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					Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
     Doctoral Nursing Education




                       By
              Dr. Florence Myrick
    Professor & Associate Dean, Teaching
   Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta
Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
      Doctoral Nursing Education

•   The Role of the Supervisor Involves:

     •   The pursuit and sharing of knowledge with students and in
         that sharing achieve understanding of students, of the
         profession and discipline of nursing, and of ourselves.

     •   The opportunity to be able to influence the thinking and
         behavior of others
    Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
          Doctoral Nursing Education


“One of the hardest things teachers have to learn
 is that the sincerity of their intentions does not
 guarantee the purity of their practice”
                             (Brookfield, 1996, p. 1).
 Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
       Doctoral Nursing Education


“Integrity, honesty and sincerity are at bottom
not matters of conscious purpose but of quality
of active response. Their acquisition is fostered
of course by conscious intent, but self-deception
is very easy.”
                           (John’s Dewey, 1944 p. 176)
  Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
        Doctoral Nursing Education




“A lot of people have gone further than they
 thought they could because someone else
 thought they could.”
                                Unknown
    Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
          Doctoral Nursing Education

   Mentorship: The Context

     The context in which we teach is critical to how we
      teach.
     It is within this broader context that we must come to
      know how best we can support one another and how
      we can create a culture in which a mentoring mindset
      is fostered to ultimately shape the face of nursing
      education for the future.
    Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
          Doctoral Nursing Education

   Mentorship: Historical Context

       Greek mythology “The Odyssey”
       Socrates mentored Plato
       Plato mentored Aristotle
       Aristotle mentored Alexander the Great
       Merlin mentored young King Arthur
     Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
           Doctoral Nursing Education


   Mentorship: Today’s Context

       Winds of Change
          Globalization and the Knowledge economy
          A changing demographic
          Technological advances
          Evidence based practice
     Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
           Doctoral Nursing Education


   The Winds of Change

       Globalization and the Knowledge based economy
     Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
           Doctoral Nursing Education

   The Winds of Change

   A changing demographic

          The Traditionalists/Veterans (born pre 1945)
          The Baby Boomers (1941-1964)
          The Generation X-ers (1964-1985)
          The Millennials/Net Generation/General Y (1980-199)
     Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
           Doctoral Nursing Education

   The Winds of Change

     Technological   advances
    Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
          Doctoral Nursing Education


   The Winds of Change

     Evidence   based practice
     Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
           Doctoral Nursing Education

   A Mentoring Ethos

     A climate of critique
     A culture of respect
     The promotion of inclusion
     An active mindset of mentoring
     Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
           Doctoral Nursing Education

   A Climate of Critique

       Conducive to open and robust critique.
       Emanates from the supervisor and the educational
        environment.
       A leadership that is open, respectful and critically
        reflective.
     Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
           Doctoral Nursing Education

   A Culture of Respect

       Education and Humanization
            Self-knowledge and self-respect.
            Clear and critical thinking.
            Independence of judgment.
            Concern, compassion, self-discipline.
            Capacity to imagine, to empathize, to appreciate goodness
             and to care.
     Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
           Doctoral Nursing Education


    The Promotion of Inclusion

    “Neither the world of our experience and understanding
     nor our language are available to us independently of
     each other; they belong together in an indissoluble
     unity”
                       (Joseph Dunne, 1997, p. 138)
      Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
            Doctoral Nursing Education

   The Promotion of Inclusion

     Question
     Reject exclusionary language.
     Connect meaning to understanding not merely of
      problem solving but of the role that language itself
      plays in the construction of meaning and subjectivity.
     Recognize that there is often little meaning outside of
      political representations.
      Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
            Doctoral Nursing Education


   “[The] call to write curriculum in a language that is
    touted as clear and accessible is evidence of a moral and
    political vision that increasingly collapses under the
    weight of its own anti-intellectualism.”

                            (Aronowitz & Giroux, 1991, p. 90)
        Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
              Doctoral Nursing Education

   A Mindset of Mentoring

       Less prevalent than we might expect in a profession like nursing.
       A mutuality that requires more than the mentee meeting the
        right mentor.
       The mentor must meet the right mentee.
       A focus on supporting, inspiring, and nurturing and not only on
        the transfer of knowledge or practical skills.
       Voluntarily sought.
        Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
              Doctoral Nursing Education

   The Supervisor as Mentor

       Forward thinking.
       Shares one or more common interests in nursing with Mentee.
       Advises and facilitates student development of professional
        strategies for the purpose of furthering the Mentee’s future
        career.
       Is authentic and affirming.
       Willingly and generously passes the torch. Remember, Mentees
        are the future Mentors.
   Reaching In, Reaching Out: Mentorship in
         Doctoral Nursing Education


“Advice is like snow -- the softer it falls, the
  longer it dwells upon, and the deeper it
  sinks into the mind.”

                            Samuel Taylor Coleridge
                             References

   Andrews, M., & Willis, M. (1999). Mentorship in nursing: a literature review.
    Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29(1), 201-207.
   Davidhizar, R. E, (1988). Mentoring in doctoral education. Journal of Advanced
    Nursing, 13, 775-781.
   Brookfield, S. (2006). The skillful teacher. On technique, trust and
    responsiveness in the classroom (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
   Chinn, P. (2008). Philosophical foundations for excellence in teaching. In B. A.
    Moyer & R. A. Wittmann-Price, Nursing education: Foundations for practice
    excellence.
   Philadelphia: F. A. Davis Company.
   Dewey, J. (1944). Democracy and education. An introduction to the philosophy of
    education. New York, NY: The Free Press.
   Earle, V., & Myrick, F. (2009). (In Press). Nursing pedagogy and the
    intergenerational discourse. Journal of Nursing Education.
   Garrison, D. R., & Vaughan, N. D. (2008). Blended learning in higher education.
    Framework, principles, and guidelines. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
                             References

   Palmer, P. J. (1998). The courage to teach: Exploring the inner landscape of a
    teacher’s life. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
   Parada, C. (1993). Genealogical guide to greed mythology. Paul Astroms Forlag
    Publishing: Jonsered, Sweden.
   Smith, D. G. (2002). Teaching in global times. Edmonton, AB: Pedagon Press.
   Smith, P. (1991). Higher education in America. Killing the spirit. New York, NY:
    Penguin.
   Stewart, D. (2001). Schooling as a journey in humanization (pp. 51-68). In W.
    Hare and J. P. Portelli (Eds.). Philosophy of education. Introductory readings
    (3rd. ed.).
   Calgary, AB: Detselig Enterprises Ltd.
   Whittmann-Price, R.A. (2008). Promoting reflection in groups of diverse nursing
   students. In B. A. Moyer & R. A. Wittmann-Price. Nursing education:
   Foundations for practice excellence.       Philadelphia: F. A. Davis Company.
   Yonge, O., Billay, D., Myrick, F., & Lahunga, F. (2007). Preceptorship and
    mentorship: Not merely a matter of semantics. International Journal of Nursing
    Education Scholarship, 4(1).

				
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