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SCHOOL OF HISTORY UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 2010 – 2011

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   SCHOOL OF HISTORY
UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK
      2010 – 2011
This Handbook should be used together with the Academic Regulations and the Student
Guide. This Handbook provides information specific to the School of History, while the
Student Guide gives information common to all students at the College. The Academic
Regulations provide detailed information on progression, award and classification
requirements. Nothing in this Handbook overrides the Academic Regulations, which always
take precedence.



The School of History Handbook is available online at:

http://www.history.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate/index.html



You will receive a copy of the Student Guide at the start of the academic year. It is also
available online at:

http://www.arcs.qmul.ac.uk/registry/useful_information.html



The Academic Regulations are available online at:

http://www.arcs.qmul.ac.uk/policy_zone/index.html#academic_policies



This Handbook is available in large print format. If you would like a large print copy, or a
copy in any other format, please contact Matt Latham, Arts Building room 3.29, tel. 020 7882
8353.



The information in this handbook is correct as of September 2010. In the unlikely event of
substantial amendments to the material, the School of History will inform you of the changes.



Queen Mary cannot accept responsibility for the accuracy or reliability of information given in
third party publications or websites referred to in this Handbook.




                                                                                             1
                                CONTENTS

                                                                 Page Number
1. Preliminary information                                       3
   1.1    Dates and deadlines
   1.2    Safety/emergencies
   1.3    Use of College ID card

2. School Information                                            5
   2.1   School location
   2.2   Contact details
   2.3   Office opening hours
   2.4   Procedure for reporting absences
   2.5   Location of key information
   2.6   Communications
   2.7   Email etiquette
   2.8   Academic Adviser/Senior Tutor/Student Support Manager
   2.9   Complaints
   2.10 Staff contact list

3. School Procedures                                             11
   3.1   Leave of absence
   3.2   Deregistration
   3.3   Extenuating circumstances
   3.4   Changing modules/programmes
   3.5   Updating personal details
   3.6   Conduct
   3.7   Representation

4. Programmes and modules of study                               15
   4.1   Degree programmes
   4.2   Programme Structures
   4.3   Progression
   4.4   Coursework submission
   4.5   Deadlines
   4.6   Essay deadline extensions
   4.7   History Research Dissertation/Special Subject
   4.8   Style guide
   4.9   Optional studies
   4.10 Teaching methods
   4.11 International Exchange programme
   4.12 Degree classification

5. Writing and Assessment                                        31
   5.1    How will I be assessed?
   5.2    Marking criteria and grading
   5.3    Feedback
   5.4    School prizes
   5.5    Plagiarism and referencing

6. Student Guide                                                 35
7. Space for individual notes                                    36

                                                                               2
                          1. Preliminary Information

1.1 Dates and deadlines

Term dates for the 2010-11 academic year

      Semester 1
                                                              th
         o 20 September to 17 December 2010 (teahing begins 27 September 2010)
         o Reading week: 8 November – 12 November 2010
         o Winter vacation: 20 December 2010 - 7 January 2011
      Semester 2
         o 10 January - 1 April 2011
         o Reading week: 21 February – 25 February 2011
         o Spring vacation: 4 - 29 April 2011
      Semester 3 - Examination period
         o Revision Week: 25 April – 29 April 2011
         o 3 May - 11 June 2011 (2 May is a bank holiday)


Graduation dates
Summer 2011 Graduation Ceremonies are yet to be scheduled but details will be published
at as soon as they are available. Graduation is normally in the third week of July.

Key Deadlines

All changes to module registration must be approved on MySiS by the end of the first
week of term. No module changes will be permitted after this date.

Your coursework deadlines will be detailed in the module course packs.

Pre-registration for the 2011-2012 academic session will take place in April 2011. Failure to
pre-enrol will severely limit your module selection in the following academic year.



1.2 Safety/Emergencies

You should familiarise yourself with emergency procedures for all areas in which you study,
noting the location of emergency exits, assembly points and equipment. In case of a fire,
immediately leave the building by the nearest exit point. Do not use the lifts. Fire action
notices are displayed in corridors and by fire escapes.

In an emergency, dial 3333 from any internal phone and clearly state the nature and location
of the problem, your name, and the number you are calling from (if known). If there is no
internal phone available, call 999 and follow the normal procedure. You should ensure that
corridors and doorways are not obstructed and that fire fighting equipment is not removed
from its station.

First aid assistance for minor accidents can be obtained by dialling 3333 from an internal
phone, or 020 7882 3333 from any other telephone.




                                                                                           3
1.3 Use of College ID Card

You will receive a College photo-ID card upon enrolment. This card is very important, and
must be carried at all times on campus. If you do not produce this card upon request and
satisfy staff that it is your card through comparison of your face and the photograph, you
may be removed from the building, or from campus.

The card shows your Student Number. You must take your card into all examinations, and
display it on your table for inspection. You will also need to copy the Student Number onto
your paper.

The card also serves as your library card and as an access card to buildings. Many buildings
have security points at which you must show your card, and others require you to scan your
card to release the doors.

It is vital that you keep your card safe and with you at all times on campus. If you lose your
card, or if your card is stolen, you should contact the Registry, who will be able to help you.
A fee may be charged to replace lost College ID Cards.




                                                                                             4
                              2. School Information

2.1 School location

The School of History is currently located in the Arts Building. The school offices can be
found on the third floor in rooms 3.27 – 3.29. The reception desk is located in the foyer
outside these rooms.

Over the spring vacation in 2011 the School of History will be moving to the new Humanities
Building that is currently being completed. Further details regarding the move will be emailed
to you nearer the time. This move may disrupt access to History offices during the spring
term and students will be kept fully appraised of any changes to staff locations and
availability.

The College campus is a no-smoking area, this includes all buildings and all outside areas
within the campus.



2.2 Contact details

School of History
Queen Mary, University of London
London
E1 4NS

Tel no: +44(0) 207 882 8351

email: history@qmul.ac.uk



2.3 Office opening hours

The School of History’s opening hours are:

Term Time             Monday – Thursday 9.00am – 5.00pm
                      Friday            9.00am – 12.30pm & 2.00pm – 5.00pm

Vacation Time         Monday – Friday        10.00am – 12.30pm & 2.00pm – 4.00pm

2.4 Procedure for reporting absences

Attendance
Seminar classes form a vital part of university education. All of the modules you take within
the School of History will have seminars that involve discussion and debate. Some will also
require you to give an oral presentation that may count towards the overall mark for that
module. Student attendance at, and participation in, seminars are vital to the success of the
learning process.

Attendance at all seminars and lectures is compulsory.



                                                                                            5
You must inform the School (020 7882 8351 or history@qmul.ac.uk) if you are unavoidably
absent from lectures or classes.

Medical Certificates
In the case of a short illness - of no more than five consecutive days - the College does not
require a certificate from a doctor. However, if you do have to miss classes due to illness you
should inform the School via the History Office (020 7882 8351, history@qmul.ac.uk).

In the case of an illness lasting for more than five days, or any illness that affects
assessment - coursework, in class test, presentation or examination – then a medical
certificate from your doctor is required. This is a college requirement and applies however
temporary the illness.

If your coursework or examination performance is affected by illness, this cannot be taken
into account without the appropriate written medical evidence.

In cases of regular but not continuous absences due to illness, the Head of School is
authorised by the College to require the submission of a doctor's medical certificate. If there
are other reasons why you are not in attendance at College, it is essential that you take
urgent steps to contact your advisor to discuss the matter.


2.5 Locations of key information
The key source of information will be your College email account and you are required to
check this on a daily basis. See 2.6 for accessing your College email.

In the School foyer you will find the student pigeon holes. These are used for all paper
communication including overdue notices from the library, class handouts and returned
essays.

The essay submission box is found next to the side of the reception desk. The cover sheets
and extension application forms are above the essay box.

The School’s intranet is currently undergoing redevelopment and a new site will be launched
during the 2010-2011 academic year. A link for the new site will be sent to your College
email address as soon s it is ready.

All module reading lists are available on WebCT which can be accessed through
www.elearning.qmul.ac.uk

Past examination papers can be found on the Library’s website at
http://qm-web.library.qmul.ac.uk/exams/index.htm



2.6 Communications

The College will communicate with you in a variety of ways. Degree results and progression
information will be sent to you by letter, and it is important that you keep the College up to
date with your personal details and address. However, it is most common for the School of
History and the College to contact you by e-mail. You are assigned a College e-mail address
when you enrol, and you are required to check this account daily.


                                                                                             6
You can access your email account by logging on to a College computer, or, if you are not
on campus, at: https://webmail.stu.qmul.ac.uk/www/index.php. You can set up automatic
forwarding from this URL to your private email account.

Whilst we are on hand to help with queries you may have, please remember that most
information you require is contained either in this handbook or on the College website. We
would ask that you use these sources to answer any questions you may have. If you cannot
find the answers you need then please feel free to contact us during office hours (see
section 2.3).

2.7 Email Etiquette

If you are contacting the School by email you should comply with the following guidelines

      Enter the nature of the enquiry in the subject line.

      Include your student number and both your forename and surname in the email sign
       off

      Always address the email to the recipient, i.e. Dear Professor Mason and always
       sign-off i.e. With best wishes, Harriet.

      Always formulate emails in clear well-written English and do not use text speak or
       slang. Emails that are not properly written will be returned to you for rewriting.

      If you do not include appropriate information in your email it may not be replied to.

      Any email that you send to the School may be added to your file.

If you have a question for your module organiser you should always try to speak to the
module organiser during their office hours. Office hours are designated periods of time
(normally two hours a week) when academic staff are available to discuss academic issues
with their students. The best way to enquire about any questions that you may have is to
attend the office hours. Staff are not required to read emails over the weekend.

The History office is open from 09.00-17.00 Monday to Friday (with the exception of Friday
lunchtime) and we are always happy to answer your questions in person.



2.8 Academic Adviser/Senior Tutor

Academic Advisers
On joining the School of History you will be assigned to a member of the academic staff, who
will act as your adviser. Your adviser has the dual role of supervising your academic
progress and also providing pastoral support. Where possible you will keep the same
adviser throughout your degree programme, however it will be necessary to reassign
students when a member of staff goes on sabbatical.

The principal academic duties of the adviser are:
    to advise you on your choice of modules, ensuring that the proposed programme has
       coherence, especially important when you are contemplating modules from other
       disciplines.
    to monitor progress in cases of unexplained absence, failure to produce coursework
       on time, and prolonged illness.
    to provide feedback on previous examination performance.

                                                                                               7
Senior Tutor
Dr Tom Asbridge is the Senior Tutor. The Senior Tutor is a member of the School’s
management team and has overall responsibility for academic support and pastoral care
within the School. Extension requests are considered by the Senior Tutor, who has sole
discretion in granting their approval. For further details concerning how to request an
extension see essay deadline extensions (section 3.3).

If you are continually absent from class, the Senior Tutor will be informed by your seminar
tutor. If you are unable to provide an adequate reason for your continued absence you may
be deregistered. See Deregistration (section 3.8).


Other support staff

The School has a Student Support Officer, Matt Latham, who is available to provide support
to any students as the duty advisor. Matt Latham can be contacted via email at
m.latham@qmul.ac.uk, via phone on 020 7882 8353 or in person in office 3.27.

If you are having any difficulties at all with your programme of studies please let us know.
We are here to help and can provide you with guidance and support. If you do not feel
comfortable approaching any of the above people you can always talk to someone else in
the School who you have found supportive (such as a module organiser or seminar tutor).



2.9 Complaints
Within the School of History we aim to solve your problems quickly and simply, with the
majority of problems being resolved within the School. If you have a complaint you should
first of all raise the matter with the member of staff concerned, or if you do not feel able to
approach the person concerned, you should talk to your adviser about the matter. If this
informal complaint does not result in a satisfactory outcome, you should make an
appointment to discuss the matter with the Head of School. This is still regarded as an
informal complaint.

If this informal policy does not solve the problem or if you remain seriously concerned you
should make a formal complaint to the School. This should be done in writing to the Head of
School. Your complaint will be further investigated and you will receive a written response.
 Complaints are dealt with confidentially and only the person(s) responsible for dealing with it
and those who are parties to it will be informed.

 Should you still feel that the problem has not been solved you may bring a complaint at
institutional level as indicated in the Queen Mary Complaints Policy. The Queen Mary
Student      Complaints     Policy    is available   in   full  on   the   Intranet   at
http://www.arcs.qmul.ac.uk/student_complaints/

2.10 Staff contact list

All telephone numbers are preceded with 020 7882 XXXX and all emails end with
@qmul.ac.uk.

 Name (role)                                   Tel        Email               Room


 Mr Matt Latham                                           m.latham            3.29
                                                                                              8
(Student Support Manager)                        8353
Mr Jon Clifford (Assistant Administrator–
Admissions & Student Support)                    8370   j.clifford         3.29

Miss Charlotte Davies (Receptionist)
                                                 8351   charlotte.davies   Reception

Professor Julian Jackson (Head of School)
                                                 8360   j.t.jackson        2.24

Ms    Sarah      Cowls      (Director       of
                                                 8352   sarah.cowls        3.28
Administration until Jan 2011)
Miss Claire Hackett
                                                        c.l.hackett        3.28
(Director of Administration from Jan 2011)       8352
Ms Rose Dougall
(Assistant Administrator – Exams &               8355   r.dougall          3.27
Finance)
Mr Alex Ferguson
(Assistant Administrator– Research and           8348   alex.ferguson      3.27
Communications)
Dr Tom Asbridge
(Senior Tutor)                                   8343   t.s.asbridge       2.12

                                                                           Hatton
Dr Loukas Balomenos                                     l.balomenos
                                                 8425                      House 3B
Dr David Brooks
                                                        d.r.brooks         2.25
                                                 8346
Dr Richard Bourke
                                                        r.bourke           2.21
                                                 8345
Dr Peter Catterall                                      p.p.catterall      2.18
                                                 8347
Dr Joanne Cohen                                         j.cohen            2.28
                                                 8363
                                                 8427                      Hatton
Dr Jon Davis                                            j.m.davis
                                                                           House 3D
Dr Peter Denley                                  8349
                                                        p.r.denley         2.31
Dr Thomas Dixon                                                            Hatton
                                                        t.m.dixon
(on Sabbatical 2010-11)                          8425                      house 3B
Dr James Ellison
                                                        j.r.v.ellison      2.11
                                                 8357
Dr Martyn Frampton                                      m.frampton         2.19
                                                 8371
Dr Mark Glancy
                                                        h.m.glancy         2.35
                                                 8358
Dr Rhodri Hayward
(on sabbatical 2010-11)                          8368   r.hayward          G.25B

Professor Peter Hennessy
(on sabbatical 2010-11)                          8350
                                                        p.j.hennessy       2.23

Dr Tristram Hunt                                 8347   t.hunt             2.18

                                                                                       9
                                                                   Hatton
Dr Joel Isaac (on sabbatical spring term
                                         8428                      house 3K
2010-2011)                                          j.t.isaac

Dr Maurizio Isabella                                               Hatton
                                                    m.isabella
                                             2862                  house 2E
Professor Colin Jones
                                                    c.d.h.jones    2.34
                                             8361
Professor Kate Lowe
(on sabbatical 2010-11)                      8363   k.j.p.lowe     2.28

Dr Helen McCarthy                            2684
                                                    h.mccarthy     2.36
Professor Catherine Merridale
                                                    c.merridale    2.14
(on sabbatical 2010-11)                      8364
Professor John Miller
                                                    j.l.miller     2.32
                                             8365
Professor Michael Questier (on sabbatical
in spring term 2010-2011)                 8367      m.c.questier   2.29

Dr Yosef Rapoport
                                                    y.rapoport     2.22
(on sabbatical autumn term 2010-11)          8362
Professor Miri Rubin
                                                    m.e.rubin      2.33
(Director of Graduate Studies)               8369
Professor Donald Sassoon
                                                    d.sassoon      2.19
(on sabbatical 2010-11)                      8371
Dr Jon Smele                                                       2.30
                                                    j.d.smele
                                             8372
Professor Gareth Stedman-Jones               TBC
                                                    TBC            TBC
Professor Tilli Tansey                       TBC
                                                    t.tansey       TBC
Dr Dan Todman                                                      Hatton
                                                    d.w.todman
                                             8373                  House 2F
Dr Georgios Varouxakis
                                                    g.varouxakis   G.25A
                                             8374
Professor Amanda Vickery (from January
2011)                                  TBC          TBC            TBC

Dr Christina      Von    Hodenberg    (HRD
Organiser)                                   8375   c.hodenberg    1.41

Prof Mark White
                                                    m.j.white      2.14
                                             8376
Dr Daniel Wildmann                           8375   d.wildmann     TBC




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                              3. School Procedures

3.1 Leave of Absence
You are not permitted to be absent from College during term times except with explicit
permission from the Senior Tutor obtained in advance.

Examinations and other forms of assessment are important points in the academic calendar
and you will not be given permission to be absent at such times.

However, the College understands that from time to time students may wish to take leave for
religious occasions, the dates of which are known in advance. There are also some students
who wish to be granted leave to take part in sporting, cultural or social events or for other
reasons they believe to be valid. If this applies to you, you must be prepared to catch up on
the tuition you plan to miss. All such absences must be authorised by the Senior Tutor

In exceptional circumstances, or if there is an emergency, the Senior Tutor or Student
Support Manager must be contacted as soon as possible with full details.


3.2 Deregistration
In cases of repeated absence or persistent failure to submit coursework, you may be
deregistered from a module.

If you miss two seminars for any particular module, without good reason, you will be
contacted by your Seminar Tutor. If you fail to adequately explain your absence, fail to
respond to your Seminar Tutor or continue to be absent you will be contacted, normally via
email, to meet with the Senior Tutor. The Senior Tutor will explain the consequences of your
continued absence and, if the absenteeism continues, deregister you from the course. A
letter will be sent to your home address informing you of the deregistration by the QMUL
Registry and a copy will be placed on your student file.

Deregistration withdraws you from the module and you will not be allowed to attend any
more classes or lectures, or to submit any further coursework. The module will appear on
your transcript as a mark of '0' (Fail) with a notation to indicate you were deregistered from
the module. You will not be allowed to register to resit or retake that module at a later date.
If your registration drops below 90 credits per year as a result of deregistration, you will be
deregistered from your degree programme. Once you have been deregistered from a
module, you are not allowed to register for additional modules during that or subsequent
years.

Should you not meet module requirements for attendance or for submission of coursework,
you may be deregistered from the module. You will be given warnings via your College email
before deregistration occurs, and you will have the right to represent your case to the School
of History.



3.3 Extenuating circumstances

If you believe that your performance in a particular item of assessment or more generally
has been negatively affected by circumstances beyond your control, you may wish to submit
a claim for extenuating circumstances. Extenuating circumstances include illness, death of a
close relative, etc. Extenuating circumstances do not normally include computer problems,
                                                                                            11
misreading your exam timetable or planned holidays.

If you do not feel you are well enough to attend any invigilated examinations then you should
not attend and submit a claim for extenuating circumstances instead. You should note that
the Academic Regulations state that if you attend an examination then you will be deemed to
declare yourself well enough to sit it and as a result any extenuating circumstances claim will
not be considered.

Extenuating circumstance claim forms are available from the Student Support Office (room
3.29) during the exam period. If you believe that you have a case for consideration, you
should complete this form and supply supporting documentation (for example medical
certification, death certificate, police report and crime number, or other written evidence from
a person in authority), and submit the paperwork to the Departmental Administrator by the
specified deadline. In accordance with the Academic Regulations all claims must be
received no later than 24 hours before the relevant examination board meeting; the date of
the examination. Claims without evidence cannot be consider however if you have a
problem that cannot be evidenced you should make an appointment to see your adviser and
explain the circumstances to them. They will then be able to submit a report on your behalf
which will be considered as evidence.

All cases of extenuating circumstances are kept confidential until they are considered by a
small subcommittee of the Examination Board. All proceedings of the subcommittee are
strictly confidential, and will not normally be discussed at the full Examination Board
meeting.

It is your own responsibility to submit your any claims for extenuating circumstances, not that
of your tutor. Please ensure that if you do have what you believe is a valid case, you
complete the submission process in accordance with the School of History guidelines and
deadlines.

It is not possible to make a retrospective claim for extenuating circumstances, specifically
once you know your results. Therefore claims submitted after the deadline will not be
considered by the Examination Board.



3.4 Changing modules/programmes

Students are permitted to change modules providing the details are entered an approved on
MySiS by the end of the first teaching week of term. Students are not permitted to change
after this date. A student who wishes to change the modules that they have be allocated
must contact the Student Support Manager either in induction week or at the start of week
one. Please note that most modules are full after the pre-registration process that took place
in May.

Students who wish to change their programme of study should also contact the Student
Support Manager. Students should note that the College no longer permits students to
change from a History ‘and’ joint honours degree to a History ‘with’ joint honours degree.

If spaces become available on modules that were previously full in the first week of term you
will be notified via your College email and they will be allocated on a first come first served
basis.




                                                                                             12
3.5 Updating personal details

It is important that the College has up to date personal details for all students. Please ensure
that if you change your home or term-time address, name, telephone number or other details
you make the necessary changes on your MySIS page as soon as possible.

If your details are not up to date you may miss vital information from the College so make
sure your MySIS page is kept up to date. MySiS can be accessed through
https://mysis.qmul.ac.uk



3.6 Conduct

Details regarding the Code of Student Discipline are available at:

http://www.arcs.qmul.ac.uk/student_complaints/index.htm



3.7 Representation

Your views are important to the School of History and Queen Mary. There are a variety of
ways in which you can communicate your opinions to us.

Student-Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC)
The SSLC is intended to provide a formal channel of communication between students and
staff and a voice for student opinion. Elections to the committee are held at the beginning of
the first semester and are run by the Students’ Union. All students are strongly encouraged
to stand in these elections as the SSLC is a vital channel for improving the student
experience at QMUL.

The SSLC normally meets once a term and discusses any issues that the students want to
discuss. Discussions at the SSLC are reported to the School’s management committee on a
regular basis so that any concerns can be quickly communicated to staff. The minutes of
SSLC meetings will be put on the new School intranet and will be emailed to all students as
soon as they are ready.

The SSLC considers a wide range of matters and is attended by a range of School staff
including the Head of School, Director of Administration and the Student Support Manager.
The SSLC is also attended by a representative from the Library.

We strongly value all forms of feedback from students so do please let us know if there is
anything that we can do to improve your experience at QMUL.


Students’ Union
You will automatically become a member of the Students' Union (QMSU) when you enrol at
Queen Mary. We have one of the most adventurous and ambitious Students' Unions in the
country. QMSU is split into three sites: the main site in Mile End, the Students' Association in
Whitechapel and Charterhouse Square. Through an ever-developing range of services and
facilities, the aim of QMSU is to ensure that your time at university is not just about work, but
also socialising and personal development. Further details of the services and facilities the
Students’ Union offers can be found at: www.qmul.ac.uk/qmliving/su/


                                                                                              13
At the start of each academic year the Students’ Union run elections for the College’s SSLC
and for some representation on College committees. You are encouraged to participate in
nominations and elections. Student representation is vital, giving you the chance to
contribute to the College’s decision-making process and make a genuine difference to the
way the College works. Moreover, graduate employers will look favourably on any SU
participation and training on your CV.

It is also possible to join the University of London Students’ Union (ULU). More information
can be found on their website www.ulu.co.uk/

Module Evaluation
At the end of each term you will be asked to complete a module evaluation for each module
that you take. These module evaluations are anonymous and give you the opportunity to
feedback on your experience of the module. The results of module evaluation are
considered at the School’s Undergraduate Teaching Committee and fed through the
College’s quality assurance processes.


National Student Survey
All final year students at UK institutions take part in the National Student Survey (NSS). This
is your opportunity to share your experiences of Queen Mary with the wider world and future
students. Please do complete the NSS, and fill it in honestly. If you are a finalist, you will
usually be contacted by email in the spring term. The results are important as they are used
in compiling university league tables, which can determine national university ‘rankings’ in
the press.




                                                                                            14
                 4. Programmes and modules of study
4.1 Degree Programmes

Students in the School of History may be registered for one of three History degrees or for a
joint degree.

Single Subject Degrees
    BA History (V101)
    BA Medieval History (V130)
    BA Modern and Contemporary History (V140)

Joint Degrees
     BA English and History (QV31)
     BA History and Politics (LV21)
     BA French and History (VR11)
     BA History and German Language (VR12)
     BA History and Film Studies (VW16)
     BA History and Comparative Literature (VQ12)
     BA Journalism and Contemporary History (PV51)



4.2 Modules

The School offers a wide variety of modules that can be found in the separate module
handbook or online at qmul.ac.uk/modules.

All modules are categorised into levels that reflect the academic content of each module.
There are three undergraduate levels – 4, 5 and 6 – which broadly correspond to first year
work, second year work and honours level work.

Each module has a credit value that reflects the hours of learning needed to enable
successful completion of the module. One credit point equates to 10 hours of notional study.
A 15 credit module, therefore, requires 150 hours of notional study and a 30 credit module
requires 300 hours of notional study. Notional study covers any study that you undertake as
part of the module. This can include attendance at, and preparation for, lectures and
seminars, essay research and writing, preparation of presentations, revision, examinations
and so on. Students should be completing 40 notional study hours a week if they are to
successfully complete their programme of studies.

4.3 Programme Structures

Students are required to register for modules to the value of 120 credits per year and will be
examined on those modules at the end of that year. All modules are listed in the College
Course     Directory,    which      can   be      found    on     the     College    website:
http://www.qmul.ac.uk/modules/

In some degree programmes, there are compulsory modules in the first year, but thereafter
the range of choice is much wider. In most single honours programmes, you are free to take
at least one module per year in another School if there are places available. This allows you
to shift your centre of interest without changing your registration or leaving the School of
History. The below tables give full details of programme structures.
                                                                                           15
All of the modules within the School of History are coded to indicate the level of the module
and the period of study. Modules all start with the letters HST to indicate that they are taught
by the School of History. The next number indicates the level of the module. Level 4 broadly
corresponds to first year study, level 5 corresponds to second year study and level 6
corresponds to final year, or honours level, study. The next digit indicates the period of
history that the module covers as follows

       HST*1** - indicates a medieval module
       HST*2** - Indicates an early modern module
       HST*3** - indicates a modern/contemporary module
       HST*4** - indicates a module that covers both the medieval and the early modern
       period
       HST*5** - indicates a module that covers both the early modern and
       modern/contemporary period
       HST*6** - indicates a module that either covers a period encompassing all historical
       periods or covers thematic issues such as historiography.

Some examples

HST4305 – Europe since 1890 – a level 4 modern and contemporary module
HST510* - Outsiders in the Middle Ages - a level 5 medieval module
HST6205 – Ireland under the Stuarts – a level 6 early modern module

Individual programme structures follow on the next page. The programme diet for BA English
and History is available from the School of English and Drama.




                                                                                             16
V101 History Programme Structure

Year One                                                                                   Credit
                                                                                           Value

HST4600 Making History                                                                     0

30 Credits from any level four medieval/early modern module within the School of
History (modules coded HST41, HST42 or HST44)                                              30

30 credits from any level four modern/contemporary module within the School of
History (modules coded HST43 or HST45)                                                     30
Between 30 and 60 credits from any level 4 History module
                                                                                           60
Up to 30 credits from any School within the College. You must follow the other
School’s registration processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their
programmes of study.
Year Total                                                                                 120
                                                                                           Credits
Year Two

90 credits from level 5 History modules from any chronological period (modules coded 90
HST5)
30 credits from any level 4, level 5 or level 6 History module or up to 30 credits from 30
any School within the College. You must follow the other School’s registration
processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their programmes of
study.
Year Total                                                                              120
                                                                                        credits
Final Year

Either a level 6 60 credit Special Subject coded HST6 or the History Research 60
Dissertation (HST6600). Students may take an intercollegiate special subject if places
are available.
30 credits from level 6 History modules from any chronological period (modules coded 30
HST6)
30 credits from any level 5 or level six History module (coded HST5 and HST 6) or up
to 30 credits from any School within the College. You must follow the other School’s
registration processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their
programmes of study.
Year Total                                                                             120
                                                                                       credits

Degree total                                                                               360
                                                                                           credits




                                                                                               17
V130 Medieval History Programme Structure

Year One                                                                               Credit
                                                                                       Value

HST4600 Making History                                                                 0

HST4105 The Middle Ages                                                                15
HST4102 The Medieval World: Structures and Mentalities                                 15
HST4101 Latin for Medievalists I                                                       15
HST4103 Reconstructing the Past: An Introduction to the sources of Medieval History    15
30 credits from any level 4 medieval or early modern module within the School of       30
History (modules coded HST41, HST42 or HST44)
30 credits form any level 4 History module. Alternatively students may take up to 30   30
credits from any School within the College. You must follow the other School’s
registration processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their
programmes of study.
Year Total                                                                             120
                                                                                       credits
Year Two

90 credits from any level 5 medieval or early modern History module (modules coded 90
HST51, HST52 or HST54) .
30 credits from any level 4, level 5 or level 6 History module or up to 30 credits from 30
any School within the College. You must follow the other School’s registration
processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their programmes of
study.

Students are encouraged to have undertaken at least one historiographically reflective
module by the end of their second year. The historiographically reflective modules are
HST4000 Methods of History and the HST5000/1 modules Historiographical Essay
Year Total                                                                             120
                                                                                       credits
Final Year

Either a level 6 medieval or early modern 60 credit Special Subject coded HST61,       60
HST62 or HST64 or the History Research Dissertation (HST6600). Students may take
an intercollegiate special subject if places are available.
30 credits from level 6 medieval/early modern History modules (modules coded           30
HST61, HST62 or HST64)
30 credits from any level 5 or level six History module (coded HST5 and HST 6) or up   30
to 30 credits from any School within the College. You must follow the other School’s
registration processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their
programmes of study.
Year Total                                                                             120
                                                                                       credits
Degree total                                                                           360
                                                                                       credits




                                                                                           18
V140 Modern and Contemporary History Programme Structure

Year One                                                                                 Credit
                                                                                         Value

HST4600 Making History                                                                   0

Two of the following three level 4 modules                                               60

     HST 4305 Europe since 1890
     HST4302 The American Century
     HST4306 The Road from 1945: Britain since the Second World War
30 credits from all modern/contemporary level 4 History modules (coded HST43 or 30
HST45)
30 credits form any level 4 History module. Alternatively students may take up to 30 30
credits from any School within the College. You must follow the other School’s
registration processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their
programmes of study.
Year Total                                                                           120

Year Two
90 credits from any level 5 modern/contemporary History module (modules coded 90
HST 53 or HST55)
30 credits from any level 4, level 5 or level 6 History module or up to 30 credits from 30
any School within the College. You must follow the other School’s registration
processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their programmes of
study.

Students are encouraged to have undertaken at least one historiographically reflective
module by the end of their second year. The historiographically reflective modules are
HST4000 Methods of History and the HST5000/1 modules Historiographical Essay
Year Total                                                                               120

Final Year
Either a level 6 modern/contemporary 60 credit Special Subject coded HST613HST62 60
or HST64 or the History Research Dissertation (HST6600). Students may take an
intercollegiate special subject if places are available.
30 credits from level 6 modern/contemporary modules (modules coded HST61, 30
HST62 or HST64)
30 credits from any level 5 or level six History module (coded HST5 and HST 6) or up 30
to 30 credits from any School within the College. You must follow the other School’s
registration processes. Not all Schools will accept students from outside their
programmes of study.
                                                                                     120
                                                                                     credits
Degree total                                                                         360
                                                                                     credits




                                                                                             19
LV21 BA History and Politics Programme Structure

Year One                                                                           Credit
                                                                                   Value

HST4600 Making History                                                             0

Two of the following three level 4 modules                                         60
    HST 4305 Europe since 1890
    HST4302 The American Century
    HST4306 The Road from 1945: Britain since the Second World War
                                                                                   60
Two of the following three level four modules
    POL100 Introduction to Politics
    POL103 Comparative Government and Politics
    POL104 International Relations since 1914

Year Total                                                                         120

Year Two

At least one of the following level 5 modules                                       15/30
     HST5313 – History of Modern Political Thought (15 credits)                   credits
     HST5601 – History of Western Political Thought (30 credits)                  depending
     POL206 – Modern Political Thought I & II (30 credits)                        on choice

If POL206 has been chosen then 30 further credits from Politics. If POL has not been 30/60
chosen the 60 further credits from Politics                                          credits
                                                                                     depending
                                                                                     on choice
IF HST5313 has been chosen then 45 credits from History. If HST5601 has been 30/45/60
chosen then 30 credits from History. If neither module has been chosen then 60 depending
credits from History                                                                 on choice
From the above options at least 90 credits must be selected at level 5. This can be
balanced over either discipline.
Year Total                                                                           120
                                                                                     credits
Year Three

Either a History Special Subject coded HST6 or HST6600 History Research 60
Dissertation
30 credits from Politics level six modules                              30

30 credits from any Politics level five or level six module                        30

Year Total                                                                         120
                                                                                   credits
Degree total                                                                       360



                                                                                       20
VW16 History and Film Studies

Year One                                                                    Credit Value

HST4600 Making History                                                      0

Two of the following three level 4 modules                                  60

   HST 4305 Europe since 1890
   HST4302 The American Century
   HST4306 The Road from 1945: Britain since the Second World War
  
Module FLM100 – Introduction to Film                                        30

Module FLM004 – Auterism: The European Tradition                            15

Module FLM105 – Stars                                                       15

Year Two

FLM0003 What is Cinema                                                      30

Film modules totalling 30 credits                                           30

History modules totalling 60 credits                                        60

You must take at least 90 credits at level 5 across your History and Film
modules combined. Students are encouraged to have undertaken at least one
historiographically reflective module such as Methods of History or an
Historiographical Essay by the end of their second year

Year total                                                                  120

Final Year

Either a History Special Subject coded HST6 or HST6600 History Research     60
Dissertation

30 credits of level 6 Film modules                                          30

30 credits of level 5 or 6 Film modules                                     30

Year total                                                                  120

Degree total                                                                360




                                                                                   21
VW16 History and German

Year One                                                                         Credit Value

HST4600 Making History                                                           0

90 credits of History level four modules. You are encouraged to take HST4305 90
Europe since 1890
GER051 German I                                                              30

Year Total                                                                       120

Year Two

GER212 German II                                                                 30

60 credits from any level 5 History modules coded HST5                           60

30 credits from any level 4, 5 or 6 History modules (coded HST4, HST5 or 30
HST6). Students are encouraged to have taken at least one historiographically
reflective module by the end of their second year. The historiographically
reflective modules as HST4000 Methods of History and HST5000/1
Historiographical Essay

Year Total                                                                       120

Year Three – Year Abroad
Studying History through the medium of German at a German University. The 120
year abroad requirement may be waived for native speakers and exemption
may be granted on grounds of domestic commitments or religious obligations.

Students studying at a German University take examinations there, the results
of which contribute towards their overall Queen Mary assessment.


Year Total                                                                       120

Final year

GER061 German III                                                                30

Either HST6600 or a History Special Subject coded HST6                           60

30 credits from any level five or level six History modules coded HST5 or HST6   30
Year Total                                                                       120
Degree Total                                                                     480




                                                                                        22
VR11 French and History



Year One                                                                             Credit Value

HST4600 Making History                                                               0

60 credits of History level four modules. You are encouraged to take HST4305 60
Europe since 1890

French I (this module is core and must be passed in order to progress to the         30
second year. This is in addition to normal progression requirements)

French Foundations                                                                   30

Year Total                                                                           123

Year Two

60 credits of History modules with at least 30 credits at level 5. Students are 60
encouraged to have taken at least one historiographically reflective module by
the end of their second year. The historiographically reflective modules as
HST4000 Methods of History and HST5000/1 Historiographical Essay.

French II (this module is core and must be passed in order to progress to the 30
third year. This is in addition to normal progression requirements)

30 credits from any SLLF module or available module in other Schools in the 30
Faculty of Arts

At least 90 of the 120 credits listed above for the second year must be at level 5

Year Total                                                                           120

Third Year
French year abroad (this must be passed in order to progress to the final year)      120

Final Year

French III (this is core and must be completed for the award of the degree)          30

Between 15 and 30 credits to be chosen from level 5 or 6 French options              15/30

Either a History special subject coded HST6 or HST6600 History Research 60
Dissertation

UP to 15 credits from any available module within the Faculty of Arts                0/15

Year Total                                                                           120
Degree Total                                                                         480
                                                                                             23
VQ12 History and Comparative Literature

Year One                                                                           Credit Value

HST4600 Making History                                                             0

60 credits of History level four modules. You are encouraged to take HST4305 60
Europe since 1890

Introduction to Film Studies (this module is core and must be passed in order to 30
progress to the second year. This is in addition to normal progression
requirements)

Auterism                                                                           15

Stars                                                                              15

Year total                                                                         120

Year Two

60 credits from level 5 History modules                                            60

The Scene of Reading                                                               15

Between 15-45 credits of level 5 SLLF modules                                      15-45

Between 0 and 30 credits of level 5 comparative literature modules                 0-30

Up to 30 credits from available level 5 and 6 modules within the Faculty of Arts   0-30

Year Total                                                                         120

Final year

Either a History special subject coded HST6 or HST6600 History Research 60
Dissertation

The Scene of Writing                                                               15

Between 30 and 45 credits from SLLF level 6 modules                                30-45

UP to 15 credits from available Faculty of Arts modules                            0-15

Year Total                                                                         120

Degree Total                                                                       320




                                                                                           24
4.3 Progression

You must pass at least 90 credits in your first year in order to progress to the second year,
and 180 credits in your first two years in order to progress to the final year. You must also
pass any modules listed as ‘core’.

If you have insufficient credits at the end of a year, you will not progress. For you to
continue with your studies you will need to return the following May and resit out of
attendance. The marks for resits are pegged at 40%.

Students with documented extenuating circumstances will be considered separately and
may be eligible or offered a first sit (i.e. the opportunity to submit coursework or sit exams to
gain an unpegged mark) in the summer. For further information, see section 3.3 Extenuating
Circumstances


4.4 Coursework submission

One paper and one electronic copy submitted via WebCT of all coursework must be handed
in by the deadline date and time published in your individual module outlines. You must
submit both versions of an assignment to comply with the assignment submission policy.
Some modules may require submission of two paper copies so please consult your module
outline prior to submitting any assessment.

NOTE
If either the electronic or the paper copies of the essay are not received the essay will
registered as ‘not submitted’. The date of the later submission will be the date the essay is
classed as received.


Normally, it will be your paper copy that is returned to you with comments and provisional
mark by the seminar tutor. Essays are returned during class or via the student pigeon-holes.
Students are responsible for keeping their own electronic and paper copies of all the work
they submit.

NOTE
Assignments cannot be accepted by the class teacher or by fax.



Paper copies
Paper copies must be accompanied by a completed cover sheet and placed in the Essay
Submission Box next to the reception desk in the School foyer.

Electronic Copies
Electronic versions of essays must be uploaded using the Virtual Learning Environment -
WebCT. You will require your college email username and password to access WebCT at
the following site;

www.elearning.qmul.ac.uk



                                                                                              25
On logging on you will have full access to all the History modules for which you are enrolled.
If your WebCT modules differ from either the classes you are attending or your registered
modules on MySiS you must tell the Student Support Manager as a matter of urgency


You should follow the assignment links either in the calendar or through the module entry to
upload your work. You are required to save your coursework using the following template to
ensure you upload the correct essay to the correct assignment box:

Module code– Assignment number – candidate number.

i.e. candidate HJ999 who is submitting their second assignment for HST4305 Europe Since
1890 will save their work as:
        HST4305 – 2 - HJ999

Once you have submitted your essay correctly you will see the message ‘submit successful’.
You should ensure that the submitted date and time are appearing next the assignment, and
take a screen dump of this as proof that your assignment was submitted successfully via
WebCT. You are advised to log on to WebCT to familiarise yourself with the service before
you have to submit work.

Introductory courses for WebCT will be run at the start of the autumn term, and new students
will learn about WebCT as part of the Making History module.

NOTE
Any problems using WebCT or submitting coursework must be reported to the History office
immediately.




4.5 Deadlines
Assignment deadlines are set in order to help you plan and structure your workload. Module
organisers set the deadlines for their modules and this information is included in the relevant
module outlines as well as on WebCT.

The History Department upholds essay deadlines rigorously.         Students are expected to
submit assignments by 4.00pm on the day of the deadline.

NOTE
Failure to submit an assignment by its deadline will result in the deduction of FIVE marks for
each working day that the essay is late.



Late penalties are applied for all days on which the History Office is open, including days
during Reading Weeks and the Christmas and Easter vacations. Assignments submitted
after the deadline, will be returned giving the provisional mark, and also indicating the
amount of marks deducted for lateness.

If you are experiencing problems submitting your paper copy of any assignment you must
contact the History Office. Your paper copy may be submitted up to 10am the following day
without incurring any penalties. However, only if your WebCT copy is submitted on time.

                                                                                            26
These guidelines apply to all assessed work including, History Research Dissertations,
Historiographical Essays and work submitted as part of a Special Subject.

4.6 Essay Deadline Extensions

If you are unable to meet an assignment deadline due to severe medical problems or family
tragedy e.g. the death of an immediate family member, you may make an application to the
Senior Tutor for the penalty to be waived. However, the Senior Tutor will only consider
applications fully supported by documentation (such as a medical or death certificate).

To request an extension, you should complete the extension request form - available from
above the Essay Submission Box. A separate request form should be completed for each
extension required. Any relevant documentation (e.g. medical certificates) should be
attached to the request form and placed in the essay box. We will supply envelopes for
confidential applications. Essay extension requests will only be accepted on the extension
request form. If you are unable to attend College to collect the form you should call the
History office on the contact details give above.

The Senior Tutor’s response will be put in your pigeon hole, and copies will be given to your
seminar tutor and a copy placed on your file.

The Senior Tutor has absolute discretion in granting, modifying or refusing these requests.

NOTE
Computer failure, transport difficulties and minor illnesses will not be considered adequate
grounds for waiving penalties.

You are expected to regularly save and keep back-up copies of any coursework; computer
failure will not be accepted as a reason for an extension.

Similarly you are expected to plan your time effectively so that you are not leaving handing in
coursework until the last minute, and to allow sufficient travel time to reach the School
bearing in mind that public transport delays can often occur.

Finally, any minor illness without a doctor’s note will not be treated as a valid reason for
granting a deadline extension.



4.7 History Research Dissertation/Special Subject

Single-honours students are required to undertake either a History Research Dissertation or
a 60 credit Special Subject module in their final year.

Students taking a Research Dissertation need to decide on a topic and to be allocated a
supervisor in their second year so that they can begin their research over the summer
vacation.

An important briefing meeting to discuss final year module choices, including Research
Dissertations and Special Subjects, will be held in the second semester of your second year.
All second year students are required to attend. There is a separate handbook for the
Historical Research Dissertation and Special Subjects and students are issued with
information from the individual module organiser.

                                                                                              27
If you are pre-registered for a Research Dissertation you are required to submit a brief report
on the progress of your research (which counts towards 10% of your overall mark for the
Dissertation) by noon on the first day of the first week of teaching of your final year. In the
2010-2011 academic session this deadline is the 27th September 2011. In the 2011-2012
academic session it will be Monday 26th September 2011.


The submission requirements are the same as described for other coursework with the
exception that all dissertation must be soft bound as detailed in the dissertation guidance
booklet that will be distributed to you in the second semester of your second year.



4.8 Style guide

Presentation
The School of History attaches great importance to the standard of presentation of
assignments, as well as to style, spelling and grammar. All assignments must be word-
processed. You should adhere to scholarly conventions when setting out your bibliography
and cite your sources correctly (see the Study Skills and Essay Writing booklet).

Assignment length
The module organiser will inform you of the recommended word length for individual module
assignments. Assignments should be no more than 10% in excess of the recommended
word length.

NOTE
Assignments in excess of 10% of the recommended work length will be subject to a standard
penalty of a deduction of FIVE marks.


You will be asked to certify the word count on the assignment coversheet, you should,
therefore, run a word count on the computer before coming in to submit your work.

The Historical Research Dissertation and Historiographical Essay, both have separate
handbooks concerning style, presentation, deadlines and submission. If you are undertaking
these modules you should refer to the individual handbooks.

Further Guidance
The Department also produces a handbook on - Study Skills, Essay Writing and Exam Skills
- issued at the start of semester one and available from the racks outside the History Office.
The majority of your study-skills training will take place through your tutors' comments on
your assignments. In addition, you are free to seek advice about studying and exams from
your adviser and seminar tutors.

Study Skills Courses are also offered by the Learning Development and Continuing
Education Unit and details of these are available from the Student Support Manager or at
http://www.languageandlearning.qmul.ac.uk

The School of History’s Writing Tutor, Dr Dan Todman, is available for consultation on
Wednesday afternoons. As Writing Tutor, Dr Dan Todman is happy to discuss any aspect of
your academic work, and especially any concerns relating to essay-writing. He is also able to
advise you about other student-support services offered by Queen Mary. Appointments for a
20-minute tutorial can be made by email: d.w.todman@qmul.ac.uk.

                                                                                            28
4.9 Optional studies

In most History programmes, you are free to take up to 30 credits per year in another
School. However not all Schools will accept students from other disciplines (for example
the School of Law very rarely accepts outside students onto their modules). In order to
register for a module in another School you must approach the school independently to
enquire about their registration procedures.

In addition to the modules advertised in the Queen Mary module directory, it may also be
possible (by negotiation) for students in their second or final year to take a history module in
another college of the University of London. Full details of the modules available under the
intercollegiate scheme can be found at http://www.history.ac.uk/syllabus/intercollegiate-
courses

Applying for intercollegiate courses has to occur well in advance (normally in the February
preceding the start of the next academic session), and students will be informed by email in
the second semester when a list of available modules is released for the following year.
Information concerning deadlines for applications will also be included in the same email. If
you are interested in taking intercollegiate modules you should contact Matt Latham
m.latham@qmul.ac.uk.


Introductory language courses are offered by the College's Language Learning Unit (Room
1.24. Francis Bancroft Building). See www.learndev.qmul.ac.uk/language/index.html for
more information.

Students with appropriate linguistic skills may also take language modules. Please check
availability with Jill Evans, Administrator, School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, Arts
1.03, Tel: 020 7882 8300. Email: j.k.evans@qmul.ac.uk


4.10 Teaching methods

Teaching for most modules consists of one hour of lectures and one hour of classes per
week, for 11 weeks in each semester, although some more specialised modules are taught
in two-hour seminars.

You will receive an individual timetable at the beginning of the year for the full 2010/11
academic session.

If you are working part-time, you should note that classes cannot be changed to
accommodate this and you should endeavour to rearrange your paid working hours.

NOTE
The NUS (National Union of Students) advises students that they should not undertake more
than 12 hours paid work per week during term-time and the History Department fully
endorses this recommendation.



If you have exceptional circumstances that means attending certain classes is difficult please
inform the Student Support Manager.
                                                                                            29
4.11 International Exchange Programme

The international exchange programme enables students from Queen Mary to study at one
of our partner institutions.

First year students are invited to apply to spend their second year, or the first semester of
their second year, of their degree programme overseas.
The academic work completed abroad will be credited towards your Queen Mary degree.

You will continue to pay tuition fees to Queen Mary at the normal rate for your period abroad,
and will not have to pay tuition fees at the host institution. Full details can be obtained from:
 Harry Gibney,
Study Abroad Officer
Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 5074
email: h.gibney@qmul.ac.uk

4.12 Degree Classification

Your class of degree is based on all 360 credits taken during your undergraduate years,
weighted towards the work in your later years in the following way:

4      :     2    :      1
Final Year : Second Year : First Year

Therefore your first year is worth 1/7 of your degree classification, the second year 2/7 and
the final year 4/7 of your final degree.


This effectively means that your second year carries double the weight of your first year and,
in turn, your final year carries double the weight of your second year. This is to account for
the fact that generally students improve as they progress through their degree programme.

Candidates may be raised to a higher class if they have achieved the following:

      an A3 mean of 68.00% + at least 8 course units of A at level 5 or 6 for a First;

      an A3 mean of 58.00% + at least 8 course units of B or above at level 5 or 6 for an
       Upper-Second;

      an A3 mean of 48.00% + at least 8 course units of C or above at level 5 or 6 for a
       Lower-Second;

      an A3 mean of 43.00% + at least 8 course units of D or above at level 5 or 6 for a
       Third.


NOTE
BA Journalism & Contemporary History (PV51) students must pass all their final year
modules to graduate.




                                                                                              30
                         5. Writing and Assessment

5.1 How will I be assessed?

Coursework
Where a module is coursework only, i.e. it does not have an examination in May. Your final
mark is based on the average of the marks for all assignments submitted. You should
consult the individual module outline for a breakdown of assessment and their weighting.

Examination
The written examination contributes to a percentage of the final grade for the course –
normally 75%. A three-hour written paper for a 30 credit module, a two-hour written paper
for a 15 credit module all sat in May.

It is important that you submit all assessments required for each of your modules. Failure to
do so may result in your failing the course.
All assignments must all be of a satisfactory standard, showing evidence of adequate
preparation and serious academic intent. If it does not, it will receive a zero fail

Individual module organisers will notify students of the dates when assignments are due in
their module outlines. This information can also be referenced on the WebCT entry for that
course and via the calendar tool.



        Coursework may be submitted up until the 29th April 2011 and will receive a
         mark capped at 40%.

        Any coursework outstanding after April 29th 2011 will automatically receive a
         mark of zero fail (0F).




5.2 Marking Criteria and Grading

The table below indicates the marking criteria used in the History Department. Further
information concerning marking criteria is displayed above the Essay Submission Box and
contained in the ‘Study Skills and Essay Writing’ booklet.

Percentage Degree             Exam Description (for further guidance and does not
           Class              Grade constitute an official statement of School or
                                    Examination Board policy)


70-100         First          A        70-100%, generally ‘outstanding’

                                       An essay that scores a first class mark will show an
                                       authoritative grasp of the concepts involved in the
                                       question, its methodology and factual content.

                                       It will select and organise the material with consistent
                                       relevance but also with originality, control and
                                                                                            31
                                       personal flair. It will also express and sustain
                                       arguments clearly and precisely, demonstrating a
                                       critical and analytical approach to the material.


60-69          Upper          B        60-69%, generally ‘Very good/good’
               Second
                                       An above average level of understanding organisation
                                       and interpretation of the relevant evidence; answers
                                       the question asked directly, fully and convincingly; a
                                       clear understanding of the historical concepts involved
                                       and lucid presentation of the material.


50-59          Lower          C        50-59, generally ‘Average’
               Second
                                       Competent overall grasp of the material involved in
                                       answering the question, but without consistency,
                                       directness and fullness that is found in an Upper
                                       Second.

                                       Focus on the actual question is often inadequate and
                                       there may also be a lack of rigour in the selection of
                                       material and maintenance of overall relevance.

                                       Marks may well have been deducted for sloppy
                                       presentation and for inadequate academic apparatus
                                       of reference notes and bibliography.


45-49          Third          D        45-49, generally ‘below average’

                                       Basic knowledge, but insufficient to answer the
                                       question, which is likely to be ignored, by-passed or
                                       simply answered in a wholly inadequate way.

                                       Inability to select material and sustain argument.


40-44          Pass           E


0-39           Fail           F



5.3 Feedback

For each essay that you submit you will receive feedback through the return of an essay
coversheet that details your performance in a variety of areas. You will also receive a grade
that details your performance in accordance with the above grading schedule.



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Students can get further feedback by visiting module organisers or seminar leaders in their
office hours. Most full-time academic staff have two office hours a week where student can
visit academic to get more detailed feedback on their academic performance and
suggestions for future development. We strongly recommend that you use these office
hours as much as possible. The nature of academic work means that academic staff are not
in College every day as they have to undertake research work away from campus. If you
cannot attend the office hour you should send an email to the member of staff to see if it is
possible to make an appointment at an alternate time.

You will also receive feedback through seminar classes where you will be able to discuss the
weekly topic and receive feedback on the views you give during the seminar.

If you want to discuss your overall academic performance you can take your marked essays
to your advisor who can discuss any thematic issues and suggestions for future performance

You can request to have feedback on your end of year examinations. If you fill in the form at
the back of the study skills booklet you will receive feedback via your advisor at the start of
the following academic year.

If you have any comments on the School’s feedback structure please do not hesitate to
contact the Student Support Manager. Alternatively you could contact your SSLC rep and
ask for issues to be discussed at the next SSLC meeting.



5.4 School prizes

The School, and the College, award a number of prizes annually for academic excellence,
the majority of these are for finalists although, exceptionally, second year students may be
awarded a College Prize.
Students who have attained a very high standard may be awarded a College or Drapers
Prize at graduation.

Prizes are:
     School Book Prizes. Offered for excellence in History Research Dissertations or
       Special Subject Dissertations.
     The Royal Historical Society/History Today Dissertation Prize. With the student’s
       permission, the best dissertation is entered annually.
     University of London's Derby-Bryce Prize. Awarded for the best History performance
       across the University of London.
     The J. L. Bolton Prize. Awarded to the second year student who has made the most
       progress, with reference given to students interested in medieval history.
     The Carol Coulter Prize. Awarded for best 1st year student who has been out of
       formal education for at least five years.
     The Attlee Prize. Awarded for a first class performance in the HST5323 Cabinet and
       Premiership module.


5.5 Plagiarism and referencing


Plagiarism is the failure to properly credit the writings or ideas of another person that you
have used in your own work. In such cases you are, deliberately or inadvertently, attempting
to pass their work off as your own. Plagiarism is a serious offence, and can carry severe
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consequences, from failure of the module to deregistration from the College. You may also
commit plagiarism by failing to reference your own work that you have already used in a
previous essay, or by failing to credit the input of other students on group projects.

It is your responsibility to ensure that you understand plagiarism and how to avoid it. The
recommendations below can help you in avoiding plagiarism.

      Be sure to record your sources when taking notes, and to cite these if you use ideas
       or, especially, quotations from the original source. Be particularly careful if you are
       cutting and pasting information between two documents, and ensure that references
       are not lost in the process.
      Be sensible in referencing ideas – commonly held views that are generally accepted
       do not always require acknowledgment to particular sources. However, it is best to
       be safe to avoid plagiarism.
      Be particularly careful with quotations and paraphrasing.
      Be aware that technology is now available at Queen Mary and elsewhere that can
       automatically detect plagiarism.
      Ensure that all works used are referenced appropriately in the text of your work and
       fully credited in your bibliography.
     
If in doubt, ask for further guidance from your adviser or module tutor.

If you are found to have plagiarised in an essay worth less than 31% of a module the normal
first penalty is failure in the item of assessment with no right to resubmit the assessment.
The penalty may be higher if the plagiarism is extensive. The penalty for plagiarising in an
essay worth more than 31% of a module is failure in the module with no right to resit that
module. These are penalties for first offences. The penalty for a second offence if failure in
the whole year with all resits capped at 40%.

The penalty for submitting an essay that has been bought from another person or company
is expulsion from the College.




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                             6. The Student Guide


The Student Guide is a College publication that you will receive at the start of the academic
year. The Guide should be used together with this Handbook for general information on your
time at Queen Mary.

The Student Guide contains a wide range of information, including:

      Academic and student support services
      The academic year
      Campus facilities
      Simplified academic regulations
      How to? advice
      Queen Mary contact information
      Calendar
      Graduation and alumni
      Student administration, and common issues and processes
      College policies
      Campus and College information




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Individual Notes




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