to relationships with other community
   agencies, and stronger relationships with school administrators, teachers, and social workers.
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   Furthermore, referrals from the RI Training School, Juvenile Parole and Probation Officers, and the
   Family Court were steady as evidenced by the census remaining at or above capacity throughout the
   fiscal year.

4. YNF Pawtucket served 88 clients throughout the 2008-2009 fiscal year through treatment planning
   designed to focus on goals for successful closing while working with youth for a period of six
   months, and currently maintains a census caseload of 35 youth.

5. By meeting or exceeding contractual client contacts, 77% (41/53) of clients referred to Pawtucket
   YNF remained at home when their cases were successfully closed during the 2008-2009 fiscal year.

6. Through educational advocacy and partnerships with community employment agencies, 85% (75/88)
   of clients referred to Pawtucket YNF were enrolled in school, attended GED, and/or were employed
   while receiving services.


Barriers/Goals for the Youth New Futures/Youth Transition Center –Pawtucket/Central Falls

1. During the 2008-2009 Fiscal Year, about 50% of the target families participated in at least one
   family meeting every 45 days. Due to various reasons, one being occasional scheduling constraints
   on either the staff’s part or the families’ part, some meetings were missed and never made up.
   Weekly, YNF staff will plan one meeting per week and ensure the family does not have any conflicts
   so that missed appointments can be avoided.

2. Inconsistent behavioral support in some of the schools can be difficult for the clients, families and
   staff to understand as certain rules or consequences are not predictable. YNF Pawtucket will utilize
   the agency’s educational advocate in a more proactive manner to increase the reduction of
   unnecessary disciplinary actions in school.

3. An increase in violence involving YNF clients among rival peer groups in Central Falls and
   Pawtucket has limited our ability to track and contact youth in certain circumstances, hindered
   progress with treatment goals, and led to an increase in adjudications leading to the imposition of
   sentences at the RI Training School. YNF will re-establish the Re-Entry Group that targets youth on
   Parole who are high risk due to negative peers and environments with the use of guest speakers with
   whom the youth can identify.

4. Unfortunately, there were 15 youth out of the 88 served during 2008-2009 in YNF Pawtucket that
   were sent or returned to the RI Training School. 13 out of the 15 youth are the same 13 youth
   mentioned above who represent the 15% who were not enrolled in school or employment. Thus,
   YNF will focus on an increase in educational outreach and advocacy, as well as increase the
   implementation of employment goals through community partnerships.

Conclusion

Pawtucket YNF will continue to monitor the program’s progress, barriers to progress, and objectives to
overcome those barriers every quarter, and communicate those needs to the VP of Quality Management
and the Administration in an organized manner, in order to assure that quality services are delivered to
the clients and their families, and maintain the Tides Family Services overall CQI plan.



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                        Youth Transition Center (YTC) – Providence
              Jasmin Osorio, Supervisor (Report submitted by Cesar Perez, Director)

YTC is 70% operational. YTC/Safe Streets are meeting bi-weekly to rundown cases with other
providers. Program supervisor is also meeting bi-weekly to coordinate with other providers to develop
treatment plans.
Tides Family Services management team meets once per month with Probation Department
Administrators and other providers to discuss progress.

Program Director has helped coordinate with the RITS on referral process. Program Director attends
referral meetings for potential clients, screens referral and conducts interviews of potential clients. YTC
supervisor and caseworkers meet clients as they transition out of the RITS.

Transitional Planning Meetings (TPM) are facilitated by the transition unit social worker once the client
is released from the training school, these meetings are typically held at the YTC.



             Preserving Families Network – Multi-Systemic Therapy (MST)
                                         Rose Paola, Supervisor

                                (See Full Report Attached – Appendix H)

This report was prepared by Dan Ensor, MST System Supervisor. The purpose of this report is to
provide you with an overview of the implementation of MST to date by Team Charism. It is our intent
to identify areas of program development that we see as organizational strengths and those areas that
may benefit from further discussion and evaluation.

The purpose of this section is to summarize the program’s progress in adhering to MST practices and to
outline the next steps recommended to be addressed over the next six months.

Summary of strengths

This is the initial startup of the MST program for Team Charism. It is common place for new programs
to experience difficulties during the first year, but Team Charism was able to overcome many of them.
As a result, their initial outcomes were very strong. A review of the data indicates that the team was
able to surpass the TAM-R collection target of 70%, with a collection rate of 81%. They were able to
surpass the Overall Adherence Threshold of 0.61, with an overage score of 0.672. 92.31% of all cases
completed treatment, with no cases being closed due to low engagement, and only one youth (6.67%)
being placed into a restrictive setting due to delinquent behavior. At the time of discharge, 92.31% of
youth were in the home, in school/working and had not received a new arrest during the course of
treatment.

Areas to be addressed and targeted for improvement (Multi-Systemic Therapy)

The following next steps are recommended to address other areas targeted for improvement:

Recommendation 1: The percent of families reporting Adherence will increase to 80% or more by
11/30/09.


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A review of the data indicates that the percent of youth reporting adherence on a TAM-R was 62%.
This indicates that 1 out of 3 families did not report an adherent score during the course of treatment. In
order to increase this to 80% ore more, it is recommended that:
    The Supervisor will continue to utilize the MST Therapist Adherence Report to identify the
        TAM-R items that each therapist is struggling with, and utilize the Clinician Develop Plans to
        conduct fits for the struggle and develop interventions to increase the clinician’s development.
    The Clinical Supervisor and System Supervisor will monitor the MST Therapist Adherence
        Report on a monthly basis to monitor this process.

Recommendation 2: The Percent of youth with at least 1 TAM-R will increase to 90% or more by
11/30/09.
A review of the data indicates that 81.8% of all youth completed at least 1 TAM-R during treatment.
While this is a solid rate, particularly for a new team, the MST target for this is 90% or more. It is
recommended that:
     The Program Director will work with the therapists to ensure they are identifying the correct
       phone numbers, and a best day and time to call the families are entered into the Case Enrollment
       Forms.
     The Supervisor will review the TAM-R Schedule Report and the TAM-R Monitoring Report
       Weekly.
     The week that a family is due a TAM-R, the therapist will remind the family that they will be
       receiving a TAM-R Collection call, and remind them of the importance of accepting and
       completing the call.
     If a TAM is not completed by the 2nd week after the due date, a Paper TAM-R will be assigned,
       in order for it to be collected.

The Supervisor and System Supervisor will review the report bi-weekly in order to ensure this is
prioritized.


           Preserving Families Network – Outreach & Tracking Woonsocket
                                        Erin Diorio, Supervisor

This narrative represents the Woonsocket PFN Outreach and Tracking Program first annual report on its
overall progress and recommendations for goals moving forward. The narrative will briefly explain the
program’s purpose and function, and will serve as a baseline reference point for future Continuous
Quality Improvement (CQI) annual reports.


Program Description

Woonsocket PFN Outreach and Tracking consists of two BA level trackers and one supervisor. The
program services high-risk youth and their families involved with the Department of Children Youth and
Families (DCYF). The youth are either returning home from placement or the RI Training School, or
are referred due to engaging in unsafe behavior for themselves and or their communities, making them
at risk for placement outside of home for the first time. The youth are seen in school and home and in
the community by the trackers multiple times a day, six days a week with 24/7 on call service.

Each client has an individual treatment plan based on program goals in the areas of therapeutic
recreation, educational performance and attendance, community service and individual and family
counseling. Treatment goals are based on a comprehensive assessment of the needs in these areas and

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progress is monitored on a three-month basis through the utilization review process. If behaviors or
family circumstances are assessed at a very high level of risk, PFN may incorporate clinical services
such as MST, Home-Based Clinical Services, or Fee For Service to coincide with or continue without
the Outreach and Tracking Program.

Accomplishments

The Woonsocket PFN Outreach and Tracking Program accomplished the following for fiscal year
2008/2009:

1. Approximately 92% of all referrals since April of 2007 avoided out-of-home placement whether
   they remained at home or were successfully reunified.

2. Created and continue to manage an after school program to offer monitoring and supervision over
   those clients in need of after school activities such as help with homework and various recreational
   activities.

3. Focused on fostering new partnerships over the past year. Our visibility in the schools, courts and
   community has led to positive relationships with other community agencies, Magistrates, and school
   administrators, teachers, and social workers. This objective has been beneficial to progress with both
   of the program’s two main objectives: receiving new referrals, and reducing disciplinary actions
   within the schools and Truancy/Family Court.

4. Through educational advocacy and partnerships with community employment agencies, 90% of
   clients referred to Woonsocket PFN Outreach and Tracking were enrolled in school or employed
   while receiving services.

Barriers/Goals for Preserving Families Network Outreach & Tracking Woonsocket

1. A lower than expected number of referrals occurred for multiple reasons, one being referral sources’
   confusion that was caused by the more complicated referral process versus the referral process of a
   similar outreach and tracking program within the agency. TOP Woonsocket will continue to
   outreach the referral sources to educate and update the workers to provide the information needed
   and answer any questions that may arise.

2. Inconsistent behavioral support in some of the schools can be difficult for the clients, families and
   staff to understand as certain rules or consequences are not predictable. Woonsocket PFN Outreach
   and Tracking will utilize the agency’s educational advocate in a more proactive manner to increase
   the reduction of disciplinary actions in school.

3. Due to the large catchment area we serve, it is sometimes difficult to deescalate or respond to crisis
   calls in a timely manner, and presents scheduling constraints while trying to maintain the contact
   level with each client.

Conclusion

Woonsocket PFN Outreach and Tracking will continue to monitor the program’s progress, barriers to
progress, and objectives to overcome those barriers every quarter, and communicate those needs to the
VP of Quality Management and the Administration in an organized manner, in order to assure that
quality services are delivered to the clients and their families, and maintain the Tides Family Services
overall CQI plan.
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         Preserving Families Network – Outreach and Tracking Kent County
                                      Melissa Brazil, Supervisor

Summary Statement: During the 08-09 FY we were able to maintain the majority of the clients in
home with their family. For those that were placed out of the home we worked diligently with the
Department and made all possible efforts to maintain the client at home.

Areas of the program that meet or exceed the strategic objectives: In working with a new program
and two staff new to the Agency the program structure has been running without major concerns.
Supervisor has maintained communication with other programs within PFN for assistance when needed.
Contact has been fluent between supervisor and DCYF/Probation Workers to ensure proper treatment
for clients. Caseworkers have been diligent on maintaining school contacts and properly advocating
client’s rights while seeking assistance with Tides Special Education Advocate as needed.

Areas identified as needing corrective action: Using Ohio Scales/YLS, MCGAS, and
biopsychosocial assessments as tools to develop treatment goals. Caseworkers have begun to bring
treatment goals to UR team for approval one month after case opens. Consistent face-to-face meetings
with clinicians in order to maintain common treatment goals.

Potential strategic objectives for the 2009-2010 fiscal year: Ensure that all treatment plans are signed
by Client and Parent/Guardian. Supervisor will assign each caseworker primary cases to ensure goals
are being achieved. To ensure all parties involved in cases are present at URs.


            Preserving Families Network – Outreach & Tracking Pawtucket
                                     Patrick Costello, Supervisor

This narrative represents the Pawtucket/Central Falls Preserving Families Network (PFN) Outreach and
Tracking Program first annual report on its overall progress and recommendations for goals moving
forward. The narrative will briefly explain the program’s purpose and function, and will serve as a
baseline reference point for future Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) annual reports.

Program Description

Pawtucket/Central Falls PFN Outreach and Tracking consists of two BA level trackers and one
supervisor. The program services high-risk youth and their families involved with the Department of
Children Youth and Families (DCYF). The youth are either returning home from placement or the RI
Training School, or are referred due to engaging in unsafe behavior for themselves and or their
communities, making them at risk for placement outside of home for the first time. The youth are seen
in school and home and in the community by the trackers multiple times a day, six days a week with 24
hour on call service. Additionally, the trackers and/or their supervisor provide educational and Family
Court advocacy as needed.

Each client has an individual treatment plan based on program goals in the areas of therapeutic
recreation, educational performance and attendance, community service and individual and family
counseling. Treatment goals are based on a comprehensive assessment of the needs in these areas and
progress is monitored on a three-month basis through the utilization review process. If behaviors or
family circumstances are assessed at a very high level of risk, PFN may incorporate clinical services
                                                                                                        15
such as MST, Home-Based Clinical Services, or Fee For Service to coincide with or continue without
the Outreach and Tracking Program.

All services provided as well as progress made on treatment plans are logged in the agency’s client
database. Additionally, all paperwork including appropriate releases and consent forms are kept in a
client file. All programs in the agency are subject to our agency’s overall Quality Improvement Program
to insure the oversight of quality services.

Accomplishments

The Pawtucket/Central Falls PFN Outreach and Tracking Program accomplished the following for fiscal
year 2008/2009:

1. Approximately 80% of all referrals since April of 2007 avoided out-of-home placement whether
   they remained at home or were successfully reunified.


2. Focused on fostering new partnerships over the past year. Our visibility in the schools, courts and
   community has led to positive relationships with other community agencies, Magistrates, and school
   administrators, teachers, and social workers. This objective has been beneficial to progress with both
   of the program’s two main objectives: receiving new referrals, and reducing disciplinary actions
   within the schools and Truancy/Family Court.

3. Through educational advocacy and partnerships with community employment agencies,
   approximately 90% of clients referred to Pawtucket/Central Falls PFN Outreach and Tracking were
   enrolled in school or employed while receiving services.

Barriers/Goals for Preserving Families Network Outreach & Tracking Pawtucket/Central Falls

1)     A lower than expected number of referrals occurred for multiple reasons, one being referral
       sources’ confusion that was caused by the more complicated referral process versus the referral
       process of a similar outreach and tracking program within the agency. The Pawtucket/Central
       Falls PFN supervisor and trackers will continue to outreach the referral sources to educate and
       update the workers to provide the information needed and answer any questions that may arise.

2)     Inconsistent behavioral support in some of the schools can be difficult for the clients, families
       and staff to understand as certain rules or consequences are not predictable. Pawtucket/Central
       Falls PFN Outreach and Tracking will utilize the agency’s educational advocate in a more
       proactive manner to increase the reduction of disciplinary actions in school.

Conclusion

Pawtucket/Central Falls PFN Outreach and Tracking will continue to monitor the program’s progress,
barriers to progress, and objectives to overcome those barriers every quarter, and communicate those
needs to the VP of Quality Management and the Administration in an organized manner, in order to
assure that quality services are delivered to the clients and their families, and maintain the Tides Family
Services overall CQI plan.




                                                                                                           16
            Preserving Families Network – Outreach & Tracking Providence
             Sharon Martinez, Supervisor (Report submitted by Cesar Perez, Director)

PFN Outreach and Tracking in Providence meeting referral criteria. Expanding referral source to
include RITS and Truancy Court. Expanded geographic region served.

Outreach and Tracking has developed into a program that understands the goal of diverting clients from
being placed. PFN O/T VP and Supervisor have developed form to keep important data.

PFN O/T Director, Supervisor, and caseworkers operate the program according to program manual.



                                  Tides School – West Warwick
                                       Ginny Shuttert, Principal

The following is a status report for the West Warwick School strategic objective for fiscal year 2008-
2009. This report will focus on the overall accomplishments, barriers, and recommendations for 09/10
based on the long-term strategic plan developed by the Board of Trustees. The report will highlight the
accomplishments, barriers to the full accomplishment of objectives and recommendations for the next
fiscal year.

Accomplishments:
The West Warwick school programs for the school year 2008-2009 proved to be a challenge. Student
enrollment was down and staffing adjustments were required. Although we anticipated a possible
financial shortfall we were capable of providing a quality while actually producing a small surplus. We
met our expressed goals and graduated five students who, without this support, would never have been
capable of achieving a high school diploma.

Barriers:
Local school department financial difficulties have directly impacted our ability to secure student
referrals. This appears to be a situation that will remain a factor for the next several years.

Recommendations for next year (Tides School West Warwick):
We plan to re-double our efforts to work out placements in our West Warwick program from school
districts outside of our normal catchment area. For example, we have one student who will be attending
from Woonsocket and anticipate two to three students from the Providence area. While we expect our
program to remain small, we will position the program for future growth by improving our district to
school transportation system and ―selling‖ our culinary program (shortly to be housed in our West
Warwick facility) to sending districts.



                                     Tides School – Pawtucket
                                          Tom Stott, Principal

The following is a status report for the Pawtucket School strategic objective for fiscal year 2008-2009.
This report will focus on each of the AVP of Treatment Programs short-term objectives based on the
long-term strategic plan developed by the Board of Trustees. The report will highlight the
accomplishments, barriers to the full accomplishment of objectives and recommendations for the next
fiscal year.
                                                                                                           17
Accomplishments:
The Pawtucket school had an excellent school year for 2008-2009. Student enrollment was up, daily
attendance improved, and staff performance was excellent. School opened without any issues. Relations
with sending school districts remained positive with some minor issues experienced with Central Falls.
Working relationships with Tides counseling programs were excellent.

Barriers:
Funding from local school departments have become an issue relative to securing day school placements
for their schools.

Goals for FY 09-10 (Tides School Pawtucket):
For the 09-10 school year the Pawtucket schools will continue to focus on issues involving the opening
of school and school preparedness to accomplish its objectives in addition to student attendance and the
proper management of behavioral and academic issues. We are preparing for the implementation of our
new regular education program that will position The Tides School to provide high school diplomas.
This new program, (The Reis-Norton Academy), will utilize a computer based instructional program in
conjunction with individualized and small group tutoring support to achieve academic credits. The
ultimate goal being completion of the program and attainment of a high school diploma. In addition, the
Pawtucket school will continue to work closely with the various Tides counseling programs and PFN to
support the educational and advocacy needs of these youngsters. Finally, we will work to assist The
Tides School culinary program in their effort to build a ―business‖ based component to their program. In
this way, we believe more of our students will be able to gain a practical work experience that may lead
to future employment.


                                    Tides School – Providence
                                       Ginny Shuttert, Principal

The following is a status report for the Providence School strategic objective for fiscal year 2008-2009.
This report will focus on the overall accomplishments, barriers, and recommendations for 09/10 based
on the long-term strategic plan developed by the Board of Trustees. The report will highlight the
accomplishments, barriers to the full accomplishment of objectives and recommendations for the next
fiscal year.

Accomplishments:
The Providence school programs for the school year 2008-2009 exceeded all expectations with regard to
service delivery and overall environment. Staffing was increased, and overall, produced an improved
and coordinated instructional delivery system. Although our student population can at times be highly
challenging, the staff was capable of working out issues and managing situations effectively. We
improved our approach to faculty coordination via regular and ongoing staff meetings. Our relations
with the Providence school department remain excellent and, as a result produced an excess of student
referrals. Overall, our school program produced a quality school arrangement for a highly challenged
student population.

Barriers:
There were no specific barriers to the successful program in the Pawtucket school program.
Transportation issues remain a mild challenge as we attempt to manage the referral demand by sending
the overflow to our other school programs in Pawtucket and West Warwick.


                                                                                                        18
Recommendations for next year (Tides School Providence):
Our plan is to continue our efforts to meet the need of our students by strengthening our reading
program via the Wilson Reading System. In addition, we believe we can add elements of employment
opportunities for our students via the agency/school culinary program. An overall positive working
relationship with Providence will be maintained and hopefully expanded as we approach the 09-10
school year. I would note that the working relationship between our school program and the agency’s
counseling program have never been more positive.


                                 Follow-Up Data – Closed Cases
Accompanying these program evaluations, Tides also sent a Follow-up Data Collection Questionnaire to
families who had closed to Tides services within the past year. The questionnaire was comprised of six
questions regarding the client’s current living placement, school attendance & performance,
employment, involvement with the Department of Children, Youth and Families, acquisition of new
charges since exiting Tides, and involvement with other service providers. A total of 248 questionnaires
were sent and twenty-six (26) were returned for a 10% return rate.

Results:

Current living placement: 84% (22) reported that the youth was living at home with their
parent(s)/guardian(s). 15% (4) reported other living arrangements {i.e. (1) Job Corps, (1) Group Home,
(2) Training School}.

School attendance/performance: 88% reported youth were attending school regularly. 69% reported
the youth was passing academically.

Employment: 15% (4) reported that the youth was currently employed. Of these, 3 youth had been
employed for over one year.

Involvement with DCYF: 54% reported having no involvement with DCYF after closing with Tides.
46% reported having some involvement with DCYF after closing with Tides. Reasons for additional
involvement with DCYF included wayward behavior, truancy and monitoring school attendance and
compliance.

Acquisition of new charges: 80% (20) of youth had not acquired any new charges since exiting Tides’
services. 19% (5) had acquired new charges including disorderly conduct, gang involvement and
wayward charges.

Involvement with other service providers: 80% reported no involvement with other service providers
since exiting Tides. 19% reported being involved with services including the Providence Center,
Probation, Cranston Arc, the Groden Center, Homestead and private therapist.

Based on the results of the Follow-Up Data Questionnaire, I recommend the following goals for the 09-
10 Fiscal Year:

1. Tides will increase the return rate on the survey to at least 50% and/or develop a more effective
   method of monitoring these statistics with closed cases.
2. Tides will increase the percentage of clients living at home to 90%.


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3. Tides will increase the percentage of clients either attending school full time or working full-time to
   90%. Of clients who are attending school, Tides will increase the percentage of youth passing
   academically to 80%.
4. Tides will decrease the percentage of youth reporting having some involvement with DCYF after
   completing services with Tides to 30%.
5. Tides will decrease the percentage of youth who acquire new charges after completing services with
   Tides to 10%.
6. Tides will continue to monitor the types of services youth/families are involved with after
   completing services with Tides to ensure aftercare plans are appropriate and adequate.




                                                                                                        20
Committee Reports
All Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) activities are monitored through assigned committees
(Clinical Committee, Personnel Committee, Building Safety Committee, Finance Committee and the
Steering Committee). Each committee is responsible for reviewing all data collected through the CQI
process, identifying trends and developing corrective action when necessary. The following reports are
from the Clinical Committee, the Personnel Committee and the Building Safety Committee,
respectively, on the activities and corrective action they have taken this fiscal year.

Clinical Committee
The general charge of the clinical committee is to provide consistent oversight, guidance and
management of clinical policies and procedures for Tides Family Services. Responsibilities aimed
toward this charge include a quarterly review of Utilization Review Forms, Clinical Incident Reports,
Training Evaluations and Clinical Case Record Reviews. These quarterly reviews result in
management, oversight and corrective action planning within each of the reviewed areas. The initial
clinical committee consisted of MSW level clinicians within TFS. A decision was made during this
fiscal year to incorporate all offices and programs within the agency by inviting a broader representation
of staff onto the committee. At this time all offices and programs have personnel representing them on
the clinical committee. The following is a summary of the corrective plans and actions that were taken
by the clinical committee over the course of the 2008/2009 fiscal year.

Clinical Record Reviews are conducted on a quarterly basis. Files are selected through random
sampling and the purpose of the audits is to identify areas of improvement within our service delivery.
Initially, agency clinicians struggled to complete the necessary audits in addition to their job duties.
During the initial audits there were less than 50% of selected files being audited. This low percentage of
audits limited the amount of information being gathered and ultimately was a barrier to making needed
improvements. The Clinical Committee drafted a proposal for auditing clinicians to be reimbursed for
this work outside of the scheduled workweek. This proposal was approved and the subsequent audits
have shown great improvement with almost 100% of selected files now being audited during each
quarter. Many actions have been taken as a result of these audits over the past year. Needed
improvements were identified in the current filing systems to allow for a more efficient and spacious
filing of records, and improvements were made within all offices to the existing filing systems. Audits
revealed inconsistencies in staff and program use of intake forms and assessments resulting in additional
trainings in these areas aimed at creating consistency in the intake process and a more complete initial
assessment as clients are entering our services. Needs were also identified in the area of aftercare
planning for our clients upon termination. Trainings were given to all supervisors in TFS as a result of
these audits to outline the process for aftercare planning and documentation for all programs. Audits
have also revealed some inconsistencies within our filing practices as an agency- different or outdated
forms being utilized across programs; treatment plans not always being signed and placed in the files;
progress notes not always up to date or filed in chronological order. Each of these filing inconsistencies
has been addressed as a result of the clinical chart audits and improvements will result in a higher
standard of care and record keeping for our clients. There is one identified corrective action that is
currently being addressed but not yet finalized. It has been identified that there is a need for a uniform
expectation for client files across all programs. Currently, each program utilizes a different format and
order within their client files creating confusion and disorder when a client receives more than one
service through our agency or transitions from one program to another. The Clinical Committee has put
forth a proposal for 8-flap file folders, which will allow the necessary improvements to be made to the
current client file system.

                                                                                                        21
Training evaluations are given to each trainee at the completion of a scheduled agency training. The
Clinical Committee reviews these evaluations and imparts corrective actions as a direct result of this
employee feedback. The first action taken by the Clinical Committee in this area was the incorporation
of an online calendar that allows for a posting of all agency trainings and upcoming events for the year.
This calendar is accessed by all TFS employees and has been a great asset in the organization of all
training activities. The online program utilized for this also allows for each TFS staff member to post
their weekly schedule online allowing for better overall staff collaboration and communication. Other
actions taken as a result of these evaluations over the past fiscal year include additional training to all
supervisors in the area of database logging as this was identified as an area of need for new and veteran
staff members. Feedback was received from staff around training needs in certain areas that are
currently addressed by Bob Cohen during his consultation time with supervisory staff. Recognition of
these needs prompted further instruction to all supervisors to be incorporating information and
techniques that they are learning through consultation with Bob Cohen into the weekly supervisions that
they are conducting with their staff. Corrective actions have prompted improvements to the agency
training calendar as well as modifications to some of the training times and locations to better meet staff
needs. The committee is currently discussing the best method of creating an on-line database for all
agency forms to improve accessibility for staff.

Corrective actions have also been taken as a result of the quarterly reviews done with Clinical Incident
Reports. The committee identified that incident reports were not being completed and filed for all
occurrences that warrant this step. This has prompted further training for all supervisors around the
appropriate use of incident reporting. Improvement in this area will allow for improved service delivery
and the improved ability for this clinical committee to track and address trends in this area.

The last charge of the clinical committee was the review of Utilization Review Forms. Through the
development of the Continuous Quality Improvement Program, the decision has been made to use the
Utilization Review forms to monitor program outcomes beginning in the 09/10 Fiscal year. The
program outcomes will be monitored by program directors and supervisors under the guidance of the
Vice President of Quality Management and the supervising Vice Presidents. As a result of this decision,
the Utilization Review forms will be taken off of the list of responsibilities for the Clinical Committee.


Personnel Committee
This report will record the committee’s activities and accomplishments since inception in July 2006.
This document will also cite how the charges have been addressed and the CQI goals for the upcoming
fiscal year 2009-2010.

The original charges to the committee include monitoring the processes for human resource planning,
performance reviews, employee satisfaction and retention, recognition events, staff grievances, and
recruiting in addition to monitoring and reporting on the agency’s CQI plan in relation to personnel
activities. In an effort to represent all staff, the committee consists of members from each office and
program as well as the Vice President of Human Resources.

Accomplishments

The Personnel Committee first focused on assigning each member a Council on Accreditation (COA)
Human Resource standard with a task to review our policies and determine how the agency could
illustrate that we meet the standard. If we did not have a proper policy or procedure in place, members
systematically discussed and proposed changes and/or a new policy. Through use of the ―Request for
Policy & Procedures Changes or Revisions form‖, the revisions were submitted to the Continuous
                                                                                                          22
Quality Improvement (CQI) team and the Board for final policy change approval. This process ensured
that the agency met all Human Resource standards under the COA guidelines to achieve our initial
accreditation.

In an effort to establish baselines for personnel committee activities, an employee satisfaction survey
was developed in 2007 that provided feedback regarding the agency’s climate, management, and
conditions of employment. Specific questions were centered on communication and supervision,
professional development, and work atmosphere and workload. Annually, the committee conducted the
survey and compiled the results. Then, action plans were developed based on a low scoring average less
than 3 in any category. Some of the quality improvement activities were:

       1.  Created and assigned all staff, whether full or part time, with an email address to improve
          agency wide communication.
       2. Check In/Out Boards were established to improve communication within each building.
       3. Waiting areas were designated in the Pawtucket and Providence offices.
       4. Providence and Pawtucket reported in-service trainings were not adequate. This was
          addressed by the Clinical Committee completing and implementing the agency orientation
          and ongoing professional development training manuals and informing staff how to sign up
          for these modules.

Retention Rates:

Personnel retention and turnover rates were measured and analyzed as well as the length of staff
employed from FY03-04 through the present (see attached analysis – Appendix I). These rates were
compared to Rhode Island statewide rates of comparable day programs’ findings that were published by
the Human Resources Institute in Cambridge, MA. The report distinguished between day support and
residential programs in several states with RI statistics broken out between day support and residential
programs.

Our overall retention rate was 50% or over each year for all staff who have been employed more than 12
months, whereas the RI retention rate in the above noted publication reported 45%. So the agency fared
better here.

Our overall turnover rate was 25% for FY03-04 and the above cited publication found 29% for all states
and 43% in RI, so we were also below average in both of these categories.

Since some of the data we used included temporary employees (TOP) and part time staff, the Personnel
Committee will further break these rates down to ensure we are identifying accurate trends.

Our next step is to identify personnel retention and turnover goals based on the agency’s historical data.

Gap Analysis:

In an effort to plan for Human Resource needs, the committee chair modified the quarterly census form
to solicit personnel gap analysis data, e.g. where the supervisors foresee a need whether it is a specific
bilingual or cultural background to reflect the service population. Also, a workforce gap analysis (see
attached report – Appendix J) was performed from the Client Information Database comparing client
demographics to staff demographics. The results and the actions taken were as follows:

1. In Providence, there is a need for Asian staff to reflect the Asian families they serve.
4. In the MST program, they need bilingual speaking staff.
                                                                                                         23
5. The Committee brainstormed other cost-effective methods to recruit such as: bilingual newspapers,
   jobsinri.com, college fairs, community resource fairs.

Other Accomplishments:

Nominated Best Places to Work in RI from Providence Business News and awarded 5th place in
category of 10 mid-size companies.

Committee submitted proposals to amend the ―Tides Family Medical Assistance Program‖ to further aid
employees. The Steering Committee approved.

After reviewing the 1st employee grievance, the committee wanted to relinquish this task to the Steering
Committee due to the confidentiality and sensitivity of the staff member who is filing. Steering
Committee approved.

Distributed United Health Plan survey to assess health concerns and implemented a wellness program.

On a quarterly basis, the committee reviewed exit interviews and determined actions plans based on
feasibility. Implemented the agency’s years of service recognition program by presenting personalized
gifts to staff at staff day.

Goals for FY 09-10 (Personnel Committee)

The committee will continue to meet monthly with a set agenda to maintain Council on Accreditation
(COA) compliance. One recurring item is to review the agency’s Human Resources Management and
Personnel policies and procedures.

1) In July 2009, the committee will get a report from Carla, HR Assistant as to status of all reviews
   completed. The committee will review the status list and follow up on the outstanding reviews.

2) In July 2009, the committee will get a report from Carla, HR Assistant as to status of missing job
   descriptions. The committee will review the list and develop new job descriptions where needed.

3) The committee will set a goal for a decreased staff turnover rate based on the previous years’ rates.

4) The committee will continue to analyze the length of employment of separated staff as well as the
   length of current staff employed. Thus, a staff retention rate will be set based on prior history.

5) The committee will administer the annual staff satisfaction survey in January 2010 and based on the
   results implement action plans for continuous quality improvement.

6) Biannually, the committee will continue to hold years of service award ceremonies to recognize
   staff’s commitment to our mission.

7) The committee will continue to analyze the exit interviews monthly and develop action plans, if
   feasible, based on the reasons that people have left the agency.




                                                                                                           24
Building Safety Committee
This narrative represents the Building Safety Committee’s first formal report on its activities, corrective
action, overall progress, and recommendations for goals moving forward since being formed in
2006/2007. The narrative will briefly explain the committee’s purpose and function, and will serve as a
baseline reference point for future Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) annual reports.

Purpose and Function

Tides Family Services is responsible for the management of four buildings located in West Warwick,
Providence, and Pawtucket. Tides also operates out of rented space in Woonsocket, and while we do not
assume any property management duties there, we still assume responsibility for the well being of its
employees working there. Furthermore, Tides owns two 12-passenger vans used to transport various
program service recipients for recreational activities, etc. As the agency grew and continues to grow,
however, it became evident through our accreditation self-study that an internal committee was needed
to help organize the tasks required to maintain the buildings and vehicles, and to monitor the
implementation and adherence to trainings and safety regulations as well.

The Building Safety Committee was formed at first to help the agency meet certain standards of
operation for an agency of its size. Through regular reporting via building-safety and vehicle-safety
checklists, and the use of standard work orders, documentation and a method of prioritizing maintenance
jobs was established to provide a needs-based focus for building maintenance workers. The committee
also developed fire drills requirements based on state regulations, and the Emergency Response and
Preparedness Training to ensure that all staff are trained for emergency situations. All drills conducted
are documented in logs, and attendance to trainings is noted in each of the personnel files. In order to
divide the responsibilities within the committee, the following membership was adopted:

Committee Chair: Committee oversight, ERP Training Facilitator.
Building/School Representatives: Office/vehicle maintenance reporting, fire drill facilitation and
reporting.

Building Maintenance Representatives: Work Order completion/scheduling reporting, reporting on
property management tasks.

Administrative Representatives: Provide information and input into decision making.

Accomplishments

1)     During fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee fulfilled and maintained its responsibilities to:
        A. Provide sufficient documentation regarding its activities
        B. Ensure each building was in compliance for successful site visits

       As a result, the peer reviewers from the Council On Accreditation (COA) acknowledged that
       Tides adheres to various standards relevant to building safety and maintenance required of an
       agency attempting to gain accreditation for the first time.

2)     During fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee adopted an invoice numbering system for work
       orders by location for easier job tracking and better system efficiency.


                                                                                                         25
3)     During fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee created a list of all work orders and maintenance
       jobs that prioritizes important tasks, that denotes which jobs can be completed within the current
       budget, and that is updated to include progress, expected completion dates, and date of actual
       completion.

4)     During fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee helped to conduct and implement the ERP training
       that had over a 90% employee participation rate.

5)     During fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee created and implemented an agency van schedule
       and policy to standardize the process of vehicle sharing between offices.

6)     During fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee assumed the oversight of an annual process that
       collects Risk Prevention Management information and practices of each committee and
       administrators responsible for the agency’s operation.

7)     During fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee assumed the oversight of reviewing Incident
       Reports related to building and safety issues.

Goals for FY 09-10 (Building Safety Committee)

1. During fiscal year 2009-2010, the committee will maintain and review quarterly objectives to ensure
   steady CQI focus and progress.

2. During fiscal year 2009-2010, the committee will increase the employee participation rate in the
   ERP training to 100% by contacting program supervisors to ensure their staff sign up once per year.

3. During fiscal year 2009-2010, the committee will ensure that building and school representatives
   formally meet with staff at their locations quarterly to provide updates on work orders and building
   needs based on the priority/completion list.

4. During fiscal year 2009-2010, the committee will ensure that fire drills are conducted regularly by
   scheduling the drills within the committee. Building and school representatives will inform their
   locations about the drills in a timely manner.

5. Beginning fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee will compile the Risk Prevention Management
   information and practices of each committee and administrators responsible for the agency’s
   operation, and present this information to the Board of Trustees. During fiscal year 2009-2010, the
   committee will continue this practice and implement changes or added practices as requested by the
   Board.

6. Beginning fiscal year 2008-2009, the committee will monitor, on a quarterly basis, all
   building/safety related incident reports and make recommendations for policy change or other
   corrective action to address any negative trends.

Conclusion

The Building Safety Committee will continue to monitor the agency’s maintenance and safety needs,
and communicate those needs to the Board and the Administration in an organized manner, in order to
promote the most efficient response to those needs as our resources will allow. Furthermore, the
Building Safety Committee will strive to achieve the FY 2009-2010 goals to maintain the Tides Family
Services overall CQI plan.
                                                                                                          26
Steering Committee Annual Strategic Objectives Updates (FY 08-09) &
New Objectives for FY 09-10

The following is a status report for the Steering Committee’s annual strategic objective for fiscal year
2008-2009. This report will focus on each of the Steering Committee Member’s (senior management)
short-term objectives based on the long-term strategic plan developed by the Board of Trustees. The
report will highlight the accomplishments, barriers to the full accomplishment of objectives and
recommendations for the next fiscal year.

Br. Michael Reis, LICSW - CEO
Goal I.1 Foster a statewide shift for high – risk youth away from residential care and toward
community/family based care.

Objective 1. Effect legislation that supports community/family based care.

Accomplishments:
Legislation was passed in FY 2008-09 authorizing DCYF to keep monies saved by diverting children to
community based programs and returning them to their families from placements. The plan is for
DCYF to re-invest this money into further developing community based alternatives to placements.
DCYF was capped at 1000 beds and has been able to reduce the amount of beds utilized by over 100
beds throughout the fiscal year. The projected DCYF 2010 budget calls for the elimination of additional
100 beds with a portion of the savings going to a re-investment into community based programs.

Barriers:
There is an additional $150 million unexpected revenue short fall in the 2010 state budget and we are
unaware how this will effect the DCYF budget for FY 09-10.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to lobby and advocate for continued support of community based programming for at-risk
youth and families from the legislature based on proven outcomes of effectiveness and cost savings.
Continue to serve on the Child Welfare Advisory Committee and the Global Waiver Taskforce.

Objective 2. Secure the adoption of community/family based model with all parties in the Family
Court System.

Accomplishments:
We offered to fund a pilot project (through our PFN surplus).




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Barriers:
DCYF never acted on our request.

Recommendations for next year:
1. Meet with the Governor to educate on PFN’s cost savings to the State.
2. Continue to meet with the General Assembly and House Finance Committee to educate on cost
   savings to State.
3. Continue active involvement w/ Director of DCYF and Family Court;
4. Continue active involvement participation with DCYF Child Welfare Advocacy Committee;
5. Meet with individual Judges to explain community based services and market PFN as an alternative
   to placement;
6. Continue to meet with DCYF Administrators of the 4 regions and Probation;
7. Continue to develop parnerships with service provider community including those that will enhance
   respite services.

Goal I.2 Develop and establish provider affiliations that offer the full spectrum of community –
based youth/family care needed, including, where necessary, residential care.

Objective 1. Operationalize Partnerships for Families a DCYF contracted (FCCP).

Accomplishments:
The Partnerships For Families FCCP has been operationalized. Actively involved with the Partnerships
for Families (PFF) FCCP. Tides assigned a staff member to be trained in the Hi-Fidelity Wrap around
Model. Tides has a seat at the monthly CEO meetings in both the CEO/Governance PFF meetings as
well as the service provider meetings.

Tides also has hired a consultant from the Parent Support Network to help increase our knowledge and
participation in the Wrap Around Model and to evaluate and work with the Steering Committee to
increase our parent/youth involvement at all levels of the agency.

Barriers:
DCYF has not been able to clarify their strategy for the FCCP’s and how they will interrelated with
service providers or Networks.

Recomendations for Next Year:
1. Continue to participate in CEO and clinical meetings of the FCCP.
2. Participate in the Ocean State Network for Children and Families and how to incorporate the
   FCCP’s and/or Wrap Around Model into the OSNFC&F’s.

Objective 2. Operationalize contract with Family Care Community Partnership of Northern and
Southern Rhode Island to provide strength based family services for adolescent youths referred to the
FCCP.

Accomplishments:
Tides Family Services is actively involved in the Northern RI FCCP and in addition has began
discussions with the lead agency for the South County FCCP.

Barriers:
See above barrier.

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Objective 3. Formalize contract for Community Partnership for Change (Ocean State Network for
Children and Families)

Accomplishments:
Tides has been involved from the beginning on both the CEO/Governance group meetings as well as the
clinical group meetings to develop this Community/Residential provider Network. Both groups have
made great progress in defining the structure of the Network. The CEO group has developed a draft of
the Memorandum of Understanding, which will become the initial by-laws for the Network. A copy of
this draft was reviewed by the Steering Committee as an ad hoc committee of the Board (Chris Gontarz
and Tom Dickinson) to highlight any potential risk or conflict to the Agency. Chris Gontarz will give a
report to the Board at the June meeting.

Barriers:
The Network needs to be incorporated and established as a separate non-profit in order to respond to the
RFP (expected to come out in July 09) from DCYF to form new provider Networks. In order to be
incorporated the group needs established by-laws.

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to participate in the development of the Ocean State Network for Youth and Families.

Objective 4. Formally establish Preserving Families Network to reach sustainable goal of 300 cases.

Accomplishments:
The PFN has been established and is fully operational. Since it’s inception in Nov. of 2007 the PFN has
serviced 328 children/families, 98 of whom were returned from out-of home placement and all referrals
had a status of being ―at-risk‖ for residential placements. 91% of children taken into the PFN were
diverted from residential placements.

Barriers:
Due to budgetary issues DCYF has been unable to fund PFN for 300.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
1. Continue to participate in the development of the FCCP’s.
2. Continue to work towards securing a formal contract and participate in the development of the
   Ocean State Network for Children and Families.
3. Continue to actively negotiate with DCYF on 120 slots in order to make the PFN viable at a
   sustainable rate.

Objective 5. (New Objective 2009-2010)

1. Formally establish a partnership with the Choice Program in Baltimore, MD and the St. Gabriel’s
   System in Philadelphia, PA to broaden the scope of community based partnerships on the East
   Coast.


Goal II. Determine what educational services Tides provides.

Objective 1. Develop recommendations on what educational services Tides will provide.

Accomplishments:

                                                                                                      29
It has been determined that Tides will continue to be a provider of educational advocacy and special
education and private education services for at-risk youth. Tides continued to actively advocate on
behalf of our population by testifying before the Board of Regents, holding meetings with the Chair of
the Board of Regents Elementary and Secondary Schools and the Director of the Special Education
Department for the State of Rhode Island. Tides also has been working with the Educational Justice
Council of Rhode Island to monitor educational legislation and is participating in a study funded by The
Rhode Island Foundation with Brown University on drop-out and throw-away youth in urban and
suburban school systems in Rhode Island.

Barriers:
The Tides School lost its ability to award high school diplomas. Also, the development of the new state
standards (college prepatory diploma only) will make it difficult for many of the Tides School
population to graduate.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
1. Continue to work with local LEA’s to secure diplomas for at-risk students.
2. Continue to work w. Department of Education to re-establish the ability to grant high school
   diplomas.
3. Work in conjunction with legitimate, accredited on-line diploma granting educational services for at-
   risk students.


Goal V1. Secure and maintain COA accreditation.

Objective 1 & 2 Achieve full implementation of all COA standards.

Accomplishments:
Achieved. The agency was successful in its attempt to secure accreditation from the Council On
Accreditation. There were four standards that COA required additional information on prior to granting
full accreditation. These four standards were minor and easily addressed.

Objective 3. Maintain COA accreditation.

The agency is committed to adhering to and maintaining all the COA standards. One of the ways this
will be accomplished is through the Agency’s Continuous Quality Improvement Plan. Since the official
accreditation notice, the Agency’s CQI Plan continues to grow and evolve into a complete cyclical
system that incorporates and puts into action the agency’s strategic plan, including the development
agency committees that hold responsibility for monitoring, evaluating and reporting on continuous
quality improvement audits ion their designated areas.


Goal V2. Solve the organizational need for financial, risk and human resource management.

Objective 1. Lead the effort to accomplish the action steps outlined under V-2 in the Strategic
Plan action steps.

1. Develop a job description/duties & roles for CFO and HR positions. (MET)

2. Steering Committee reviews and modifies job descriptions/duties & roles. (MET)
3. Develop true cost accounting model and begin accounting for all cost of providing
   Services. (Ongoing)
                                                                                                      30
4. Determine cost for dedicated staff and determine timeline given financial resources. (Ongoing)
5. Review and update timeline as needed. (Ongoing)

Accomplishments:
A job description was reviewed for the Human Resource position, however due to funding constraints
this position has been put on hold. The Board Finance Committee developed a job description for a
CFO, did a search for candidates, held interviews and the CEO hired a CPA for the position that will
begin in July. The risk management duties will fall under the responsibility of the CFO.

Barriers:
Expense.

Recommendations for next year:
The CFO should evaluate and revise as necessary the agency’s cost accounting model. The CFO should
assume the agency’s Risk Management responsibilities. The CFO will review the budget and make
recommendations to allocate funding for a Fund Development position.


Goal V4. Design and activate a succession plan for the CEO.

Objective 1. Have succession plan for the Board of Trustees

Accomplishments:
Br. Michael has begun to assign tasks to members of the Management Team/Steering Committee that in
the past he would have reserved for himself. These tasks include participation on ―CEO‖ committees
such as the Ocean State Network and the FCCP’s; participation in contract and service negotiations with
funding sources; program development and program oversight.

Barriers:
More direction is needed from the Board on formalizing a succession plan.

Recommendations for next year:
The Executive Committee should develop a succession plan with input from Br. Michael.

Goal V5. Increase the use and functionality of technology.

Objective 1. Identify need and cost for new technology systems. (MET)

Objective 2. Secure third party funding for new technology system.

Accomplishments:
Grant proposals have been submitted to the Rhode Island Foundation, Fidelity, the Champlin
Foundation, Nuance and IBM for a complete update of technology hardware.

Barriers: Dependent on response from third party funders.

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to solicit funding.

Objective 3. Operationalize new technology system.

                                                                                                       31
Accomplishments/Barriers/Recommendations for next year:
See above

Goal V6. Complete transition to a primarily community based/led Board of Trustees committed
to Lasallian mission supported by active and effective board committees and task groups.

Objective 1. Identify and recommend appropriate community members to the Board Development
Committee.

Accomplishments:
Board committees are fully functional and Board committee chairs are active in the tasks assigned to
their committees.

Barriers:
Need more diversity on the Board.

Recommendations for next year:
Board members need to be more active in identifying appropriate potential new board members that
meet the need for diversity.

Board members need to consider attending some of the extended Lasallian training

Objective 2. Plan and implement a CEO Advisory Committee.

Barriers:
Lack of time to make this objective a priority.

Recommendations for next year:
Extend this objective into the coming fiscal year.


Goal VI 1. Develop and execute the requisite plans and processes to achieve established silent and
public phase capital campaign goals.

Objective 1. Guide and facilitate, in conjunction with the fund development committee of the Board,
ten on-site presentations, to include quarterly reports, to potential donors. (MET – ongoing)

Objective 2. Guide and facilitate 20 fact to face major donor multi-year pledge solicitations (MET –
ongoing)

Accomplishments:
Hired a fund development consultant to identify and outreach to major donors witch has resulted in
meeting objectives 1&2. Fund development committee independently active.

Barriers:
Economy.

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to recruit new individuals who are interested in Tides through the Golf and Humanitarian fund
raising events. Follow recommendations from the Fund Development Committee.

                                                                                                       32
Hire a full-time fund developer.



Heather Ferro, LICSW – Vice-President of Quality Management
Goal 1.1-2 Ensure the availability of community based programs for the state-wide population of
underserved and high-risk youth and families.

Objective 1. Ensure the organization adheres to the Continuous Quality Improvement Plan.

Accomplishments:
This fiscal year marks the first year the agency has participated in a full-scale Continuous Quality
Improvement (CQI) program. The CQI committee structure is working well, from the board level to the
program level. The Board of Trustees participated actively in the development of a three-year strategic
plan, which was operationalized by the agency’s steering committee (CEO and senior management)
through the development of annual strategic objectives and each program supervisor developed quarterly
program objectives that were monitored and reported on regularly. The chairs of each committee have
taken ownership of their committee and are actively accomplishing the assigned responsibilities.
Stakeholder feedback (client, staff, community) was solicited and analyzed. This year’s CQI Report
will be reviewed by the steering committee and Board of Trustees and goals and objectives for next year
will be established. This report will also be posted on the agency’s website for stakeholder review.

Additionally, I have developed for each program measurable outcomes that focus on placement at
closing, successful attainment of treatment goals, an increase in positive functioning and an increase in
school attendance. These outcomes will be monitored on a quarterly basis through the agency’s
utilization review process and will be reported to the steering committee.

I have also represented Tides in the development of the Ocean State Network meetings (clinical group).
This group is looking at the clinical aspects of a new network in preparation for an RFP from DCYF that
the service provider community expects will be issued soon.




COA GOALS

5.1.1 Secure and maintain COA accreditation. (Finalize policies embracing all COA standards
and make them operational throughout the organization).      MET

5.1.2 Secure and maintain COA accreditation. (Develop self-study documents).               MET

5.1.3 Secure and maintain COA accreditation. (Prepare on-site documents)                   MET

5.1.4 Secure and maintain COA accreditation. (Prepare for site visit)                      MET

5.1.5 Secure and maintain COA accreditation. (Maintenance)                  MET


Goal 5.2.2 Solve the organizational need for financial, risk management and human resource
management. (Steering Committee reviews and modifies job description/duties & roles).
                                                                                                            33
Objective 1. Ensure that the job description meets the best practice standards and quality
improvement needs for the agency.

Accomplishments:
Job descriptions were developed for both the CEO and the HR functions. The CFO job description
included the responsibility of agency-wide risk management oversight. The CFO position was filled in
July 2009.

Barriers:
There were no barriers to developing job descriptions.

Goals for FY 09-10:
Assist CFO in any way necessary to help secure funding for HR position.


Goal 5.5 Increase the use of technology and information systems.

Objective 1. Recommend technology improvements for enhanced quality

Accomplishments:
I assisted the steering committee in identifying an appropriate web-based data base system that will
allow staff to be more productive in the field as well as allow the agency to capture outcomes more
effectively.

Barriers: None

Goals for FY 09-10:
Assist the steering committee in any way necessary to secure the funding and or implementation of the
new web-based system.


Goal 5.6 Complete transition to a primarily community-based Board of Trustees committed to
Lasallian Mission supported by active and effective Board committees and task groups.

Objective 1. Participate in the work of the Board committees and task groups as assigned by the
CEO.

Accomplishments:
In addition to attending every Board meeting to assist and inform the governing body in attaining the
COA accreditation, I have served on several board committees as a staff representative including the
Strategic Planning committee, the Board Development committee and the Finance committee. Each of
these committees have made great progress over the past year. Specifically, strategic planning
committee successfully developed an active strategic plan that lays the foundation for the agency’s CQI
plan, the Board Development committee secured much needed talent and expertise in the area of fiscal
management and fund development and the Finance committee attained an appropriate chair and
subsequently recommended the hiring of a CFO.

Barriers:
There were no barriers to my participation in Board committees.

                                                                                                        34
Goals for FY 09-10:
In addition to continuing with the above objective, my goal for FY 09-10 will be to assist the Board of
Trustees in developing the appropriate venue for monitoring the Strategic Plan.

Other Objectives:

Clinical work/contract oversight – Provide one day of counseling at La Salle Academy and oversee
the Tides – La Salle Academy contract.

Accomplishments:
This past academic year I provided one day of counseling to students referred to the program. I also
provided in-home or in-office (Tides) family counseling as necessary and facilitated an Al-Ateen group
at La Salle. I also supervised the BA level counselor who was placed at La Salle the additional four
days. Overall, Tides serviced over 50 students and families at La Salle this past academic year.

This year marked my ninth year providing counseling at La Salle Academy. Having one person placed
at La Salle for four days was very helpful in terms of being able to provide the consistency both La Salle
and the counselors placed there felt necessary to provide the best possible service.

I continue to maintain an excellent working relationship with the administration and faculty.

Barriers:
There remains confusion among the steering committee in terms of the operating cost to Tides in this
contract. This should be clarified at some point. Another potential barrier has been the scheduling
difficulties when my day at La Salle conflicts with my responsibilities at Tides (i.e. clinical supervision
with Norah, participation in Ocean State Network meetings and management meetings, and travel for
Lasallian Ministry meetings), La Salle has been very accommodating when I have needed to leave for
some time to cover these Tides responsibilities and I have made a concerted effort to be conscientious
about covering all my responsibilities and communicating with both the administration at La Salle and
Br. Michael to ensure all needs are being met.

Goals for FY 09-10:
While it was my goal for the next academic year to use the funding La Salle provides to hire a full-time
(4 days a week) clinician and have myself provide counseling the additional day, the decision was made
to place me at La Salle three days a week with the additional days covered by the BA level counselor
who was placed at there last year. This arrangement certainly gives La Salle the consistency they were
looking for, however it will significantly increase my caseload to a potential 30 clients at any given time
and given my primary role as vice-president of quality management I will have to balance my
responsibilities to La Salle with the goals I have for Tides in terms of quality management.

Supervision – Fulfill the role of site director at Tides Family Services for the Lasallian Volunteer
Program.

Accomplishments:
This year started with two new LV’s and one returning. Despite one of the new LV’s leaving half-way
through the year for personal reasons I would say this has been another very successful year in the
Lasallian Volunteer program.

Barriers:
There were a few adjustments that were needed in terms of placement for one LV due to a ―goodness of
fit‖ issue. Once the adjustments were made however, the year for that LV went very smoothly. A
                                                                                                          35
second LV decided several months into the program to leave despite several attempts to accommodate
her needs.

Goals for FY 09-10:
In an attempt to rectify any potential ―goodness of fit‖ issues for next year, we decided to have all the
supervisors meet with and interview the incoming LV’s and get their input on where they think the LV’s
will be best placed. More specifically, my goal for next year will be to incorporate the LV program
more formally into the CQI program in terms of stakeholder feedback to identify any areas that may be
in need of improvement.

Mission – Represent Tides Family Services and Lasallian Child Care Agencies at the District level
through membership on the Mission & Ministry Council.

Accomplishments:
This past year I represented Tides Family Services on the LI-NE District’s Mission and Ministry
Council and acted as both the Vice-Chair and Secretary of that Council. I have also represented Tides
Family Services on the new district’s (DENA) Child-Care affinity group (the Administrators Forum). I
was also asked to become a member of the St. Mary’s Press Board of Directors and while this will not
have an effect on the District, it will have an impact on the larger Lasallian world’s understanding of the
child-care agencies.

Barriers:
Other than having to manage time more effectively, there were no barriers to serving on these councils.

Goals for FY 09-10:
My goal for 09-10 will be to continue to serve and represent Tides Family Services at the district level
and to promote the Lasallian Child-Care ministries.

Other/Additional Goals for FY 09-10

1. Tides Family Services will begin to be recognized as an ―evidenced-based/best practice‖ service
   provider.
       Promote and facilitate discussions with other best-practice/evidenced based programs/groups
          (i.e. MST, Choice, National Family Preservation Network) to explore the steps needed to
          become recognized as a best practice service provider.
       Promote and facilitate discussions with local colleges and universities to establish potential
          research projects necessary for evidence of best practice services.
       Collaborate with other Lasallian Child-Care agencies and provide expertise to Lasallian child
          care agencies in providing effective community and home based services.
       Develop protective factor oriented assessment tools and treatment goals to assist staff in
          focusing on interventions that promote protective factors (evidenced-based).
       Oversee the collection of outcome data that supports evidence-based, best practice service.

2. Incorporate findings from the FY 08-09 CQI Report into corrective action for FY 09-10.
       Provide guidance to the Board of Trustees, Steering Committee and CQI Committees to
          incorporate identified corrective action into attainable action steps for quality improvement.

3. Oversee the Tides - La Salle contract and provide three-days of counseling to that program.

4. Become a Peer-Reviewer for the Council On Accreditation.

                                                                                                           36
Sue Kershaw-Sczuroski, LICSW - Vice-President of Treatment Programs
Goal I.1 Foster a statewide shift for high – risk youth away from residential care and toward
community/family based care.

Objective 1. Supervise staff to protect program purity and increase referrals at family court.

Accomplishments:
This objective is ongoing. I continue to supervise staff and provide guidance with respect to the agency
mission and best practice models.

Barriers:
Time commitments and program development. Specifically the new programs we are in the process of
implementing are requiring more time and effort than originally planned.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to recruit and train staff with a focus on best practice and mission. Positive outcomes will drive
referrals and adherence to best practice across all programs will guarantee an increase in referrals.

Objective 2. Assist Brother Michael in securing funding for a daily “gatekeeper” in Family Court.

Accomplishments:
This objective is ongoing. I continue to accompany Br. Michael to meetings with DCYF Administration
with the goal of securing current funding as well as developing expanded programming, including a
―gatekeeper‖ in Family Court. Relationships between DCYF Administration and Tides have
strengthened. DCYF has invited Tides Management to meet with the Chief Judge to discuss.

Barriers:
Cultural mindset within DCYF, union influence, and state budget crisis.
Recommendations for next year:
Continue to pursue funding and secure daily presence in family court.

Objective 3. Assign and supervise staff as daily gatekeepers in Family Court.

Accomplishments:
The Directors of Outreach and Tracking for Providence and Pawtucket, Cesar Perez and Mike Schmitt
have been assigned as the key court presence for Tides. Additional staff advocates for clients in family
court on an ongoing basis.

Barriers:
Time commitments and crisis work with families and clients often require a re-scheduling of priorities.

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to assign staff as needed to advocate for clients in family court and maintain a presence that
will aid in increasing referrals.

Objective 4. Oversee Quarterly program objectives for Directors and Supervisor’s to secure timely,
relevant outcome data.

                                                                                                           37
Accomplishments:
Implementing the CQI process, in particular, program objectives, has been a challenge, but Director’s
and Supervisors have come to understand the importance of CQI and have been challenged by the
oversight and a desire to be committed to improving programming.

Barriers:
Preparing staff for the changes that were taking place agency wide, the accreditation process, data and
technology issues and the development and implementation of new programming strained systems and
presented a barrier to accomplishing objectives according to the agency schedule.

Recommendations for next year:
Consistency in review and documentation should be areas of improvements made.

Objective 5. Participate on Board Advocacy and Outreach Committee.

Accomplishments: Met
I attended and participated in the Board Advocacy committee. The committee met all of its goals for the
year.

Barriers: None

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to participate in committee and establish relationships with decision-makers.


Goal I.2 Develop and establish provider affiliations that offer the full spectrum of community –
based youth/family care needed, including, where necessary, residential care.

Objective 1. Increase staffing needs within a program when financially appropriate.


Accomplishments:
Staffing needs have been increased throughout the year in a fiscally responsible manner.

Barriers:
Due to the volume of referrals to PFN, staff needs to be expanded further.

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to increase staffing needs in accordance with program needs and funding/budget concerns.

Objective 2. Manage hiring, training, supervision, and appointments of new staff to a position.

Accomplishments:
I continue to manage hiring, training, supervision and appointment of new staff.

Barriers:
As indicated previously, my ability to arrange and manage work time in a manner that allows me to
complete all of the work required. The paperwork requirements of this aspect of my job can sometimes
be overwhelming.


                                                                                                          38
Recommendations for next year:
Continued oversight of agency wide program staffing needs.

Objective 3. Secure an approved Tides MST Team

Accomplishments: Met
The agency successfully obtained 2 MST teams. The 6-month review of the first MST team was
extremely positive.

Barriers:
As to be expected when developing or establishing a new program, growing pains are a part of the
process. Issues such as space for the team, managing training, and meeting deadlines during an
incredibly busy and demanding time in the agency presented challenges, but all staff rose to the occasion
and the program experienced very positive outcomes that exceeded expectations.

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to manage and grow the program.

Objective 4. Operationalize the FCCP contract.

Accomplishments:
The agency has appointed one staff member to attend FCCP development meetings and be trained in
wraparound.

Barriers:
DCYF budget issues coupled with growing pains with the FCCP’s has created challenges and barriers to
successfully operationalizing contract.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
1. Continue to participate in the development of the FCCP’s.
2. Continue to work towards securing a formal contract and participate in the development of the
   Ocean State Network for Children and Families.
Objective 5. Secure and implement YTC contract for Pawtucket

Accomplishments:
The contract has not been operationalized but several planning meetings have taken place to move
toward goal of securing contract.

Barriers:
Union issues and state budget crisis presented barriers to accomplishment.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Tides staff will continue to meet to collaborate with Probation Administration with a goal of
operationalizing the Pawtucket YTC contract.

Objective 6. Achieve the completion of services and space for YTC Providence and Pawtucket

Accomplishments:
YTC Pawtucket physical site is 90% complete.

                                                                                                       39
Barriers:
Changing plans and additional probation staff added to proposed facility caused a delay in the project.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Finalize construction for the YTC Pawtucket.

Objective 7. Achieve a partnership between YTC and Probation through securing a permanent
presence for Probation at the YTC in Providence and Pawtucket.

Accomplishments: Met
Probation has a permanent presence at the YTC in Providence.

Barriers:
State union issues have proven to be an obstacle to securing probation worker and supervisor positions;
however staff are progressing along smoothly.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to work with Probation Administration toward goal of permanent presence for YTC in
Pawtucket.

Objective 8. Secure community resources partnership with the YTC in Providence and Pawtucket

Accomplishments: Met
Tides has MOA with Caritas house to provide substance abuse treatment at the YTC. Additionally,
Network RI provides employment testing and training and placement assistance, independent therapists
utilize the YTC as well as a Bible study for the youth.

Objective 9. Rebuild Clinical Department in a financially viable way to meet the current demands of
standards and program.

Accomplishments: Met
I have hired several new clinicians this year within the Preserving Families Network.

Barriers:
Funding and inconsistent referrals within Preserving Families Network.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Assess current state budget crisis and contracts with DCYF to determine whether more clinicians will be
hired Fee for Service.

Objective 10. Assist Brother Michael in securing Providence Diversion contract and implement if
secured.

Accomplishments:
I have transitioned this goal to Cesar Perez, with oversight by me, who has taken responsibility for
working with Brother Michael to develop the Providence Diversion Program. I have twice monthly
meeting to with Family Resources to further develop the respite part of the program. We have contacted
NAFI and are working with Family Services of RI to expand respite options to meet the demands of this
new program.

Barriers:
                                                                                                          40
State budget issues coupled with union issues and development and utilization of the risk assessment
tool have presented barriers to formalizing this program.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to oversee Cesar Perez, further develop and manage the respite program, and assist Br.
Michael.

Goal I.3 Market Tides/Networks to potential sources of kids (Family Court, DCYF, Lawyers)

Objective 1. Represent or appoint someone to represent Tides’ program interests at Juvenile Justice
meetings to secure appropriate referrals and educate and advocate on behalf of Tides Family
Services.

Accomplishments: Met
I have appointed staff to attend meetings in referrals are made such as the United Families Initiative and
the RITS referral meetings.

Objective 2. Ensure and manage Tides staff on collaboration skills to build and foster relationships
with community stakeholders.

Accomplishments:
Building collaboration skills with staff continues to be a primary focus and ongoing goal. We have made
excellent progress by holding provider meetings regularly, improving weekly communication with
stakeholders, and sharing treatment plan updates monthly.

Goal V. 1 Secure and Maintain COA accreditation

Objective1.3 Implement standards, achieve accreditation, and maintain accreditation.

Accomplishments: Met
The agency obtained COA accreditation. It is my goal to maintain standards while continuing to develop
new programs and work toward re-accreditation in three years.

Goal V5. Increase the use and functionality of technology.

Objective 1. Identify need and cost for new technology systems. MET


Beth Bixby, LICSW - Assistant Vice-President of Treatment Programs
Goal I.1 Foster a statewide shift for high – risk youth away from residential care and toward
community/family based care.

Objective 1. Assign and supervise staff as daily gatekeepers in Family Court.

Accomplishments:
The Directors of Outreach and Tracking for Providence and Pawtucket, Cesar Perez and Mike Schmitt
have been assigned as the key court presence for Tides. Additional staff advocates for clients in family
court on an ongoing basis.

Barriers:
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Ability to fund a full time position.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to assign staff as needed to advocate for clients in family court and maintain a presence that
will aid in increasing referrals. Continue to recruit and train staff with a focus on best practice and
mission. Positive outcomes will drive referrals and adherence to best practice across all programs will
guarantee an increase in referrals.

Objective 2. Assist Vice President of Treatment Programs in securing funding for a daily
“gatekeeper” in Family Court.

Accomplishments:
This objective is ongoing. I continue to accompany Br. Michael and Sue Kershaw-Sczuroski to meetings
with DCYF Administration with the goal of securing current funding as well as developing expanded
programming, including a ―gatekeeper‖ in Family Court. Relationships between DCYF Administration
and Tides have strengthened. DCYF has invited Tides Management to meet with the Chief Judge to
discuss.

Barriers:
Cultural mindset within DCYF, union influence, and state budget crisis.

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to pursue funding and secure daily presence in family court.

Objective 3. Oversee Quarterly program objectives for Directors and Supervisor’s to secure timely,
relevant outcome data.

Accomplishments:
Implementing the CQI process, in particular, program objectives, has been a challenge, but Director’s
and Supervisors have come to understand the importance of CQI and have been challenged by the
oversight and a desire to be committed to improving programming.
Barriers:
Preparing staff for the changes that were taking place agency wide, the accreditation process, data and
technology issues and the development and implementation of new programming strained systems and
presented a barrier to accomplishing objectives according to the agency schedule.

Recommendations for next year:
Consistency in review and documentation should be areas of improvements made.

Goal I.2 Develop and establish provider affiliations that offer the full spectrum of community –
based youth/family care needed, including, where necessary, residential care.

Objective 1. Increase staffing needs within a program when financially appropriate.

Accomplishments:
Staffing needs have been increased throughout the year in a fiscally responsible manner.

Barriers:
Due to the volume of referrals to PFN, staff needs to be expanded further.


                                                                                                          42
Recommendations for next year:
Continue to increase staffing needs in accordance with program needs and funding/budget concerns.

Objective 2. Manage hiring, training, supervision, and appointments of new staff to a position.

Accomplishments:
I continue to manage hiring, training, supervision and appointment of new staff.

Barriers:

Recommendations for next year:
Continued oversight of agency wide program staffing needs.

Objective 3. Secure an approved Tides MST Team

Accomplishments: Met
The agency successfully obtained 2 MST teams. The 6-month review of the first MST team was
extremely positive.

Barriers:
As to be expected when developing or establishing a new program, growing pains are a part of the
process. Issues such as space for the team, managing training, and meeting deadlines during an
incredibly busy and demanding time in the agency presented challenges, but all staff rose to the occasion
and the program experienced very positive outcomes that exceeded expectations.

Recommendations for next year:
Continue to manage and grow the program.

Objective 4. Attend FCCP meetings to develop appropriate partnerships.



Accomplishments:
Attended and collaborated with Ivy Mederois, program Manager for FCCP within the Northern Region
of RI.

Barriers:
Ability to fund Tides services through flex funds within the FCCP.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to Participate in the development of FCCP’s statewide.
Continue to work with agencies in developing Ocean State network for Children and Families.

Objective 5. Assist Vice President of Treatment Programs to Secure and implement YTC contract for
Pawtucket

Accomplishments:
The contract has not been operationalized but several planning meetings have taken place to move
toward goal of securing contract.

Barriers:
                                                                                                       43
Union issues and state budget crisis presented barriers to accomplishment.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Tides staff will continue to meet to collaborate with Probation Administration with a goal of
operationalizing the Pawtucket YTC contract.

Objective 6. Achieve the completion of services and space for YTC Providence and Pawtucket

Accomplishments:
YTC Pawtucket physical site is 90% complete.

Barriers:
Changing plans and additional probation staff added to proposed facility caused a delay in the project.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Finalize construction for the YTC Pawtucket.

Objective 7. Achieve a partnership between YTC and Probation through securing a permanent
presence for Probation at the YTC in Providence and Pawtucket.

Accomplishments: Met
Probation has a permanent presence at the YTC in Providence.

Barriers:
State union issues have proven to be an obstacle to securing probation worker and supervisor positions;
however staff are progressing along smoothly.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to work with Probation Administration toward goal of permanent presence for YTC in
Pawtucket.

Objective 8. Secure community resources partnership with the YTC in Pawtucket

Accomplishments: Partially Met
Tides has MOA with Caritas house to provide substance abuse treatment at the YTC. Additionally,
Network RI provides employment testing and training and placement assistance, independent therapists
utilize the YTC.

Barriers:
State union issues have proven to be an obstacle to securing probation worker and supervisor positions.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to work to form partnerships with community resources.

Objective 9. Assist Vice President of Treatment Programs to Rebuild Clinical Department in a
financially viable way to meet the current demands of standards and program.

Accomplishments: Met
Several new clinicians have been hired this year within the Preserving Families Network.

Barriers:
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Funding and inconsistent referrals within Preserving Families Network.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Assess current state budget crisis and contracts with DCYF to determine whether more clinicians will be
hired Fee for Service.

Objective 10. Assist Vice President of Treatment Programs to secure Providence Diversion contract
and implement if secured.

Accomplishments:
Cesar Perez has taken responsibility for working with Brother Michael to develop the Providence
Diversion Program. Twice monthly meeting are scheduled with Family Resources to further develop the
respite part of the program. We have contacted NAFI and are working with Family Services of RI to
expand respite options to meet the demands of this new program.

Barriers:
State budget issues coupled with union issues and development and utilization of the risk assessment
tool have presented barriers to formalizing this program.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to assist Vice President of Treatment Programs and Director of Providence YTC to further
develop and manage the respite program, and assist Br. Michael.


Goal I.3 Market Tides/Networks to potential sources of kids (Family Court, DCYF, Lawyers)

Objective 1. Represent or appoint representatives to attend United Family Initiative Meetings and
DCYF Provider Fairs.


Accomplishments:
Patrick Costello and Erin Diorio attend Bi-weekly meetings within Region 4. The conferencing teams
that meet bi-weekly at the Regional Office to participate with DCYF staff in case conferencing, planning
and identifying resources to ensure that community services are accessed. The teams focus on families
and resource needs in specific geographic areas within the Region.

Barriers:
Many referrals are for children under age 9.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Staff will continue to collaborate with community partners.

Objective 2. Develop a training document in order to educate Tides staff on collaboration skills to
build and foster relationships with community stakeholders.

Accomplishments:
Informal training has occurred through ongoing training and supervision.

Barriers: No time.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
                                                                                                       45
Staff will continue to collaborate with community partners.

Goal V. 1 Secure and Maintain COA accreditation

Objective1.3 Implement standards, achieve accreditation, and maintain accreditation.

Accomplishments: Met
The agency obtained COA accreditation. It is my goal to maintain standards while continuing to develop
new programs and work toward re-accreditation in three years.

Goal V5. Increase the use and functionality of technology.

Objective 1. Identify need and cost for new technology systems. MET


Mike Capalbo, M.Ed. - Director of Education & Human Resources
Goal II.1 Determine what educational services Tides should provide.

Objective 1. Define alternatives and determine program and financial feasibility of each for the
board.

Accomplishments:
Because of the current climate of the educational community it was decided to remain with our current
delivery service for our client population. At this time new ventures with this or similar populations
would not be prudent.

Barriers:
Financial climate and resultant philosophical approach by LEA’s.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
We will continue to monitor the various financial and philosophical approaches of the LEA’s we work
with as a measure of willingness and ability to pursue working relationships.

Objective 2. New Diploma Rules

Accomplishments:
Through a number of meetings with various state agencies we were able to accomplish two inroads to
this issue: (1) The state department of Education is now working with LEA’s on the development of an
―alternative‖ diploma system in addition to the previously approved plan; (2) We developed a new
private school program within The Tides School system to provide a specific High School Diploma
granting arrangement for Tides Schools.

Barriers:
Philosophical approach to education and a lack of understanding of poverty and its ultimate result on
youngster’s perception of success.

Recommendations for next year:
We will continue to pursue the development of various systems to achieving a high school diploma for
our clients and the provision of educational advocacy.

                                                                                                         46
Objective 3. Identify potential partnerships

Accomplishments:
We maintained solid working relationships with Providence and Pawtucket and are developing a
relationship with East Providence, Lincoln, and Cumberland.

Barriers:
Financial issues that exist with LEA’s and state funding formulas.

Recommendations for next year:

Goal II.2 Actively address new diploma rules.

Objective 1. Develop alternatives to address (a) Lawsuit or work within system; (b) Advocate with
individuals who can affect change.

Accomplishments:
Through a number of meetings with various stakeholders, including the Chairman of the Board of
Regents, we were able to get the state department of education to consider an ―alternative diploma‖
system in addition to the proficiency diploma system already in place.

Barriers:
The philosophical view within the educational community that a ―one size fits all‖ diploma system and
college prep diploma is necessary.

Recommendations for next year:
We are pursuing an adjustment to our private school certification that will provide a new ―alternative‖
diploma. Thus, Tides schools will be providing a new diploma-granting program called The Reis-Norton
Academy.

Goal III.1 Develop and implement a positive process for securing more public school
dropout/other referrals.

Objective 1. Dependant upon II.1 above, widen the network of special education contacts to facilitate
an increased number of referrals of potential dropouts.

Accomplishments:
By working very closely with the agency’s PFN program we were able to provide school services and
educational advocacy support for eighty-five youngsters.

Barriers:
Monetary issues being faced by the state and local education agency’s and the resulting ―push out‖
mentality of many educators.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
 To continue to expand our efforts supporting the PFN program and utilize our school programs to assist
as necessary.

Objective 2. Dependant upon II.1 above, coordinate with the PFN director, the flow of referrals via
the network into The Tides Schools.

                                                                                                      47
Accomplishments:
We have developed a relatively seamless system to provide educational support for PFN clients and,
have the initial stages of a system to work with LEA’s when returning students to their local school
systems.

Barriers:
No barriers at this point.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
To continue to refine our intake, exit procedures, and contact procedures with LEA’s.

Goal IV. 1 Maintain sustainable educational programs and facilities during the transition period.

Objective 1. Increase advocacy within Kent County to identify appropriate placement for students
within The Tides Schools.

Accomplishments:
We provided a wide range of educational advocacy for all of our Tides clients and successfully
addressed a number of educational and behavioral issues. Instituted a parent support group for Kent
County to assist parents and provide opportunities for parents to share experiences and information.

Barriers:
LEA funding issues and resulting rigidity surrounding available programming.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
Continue to expand our Educational Advocacy program by training more advocates.


Objective 2. Form partnerships with selected Special Education Directors outside of Kent County to
foster referrals to the West Warwick Schools.

Accomplishments:
We have developed a strong working relationship with the Providence schools to help facilitate referrals
to our West Warwick program.

Barriers:
Transportation to and from West Warwick for students.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
To continue to work with the Providence with regard to this effort and utilize the PFN referral process to
buttress this endeavor.

Goal IV.2 Explore business opportunities (culinary program, daycare center)

Objective 1. Identify means of obtaining funds to build or lease appropriate instructional culinary

Accomplishments:
We completed our first year of lunch service to the St. Mary’s catholic school in Cranston. It was a
successful year for this small business venture.

Barriers:
                                                                                                        48
Staffing to support this effort.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
We will be expanding this program (serving lunches to local catholic schools) with the procurement of a
second catholic school lunch program. We are also negotiating for the development of our own kitchen
facility to be partially funded by any excess funds we generate from this ―business‖.

Goal V.1 Secure and Maintain COA accreditation

Objective 1 – 3. Implement standards, achieve accreditation, and maintain accreditation.

Accomplishments: Met
With the support and direction of Jennifer Marsocci, we were able to meet our COA requirements.

Barriers:
Time to complete requirements.

Recommendations for next year’s objectives:
To continue to work to maintain standards toward a goal of reaccredidation with the assistance of
Jennifer Marsocci.

Lee Grossi, Financial Advisor
Goal 1.1-2 Permanent Presence in Family Court

We offered to fund a pilot project (through our PFN surplus). DCYF never acted on our request. We
have continued to list the Court Liaison position in our FY10 budget.

Goal 1.2-5 Ensure payment for services covers true cost

For the past year, we have achieved this objective, with a minor exception. LaSalle Academy counseling
services were subsidized in the amount of $15,000 by agency and board decision. In FY 10, the
greater challenge will be negotiating a fair contract renewal with DCYF that covers the full cost of
our Preserving Families Network.
We will also modify the chart of accounts to allow for improved aggregate budget reporting; and
evaluate the need for a new financial software system.

Goal V-1 Secure and Maintain COA Accreditation

While COA evaluators were satisfied with new contracting procedures that have been implemented
prospectively, we should not lose sight of the fact that we continue to operate with some old agreements
that do are not in conformance with standards.

Goal V.2-1 Develop CFO/HR Job Descriptions

CFO has been finalized and hired.
HR position is on hold.

Goal V.2-4 Determine Cost for dedicated staff


                                                                                                      49
Completed. FY 10 objectives include establishing separate cost allocation accounts for
development; building maintenance; and intake services.

Goal VI-.2-1 Develop and Maintain a list of facility needs and priorities

Serge developed a list in the fall of 2008. The Building Committee has monitored this.
Future projects should be costed out and incorporated into a comprehensive Capital Budget.




                                             Appendix



A. Best Companies Employee Feedback Report

B. Family Satisfaction & Feedback Survey 2009 Results

C. Community Stakeholder Feedback Survey 2009 Results

D. Employee Satisfaction & Feedback Survey 2009 Results

E, F, G. Best Companies Group Reports 2009, 1-3

H. MST Report

I. Employee Retention Rate Analysis 08-09

J. Workforce Gap Analysis 08-09



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