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PCB 3063 General Genetics Syllabus

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PCB 3063 General Genetics Syllabus Powered By Docstoc
					Syllabus: Honors Genetics (PCB 3063H)

Spring Semester 2010

Lectures: Tuesday and Thursday 12:00pm-1:15pm, BHC room 128
1. Course Objective: To present the basic concepts of Genetics. The course will emphasize classical and
molecular genetic principles. Classical genetics will include Mendelian genetics, chromosome segregation and
disorders of chromosome segregation in humans, sex determination, mapping genes in eukaryotes, and
population genetics. Molecular genetics will cover DNA structure and replication, storage and expression of
genetic material, regulation of gene expression and recombinant DNA technology. This is an upper division
class designed for students who have completed general biology and 2 semesters of general chemistry.

2. Instructor:

Dr. Laurence von Kalm
Office: BL 433
Phone: (407) 823-6684
email: lvonkalm@knights.ucf.edu
Office hours: Tuesday, Thursday 1:30-4pm or by appointment

3. Communication With The Class:

All communications from me will be sent to your knights email account. You are responsible for checking your
knights email on a regular basis.

I always respond to email from students, however occasionally an email message may be lost. If I do not
respond to your email within 24 hours, phone me or talk to me in class. As a matter of courtesy I expect you to
identify yourself in the email.

4. Text:

Concepts of Genetics; Klug, Cummings and Spencer; 8th edition (ISBN 0-13-191833-8). You can buy a used
copy of the book online for around $10.

5. Web site for class material:

All class materials are available on the website which can be accessed through myUCF or Webcourses.

6. Behavior in class: It is assumed that all students will act in a mature manner in the classroom showing
consideration for their peers and the instructor. Any student who consistently distracts other students or the
instructor will be removed from the course. Electronic devices must be on silent mode or turned off in the
classroom. Laptops are to be used only for displaying the lecture slides and taking notes.




7. Grading Scale and Assessment:
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Grade Scale:                          Grade Range            Grade          GPA

                                      90 - 100               A              4.0
                                      87 - 89                A-             3.75
                                      84 - 86                B+             3.25
                                      80 - 83                B              3.0
                                      77 - 79                B-             2.75
                                      74 - 76                C+             2.25
                                      70 - 73                C              2.0
                                      67 - 69                C-             1.75
                                      64 - 66                D+             1.25
                                      60 - 63                D              1.0
                                      below 60               F              0

Note that the University considers any GPA above zero a passing grade. Specific program requirements may
vary.

Any form of cheating = automatic F and referral to The Office of Student Conduct for disciplinary
action.

Rounding up policy. There will be no exceptions to this policy.

If your final average across all exercises is less than or equal to one point below a higher grade, rounding up to
the higher grade will occur if three of the four tests scored at the higher grade. For example, if your test scores
were 84, 90, 91, and 92 with an average of 89.25, your final grade will be rounded up to an A because three of
the tests scored at 90 or above.

Grades for the critical thinking and information fluency exercises (see below) will not be considered for the
purposes of rounding up a grade.

Grading will be divided into three components.
i. - Tests – 80% of grade
ii. - Information Fluency Exercise - 10% of grade
iii. - Critical Thinking Exercises - 10% of grade




i.) Tests (80% of grade) - Note: All tests will be in written/short answer format.

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There will be four tests each worth 20% of the final grade. All test questions will be based on material discussed
in class and assigned problem sets. Test 4 will be comprehensive. Test dates are shown below.

Test 1:                          Tuesday February 16th          in class
Test 2:                          Thursday March 18th            in class
Test 3:                          Thursday April 22nd            in class
Test 4                           Thursday April 29th            10am - 12:50pm; in classroom

Test scores and grades from other exercises will be posted on myUCF grades. I strongly encourage all
students to review their tests with me.
    Missed tests. You can elect not to take one of tests 1, 2, and 3 for any reason. Documentation is not
       required. In this case test 4 will count twice in the final grade calculation. If you miss a second or
       subsequent test you must provide acceptable documented evidence (e.g. from doctor, police, etc.) that
       circumstances beyond your control prevented you from taking the test or that you were required to
       participate in official University business. In the absence of acceptable documentation a grade of 0 will
       be assigned for the second or subsequent missed test. Makeup tests will be administered at any time
       during the semester at the discretion of the instructor.

         Test 4 – comprehensive final. You can elect not to take test 4 if you are satisfied with your grades from
          tests 1, 2 and 3. In this case your test grade will be calculated from the average of scores for tests 1, 2,
          and 3. You must take test 4 if you miss any of tests 1, 2, or 3 for any reason, including illness, personal
          emergency, etc. If you miss one of tests 1, 2, or 3 and cannot take test 4 at the scheduled time you must
          provide acceptable documented evidence (e.g. from doctor, police, etc.) that circumstances beyond your
          control prevented you from taking the test or that you were required to participate in official University
          business. In the absence of acceptable documentation, if you miss a test and do not take test 4, all missed
          tests including test 4 will be assigned a grade of 0.

         Test 4 can replace the lowest grade of tests 1, 2 or 3. This applies only to test 4, no other test can
          replace a lower grade. To qualify to use test 4 to replace a lower grade in another test you must take tests
          1, 2, and 3. If test 4 is used to replace a lower grade in tests 1, 2, or 3, the grade for test 4 will count
          twice in the final grade calculation.

         If you arrive late for a test you will be allowed to take the test. However, you must turn in the test
          paper at the regular scheduled end of the test. You will not be allowed extra time unless a documentable
          emergency has occurred (see above).

         Three tests in one-day policy. If you have three tests on the scheduled day of a Genetics test I will
          consider offering you the test on another day. The other two tests must each be worth at least 20% of the
          semester grade for each course. To take advantage of this policy you must inform me at least three days
          in advance of the test, and provide the course name and name of the instructor. If the information you
          provide cannot be verified you must take the test at the regular scheduled time.

        Honor system for distribution of tests. To facilitate learning, tests 1-3 will be returned to the student.
         Test 4 will not be returned but can be reviewed by appointment with me. By registering for this class
         each student agrees that the tests are the intellectual property of the instructor and may not be sold,
         reproduced, shared, or used for any other purpose that would provide assistance to students in future
         classes. The contents of the test are to be shared only with individuals registered in this class (spring
         2010).
ii.) Information Fluency Exercise (10% of grade)


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Each student/group will write a minimum 1500 word essay (not including references) on the potential uses of
stem cells in medicine. More information is provided on the website in the folder ‘Information Fluency
Exercise’.

It is important to develop skills that enable you to effectively research and present information. A critical step in
this process is the ability to identify high quality sources of information. This exercise is designed to enhance
your abilities to research and present information, and to identify good reference sources.

You may work individually or in groups of two or three for this exercise. If you work in a group, all group
members will be assigned the same grade. You may elect to separate from a group at any time, however any
grades assigned while you were in the group will be retained.

The exercise will be divided into four stages with specific deadlines. Each stage is designed to improve the
quality of the final product. If you miss a deadline you will receive a 0 for that portion of the exercise.

Stage 1 (2.5% of grade – due by 5pm Friday January 22nd): You will provide five reference sources on the
assigned topic. You will be provided with feedback on the quality of the reference sources you selected. You
will earn full points for this stage of the exercise regardless of the quality of your source material providing you
submit your information by the deadline. 20% deduction for each reference under five.

Stage 2 (2.5% of grade - due by 5pm Friday February 26th): You will submit a minimum 1500-word draft
essay with at least 5 acceptable reference sources on the assigned topic following the specific guidelines
provided. 20% deduction for each 100 words or part thereof under 1500.

I will review the essays and provide you with critical feedback on the essay structure and content, and quality of
the references. We will also submit the essay to turnitin.com to identify sections where plagiarism has occurred.
Plagiarism is the use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of
them as one's own original work. Within academia plagiarism by students, professors, or researchers is
considered academic dishonesty or academic fraud and offenders are subject to academic censure and criminal
prosecution

You will earn full points for this stage of the exercise regardless of the quality of your essay providing you
submit your information by the deadline and meet the above requirements.

Stage 3 (2.5% of grade - due by 5pm Friday March 26th): You will submit a substantially improved draft of
the essay with at least 5 acceptable reference sources. I will review the essay and provide you with additional
critical feedback. We will also submit the essay to turnitin.com to identify sections where plagiarism has
occurred.

You will earn full points for this stage of the exercise regardless of the quality of your essay providing it is
substantially improved and you submit your information by the deadline meeting the above requirements. I will
subjectively determine deductions for work that is not a substantial improvement over the previous submission.
20% deduction for each 100 words or part thereof under 1500. 20% deduction for each unacceptable reference.

Stage 4 (2.5% of grade - due by 5pm Friday April 16th): You will submit the final version of the essay with
at least 5 acceptable reference sources. Clarity of writing and organization of the essay will be graded
subjectively. 20% deduction for each 100 words or part thereof under 1500. 20% deduction for each
unacceptable reference.
iii.) Critical Thinking Exercises (10% of grade)


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Critical thinking exercises will be offered throughout the semester. Each exercise is worth 1% of the final grade.
A maximum of 10% of the final grade may be accrued from these exercises. Specific guidelines and submission
dates will be provided for each individual exercise. The guidelines will be discussed in class and posted on the
web site. If you fail to submit an exercise by the submission deadline you will not receive credit for that
exercise.

For these exercises you may work individually or in groups up to four. You may not seek advice or any
form of assistance from individuals not registered in the class. Groups should submit one response with all
group members clearly identified.



Important Academic Dates:

January 11             Classes begin
January 14             Drop ends
January 15             Add ends
January 22             Payment deadline
March 5                Withdrawal deadline
April 26               Classes end
April 27 – May 3       Final examination period
May 8                  Grades available
May 7-8                Commencement

Holidays:

January 18             Martin Luther King Jr. Day
March 8-13             Spring Break




ORDER OF MATERIAL TO BE COVERED (actual order may vary)

Assigned reading is from Klug, Cummings and Spencer; Concepts of Genetics 8th edition.
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(see web site for problem sets)

Jan 12                Syllabus and Terminology


                                     CLASSICAL GENETICS

Jan 14                Module 1: Mendelian Genetics - Problem sheet 1
                      Chapter 3 pp. 39-49; 51-52
                      (Introduction and sections 3.1 - 3.5, 3.7, 3.8 - stop at Conditional Probability)

Jan 19                Module 2: Mitosis and Meiosis - Problem sheet 2
                      Chapter 2 pp. 17-30 (Introduction and sections 2.1 - 2.4)
                      Chapter 18 pp. 439-442 (section 18.3)
                      Chapter 3 pp. 49-51 (section 3.6)

Note: The mechanics of chromosome segregation during mitosis will not be covered in class. You will however
be responsible for revising that information and making sure you can answer relevant questions on problem
sheet 2.

Jan 21                Module 3: The Development of Gametes - Problem sheet 3
                      Chapter 2 pp. 31-32 (section 2.5)

Jan 26                Module 4: Down Syndrome - Problem sheet 3
                      Chapter 2 pp. 32-33 (section 2.6)
                      Chapter 8 pp. 187-194; 206-207 (Introduction and sections 8.1 - 8.4; section 8.10 - start
                      at Translocations in Humans: Familial Down Syndrome)

Jan 28, Feb 2, 4      Module 5: Extensions of Mendelian Genetics - Problem sheet 4
                      Chapter 4 pp. 66-79; 84-85 (Introduction, sections 4.1 - 4.8 and 4.11)
                      Chapter 24 pp. 599-603 (Introduction, sections 5.1 and 5.2)

Feb 9, 11             Module 6: Sex Determination and Sex Chromosomes - Problem sheet 5
                      Chapter 7
                      Chapter 4 pp. 81-83 (section 4.10)

Feb 16                TEST 1 (covers modules 1-5)

Feb 18                Module 7: Chromosome Mapping in Eukaryotes - Problem Sheet 6
                      Chapter 5 pp. 100-118 (Introduction and sections 5.1 - 5.7)

Feb 23                Module 8: Population Genetics - Problem sheet 7
                      Chapter 25 pp. 617-624 (Introduction and sections 25.1 - 25.4)




                                         MOLECULAR GENETICS

Feb 25                Module 9: DNA Structure: Problem Set 8
                      Chapter 10 pp. 241-248 (sections 10.6 - 10.7)
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Mar 2, 4         Module 10: DNA Replication: Problem Set 9
                 Chapter 11 pp. 263-273; 275-276
                 (Introduction and sections 11.1 - 11.8 and section 11.11)
                 Chapter 10 pp. 251-253 (Sedimentation Behavior)

Mar 9, 11        SPRING BREAK

Mar 16           Module 11: The Genetic Code: Problem Set 10
                 Chapter 13 pp. 306-309; 315-317 (Introduction and sections 13.1 - 13.2 and 13.5 - 13.7)
                 Chapter 14 pp. 346-349 (section 14.7)

Mar 18           TEST 2 (covers modules 6-10)

Mar 23           Module 12: Transcription in Prokaryotes: Problem Set 10
                 Chapter 13 pp. 317-320 (sections 13.8 -13.10)

Mar 25, 30       Module 13: Translation in Prokaryotes: Problem Set 10
                 Chapter 10 pp. 249-251 (section 10.9)
                 Chapter 14 pp. 334-343 (Introduction and sections 14.1 - 14.2 and 14.4)
                 Chapter 13 pp. 313-315 (section 13.4)

Mar 30, Apr 1    Module 14: Regulation of Gene Expression in Prokaryotes: Problem Set 11
                 Chapter 16 pp. 392-399 (Introduction and sections 16.1 - 16.3)

Apr 6, 8         Module 15: Eukaryotic Gene Regulation and Genome Structure: Problem Set 12
                 Chapter 13 pp. 320-327 (sections 13.11 - 13.13)
                 Chapter 17 pp. 411-415; 423-425 (Introduction and sections 17.1 and 17.3, 17.8 - stop at
                 RNA Silencing of Gene Expression)
                 Chapter 12 pp. 297-301 (sections 12.6 - 12.7)

Apr 13, 15, 20   Module 16: Recombinant DNA Technology: Problem Set 13
                 Chapter 10 pp. 253-257
                 (section 10.10 - start at Denaturation and Renaturation of Nucleic Acids)
                 Chapter 19

Apr 22           TEST 3 (modules 11-16)

Apr 29           TEST 4 (comprehensive; modules 1-16)




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