Enrollment Management in the Early Childhood Education by bub68359

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									Enrollment Management
         Plan

      2004-2008

       Phase I
                       Enrollment Management Plan 2004- 2008
                             Phase I: Goal and Objectives



Introduction

Strategic enrollment management is a tool for Community College of Philadelphia to
realize its educational mission while preserving and enhancing its unique character.
Enrollment planning assists the College as it looks to the future by projecting strategies
for recruitment and retention that adapt to a changing environment.

The Enrollment Management Planning Task Force consulted with community members
between December 2003 and October 2004. The conversations outline a blueprint for
how the college, in a time of growing pressure for change, can affirm its existing
strengths, enhance its character as a large urban institution and heighten its status as the
state’s flagship community college. This plan proposes a “down to business”
management approach that embraces the mix and flow of new students in ways that
maintain the character of the college while increasing the learning outcomes, diversity
and size of the student body. It recommends priority branding identity and an all-
inclusive marketing strategy. It requires that we work diligently together to understand
and shape our image in the community and among ourselves. It urges the college
community, its students, faculty, staff and administration to take up these enrollment
management challenges immediately, to maintain the natural enrollment momentum of
the past years while establishing a greater competitive identity.

This plan is a dynamic document that can inform and guide the college’s recruitment and
retention strategies for students, allocation of institutional resources, marketing, and
advancement initiatives. The perspective is student centered. It aligns with other
institutional planning initiatives and is integrated with the Strategic Plan 2004-2008 goals
and objectives. Phase I identified the goals and objectives in the areas of
Recruitment/Marketing, Retention/Persistence, Institutional Effectiveness, Educational
Effectiveness, and Integration and Alignment. Phase II, the implementation phase, will
begin in January 2005. Some work groups identified implementation steps as they
adjusted the goals and objectives.

Positioning and meeting enrollment goals is crucial to the well being of the Community
College of Philadelphia and its ability to fulfill its mission. The number of enrolled
students determines budget levels, teaching loads, and infrastructure needs; the size and
composition of the student body helps define the overall character of the college. Careful
attention to enrollment goals and policies is, therefore, vital. In addition, the role the
College should play as a creator of opportunity, collaborative partner, and institution of
choice for future offerings establishes new visibility and credibility milestones in the
institution’s portfolio.
Phase I
January 2005
Page 1
The Task Force started with some basic assumptions about what the Community of
Philadelphia is and wants to become, based on the President’s vision, College mission
statement, core values, and stated administrative goals. Specifically, the Community
College should retain and enhance its basic character as a large urban, public access
community college committed to excellence with a strong emphasis on the liberal arts,
transfer partnerships, and workforce development. The scope of programs and majors
offered will be adjusted in response to emerging community and economic needs. Its
service to the community – local, regional, national, and global will be evaluated by the
contributions it makes through its alumni, faculty involvement, and staff engagement.

The Enrollment Management Planning Task Force understands the importance of the
College mission, size, diverse culture, and environment in attracting students and faculty
members. We acknowledge the impact that environmental scans, funding changes, and
new business practices bring to the College.

We believe in the enduring value of the educational experience we offer and our five-year
vision is of a college that builds upon the best of these qualities. We should not lose our
advantages, but rather strengthen them and market them properly so that potential
students, their families, and the communities we serve may better understand their
importance. In a time of growing pressure on higher education to change, we recommend
a radical declaration of our existing strength and a commitment to creative growth and
development.

This report summarizes the Enrollment Management Planning Task Force’s work, and
contains the Team’s specific findings and recommendations to date to be implemented in
Phase II of the process.. This plan is a work in progress— structured enough to provide a
tangible framework for the future, but flexible enough to respond to changes in funding,
tuition assessments, fluctuations in the flow of funds from outside sources, demographic
and market changes, and institutional priorities.

Project Design

The Enrollment Management Planning Process (EMP²) began with the first meeting of
the Enrollment Management Planning Process Task Force (EMP²TF) on November 14,
2003. Work Groups (EMP²WG) were assigned to identify goals and objectives in the
areas of Recruitment/Marketing, Retention/Persistence, Institutional Effectiveness,
Educational Effectiveness, and Integration and Alignment. This was accomplished
through collaboration and conversation with appropriate community members.

Throughout the Spring and Fall 2004 professional development activities provided for the
college community opportunities to hear leaders in the Enrollment Management research.
Speakers included Robert Seviers, Senior Vice President of Stamats, Inc. and Michael
Dolence, President and CEO of Dolence Associates, a leader in strategic enrollment
management.

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January 2005
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The timeline for the project was followed as proposed. Initially, the purpose of the Task
Force participants was to develop a collaborative effort by appointing students, faculty,
and staff who were willing to collaborate with many members of the College community.
However, the Task Force experienced many opportunities for renewal due to staff
changes. Students, faculty, and staff who stepped into vacated leadership roles on the
work groups kept the momentum going but often had to re-create the direction. In
addition, the OASIS project timeline required participation at a greater level from some
of the Task Force members. The “sea change” for community colleges in general was
responding to funding challenges. Capital needs will require flexibility in the
implementation of proposals for expansion. Business plan redesign and the changes in
the way Banner redirects the daily operation calls for a higher level of institutional
communication.

Phase II of the Enrollment Management Plan should begin in January 2005 with the
appointment of an Implementation Team. The purpose will be to set out the details of
implementing many of the recommendations made in Phase I. The Implementation Team
will need to list the details, areas of responsibility, priority, estimated cost, and status.
The Retention and Persistence Work Group developed a model.




Phase I
January 2005
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                   Summary of Recruitment and Marketing Work Group

Introduction

The Recruitment and Marketing Subcommittee of the Enrollment Management
Committee undertook several areas of review including: a survey of curriculum
coordinators, a review of demographic data according to Zip Code, a review of the draft
of the College’s recruitment plan, meetings with College recruiters, a review of the 2000
Clarus Report, and an evaluation of communication methods across sectors involved in
the areas of recruitment and marketing. A summary of each of these areas appears
below, followed by recommendations.

Surveys of Curriculum Coordinators

The survey of curriculum coordinators focused on substantiated job opportunities for
programs as well as on marketing and recruitment efforts. Programs surveyed included
Automotive Technology, Behavioral Health / Human Services, CAD, Construction
Technology, Early Childhood Education, Education, Justice, Medical Assisting, Office
Management, and Paralegal Studies.

Survey questions included: How do students learn about your program? Are students
able to easily access information about the program and contact staff before and during
the enrollment process? Is your program at or near capacity in terms of enrollment? If
not, how many students are enrolled on average compared to the program’s capacity?
What is the next step for students after completing the program (i.e., employment or
transfer to a four-year school, etc.)? What employment opportunities exist for students in
your program? Do you feel current recruitment and retention efforts for your program
are adequate? Do you have any suggestions on how to improve recruitment and retention
efforts?

Key conclusions from the survey responses include:

1. Data supports the conclusion that there are jobs and career opportunities in all
   of the fields surveyed. (For some programs such as Education, a four-year
   degree is required before entering the career field). All programs report good
   to excellent placement rates for graduates.
2. With the exception of Automotive Technology (which has space difficulties),
   no program has reached capacity enrollment, and many are far from capacity.
   (“Capacity enrollment” includes a consideration of the whether classes have
   reached maximum enrollment and whether the marketplace could absorb
   additional graduates in the field.)

Program coordinators consistently reported difficulties communicating their offerings to
prospective students. Problems in this area include limited program marketing by the
Phase I
January 2005
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institution, difficulties in assuring that prospective students are directed to the appropriate
office or that correct information is given out, and difficulties in getting information out
to prospective students in general. Transition to web-based marketing should include a
campaign to alert all prospective students to the web. It was recommended that the
deletion of the direct mail of course brochures be evaluated for Fall 2004 and Spring
2005 for specific programs that identified this correspondence as a primary recruiting
tool.

Demographic Analysis of Zip Code Data

The full report on the Zip Code analysis is attached. Key conclusions of particular
significance to the institution include:

1. In a job market demanding increased education and high skill level, Philadelphia
   residents are far below the national average for both education levels and
   participation in the job market.
2. Philadelphia’s population continues to age while the overall population continues to
   shrink.
3. Asian and Hispanic communities continue to grow.

This demographic information, when considered in light of the institution’s mission,
underscores the need to improve outreach efforts to the changing population of the City
in order to provide the community with the educated workforce and citizenry required by
our continually changing, technologically focused society. Community College of
Philadelphia needs to become the city’s “first choice for cost effective quality
education and training”.

Review of Draft of the Recruitment Plan

The committee reviewed the 2004-2005 Recruitment Plan. The committee recognizes the
need to balance practicalities and budget with the need to serve all possible
constituencies. In addition to traditional high school students, high school counselors,
high school faculty, parents of high school students, new populations were identified.
Suggested additional constituencies to add to future efforts and constituencies requiring
increased efforts and resources in a future plan include:

1.   Older adults desiring or forced into a career change
2.   Older adults desiring intellectual enrichment
3.   Hispanic and Asian populations
4.   International students
5.   Students who wish to earn a degree online
6.   Students who wish to earn a degree at an accelerated pace
7.   Students who wish to attend college on an alternative schedule
8.   Students who withdrew without reaching stated goal


Phase I
January 2005
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Review of the Clarus Report 2000

Although some of the information in the Clarus Report is outdated, the report provides
several valuable observations that continue to be accurate. In summary, the report draws
the following conclusions:

                                 Clarus Report 2000 Findings
  •      Community College of Philadelphia is not a first choice for consumers
         considering higher education.
  •      Consumers tend to associate quality of education with tuition costs. As a result,
         the institution’s low-cost tuition in some ways constitutes a negative factor
         regarding its quality to some consumers.
  •      Consumers value high-quality instruction, diverse offerings and majors,
         transferability, technology, and safety.
  •      Many consumers believe – without factual basis – that their desired field of
         study is not offered at the institution.
  •      Potential students prefer to attend education institution close to their home and
         many are reluctant to travel to the main campus for classes.
  •      Ideal classes for many consumers meet one evening a week for three hours.
  •      At-home mailings were the most important source of information regarding the
         institutions for most consumers and the source of information best remembered.
  •      Many consumers (one-third of those surveyed) believe that the institution’s
         student body consists of students who are not successful in obtaining admission
         to a four-year institution, and most parents express a strong preference that their
         children attend a four-year institution instead of Community College of
         Philadelphia.

Review of Communication Efforts

The committee undertook an extensive discussion regarding the issues underlying the
topics within our purview. A theme of lack of effective communication across divisions
emerged from this discussion. For example, professionals in the office of
communications were not aware of new courses and new curricula while members of
academic program had little awareness of the College’s current marketing efforts. This
example has been corrected by expanding the distribution list for new offerings.

Recommendations

It is clear there is a need to coordinate recruitment and marketing efforts more closely
with enrollment management at Community College of Philadelphia. Based on the
research reviewed and conducted by the recruitment and marketing subcommittee, the
following recommendations are suggested:


Phase I
January 2005
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1. Coordinate with program directors and coordinators to communicate new programs,
    classes and opportunities. Use surveys and focus groups to determine recruitment
    and marketing needs.
2. Deliver identified mini-marketing projects (n) annually.
3. Reinstitute mailings to the public on program offerings and/or transition to web-based
    marketing.
4. Evaluate programs with low enrollment to determine the program’s viability.
    (Academic Affairs Master Plan)
5. Coordinate with goals and objectives of the Business & Industry Plan.
6. Track current recruitment efforts to determine success rates.
7. Survey employers with whom the College already has partnerships to determine new
    employment trends in the region.
8. Continue to evaluate current marketing and recruitment efforts in terms of success
    rate and cost-effectiveness.
9. A more dynamic communication plan for external and internal dissemination of
    information to appropriate audiences should be developed. Multi-media channels
    should be used to ensure optimal audience reception.
10. Channels for response to information should be developed.
11. Develop a process flow for all internal and external communications that can be
    reviewed regularly by the EMP Implementation Team. Include a calendar,
    responsible person, desired outcomes, assessment to ensure integration and alignment
    of messages to multiple audiences.
.
                                Internal Communication       External Communications
                                Plan                         Plan
Types of Communication:
    • General notice
    • Specific Topic
    • Routine Flow
Audience Identification
    • Students by cohort
    • Alumni
    • Faculty
    • Staff
    • Board
    • Community by
        cohort
Methodology
    • Traditional
    • Non-traditional




Phase I
January 2005
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Strategic Plan 2005-2008 Alignment Summary

The Mission Statement and the Vision Statement, combined with Core Values, were the
driving factors in the development of an Enrollment Management Plan. The Committee
members were cognizant of the responsibility to develop goals, objectives, and outcomes
that were within the context and framework of the mission and vision statements, and the
core values. The alignment of the Enrollment Management Plan with the Strategic Plan
2005-2008 represents a collaborative effort to accomplish the expectations of the College
Statements and Core Values, while maintaining our charge.

Marketing and Recruitment and Retention efforts of the Enrollment Management must
align with the Strategic Plan 2005-2008. According to the Strategic Plan’s stated goals,
objectives and outcomes in these areas, the Enrollment Management Plan provides
linkages.

In Marketing, several goals, objectives and outcomes link Strategic Planning and
Enrollment Management. They include: the development and implementation of a new
marketing plan, college-wide involvement in targeted marketing strategies, marketing
strategies that are proactive and support quick response time, marketing strategies that are
connected to achievement of enrollment and financial goals and ongoing assessment of
overall effectiveness of marketing strategies.

In Recruitment and Retention, the Enrollment Management Plan also aligns with the
Strategic Plan 2005-2008 through their goals, objectives and outcomes. They include:
systemic support structures that promote monitoring of student persistence rates and
academic successes to enable students to achieve respective goals, educational plans and
meet institutional expectations, commitment of college personnel to their role in assisting
students as they identify and explore resources, and the expansion of programs that
support retention and provide vehicles for student success. The linkages also include:
program planning and delivery activities that are distinct for student/client groups,
identifying academic opportunities for customized programs combining credit and non-
credit recruiting, customized development and delivery of educational support services,
expansion of dual enrollment programs and programs focusing on secondary student
preparation for higher education.

Although the Strategic and Enrollment Management Plans currently link in specific,
target areas through the stated goals, objectives and outcomes, the plans will further be
integrated and aligned through the respective implementation steps.




Phase I
January 2005
Page 8
                          Office of Recruitment and Admissions
                               2004-2005 Recruitment Plan

Introduction

The Community College of Philadelphia’s Office of Recruitment and Admissions is
comprised of three distinct yet connected departments: Welcome Center and Admissions
Processing, the Telephone Information Center, and the Recruitment Coordinator team.

The Recruitment Coordinator team is responsible for attracting new students into college
programs by identifying and cultivating various target markets throughout the city and
region. The team participates in off-campus activities such as high school visits, college
fairs, and community-related events, as well as, coordinates and facilitates on-campus
recruitment activities such as open houses, career days, and telemarketing campaigns.

Using the College’s Enrollment Management Plan, Marketing Plan, Academic Plan and
Institutional Research data, the Recruitment Coordinator team has developed a
Recruitment Plan that identifies relevant recruitment and admissions processes that
support the delivery of programs and activities to targeted audiences, thus promoting the
image and visibility of the College.

The primary goals of the Recruitment Plan are:
1. Support the College’s efforts to achieve consistent institutional growth (“optimum
   enrollment”)
2. Support the College’s Enrollment Management Plan in efforts to target specific
   student cohorts, including (but not limited to):
       a. Underrepresented males
       b. Latinos
       c. International students
       d. Reverse transfer students
       e. Adult Students
       f. Middle School Students
3. Promote and support the “open access, cradle to grave” concept to all residents of the
   Philadelphia region
4. Promote the excellence awards received by special programs (e.g., nursing)
5. Promote best practices associated with pass rates, graduation rates, and other industry
   benchmarks
6. Position the College’s brand as a top-choice institution, marketing itself to the full
   spectrum of potential students seeking higher education, including: traditional
   students, non-traditional students, etc. This “branding concept” will be built on four
   cornerstones:



Phase I
January 2005
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  Quality       The educational offerings at CCP match those of most local four-year
                institutions

  Affordability For most local residents, CCP is the most affordable college
                choice available

  Convenience More than 60+ credit programs, numerous non-credit offerings, day,
              evening, weekend, distance learning classes, locations throughout the
              city

  Success       CCP students have success in transferring to four-year institutions, as
                well as success with employment placement efforts

By reviewing the College’s Enrollment Management Plan and working with key
personnel, the Office of Recruitment and Admissions will initiate an effective, targeted,
and thorough recruitment plan that will incorporate specific benchmarks for success, yet
have the flexibility to respond to changing needs based on internal and/or external
factors.

The Recruitment Plan will focus on four strategic goals:

1. Develop a systems approach for recruitment, admissions, and enrollment that
   addresses the Enrollment Management Plan, Marketing Plan, and Academic Plan
   while using Institutional Research and data.

2. Provide increased access to various student populations.

3. Strengthen relationships with internal programs, offices, and departments, as well as
   external agencies and institutions.

4. Develop measurement tools to assess and evaluate the overall effectiveness of
   recruitment and admissions activities.

  Goal 1                Develop a systems approach for recruitment, admissions,
                        and enrollment that addresses the College’s Enrollment
                        Management Plan, Marketing Plan, and Academic Plan
                        while using Institutional Research and available data.

With the implementation of Banner, it will be possible to capture, evaluate, and utilize
data to a much greater degree. Decision-making will be accomplished through the use of
available institutional research and data.

1. Review of all procedures for recruitment, admissions, and enrollment.
2. The Office will conduct a thorough review of its practices and procedures to insure
   that all efforts are aligned with goals of the College’s Enrollment Management Plan.
Phase I
January 2005
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     This self-diagnosis will be developed utilizing the SMART (Specific, Measurable,
     Accurate, Realistic, Time-Sensitive) and SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses,
     Opportunities, Threats) concepts of strategic planning and tactical execution.

3. Restructure procedures to address identified needs, based on available data and in
   accordance with the College’s Enrollment Management Plan, Marketing Plan,
   Academic Plan and Institutional Research.

4. Using the Enrollment Management Plan as the guide, the Office, working with the
   Offices of Communications and Government Relations as well as Institutional
   Research, the Marketing Plan and Academic Plan and other viable offices and
   programs will develop a new set of recruitment, admissions, and enrollment
   procedures.

5. One area of immediate improvement will be in technology-based communication
   strategies. While the Office has maintained success with “face to face” activities,
   technology-based recruiting services (e-mail, on-line chat rooms, etc.) will help the
   Office reach out to students with a stronger technological effort.

6. Prepare and participate in activities based on identified needs
   In previous years, the Office has maintained a “cast a wide net” approach to
   recruitment activities; that is, the more activities the Office participates in, the better
   the Office has of meeting enrollment needs. A successful strategic enrollment
   management plan will call for targeted efforts such as international students focused
   on identified needs. Again, the new Banner system will provide the technological and
   data-driven support needed to keep the Office’s attention focused in the right
   direction.

7. Evaluate effectiveness of recruitment, admissions, and enrollment activities
   Utilizing real-time data collected from Banner as well as regular reports from
   Institutional Research, the Office will be able to consistently monitor the Recruitment
   Plan’s successes as well as areas of improvement.

8. It will be important for the Office to insure overarching goals such as “optimum
   enrollment” are being addressed, while at the same time specific goals, such as
   increasing the international student population, underrepresented male population and
   Latino population remain at the forefront.


  Goal 2         Provide increased access to targeted student populations.

The Office Admissions and Recruitment will provide increased access to a specific
variety of student populations by marketing specific college programs and services these
populations. These targeted populations would include, but would not be limited to:


Phase I
January 2005
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1. High school-aged students
   The Office will maintain its strong relationship with the Philadelphia School District
   and public educators, particularly relating to activities hosted by the high schools
   (high school visits, college fairs, etc.) The Office will continue its efforts to expand
   its relationships with the Philadelphia Archdiocese, local charter schools, and home-
   school organizations. Included in this segment will be a concentrated effort to expand
   the College’s Latino student population (in cooperation with a state-funded grant), as
   well as the City’s underrepresented male population.

2. Adult students with no previous college experience
   Over the past several years, the Office has worked with specific external agencies to
   recruit adult (or “non-traditional”) students. These relationships will be maintained
   and additional relationships will be forged (see Strategic Goal #3). A recruiting
   opportunity that is extant in the College-run non credit ABE, GED, ESL, and
   Standard Evening High School programs will be explored. Initial recruiting activities
   with these cohorts began last year; expanded efforts will continue.

3. Adults with previous college experience
   Cohorts such as College alumni, bachelor degree holders, and reverse transfer
   students, all represent potential recruiting opportunities. It is important to provide
   greater on-campus programming (targeted open houses, for example) as well as
   unique communication campaigns (on-line chat rooms, etc.).

4. Parents/Guardians of high school students
   An untapped market, as was evidenced by the April 2004 “Junior Discovery Day” in
   which many parents/guardians who accompanied their sons or daughters inquired
   about the College for their own benefit. Senior citizens, retirees, and adults seeking
   alternative delivery systems hold great potential as well.

5. International Students
   Attracting international students will need to be a priority for the entire College.
   Developing greater working relationships with local community, cultural, and
   religious organizations will help increase enrollment numbers for this student cohort,
   adding to the cultural diversity of the institution.


6. Middle School Students
   A collaborative effort with college departments will be developed that will introduce
   selected middle school students to campus life.

7. Graduates of Community College of Philadelphia
   There are many opportunities for graduates or students who previously attended
   Community College of Philadelphia to re-tool with new courses, certificates, or
   associate degree programs.


Phase I
January 2005
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  Goal 3         Strengthen relationships with internal programs, offices, and
                 departments, as well as external agencies and institutions.

The Office of Recruitment and Admissions will continue to strengthen and develop
relationships with various internal departments and programs, as well as community,
cultural, and faith-based organizations throughout the Philadelphia region.

     1. Host specialized on campus events
        Selected internal departments will be able to better market their programs to a
        specific audience invited on campus for a targeted event. Two examples include
        hosting “Counselor Days” for educators in the Philadelphia Archdiocese and the
        charter school system. Such events will showcase the College as an educational
        resource for students and promote visibility that will help the College promote
        itself as a top-choice institution for college-bound students. Coordinate campus
        events with group visits.

     2. Strengthen existing relationships with external agencies
        For years, the College has maintained mutually-beneficial relationships with a
        variety of agencies, including Aspira, College Access, Congreso, Veterans
        Upward Bound, etc. With the implementation of Banner, it will be easier to track
        inquiries, applications, and enrollments that develop from these and other sources
        to help make better use of the College’s recruiting time and marketing dollars.

     3. Develop new relationships with external agencies
        The Office will launch a telemarketing and mailing campaign to untapped
        community and international agencies, making them aware of inquiries and
        applications generated from their organizations and businesses. Specific target
        groups may include: immigrants, international residents, ESL students, unions,
        continuing education organizations, and Business and Industry partnerships.
        Residency issues will be explained. Advocacy and opportunities for external
        funding should be considered.

     4. Utilize College’s Alumni network
        To assist with the College’s “branding” efforts, the use of noted Community
        College of Philadelphia graduates for marketing purposes is recommended.
        Increasing the visibility of our alumni network will foster a sense of ownership in
        the College by the citizens of Philadelphia. It will also promote familiarity and
        pride in the College and help maintain our image as a quality educational
        institution.

     5. Utilize memberships in educational membership organizations to enhance
        recruitment ideas and activities. The Recruitment Coordinator Team members
        will use their memberships in organizations such as PACAC and AACRO to
        develop additional recruitment and marketing concepts, and possibly host a
        recruitment-related seminar on campus.
Phase I
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  Goal 4                 Develop measurement tools to assess and evaluate
                         recruitment and admissions activities.

With the implementation of Banner, the College will have exceptional opportunity to
track enrollment-related data quickly and accurately. Determining the short- and long-
term effectiveness of recruitment and admissions activities will help the Office of
Recruitment and Admissions focus its energies on “the things that matter.”

     1. Conduct focus groups and implement surveys
        The Office will conduct mini focus groups to help assess various recruitment and
        admissions and activities. The data will be used to fine tune recruiting plans.
        Examples of questions would include: How did you first hear about our College?
        What made you decide to enroll in our College? What did you like/dislike about
        the enrollment process? The data will be included in Banner to assist with
        tracking efforts.

     2. Telephone and electronic survey instruments will be used to determine customer
        satisfaction relative to recruitment activities and events. This will help to
        determine from various student cohorts “what works and what does not work for
        students.” Institutional Research reports and instruments used for student
        satisfaction surveys will be re-visited. Standardized surveys will also be planned.

     3. Collect and analyze pertinent data
        The ongoing review of data from Banner and other sources will be considered to
        insure that goals are being met in accordance. Detailed attention will be given to
        inquiries, application process and enrollment relative to targeted student cohorts
        as well as to specific high schools.

     4. Evaluate overall effectiveness of all recruitment and admissions activities
        Develop evaluative system to track effectiveness of internal and external
        recruiting, admissions, and enrollment activities. Factors to consider would
        include:
            a. type of event (high school visit, on campus open house, etc.)
            b. contact information (new contact, established contact, etc.)
            c. date/time/location of event
            d. number and type of inquiries and applications collected
            e. cost effectiveness
            f. return on investment

Conclusion

The Office of Recruitment and Admissions will continue its ongoing efforts to promote
the College mission of providing “access to higher education for all who
Phase I
January 2005
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may benefit.” With the development and implementation of a comprehensive
Recruitment Plan, combined with direction from the College’s Enrollment Management
Plan, marketing Plan, Academic Plan and Institutional Research, the effectiveness of
Recruitment and Admissions will be improved.

Enrollment projections outlined below are designed to increase enrollment in each area to
include high school students, international students, adults and underrepresented males.

                          Enrollment Data Projections*

                               Fall 03     Fall 04    Projected Projected Projected
                                                      Fall 05   Fall 06   Fall 07

High School Applicants            4,326       4,400        4,500
Students Enrolled
Immediately out of High           1,480                    1,800
School                                        1,706

International Student               225                      200
Enrolled                                        168

Adults No Previous College
(22 and Older)                    4,242       4,428        4,500
Adults Previous College (22
and Older)                          720         690          725
Adults Enrolled (22 and          19,714                   19,800
Older)                                       19,726

Underrepresented Males
Applied                           3,014       3,415        3,500
Underrepresented Males
Enrolled (First Year)               928         991        1,100
Underrepresented Males
Enrolled (Total)                  2,958       2,942        3,000

The above table will serve as the basis for collecting data relevant to Enrollment
Management projections for the next three years. The Director of Admissions and staff
are reviewing the external scan documents and building their recruitment priorities based
on the data. Projections numbers will be identified during Phase II: Implementation.




Phase I
January 2005
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        Summary of the Enrollment Management Retention/Persistence Work Group



Introduction

In fall 2003, the Retention/Persistence Work Group was given the charge to review
existing research conducted by Institutional Research (IR), conduct additional research,
gather feedback from various campus entities, and draft a Retention Plan. The role and
responsibility of this group was to develop a plan of action for retention and persistence.
The group was also charged with examining current campus retention efforts,
determining how to enhance what is in place, and investigating how to reconnect with
students who have withdrawn from the College.

In addition to meetings and or discussions, the Retention/Persistence Work Group
examined reports produced by the College’s Department of Institutional Research (see
Appendix A). The work group also reviewed various journal articles and documents
produced by the College (see Appendix B). In addition, the concerns, perspectives, and
interests of the members of the group were also considered during the preparation of this
document.

This plan primarily focuses on retention efforts specific to pre-admission and admission,
orientation and advising, intervention and instructional support services. It is the belief of
the Retention/Persistence Work Group, that if students meet their goals and are retained
semester to semester, retention efforts will then become a component of a comprehensive
approach to enrollment management.

The following goals and objectives related to the above strategies were identified by the
Retention/Persistence Work Group and served as a guide for drafting a retention plan.
The work group recognizes that each of the strategies will require action and anticipates
that one or more of the recommendations within each goal will be chosen and
implemented by the College.

Goals, Objectives, Recommendations, and Desires Outcomes

  Goal 1:          The pursuit of parity in student outcomes, including persistence to
                   goal completion, will guide institutional decision making.

Objectives

a.        Persistence to goal completion will be analyzed in the context of the many
          dimensions of diversity within the College (e.g., academic ability, age, physical
          abilities, ethnicity, socioeconomic background, etc.)
Phase I
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b.        The College will develop and implement intervention strategies to improve parity
          in student persistence and achievement.

c.        Policies and procedures will reflect the commitment to achieving parity in student
          outcomes.

d.        Based upon the needs of students in various diversity categories, best practices
          (within and outside the College) will be used to promote student success in
          achieving their educational goals.

e.        College resource allocations will be aligned with the goal of achieving parity in
          student persistence and achievement.

Recommendations

a.        The College will design strategies to increase the persistence to goal achievement
          of Black and Latino male students.

b.        Under the leadership of the Office of Institutional Research, the Data Quality
          Task Force will establish appropriate dimensions of student diversity to build into
          assessment models of student academic achievement and persistence.

c.        In addition to Black and Latino male students, the Enrollment Management
          Committee will determine other students who are potentially at greater risk of not
          achieving their goals and assume the leadership in exploring intervention
          strategies to improve student persistence.
d.        Systemic approaches based upon best practices within and outside of the
          classroom will be designed and implemented. Academic Affairs and Student
          Affairs will collaborate in this effort.

e.        The Enrollment Management Committee will establish institutional benchmarks
          to assess student achievement and persistence.

f.        Institutional processes will be developed to ensure student goal information is
          accurate and effectively used to develop individual educational plans for all
          students.

g.        Assessment of student achievement and persistence will be ongoing and
          evaluation information used to adjust the approaches in place to ensure parity in
          student outcomes.

h.        Resource allocations to support achievement of this goal will be tied to
          documented success.


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Desired Outcome

a.        Persistence to goal completion of Black and Latino males in particular and other
          students at risk of not achieving their goals in general is increased by 5% over a
          three to five year period.


     Goal 2:       Enhance and create new systemic support structures designed to
                   encourage students’ academic success and persistence at the
                   College until their educational goals are achieved.

Objectives

a.        Student progress monitoring systems will be maintained which permit student
          persistence and academic success to be assessed and described relative to
          students’ goals and educational plans, and institutional expectations for the
          students.

b.        Faculty and staff will develop the knowledge and skills needed to identify high-
          risk behaviors in students and other potential barriers to student success.

c.        Faculty and staff will be committed to assisting students find and use resources to
          enhance their success at the College.

d.        All students will be provided with the knowledge to successfully negotiate the
          enrollment process.

e.        All students will have well-defined educational goals and an educational plan that
          supports the achievement of these goals.

f.        Student retention and success programs will be enhanced and expanded. Model
          programs will be reviewed.

g.        Successful retention efforts currently in place will be reviewed. New models will
          be created. Faculty engagement in the retention effort is important.

h.        The data on the Dual Admissions Programs should be promoted as an example of
          successful transfer initiative.

i.        The Freshman Orientation Seminar 101 (FOS) and other success/retention will be
          studied to determine their impact on student success and retention. Review of the
          persistence of students who took the course versus those who did not is important.


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Recommendations

a. All new students will participate in an Orientation to the College. Present orientation
   efforts will be enhanced and expanded by using a rolling orientation format that
   includes modules, on-line delivery, and evening and weekend orientation sessions.
   Student Orientation, Career Services and Academic Advising will collaborate in this
   effort.

b. Orientation opportunities should be required in more curricula. Should an Orientation
   course be required of all students?

c. The New Student Goal Statement form will be included as part of the New Student
   Orientation. Follow-up strategies will be developed to assist students who have an
   unclear focus establish educational goals and educational plans to support their goals.
   This is a Banner form used in Admissions.

d. Goal Statements for non-credit students will be developed.

e. Student goal information will be routinely updated during the student’s enrollment at
   the College through counseling and advising.

f. Information concerning students’ goals will be used by advisors, counselors, faculty,
   and staff to assist students in determining progress in the achievement of their
   educational pursuits.

g. There will be an increase in the availability of Dual Admissions programs and
   students enrolled in these programs.

h. Faculty and staff will be engaged in the process of encouraging greater student
   persistence by:

     1) Participating in an Institutional Readiness Campaign designed to identify their
        responsibility for student persistence.

     2) Defining the role of teaching faculty and counselors in the persistence of students.

     3) Developing faculty peer mentoring to encourage sharing of successful strategies
        to support student persistence at the course and program level.

     4) Faculty and staff hiring decisions and evaluations will specifically consider
        individuals’ potential contributions and effectiveness in promoting student
        success and persistence.


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      5) Professional development opportunities focused on student success strategies will
         be provided regularly to faculty and staff.

      6)       Early warning and intervention systems and orientation programs designed to
               encourage student persistence in first semester/year will be strengthened.

      7)       Systems implementation teams will ensure that student tracking is possible
               with the transition from legacy to Banner systems.

Desired Outcomes

1. Student persistence and academic success rates meet annual targets.

2. An increase in faculty and staff engaged in systematic support structures that impact student
   retention and persistence.

3. A significant increase in the number of students enrolled in FOS 101 each year and/or
   a universal Orientation course.

     Goal 3:        Improve upon the management of credit, client-partnership, and
                    other non-credit programs to create flexible options for continuous
                    learning and promote improved student retention.


Objectives

a.         Internal marketing strategies will be implemented to increase understanding by all
           internal constituents of all program options.

b.         Approaches for recruiting students who initially enter the College as non-credit
           students into credit programs will be expanded and strengthened.

c.         The College will systematically gather customer feedback to improve course
           offerings and delivery strategies.

d.         Student transcripts will be expanded to incorporate complete information on all
           student curricular and co-curricular experiences to identify potential gaps in
           current offerings and facilitate planning for student educational experiences.

e.         Advising, counseling, and other educational support services will be redesigned
           and tailored to address the needs of all students.

f.         Internal barriers that currently discourage ABE, GED, and ESL students from
           registering in the College’s credit programs after successful completion of their
           credit-free programs will be identified and reduced.

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g.        The College will be state-of-the-art in using technology to provide students and
          faculty/staff to assess student progress in achieving their educational goals.

Recommendations

a.        Academic Affairs will identify and implement continuous learning opportunities
          for all students.

b.        Student and Academic Affairs will modify and expand support services to better
          meet the needs of credit and non-credit students.

c.        Student Affairs and Academic Affairs will identify desirable expansion to the
          College’s transcript information, and implement feasible modifications in the
          Banner environment.

d.        New continuous learning opportunities will be identified, implemented and
          assessed for their impact on student persistence and goal achievement and revised
          accordingly.

e.        Internal barriers that inhibit the movement of non-credit students to credit
          programs will be identified and eliminated.

f.        The Enrollment Management Committee will establish annual targets for
          recruiting non-credit students into credit programs.

g.        Student Affairs will expand on current efforts to recruit non-credit students into
          credit programs.

h.        Student Affairs and Academic Affairs will monitor and assess the implementation
          of recommendations and make appropriate modifications based on findings.

Desired Outcomes

1. Specific targets for recruiting non-credit students into credit students are met.

2. Specific targets for recruiting credit students and graduates to re-enroll or continue in
   another program are met.

3. There is demonstrated improvement in the number of credit and non-credit students
   who achieve their educational goals for enrolling at the College.

4. Institutional goals for improved student retention are met.

5. An increase in student matriculation from non-credit Adult Education programs to
   credit courses by at least 5% for the next three to five years.

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6. An annual assessment/monitoring system of checks and balances and making
   appropriate changes based on findings.


  Goal 4:         Improve the conversion ratios associated with inquiry to
                  application, application to admission, admission to testing, and
                  testing to registration.

Objectives

a. The response associated with all College inquiries will be timely and appropriate.

b. The Inquiry System database will be comprehensive, reliable, and helpful in the
   assessment of the delivery of services by the Information Center and the effectiveness
   of marketing approaches.

c. All students are given the necessary information to efficiently move through the
   process.

Recommendations

     1. A plan to enhance the services delivered by the Information Center will be
        developed. Potential issues to be addressed in the plan include:

          a) evaluate the effectiveness of the current automated system and make
             appropriate technological updates
          b) on going training for attendants and security personnel
          c) additional relevant message options
          d) evaluation of line usage
          e) ensuring consistency of telephone greetings across all campus locations
          f) eliminating the ‘no one has a clue’ status of inquiries
          g) establishing follow-up procedures and policies
          h) delivering information packets consistent with nature of inquiry

     2. The Enrollment Management Committee will establish annual targets for
        conversion ratio and assess the achievement of these targets.

     3. Develop a plan to link inquiries about specific academic programs with
        appropriate faculty for follow-up.

     4. Systemic implementation of the Enrollment Process Map developed within the
        College’s 2003-2004 Leadership Institute.




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Desired Outcome

1. Improved conversion ratios associated with inquiry to application, application to
   admission, admission to testing, and testing to registration.

Conclusion

The Retention/Persistence Work Group anticipates that this proposed plan will serve as a
guideline for promoting student success, enhancing existing retention efforts, and
developing innovative strategies that focus on retention and persistence. We also
anticipate that the College will meet its retention and persistence goals by year five after
implementation and that the monitoring and evaluation mechanisms recommended will
reassess this plan in order to maintain and build upon future retention/persistence efforts.
Lastly, we view this document as an ongoing dynamic futuristic tool to plan, implement,
and evaluate the College’s progress.

This document was prepared after one year of work group meetings and informal
discussions with the following colleagues:
    • Dr. Kathleen Anderson, Acting Vice President for Student Affairs
    • Janice Borlandoe, Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs/Judicial
       Affairs Officer
    • Dr. Marvin Bright, Dean of Students
    • Dr. Jane Grosset, Director for Institutional Research
    • Dr. Tom Hawk, Vice President for Planning and Finance
    • Dr. Sam Hirsch, Dean of Educational Support Services
    • Dawn Sinnott, Research Associate
    • Dr. Tim Sullivan, Dean of Business and Technology
    • Dr. Sharon Thompson, Dean of Liberal Studies
    • Dr. Susan Tobia, Acting Director, Northeast Regional Center
Through individual discussions with Dr. Hirsch, Dr. Sullivan, and Dr. Thompson, work
group members examined successful retention efforts and investigated what is not
working.




Phase I
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                                       Appendix A

Baines, A. and Grosset, J. (1999). Why Do Students Drop Out of Community College of
Philadelphia: Reasons for the Attrition of Black and White Student.

Doshi, S. and Grosset, J. (2004). Reasons for Student Attrition at Community College of
Philadelphia.

Grosset, J. (1996). Potential Administrative Barriers to Student Enrollment.

Grosset, J. and Hawk, T. (2003). Institutional Effectiveness: What Do We Know?

Institutional Effectiveness 2002: A College Report Card. Report #129. January 2003.

Institutional Summary (Student Satisfaction Inventory). June 1999

Student Attrition at CCP: When Students Leave, Why They Leave, and Their Academic
Success at Departure. June 2001.

                                       Appendix B

Hammer, B. (2003). Award-Winning Approaches to Retention. Black Issues in Higher
Education.

Mason, H.P. (1998) A Persistence Model for African American Male Urban Community
College Students. Community College Journal of Research and Practice ( 22).

Mohammadi, J. (1996). Exploring Retention and Attrition in a Two-Year Public
Community College. VCCA Journal 10(1).

Palmer, J. (2001). Student Drop-out: a case study in new managerialist policy. Journal of
Further and Higher Education 25(3).

Parker, C.E. (1997). Community College Challenge: Recruiting and Retaining Minority
Students. Tech Directions 56(10).

Standard 9: Student Support Services, Community College of Philadelphia. Retrieved
August 30, 2004 from
http://www.ccp.edu/vpacaff/middlestates/Self_Study/Std_9.htm.

Strategic Plan 2005-2008 Internal and External Scan Forum. Community College of
Philadelphia. November 11, 2003.



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                                                Enrollment Management Planning
                                                Work Group: Retention/Persistence
The proposed template should be adapted by the implementation team to track the status of implementation steps. This model was presented
by the Work Group on Retention/Persistence. Estimated cost and priority status should be added. Dates should be specific to month/year.

Goal 1:        The pursuit of parity in student outcomes, including persistence to goal completion, will guide institutional decision-
               making.

            OBJECTIVES                  IMPLEMENTATION STEPS                   RESPONSIBILITY          TIMELINE          STATUS
    A. Analyze persistence to        1. Establish appropriate dimensions     Academic Affairs
    goal completion in the context   of student diversity to build into      Student Affairs
    of the many dimensions of        assessment models of student            IR
    diversity within the college.    academic achievement and                Data Quality Task Force
                                     persistence.
    B. Develop a Student Goal        1. Establish systematic procedure to    Testing Center
    Program that assists students    collect New Student Goal Statement      Counseling
    in identifying, developing,      information to identify at-risk         Advising
    and achieving their academic     students.                               IR
    goals while attending the
    college.

                                     2. Develop institutional processes to   Academic Affairs
                                     ensure student goal information is      Student Affairs
                                     accurate and effectively used to
                                     develop individual educational plans
                                     for all.
                                     3. Identify student goal achievement    Student Affairs
                                     needs through counseling sessions,      Counselors
                                     focus groups, etc.
    .                                4. Develop follow-up strategies to      Academic Affairs
                                     assist students who have an unclear     Student Affairs
                                     focus establish educational goals and
                                     educational plans to support their
                                     goals.

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    Goal #1 continued
           OBJECTIVES                 IMPLEMENTATION STEPS                         RESPONSIBILITY         TIMELINE      STATUS
                                   5. Routinely update student goal               Counselors
                                   information during the student’s               Advisors
                                   enrollment at the college.
    C. Policies and procedures     1. Establish institutional benchmarks          Academic Affairs
    will reflect the commitment to to assess student achievement and              Student Affairs
    achieving parity in student    persistence.                                   Enrollment Management
    outcomes.                                                                     Committee
                                   2. Encourage advisors, counselors,             Academic Affairs
                                   faculty, and staff to use information          Student Affairs
                                   concerning students’ goals to assist
                                   students in determining progress in
                                   the achievement of their goals.
    D. Align college resource      1. Adjust resources for successful             Academic Affairs
    allocation with the goal       implementation of interventions.               Student Affairs
    achieving parity in student
    persistence and achievement.


Goal 2:         Enhance and create new systemic structures designed to encourage students’ academic success and persistence at the
                College until their educational goals are achieved.

            OBJECTIVES                    IMPLEMENTATION STEPS                        RESPONSIBILITY         TIMELINE      STATUS
         A. Monitor student                1. Ensure that all new students will      Academic Affairs
         progress monitoring               participate in an Orientation to the      Student Affairs
         systems that will permit          college.
         student persistence and
         academic success to be
         assessed and described
         relative to students’ goals
         and educational plans, and
         institutional expectations for
         the students.

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         Goal #2 continued
         OBJECTIVES                     IMPLEMENTATION STEPS                        RESPONSIBILITY             TIMELINE   STATUS
         B. All students will be        1. Enhance orientation efforts by           Student Affairs
         provided with the              expanding the use of rolling orientation
         knowledge to successfully      format that includes modules, on-line
         negotiate the enrollment       delivery, and evening and weekend
         process.                       orientation sessions.
                                        2. Require that the Freshman                Academic Affairs
                                        Orientation Seminar (FOS) gateway is
                                        included in more curricula and explore
                                        other formats for instructional delivery.
                                        Ideally, this gateway course would be
                                        taken by all new students.
         C. All students will have      1. Incorporate the New Student Goal         Student Affairs
         well-defined educational       Statement as part of the New Student        Orientation Facilitators
         goals and an educational       Orientation session.
         plan that supports the
         achievement of these goals.
         D. Student retention and       1. Model the retention and support          Academic Affairs
         success programs will be       aspects from those used in the ACT          Student Affairs
         enhanced and expanded.         NOW, CAP, AND CLC programs.
         E. Faculty and staff will      1. Design staff training and                Academic Affairs
         develop the knowledge and      development that addresses retention        Student Affairs
         skills needed to identify      issues and encourages commitment to
         high-risk behaviors in         assist students in finding and using
         students and other potential   resources to enhance their success at
         barriers to student success.   the college.




Phase I
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Goal 3:           Improve upon the management of credit, client-partnership, and other non-credit programs to create flexible options
                 for continuous learning and promote improved student retention.

                 OBJECTIVES                  IMPLEMENTATION STEPS                     RESPONSIBILITY      TIMELINE          STATUS
         A. Internal marketing            1. Develop plan to communicate           Academic Affairs
         strategies will be               program contacts and options.            Student Affairs
         implemented to increase                                                   Finance and Planning
         understanding by all                                                      Government Relations
         internal constituents of all
         program options.
         B. Approaches for                1. Establish annual targets for          Academic Affairs
         recruiting students who          recruiting non-credit students to credit Student Affairs
         initially enter the college as   programs.
         non-credit students into
         credit programs will be
         expanded and strengthened.
                                          2. Identify and eliminate internal       Academic Affairs
                                          barriers that inhibit the movement of    Student Affairs
                                          non-credit students to credit
                                          programs.
                                          3. Modify and expand support             Academic Affairs
                                          services to better meet the needs of     Student Affairs
                                          credit and non-credit students.
                                          4. Systematically assess customer        Academic Affairs
                                          feedback to improve course offerings
                                          and delivery strategies.
         C. Counseling, advising,         1. Enhance support services by           Student Affairs
         and other educational            adjusting resource allocations to meet
         support services will be         the needs of the students.
         redesigned and tailored to
         address the needs of all
         students.




Phase I
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         Goal #3 continued
         OBJECTIVES                      IMPLEMENTATION STEPS                     RESPONSIBILITY     TIMELINE   STATUS
         D. Student transcripts will     1. Identify desirable expansion to the   Student Affairs
         be expanded to incorporate      college’s transcript information, and
         complete information on all     implement feasible modifications in
         student curricular and co-      the Banner environment.
         curricular experiences to
         identify potential gaps in
         current offerings and
         facilitate planning for
         student educational
         experiences.
         E. Identify and reduce          1. Identify barriers to continue.        Academic Affairs
         internal barriers that                                                   Student Affairs
         currently discourage ABE,                                                IR
         GED, and ESL students
         from registering in the
         college’s credit programs
         after successful completion
         of their credit-free program.
                                         2. Develop and implement a plan to       Student Affairs
                                         address internal barriers.               Academic Affairs




Phase I
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   Goal 4:    Improve the conversion
     rations associated wth inquiry to
application, application to admission,
                 admission to testing,
           and testing to registration.

               OBJECTIVES                  IMPLEMENTATION                 RESPONSIBILITY         TIMELINE   STATUS
                                                STEPS
     A. Reponses to college inquiries 1. Develop a plan to enhance             Student Affairs
       will be timely and appropriate. the services delivered by the
                                                Information Center.



                                          2. Evaluate the effectiveness        Student Affairs
                                               of the current automated
                                          system and make appropriate
                                                 technological updates.

                                                3. Provide training for        Student Affairs
                                              Information Center staff.
        B. All students are given the     1. Ensure consistency of             Student Affairs
  necessary information to efficiently     telephone greetings and
           move through the process. information across all campus
                                                          locations
                                                2. Establish follow-up         Student Affairs
                                               procedures and policies



                                                                             Academic Affairs




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                                                3. Deliver information       Student Affairs
                                         packets consistent with nature
                                                             of inquiry
C. The Inquiry System database will        1. Evaluate and update         Student Affairs
     be comprehensive, reliable and         technology, skills, and Communications and
    helpful in the assessment of the assessment tools for database. Government Relations
          delivery of services by the                                                 IT
         Information Center and the                                                   IR
          effectiveness of marketing
                         approaches.


         D. Increase conversion ratios. 1. Establish annual targets for      Student Affairs
                                          conversion ratios and assess
                                             the achievement of these
                                                               targets.




                                             2. Develop a plan to link       Student Affairs
                                               inquiries about specific    Academic Affairs
                                              academic programs with
                                        appropriate faculty for follow-
                                                                     up.




Phase I
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Introduction

The Enrollment Management Planning Process Work Group on Institutional
Effectiveness addressed the issue of institutional effectiveness as it relates to
enrollment management. This institutional effectiveness plan is intended to enable the
College to engage in an on-going process of planning and assessment for instructional
and non-instructional programs, services, and operations. The major areas of
Recruitment and Marketing; Educational Effectiveness; Retention/Persistence;
Technology; and Integration and Alignment are addressed in detail elsewhere in the
Enrollment Management Plan document and will not be addressed in this section. The
Institutional Effectiveness Work Group employed a methodology of research which
included interviews, student focus groups, and analysis of institutional documents.
Interviews were conducted with individuals representing select areas of the College.
A student focus group was held during New Student Orientation with approximately
88 students who were new to the College for the fall 2004 semester. Follow up
discussions were conducted during visits to ten (10) freshman English classes during
the second week of the semester. Approximately 200 students were contacted during
these visits. Institutional documents included in the analysis were the 2003
Institutional Effectiveness Report, the Middle Sates Commission on Higher
Education Report, and the College’s 2004-2008 Strategic Plan.

  Goal 1:       Research and review relevant College documents which identify
                performance indicators of institutional success designed to
                promote student progress and aid in decision-making processes.

Objective 1
Review relevant Office of Institutional Research reports to determine the level of
effectiveness in meeting student needs, based on established institutional
effectiveness measures.

Measurement of institutional effectiveness at the College is coordinated through the
Office of Institutional Research. This office supports institutional decision-making by
providing analyses and dissemination of data on the various operations of the
College. Institutional Research has conducted an institutional effectiveness report
since the year 2000. The indicators of institutional effectiveness are supported by
data which appear to reliable, valid, and still applicable, given that the report was
generated in 2003, in a longitudinal method of research. Institutional Research
Report # 119, titled Institutional Effectiveness 2000: A College Report Card provides
a historical perspective on the process used to develop indicators that represent five
areas of institutional effectiveness:

1. Workforce Development;
2. Transfer Preparation;
3. Student Persistence, Goal Attainment, and Assessment of Collegiate Experiences;
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January 2005
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4. Community Outreach; and
5. Revenue and Resource Usage Patterns.

The 2003 Institutional Research Report #136 is available on the College’s web page
for review in its entirety. The information which follows provides a snapshot of the
College’s success in targeted areas.

1. Workforce Development: The report cites a high degree of career goal attainment
or positive employment outcomes for Community College of Philadelphia graduates
and cites a high level of satisfaction with preparation for employment; however, a
slight drop in this area may reflect current economic conditions. The pass rates for
recent graduates on certification exams are generally higher than the national average.
Comments from students in the focus group indicated that the vast majority of
students view education and the purpose for attending college as a means to securing
a brighter economic future for themselves and their families. Few, if any students
expressed using higher education as a goal directly leading to becoming better critical
thinkers or problem solvers. Most saw these areas as “by-products” of their career-
oriented focus. The students participated in a group exercise “Essential Ingredients
for Success In College” where they were asked to rank items in order of importance
and then compare the rankings with those of their instructors. Some students were
astute enough to point out that none of the items offered as choices had any direct
statements regarding career goals.

2. Transfer Preparation: Transfer rates of graduates who graduated from transfer
programs over a period of five years range from 63% to 72%. The College has
significantly increased its articulation agreements from 22 in 1994-1995 to 91 in
2002-2003. Transfer preparation and articulation agreements will continue to be a
factor in the coming years.

3. Student Persistence, Goal Attainment, and Assessment of Collegiate Experiences:
There are five measures in this area. Overall, the College’s success in this area
ranges from below average to above average. Areas which the College’s enrollment
management plan should address include:
       • graduation rates for full-time (in first semester)
       • graduation rates for first-time, full time students
       • retention rates of new part-time students in the fall who return in the
           spring semester
       • graduation and retention rates for first-time, part-time students
       • fall-to-fall and fall-to-spring persistence/attrition rates

4. Community Outreach: The College’s enrollment at off-campus locations, in
Business and Industry programs, in distance education, and in non-credit education
has generally increased over a five to six year period, as has the number of high
school graduates enrolling in the College. Grade distribution for distance education
courses is approaching the College norm; however, the withdrawal rate remains
higher than traditional courses.
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5. Cost Efficiency, Resource Usage and Resource Development: The report utilizes
six    indicators of institutional effectiveness in this area:

          •    Total program costs per FTE compared with tuition and fees charge for
               full- time students;
          •    Average credit class size;
          •    Percent of budget directed to instructor and Academic and Student
               Support Services;
          •    Number of grants and size of grant dollars;
          •    Total revenues from Most Important Funding Sources (in thousands); and
          •    Average annual percentage increase intuition and fees and tuition and fees
               rate increases relative to regional four-year institutions.

In summary, the report shows the following revenue and resource usage patterns for
the College. Because of declines in the levels of support received from the City and
State, the major sources of funding other than tuition, tuition and fee increases have
outpaced changes in operating cost per student over the past decade. Class sizes have
increased in each year beginning Fall 2000. Instruction and student/academic support
services account for the majority of the College’s budget. Over the past decade,
compared to other Pennsylvania four-year higher education institutions, the College
has had lower average annual tuition increases.

Objective 2
 Review the College’s 2004 Middle States Commission Report to determine the level
of effectiveness in meeting student needs, based on established institutional
effectiveness measures.

The Middle States Commission on Higher Education Report of March 14-17, 2004
essentially concluded that the College could strengthen its foundation by developing
an Enrollment Management Plan. Standard 7: Institutional Assessment points to the
wide range of institutional assessment information readily available at the College,
much of which relates to student performance. The Report states that, “A
longitudinal database exists that allows the tracking of students from the time they
apply to the institution to when they transfer to other institutions, obtain employment,
and beyond. This provides for an exceptionally rich information source for the
assessment of Institutional Effectiveness.” This information is readily available to
college personnel via the web page. Additionally, the capability exists to develop
new studies.

Objective 3
Review the College’s 2005-2008 Strategic Plan to determine the level of
effectiveness in meeting student needs, based on established institutional
effectiveness measures.



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The College’s 2005-2008 Strategic Plan recommends six (6) goals related to
enrollment management targeting the following areas:
   • College Image
   • Marketing
   • Recruitment and Retention of Students: Systemic Support Structures
   • Recruitment and Retention of Students: Management of credit and non-credit
       programs; Client partnerships
   • Recruitment and Retention of Students: Partnership programs with
       Philadelphia school districts
   • Program Delivery Strategies: Flexible course and program delivery options

General Recommendations

1. March 31, 2005, all existing and new program, service, and operational areas
should:
        • In collaboration with the Office of Institutional Research, develop a set of
          data driven effectiveness indicators for its area, develop a report format,
          and establish a regular schedule to request the information from the Office
          of Institutional Research for the purpose of assessment.
        • Identify a responsible person to identify, collect, access, and disseminate
          relevant data.
        • Plan a deliberate schedule whereby all participants can review the data and
          use it for future enrollment management planning.
        • Learn to use Banner efficiently , design reports and create useful data.

2. The goals and objectives of the College’s marketing plan should reflect and be
more predictive of changes in the economy. It should drive the recruitment of
students in to career programs based on projected economic trends.

3. Re-align the institution’s mission and core values to reflect the students’ purpose
for attending the institution.

4. Increase and coordinate efforts to encourage more academic and support programs
to institute internships for second year students in order to improve their chances for
employment. Initial potential collaborations can occur between The Career Services
Center, The Center for Business and Industry, The Counseling Center, and academic
career programs.

5. Develop and implement a retention plan with specific target populations aimed at
aiding students in making stronger connections to the College. Examples include by
curriculum, certificate program, career interest, or transfer to institution.

Objective 1
Identify the components of an enrollment management effectiveness assessment
model.

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Pursuant to the Middle States document of March 2004, citing the lack of “clearly
articulated assessment measures and in the assignment of responsibility for the
implementation of the specific components of the …resources necessary to achieve
the objective,” and “the relative lack of clearly defined assessment tools to be applied
to various plans…,” (p.9) and “ Every effort must be made to ensure that subsequent
iterations of these plans provide clearly articulated periodic assessment
methodologies.” (p. 12), it is important that an institutional effectiveness plan include
and promote a fairly standardized, clearly articulated assessment model to be
implemented for each program, service, or operations area.

General Recommendations

1. Conduct systemic evaluations of all areas to ensure that each area is functioning
   well according to goals and objectives and that students are receiving quality
   service.

2. By March 31, 2005, each current and new office, program, or operations area of
   the College, in collaboration with the Office of Institutional Research, will
   develop an assessment plan using the model recommended in this document as a
   basis for development. The effectiveness assessment model will include the
   following characteristics:
           a) stated goals
           b) stated objectives
           c) assessment measures
           d) an assessment cycle
           e) assessment results statement
           f) a summary narrative
           g) program adjustment statement

3. Stated goals and objectives will be measurable and reflect the mission and core
   values of the institution.

4. Assessment measures will be emphatic and specific.

5. Measures will include specific targets, the number of individuals, offices, and/or
   programs involved and intended outcomes.

6. An assessment cycle will be established and stated which will include the data or
   information to be collected and the time frame for completion.

7. At the end of the assessment cycle, a statement of results will be developed.

8. A narrative statement will be included which will describe the office or program’s
   activities.



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9. A program adjustment statement will be included which will include changes or
   improvements to the assessment plan resulting form the current assessment results
   or emerging directions.

Objective 2
Develop an assessment plan for target areas of enrollment management services and
programs not addressed in depth in other areas of the Enrollment Management
Planning Process.

Initial offices, programs, or areas recommended to develop an assessment plan for
enrollment management are: Recruitment; Admissions; Academic Advising;
Counseling, Financial Aid, Records, Registration, Orientation, Academic Programs,
Student Support Services, Academic Support Services, Physical Facility and
Equipment, Finance.

Recommended Initial Implementation Strategies: (New and On-going)
1. A new position has been filled, Executive Assistant to the President. This position
    should be designated to oversee programmatic audits every 5-7 years, and
    program goal reviews every 3-5 years.
2. Review, revise, or develop mission statement for each targeted office, program, or
    area.
3. Set measurable goals and objectives for all targeted areas.
4. Evaluate the quality all targeted areas processes the recommended enrollment
    management effectiveness assessment model.
5. Use key performance indicators, developed with the assistance of the Office of
    Institutional Research and information from state and federal audit reports, in
    order to track what is successful and to respond to changing demands.
6. Establish a joint committee of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs to develop,
    implement, monitor, and evaluate an academic advising plan. Include
    representation from offices and programs, to include: recruitment, registration,
    records, financial aid, program coordinators,
7. Strengthen the collaboration with Records and Registration to provide transcript
    evaluation prior to registration for students transferring in to the college.
8. Develop a seamless advising system that identifies a major for the student,
    delineates related courses, and monitors the student’s progress in order to reduce
    time to graduate
9. Develop an advising system that provides seamless advising to students with
    regard to degree completion, transfer, and career goals.
10. Develop a plan for advising based on academic program and degree requirements.
11. Develop opportunities for a first semester seminar that provides information in
    career choices, selection of a major, and transfer opportunities.
12. Establish a joint committee of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs offices and
    programs to develop, implement, monitor, and evaluate a Financial Aid plan.
    Include representation from offices and programs, to include: recruitment,
    registration, records, financial aid, support program coordinators, Career Services
    Center, Counseling Department, and academic programs.
13. Train all staff on new laws and regulations on a regular basis.
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14. Establish a joint committee of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs to
    implement an academic advising plan. Include representation from offices and
    programs, to include: recruitment, registration, records, financial aid, program
    coordinators,
15. Develop a transfer system that provides transfer support to students within their
    first semester.
16. Create a system that identifies students with transfer goals and identifies them by
    college and majors.
17. Develop a system that identifies those factors which limit transfer from the
    College to other institutions.
18. Provide a more visible transfer service on campus for students and transfer
    institutions.
19. Set goals and evaluate the quality of transfer services using key performance
    indicators in order to track what is successful and respond to changing demands.
20. Initiate a pilot to make the Enrollment Management Process a user friendly
    experience
21. Have all relevant offices in close proximity of each other.
22. Provide highest possible level of Customer Service
23. Provide cross-training
24. Provide customer service workshops for all front-line staff (required at least once
    per year) and all faculty and administrators.
25. Provide customer service incentives for faculty, staff, and administrators.
26. Assure online Registration (Banner)
27. Provide students with outline of course curriculum.
28. Establish Priority Registration
29. Provide adequate instructional and non-instructional physical facilities.
30. Develop a communication plan to provide students and staff with access to timely
    information.
31. Develop training and orientation opportunities for students to encourage self-
    sufficiency in acquiring information
32. Develop a plan of support designed to increase the retention rate of students in
    distance education courses.




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                  Summary of the Educational Effectiveness Work Group


Goals and Objectives:

  Goal 1:         To articulate the characteristics of effective programs


Objectives:
     a. Identify data sources within the institution
     b. Interview key personnel within the institution


  Goal 2:         To develop a strategy for collecting information that will assist the
                  institution in monitoring the effectiveness of educational programs
                  in meeting the employment needs of local and regional workforce
                  development.


Objectives:
     a. Identify a classification scheme for the College’s offerings
     b. Identify the characteristics to be benchmarked.




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  Goal 1           To articulate the characteristics of effective programs


To address its first goal, the committee brain-stormed what it thought constituted the essential
characteristics of effective programs. Underpinning all is the committee’s core value that every
one of the College’s offerings is meant to build foundations and positively impact student
growth. Our distilled list of program essentials is presented below:

     •    Learner-centered/student-focused (student interventions)
     •    High quality
     •    Data-driven/measurable/outcomes-based
     •    Flexible (entry dates, delivery systems, life-experience credits, options to meld to a
          student’s experience/needs)
     •    Innovative (trends, technology, in sync with the market, in sync with 4-yr.schools)
     •    Affordable/cost-effective

Based upon these articulated characteristics, a set of interview questions (Appendix A) was
developed. These questions were then addressed to key representative personnel within the
College (Appendix B) to ascertain qualitative data on various aspects of educational
effectiveness. Among the topics discussed were the current and future role of the College in
Philadelphia, how the College’s programs are developed, evaluated and delivered, and the
internal and external obstacles (and proposed solutions) to effective offerings. In addition to the
interviews, a partial list of College resources was drawn up (Appendix C) that can be and is
currently used to evaluate educational effectiveness within the institution by the responsible
parties.

Information Gathered

The interview results echoed what the committee had considered to be the characteristics of
effective programs. They indicated general agreement that the College needs to position itself
now in order to be able to respond rapidly to new initiatives. While there can be no single
immutable plan for the institution, there must be a unifying and driving academic vision for the
institution. This vision must engage and be derived from all segments of the College family and
be driven by solid leadership. It is this institution-encompassing academic vision which provides
the solid infrastructure for flexible and swift responses and decision-making to a rapidly
changing world. This vision is responsible for aligning and integrating all of the College’s plans
(Appendix D) to insure that student learning is maximized.

Those interviewed felt that any attempt to accurately project the College’s programs five, ten
and/or twenty years from now would be futile as most of the jobs of 2010 do not exist yet1.
However, since technology has and continues to change how business and industry provide their
services; all felt that the demand for job training that can not be off-shored will surely
increase. Likewise, an increase in delivery options will occur as technology makes courses
more available; especially distance offerings, hybrid courses (due to accrediting association
requirements) and accelerated courses/programs. A significant opportunity for growth was
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identified in the area of continuing education offerings (CEU, CLU, etc.) for the various
professions that require them (teachers [Act 48 credit] , nurses, paralegals, legal nurse
consultants), skill upgrading and cross-training for professionals (leadership courses, CIS, etc.),
degree completion options, and certificates that can supplement the College’s offerings while
filling employment niches now being overlooked or understaffed (legal nurse consultants,
paralegals, automotive service management). The region’s abundance of health care and
pharmaceutical facilities will continue to provide growth opportunities for our students if we
properly align our programs to take advantage of these high employment arenas. All of these
growth opportunities for the College mesh well with its mission to “provide a coherent
foundation for college transfer, employment, and life-long learning.” Implementing this portion
of our mission is one of the College’s current strengths. We currently address regional employer
needs with our select programs that have proven track records (example: Nursing and
Automotive Technology). Credit-by-Life-Experience needs to be given thoughtful
implementation as increasing numbers of students return to the classroom to avail themselves of
the College’s offerings in order to switch careers. At our institution, life-long learning is truly
more than a catchy slogan. Our transfer rate is high; currently 68%2 of students graduating from
transfer programs do move toward their BA degree before entering into the job market. To
maintain its strength in these areas, the College needs to assure that there is a cohesive general
education core in place (the basics of reading, writing, communication, technology use, critical
thinking and development of soft skills) to facilitate transfer and to meet the needs of the
workplace where the skill sets required will be more interdisciplinary. With the high percentage
of transfer students, the College also must assure that the transfer process is seamless by
increasing articulation agreements, etc. Although a move toward 4-year degrees and independent
schools may be (is being) considered for some very successful programs (ex. Nursing,
Education, IT, Hospitality and Tourism), the wealth of 4-year institutions in our immediate
region predisposes us toward increased partnerships (versus competition).

That the College provides all these programs and services at a more affordable cost than our
surrounding institutions and that we are an open access institution that is willing and able to
assist students who have no other options or need a fresh start are additional College strengths
and ones that make the institution indispensable to the City. Other strengths are: our diversity,
acting as the cultural glue of the city, having small classes and great courses, and having a solid
core of faculty, staff and administrators who are mission-driven.

Obstacles

Obstacles to educational effectiveness are multiple and not easily resolved. While plans are
necessary, these plans need to be embraced by the institution’s family. Leadership in this area is
critical. The traditional view of higher education is shifting; there is a definite shift away from
the traditional ways of perceiving, judging and valuing education. Education is becoming more
of a business and this creates a lot of tension especially as the new model is not yet fully formed,
defined and in place. There was keen awareness of the need to change the College’s product(s)
to trump the competition. Student perception of the quality of our institution versus others in the
region does bring the College to a critical period in its evolution. Since perception is reality;
students must perceive value for their dollars invested. Student retention is also shown to be
positively impacted by “predictable and streamlined curricula.”3 Efforts should be made to
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insure that all the College’s programs meet these criteria. In addition, the College must be able
to demonstrate to its funding sources that it is worth the investment with measurable outcomes
and data-driven decisions.

As to growth at the institution, it is thwarted in many ways. In general, growth is slowed by the
processes in place that limit the institution’s ability to respond rapidly to new initiatives.
Growth in offerings is hampered by the invisible line drawn between courses, departments and
divisions. By and large, most interdepartmental, interdisciplinary and inter-divisional efforts at
the College have met with little if any success and those that exist require constant vigilance to
maintain. Growth in delivery options is shackled by contractual issues and the fact that the
decisions are department centered rather that market-driven. Growth is also limited by the lack
of flexibility and support from the student services area, in terms of both human resources and
infrastructure. Logistical nightmare stories regarding the services for students in alternative
delivery options have discouraged innovators in many departments. Growth is also limited by
the physical size of the institution itself, lack of financial resources (infrastructure support as IT,
software licenses, etc.), the physical numbers of support personnel and faculty and their
characteristics (i.e. reluctance of many faculty to be involved in the process), lack of targeted
marketing.

Recommendations

Overcoming the institutional obstacles to educational effectiveness encompasses both
overarching and specific needs. In general, we need to think more like a business. The
Academic Plan, by setting clear priorities for the institution, must guide the decisions made as to
course and program initiation, funding, delivery, implementation and evaluation. Following the
established audit cycle will insure the academic integrity of the College’s offerings as will
instituting an assessment scheme for those areas that fall outside of the audit process. Hiring
practices must be aligned with the institution’s projected future direction. And newly endorsed
initiatives must be able to come to the implementation stage much more quickly than is current
practice. [There was no lack of suggestions from those interviewed as regarded new curricular
offerings that would address current market niches and student needs. (Appendix E)]

Since academic initiatives will reverberate throughout the institution, this should be strategically
considered in advance so that all delivery options are fully supported by the other areas of the
institution such as physical plant, IT, Student Services, professional development, etc. [For
example, as the number of distance courses continues to grow, the need for a testing center
emerged as well the need for faculty to learn “how to teach on-line” and for the students to learn
“how to be an on-line learner”.] Communication between the credit and non-credit sectors must
be consistent and cooperative especially as students stop-in and stop-out and cross the boundary
between them. In particular, the student services area must become more flexible and truly
student-centered in assisting these efforts. Attention must be given to individualized student
cohorts and thorough and pleasant customer service despite the number of students dealt with on
a regular basis. (Perhaps Banner will assist in meeting this need.)

The College must enhance its image and advertise its excellence in order to maintain and grow
its student body. This is no easy task as so many variables play into an institution’s image.
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Nevertheless, the College must do a better job of consistent marketing and targeted marketing.
[For example, our CEU offerings are not readily known.] The College needs to take better
advantage of on-line technology; doing electronic portfolios, on-line advising, course
registration, etc. We should offer and market enrichment programs such as concerts, etc. to draw
people to campus. We need to increase the involvement of our advisory boards taking advantage
of both their expertise and their assistance to address our needs.

The College should analyze its available data and make realistic enrollment projections across all
programs and campuses so that it may prioritize distribution of its resources; i.e. the right-sizing
of programs. Additionally, the College, as well as the programs themselves, needs to take a
more active role in assuring student retention and success. To this end, the role of FOS 101 and
its impact on retention should be examined. Based on the data, perhaps it could be used as a
model and its role modified and expanded to include more students and more faculty
participation.

Evaluation

In order to go forward, the Enrollment Management Team should, in conjunction with the
Academic Affairs Division, decide on which characteristics of effective programs will be the
focus of their efforts. Once these are decided, then appropriate assessment instruments can be
defined. Assuming that the focus will be most, if not all, of the characteristics described in this
report, the following should be considered as potential measures:

     1.  Define and implement a cohesive general education core across all programs
     2.  Monitor/decrease time between proposal and implementation of new courses
     3.  Monitor/decrease time between proposal and implementation of new programs
     4.  Create a pathway for experimental curricula to be introduced and evaluated.4
     5.  Monitor/increase the number of courses offered by alternative delivery methods.
     6.  Monitor/increase the number of continuing education offerings.
     7.  Monitor/increase the number of dual admissions agreements and articulation agreements.
     8.  Monitor the cost of offerings especially in comparison to four-year institutions.
     9.  Institute and monitor evaluations of student services (Advising, Counseling, Admissions,
         etc.) for responsiveness and quality.
     10. Assess the impact of Banner on student services.
     11. Audit college programs on a regular basis (which includes success of students).
     12. Monitor success of students in Developmental programs.
     13. Monitor success of retention efforts.

In addressing its second goal, the committee came to agreement on an evaluation approach5 that
we believe would be beneficial to the individuals that are knowledgeable and responsible for
making decisions about college programs. This approach Proposes organizing curricula (for
informational purposes) from a divisional structure into Career/Industry Clusters that are aligned
with the Pennsylvania Labor & Industry Workforce Information and Statistics. This structure
will provide a mechanism for reviewing state and regional employment trends and comparing
this trend data to associated college program enrollments in order to have an indicator of how

Phase I
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effectively our programs are aligned with state and regional employment opportunities6.
[Appendix F]

A preliminary model is under development to (1) construct the parallel applications between
College programs and Pennsylvania Department of Labor Industry Clusters (by SIC,
Standardized Industry Code); and (2) provide employment projections and College program
enrollments within these Industry Clusters. After this preliminary model is developed, it will be
available for review, comment and critique by all interested parties. The benched-marked data
most likely will include numbers, demographics, success and retention information.

Reference Notes
1
          “Nearly 60% of the new jobs in the 21st century will require skills held by only 20% of
          today’s workforce.” National Association of Manufacturers
2
          Institutional Effectiveness 2003 (IR#136)
3
          Glenn, David. “For Needy Students, College Success Depends on More Than Access,
          Study Finds.” The Chronicle of Higher Education, September 3, 2004.
4
          Dolence, Michael G., Views from the Center of Chaos: the Odyssey of American Higher
                             st
          Education in the 21 Century . PowerPoint. Community College of Philadelphia, August
          30, 2004. “Curriculum Development: Time to Develop & Deliver is Shifting from Years
          to Months.”
5
          Special thanks to Institutional Research for their expert insight and guidance.
6
          Note: current job research data is inconsistent across agencies/reports. Federal career
          clusters are not the same as the State’s. In addition, much of the data is too broad to be
          prescriptive.

Appendix A
Interview Questions [for VP, Deans and Program Directors]

What do you see for the future…5yrs., 10yrs, 20yrs?

What makes CCP indispensable to Phila?

What should we be?       Where do you want to go? Is there an academic plan to get there?

Have we thought about 4 year degrees as some CC's have or BSN?

Is our thinking in alignment with the “hot programs” projected for the region (IT/Allied
Health/Vets/Morticians/Service industry/nanotech/ biotech)?

Have we considered the demographic projections for our city and region?
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Have we considered degree completion programs (therefore less than 60 credits to graduate)

Have we considered offering CEU classes for distinct populations within the region that require
them?

Have we considered additional accelerated programs?

Do we have enrollment projections? (numbers and programs? Esp. CBI?)

How will the alignment process (existing plans vs. EMP projections) be assessed so that we all
are going in the same direction?
Can a communication flow chart be developed for alignment and integration?
Should a synopsis (of plans) with recommendations be forwarded to the Educational
Effectiveness Work Group for inclusion and/or addendum to the Enrollment Management Plan?

If you had a wish list, what new curricula or curricular changes would you recommend to the
college?

Are there existing programs that you think are no longer effective?

How do you see your curriculum/curriculum in your area evolving in the next five to ten years?

How will technology effect the evolution?

How do we envision the impact of the larger political scene on CC's in general and CCP in
particular?

Appendix B
Interviewees
   • VP of Academic Affairs, Dr. Judith Gay
   • Dean of Liberal Studies, Dr. Sharon Thompson
   • Dean of Math, Science and Health Careers, Dr. Mary Anne Celenza
   • Dean of Business and Technology, Dr. Timothy Sullivan
   • Dean of Educational Support Services, Dr. Samuel Hirsch
   • Director of Workforce Development, Waverly Coleman*
   • Director of Distance Education, Mark Saks
   • Director of Developmental Education, Tom Ott
   • Acting Dean for Division of Community Services and Regional Centers, Bob Garofola
   • Northeast Regional Center Coordinator, Susan Tobia
   • Northwest Regional Center Coordinator, Claudette Dia-Taylor*
   • “Selected” program coordinators:
                Alexandra Cowley, CST (Culture, Science and Technology)
                Marcia Epstein, Education
                Rick Hock, Biomedical Technology
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                    Mardi Holliday, CIS (Computer Information Systems)
                    John Joyce*, Liberal Arts
                    Andrea Mengel, Nursing
                    David Prejsnar, International Studies/ Liberal Arts
                    Deborah Rossi, Allied Health
                    Richard Saxton, Automotive Technology
                    Kathy Smith, Paralegal
                    Alison Tasch, Liberal Arts
                                                                 *Unavailable to be interview



Appendix C
Institutional Data Sources
   • Program Audits
   • Middle States Association 2004 Report
   • College Report Card
   • Numerous IR reports (including certificate and degree program evaluations and Student
        Service program evaluations)
   • Workforce 2010 Report
   • Road Map for Regional Growth Report
   • Benchmarking presentation and resources (Tim Sullivan, et.al.)
   • Sue Piergallini for core values of the institution
   • Continuing Education brochures
   • Curriculum By Career Reference Table (under development)

Appendix D
Institutional Plans

     •    Academic Master Plan
     •    Business and Industry Plan
     •    Diversity Plan*
     •    Facility Master Plan 2003*
     •    Marketing Plan
     •    Recruitment Plan
     •    Retention Plan
     •    Strategic Plan*
     •    Technology Plan*
                                            *Updates available at http://www.ccp.edu/stafpage

     Appendix E
     Suggestions (from interviewees) for New or Revised Curricula
     • Increase offerings outside of main campus
     • Weekend College
     • Evening nursing program
     • Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy
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     •    Biophysics
     •    Computer forensics
     •    Geography
     •    Media/broadcasting
     •    Learn to teach with technology
     •    How-to evaluate software packages for educators
     •    Journalism
     •    Polysomnography (for sleep studies)

Appendix F
Curriculum By Career Reference
Table (Draft)

           CCP Curriculum and SIC
           Industry Code Association
   Academic Majors, No Career Association                                Gen Studies Undecided
                                                                                Gen Studies, Art
                                                                Culture, Science and Technology
                                                                            Associate in Science
                                                                                    Mathematics
                                                                      CST - Assoc in Science Int
                                                                                 General Studies
                                                                                    Assoc in Arts
                                                                                  Lib Arts, Assoc
                                                               Lib Arts, International Studies Opt
                                                  Lib Arts, Womens Studies-Gender Studies Opt
                                                              Gen Studies-Career Advancement
                                                               Gen Studies-Personal Enrichment
                                                                            Gen Studies-Sen Cit
                                                                            Gen Studies – Guest
                                                            Gen Studies - Chamber of Commerce
                                                                          Gen Studies-Adv Adm
                                                                        Gen Studies-Adv At Colg
                                                                          CSD-Adult Basic Educ
                                                                       CSE-New Stu Orientation
                                                                                       CSE-ESL
                                                                               CSE-Gen Studies
                  General Bldg Contractors                              Construction Technology
         Non-Retail Business & Management                                           Management
                                  Services
                                                                              International Trade
                                                            Management-Human Resources Opt

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                                                                           Business Transfer-Temple
                                                                            Business Transfer-Drexel
                                                                           Business Transfer-Lasalle
                                                                       Business Transfer-St Josephs
                                                                                            Business
                                                                       Gen Studies-Business Dev Int
   Manufacturing, Engineering, Architecture                                        Computer Science
                         & Interior Design S                  General Studies-Computer Science Int
                                                                          CST-Computer Science Int
                                                                Computer Assisted Design Tech Cert
                                                                                 Engineering Science
                                                                         Electronic Engineering Tech
                                                                                  Architechtural Tech
                                                          Computer Asst Desgn Tech Arch Doc Opt.
                                                      Architecture & Interior Design Architecture Opt.
                                                   Architecture & Interior Design Interior Design Opt.
                                                       Electronics Engineering Tech-Biomedical Opt
                                                                    Electronics Eng Tech-Digital Opt
                                                     Electronics Engineering Tech-Digital Comm Opt
                                               Electronics Engineering Tech-Computer Srvc Tech Opt
                                                                                 Manufacturing Tech
                                                                     General Studies-Engineering Int
                                                                General Studies-Assoc in Science Int
                                                                                CST - Engineering Int
                                                                                CST - Architecture Int
                                                                             CST - Interior Design Int
                                                                                Chemical Technology
                                                                          Environmental Technology
                               Retail Trade                                        Management Cert
                                                                                      Marketing Cert
                                                            Retail Management-Fashion Buying Cert
                                                                                           Marketing
                                                                                  Retail Management
                                                             Retail Management-Fashion Buying Opt
                   Eating & Drinking Places                    Culinary Arts-Chef Apprenticeship Opt
                                                              Hotel/Rest Mgmt-Restaurant Mgmt Opt
                                                                              Culinary Arts-Chef Opt
        Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate                                               Accounting
                                                                                             Finance
                                Real Estate                                 Real Estate Management
                                                                       Management-Real Estate Opt
               Hotel & Other Lodging Places                         Hotel/Rest Mgmt-Hotel Mgmt Opt
                          Business Services                                Computer Operations Cert
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                                                                               Secretarial Science
                                                             Office Science-Word Processing Opt
                                                                                 Office Technology
               Printing, Publishing, Advertising                             Photographic Imaging
                                                                                                  Art
                                                                             Art - Photography Opt
                                                                           Communication-Speech
      Computer & Data Processing Services                                          Data Processing
                                                    Data Processing Business Programming Opt
                                                            Data Processing PC Applications Opt
                                                                 CIS-Computer Programming Opt
                                                                          CIS-PC Applications Opt
                                                                      CIS-Local Area Network Opt
                                                   CIS-Internet Operations and Development Opt
                      Auto Repair Services                                         Automotive Tech
       Producers, Orchestras & Entertainers                                Music Performance Opt
                                                                     Music-Non Performance Opt
                                                                     Communication-Theater Arts
                               Health Services                                               Nursing
                                                                                   Respiratory Care
                                                                                   Health Info Tech
                                                                       Diagnostic Medical Imaging
                                                                  Medical Assisting & Office Mgmt
                                                                    Clinical Laboratory Technician
                                                               Nursing-Accelerated Opt for LPNs
                                                                                Dietetic Technician
                                                                     Gen Studies-Allied Health Int
                                                                           Gen Studies-Nursing Int
                                                             Gen Studies-Respiratory Therapy Int
                                                                 Gen Studies-Health Info Tech Int
                                                                            Gen Studies-Dental Int
                                                                        Gen Studies-Rad Tech Int
                                                           Gen Studies-Med Asst Office Mgmt Int
                                                                   Gen Studies-Med Lab Tech Int
                                                                           Gen Studies-Dietetic Int
                                                                                  CST - Nursing Int
                                                                              CST - Respiratory Int
                                                                            CST - Health Info Tech
                                                                                    CST - Dental Int
                                                                      CST - Diag Med Imaging Int
                                                                      CST - Clinical Laboratory Int
                                                                                 CST - Dietetics Int
                               Dental Services                                      Dental Hygiene
                                Legal Services                                      Criminal Justice
                                                                                  Paralegal Studies
                                                                           Gen Studies-Justice Int
                                                                   Gen Studies-Paralegal Studies
                                                                            Liberal Arts, Justice Int
                                                                         Liberal Arts, Paralegal Int
                          Educational Services                                       Lib Arts, Art Int
                                                                                          Education
                                                                              Early Childhood Edu
                                                                                     Interpreter Edu
                                                          General Studies-Early Childhood Ed Int
                                                             Liberal Arts, Early Childhood Edu Int
                                                                   Liberal Arts, Interpreter Edu Int
                               Social Services                        Sign Language Studies Cert

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                                                          Addiction Studies Cert
                                             Behavioral Health/Human Services
                                        Gen Studies-Mental Health Soc Serv Int
                                     Lib Arts, Behavior Health - Human Serv Int
                                           Lib Arts, Soc and Behavioral Sci Opt
                                                        Lib Arts, Humanities Opt
               Government Services                                  Fire Science




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Introduction

Integration and Alignment is the only work group whose goals and objective will not be
a part of the plan itself, but are a apart of the process, designated to facilitate the success
and completion of the plan.



  Goal 1
  To provide ongoing support to work groups for development of completed documents
  that can be integrated into an Enrollment Management Plan which takes into
  consideration all of the ongoing College planning documents: Mission and Vision
  Statements and Core Values and Strategic, Academic, Technology, Diversity,
  Business and Industry Plans.



Objectives
1. Assign Integration and Alignment staff to work with each working group.

2. Provide assistance in the development of respective work group goals and objectives
documents.

  Goal 2

  Integrate documentation from all of the work groups in a manner that is consistent
  with the framework of all college plans, Mission and Vision Statements and core
  values, and align all aspects of the Enrollment Management Plan toward an outcome
  consistent with these documents.


Objectives
1. Review all college plans as we begin the integration of the work group documents.

2. Review Mission and Vision Statements and align stated goals and objectives of the
respective work groups to accomplish the document writing process and a fluid,
comprehensive Enrollment Management Plan that is within the framework and context of
other college documents.




Phase I
January 2005
Page 51
Enrollment Management
         Plan

      2004-2008

      Phase II
   Implementation
                                                   Enrollment Management Plan
                                                       Guideline 2005-2008

Based on the Goals and Objectives outlined in the Enrollment Management Plan, the following tasks have been projected for specific
and/or ongoing timelines from Spring 2005 through Summer 2008. A major overlay on the projections is the successful
implementation and re-designed business practices that are currently in transition from the past and present to the future.

Spring 2005
Task              Implementation       Responsibility     Timeline        Resources        Priority Status    Comments
                  Steps                                                   Needed
Appoint an EMP                         President, VPSA December           Team to          1
Implementation                         Cabinet         2004               implement
Team                                   recommendations                    and provide
                                                                          data structure
                                                                          to the EMP
Begin                                  EMP Imp Team       January 2005    Regularly        1                  Banner Go-Live
Implementation                         chair                              scheduled                           considerations
                                                                          meeting
                                                                          times

Communications    Internal Plan                                                                               Flow of Information
Plan(s)           External Plan                                                                               charts
Complete          Information          Academic           Ongoing to                                          Information needed to
Academic          sharing              Affairs, VPAA      May 2005                                            project major/program
Master Plan                                                                                                   enrollment data
Complete          Information          Academic           Ongoing to                                          Information needed to
Business and      sharing              Affairs, VPAA      May 2005                                            project major/program
Industry Plan                                                                                                 enrollment data




Phase II
January 2005
Page 1
Capital Projects    Regular updates;     President, VPFP     Ongoing                      1   Assess available
update              budget                                                                    information on capital
                    discussions;                                                              funding for enrollment
                    Cabinet                                                                   projections (buildings,
                                                                                              space, new locations,
                                                                                              new initiatives)
SCT Banner                               Divisional          Ongoing      Enrollment          Design reports specific
Implementation                           Offices                          Processing          to EMP data
                                                                          Committee           requirements e.g.
                                                                          meetings            recruitment tracking
Write and                                Strategic Plan      February     Cabinet         1   Support the Strategic
deliver RFP for                          designated team     2005         discussions         Plan; collaborate with
external                                                                                      AA Master Plan, B&I
consultation on                                                                               Plan, Recruitment Plan,
image and                                                                                     Retention initiatives
marketing 3-
year plan
Establish           Use existing         VPFP, VPAA,         March 2005   Budget          1   Optimal scenario
enrollment          longitudinal data;   VPSA in                          process             assumes capital dollars
scenarios for 3-5   scan data;           consultation with                discussions         for growth; minimal
years               workforce            President                                            assumes no additional
                    projections to                                                            dollars
                    develop two views
                    of potential
                    growth
Design two                               VPSA, VPAA,       April 2005     With            1
versions of ONE                          Dean Enrollment                  operational
STOP SHOP                                Services, Dean                   dollars; with
                                         Educational                      capital
                                         Support Services,                dollars
                                         Dean Students

Phase II
January 2005
Page 2
Fall 2005
Task             Implementation      Responsibility     Timeline       Resources      Priority Status Comments
                 Steps                                                 Needed
Implement        •      Project      Academic           ongoing                                      Adjust EMP
Academic            enrollments      Affairs; VPAA,                                                  projections; identify
Affairs Master      per major        VPSA                                                            CFT agenda for 2005-
Plan                and/or                                                                           2006; identify new
                    program                                                                          dual enrollment and
                 •      Project                                                                      articulation agreements
                    enrollments
                    per non-credit
                    programs
Implement                         Academic                                                           Update new
Business and                      Affairs; VPAA,                                                     employment trends;
Industry Plan                     Dean Business                                                      partnerships/alliances
                                  & Technology
Assess           Track data       VPSA, Dean            Spring to      Brio reports                  Data supports
Recruitment      Benchmark trends Enrollment            Fall data;                                   adjustment of EMP
Plan success     Evaluate and     Services,             Fall to Fall                                 objectives to reach
rates            prioritize new   Director of           data                                         goals
                 initiatives and  Admissions            Admissions
                 past practices                         pyramid

Retention Plan   Define Retention    VPSA, VPAA,                                                     Training for faculty and
distribution     for the College     Dean Students,                                                  staff
                 Community           Dean
                                     Educational
                                     Support Services


Phase II
January 2005
Page 3
                                        and teams
Continue capital Regular updates;       President, VPFP    Ongoing                     1                 Assess available
funding updates budget                                                                                   information on capital
                 discussions;                                                                            funding for enrollment
                 Cabinet                                                                                 projections (buildings,
                                                                                                         space, new locations,
                                                                                                         new initiatives)
Work with                               SP designated      3-year plan   Budget        1                 Short-term/long-term
consultants to                          team: President,                 allocation                      goals; align
design and                              VPFP,VPMGR,                      and                             expectations with
implement                               Exec Asst to                     Microsoft                       Strategic Plan and
Marketing Plan                          President                        Project                         Board vision
                                                                         Manager
Capital Projects   Regular updates;     President, VPFP    Ongoing                     1                 Assess available
update             budget                                                                                information on capital
                   discussions;                                                                          funding for enrollment
                   Cabinet                                                                               projections (buildings,
                                                                                                         space, new locations,
                                                                                                         new initiatives)
Implement                               VPSA                                                             Train front desk
Phase 1 of ONE                                                                                           generalists for FAQ
STOP SHOP



Spring 2006
Task               Implementation        Responsibility     Timeline       Resources       Priority Status   Comments
                   Steps                                                   Needed
Recruitment        Assess Fall to        VPSA, Dean                        Training        1
Plan               Spring initiatives    Enrollment


Phase II
January 2005
Page 4
                   and services         Services,
                                        Director of
                                        Admissions and
                                        teams
Retention Plan     Assess Fall to       VPSA, VPAA,                                   1   Update Student Service
                   Spring initiatives   Dean Students,                                    and Education Support
                   and services         Dean                                              Services initiatives;
                                        Educational                                       communicate with the
                                        Support Services                                  College community on
                                        and teams                                         their role in Retention;
                                                                                          Retention training
Work with                               SP designated      3-year plan   Budget       1   Short-term/long-term
consultants to                          team: President,                 allocation       goals; align expectations
design and                              VPSA, VPMGR,                     and              with Strategic Plan and
implement                               Exec Asst to                     Microsoft        Board vision
Marketing Plan                          President                        Project
                                                                         Manager
Capital Projects   Regular updates;     President, VPFP    Ongoing                    1   Assess available
update             budget                                                                 information on capital
                   discussions;                                                           funding for enrollment
                   Cabinet                                                                projections (buildings,
                                                                                          space, new locations,
                                                                                          new initiatives)




Phase II
January 2005
Page 5
Fall 2006
Task               Implementation     Responsibility    Timeline   Resources   Priority Status   Comments
                   Steps                                           Needed
Capital Projects   Regular updates;   Dr. Curtis, Dr.   Ongoing                1                 Assess available
update             budget             Hawk                                                       information on capital
                   discussions;                                                                  funding for enrollment
                   Cabinet                                                                       projections (buildings,
                                                                                                 space, new locations,
                                                                                                 new initiatives)




Phase II
January 2005
Page 6
Spring 2007
Task           Implementation   Responsibility   Timeline   Resources   Priority Status   Comments
               Steps                                        Needed




Phase II
January 2005
Page 7
Fall 2007
Task               Implementation     Responsibility    Timeline   Resources   Priority Status   Comments
                   Steps                                           Needed
Capital Projects   Regular updates;   President, VPFP   Ongoing                1                 Assess available
update             budget                                                                        information on capital
                   discussions;                                                                  funding for enrollment
                   Cabinet                                                                       projections (buildings,
                                                                                                 space, new locations,
                                                                                                 new initiatives)




Phase II
January 2005
Page 8
Spring 2008
Task               Implementation     Responsibility    Timeline   Resources   Priority Status   Comments
                   Steps                                           Needed
Capital Projects   Regular updates;   President, VPFP   Ongoing                1                 Assess available
update             budget                                                                        information on capital
                   discussions;                                                                  funding for enrollment
                   Cabinet                                                                       projections (buildings,
                                                                                                 space, new locations,
                                                                                                 new initiatives)




Phase II
January 2005
Page 9

								
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