HS-ECS-007-FirstAidatWork

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					 MetMetropolitan
    Borough of Wirral



       EDUCATION & CULTURAL
       SERVICES DEPARTMENT

              FIRST-AID AT WORK

             POLICY & GUIDANCE

                       HS/ECS/007


            DATED: NOVEMBER 2003


         THIS DOCUMENT REPLACES
                 H006/97




                              
                                    2002-2003
Education & Cultural                Community Legal Services
                                    2003-2004
Services Department                 Transforming Secondary Education
                                    Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services
MetMetropolitan
   Borough of Wirral

            EDUCATION & CULTURAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT

                                FIRST-AID AT WORK

                                      HS/ECS/007


                                       CONTENTS

      1.0    Introduction

      2.0    Responsibilities for first-aid
      2.1    Employer
      2.2    Authority
      2.3    Governing Body
      2.4    Headteacher
      2.5    Teachers and other school staff

      3.0    Risk assessment of first-aid needs
      3.1    Re-assessment of first-aid provision
      3.2    Considerations for risk assessment
      3.3    Specific needs
      3.4    Accident statistics

      4.0    Numbers of first-aiders required

      5.0    Duties of first-aiders
      5.1    Selection of first-aiders
      5.2    Contacting first-aid personnel

      6.0    Qualifications and training
      6.1    Qualified first-aider
      6.2    Emergency first-aid
      6.3    Lifesaver
      6.4    Appointed person
      6.5    Insurance
      6.6    Payment for first-aid duties

      7.0    First-aid materials, equipment and facilities
      7.1    How many boxes?
      7.2    Contents of a first-aid box
      7.3    Travelling kits
      7.4    Public Service vehicles
      7.5    First-aid accommodation
      7.6    Disposal of clinical waste
      7.7    Hygiene/Infection control

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      8.0    Reporting Accidents and Record Keeping
      8.1    Statutory requirements
      8.2    Authority Policy H003/96
      8.3    Record keeping
      8.4    Information to Parents/Next of kin
      8.5    Taking pupils to hospital

      9.0    Hygiene/Infection control

      10.0   Other Authority Guidance documents

      11.0   Other Guidance


      Appendices:

      Appendix 1: Risk Assessment Guidance and Recording Form M34

      Appendix 2: Letter to parents re bump to child’s head




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1.    INTRODUCTION

      First-aid is an important and necessary provision made by schools and all
      departments within Education and Cultural Services, pupils, employees, visitors and
      members of the public.

      Whilst the actual First-aid Regulations have not been repealed, a revision of the
      Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) on the Health and Safety (First-aid) Regulations
      has been carried out by the Health and Safety Commission. The accent for these
      changes is once again RISK ASSESSMENT which leaves much of the interpretation
      of the Regulations in the hands of the employer.

      The following guidance should provide you with the necessary information to carry
      out a thorough risk assessment of your first-aid needs.


2.    RESPONSIBILITIES FOR FIRST-AID

2.1   The Employer

      Health and safety legislation places duties on employers for the health and safety of
      their employees and anyone else on the premises. In schools this includes
      responsibility for the headteacher and teachers, non-teaching staff, pupils and
      visitors including contractors. Who the employer is depends on the type of school.

      For example:

            the Authority is the employer in county and controlled schools;

            the governing body is the employer in voluntary-aided and grant-maintained
             schools.

      The employer is responsible, under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, for
      making sure that a school has a health and safety policy. This should include
      procedures for first-aid, based on a risk assessment of the school, and should cover:

            numbers of first-aiders/appointed persons;

            numbers and locations of first-aid kits;

            arrangements for off-site activities/trips;

            out of school hours arrangements eg lettings, parents’ evenings.

      The employer must also make sure that their insurance arrangements provide full
      cover for staff acting within the scope of their employment. Wirral Authority has
      secured insurance cover for all trained first-aiders whilst they carry out their first-aid
      functions in the workplace. It is the employer's responsibility to make sure that the
      statutory requirements for the provision of first-aid is met, that appropriate training is
      provided and that correct procedures are followed.

2.2   The Education & Cultural Services Department

      In county and controlled schools the Authority, as the employer, is responsible for all
      health and safety matters.


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      The Authority has produced this policy document on good practice to help all
      schools assess their first-aid needs. It is essential that schools take the time to look
      at their specific needs and to fully implement and publish their arrangements for first-
      aid.

      Governing bodies of voluntary-aided and GM schools are advised to adopt guidance
      issued by the Authority.

2.3   The Governing Body

      Individual schools should develop policies to cover their own school. This should be
      based on suitable and sufficient risk assessments. The governing body has general
      responsibility for all the school's policies, even when it is not the employer. In
      Authority schools the governing body is advised to follow the health and safety
      policies and procedures produced by the Authority. In practice, much of the day to
      day responsibility for health and safety is delegated to the headteacher.

2.4   The Headteacher

      The headteacher is normally responsible for putting the governing body's policy into
      practice and for developing detailed procedures. The headteacher should also
      make sure that parents are aware of the school's health and safety policy, including
      arrangements for first-aid.

2.5   Teachers and Other School Staff

      Teachers' conditions of employment do not include giving first-aid or medication or
      supervising pupils taking medication, although staff may volunteer to undertake
      these tasks. Teachers and other staff are, however, expected to use their best
      endeavours at all times, particularly in emergencies. In general, the consequences
      of taking no action are likely to be more serious than those of trying to assist in an
      emergency.

      The Authority will facilitate proper training and guidance for staff who volunteer to be
      first-aiders/appointed persons or give medication to pupils. Each school or
      educational establishment must ensure there are adequate numbers of trained staff
      to meet the statutory requirements, allowing for staff on annual/sick leave or off-site.

      Other Departments within Education & Cultural Services are responsible for
      ensuring adequate FIRST AID cover which is again based on risk assessing the
      activities undertaken and the level of risk involved.


3.0   RISK ASSESSMENT OF FIRST-AID NEEDS

      The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require employers
      to make a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to health and safety of their
      employees at work and to identify what measures they need to take, to prevent or
      control these risks.

3.1   Reassessment of First-Aid Provision

      The governing body/headteacher should regularly review the school's first-aid needs
      (at least annually), particularly after any changes, to ensure the provision is
      adequate.

3.2   Some Considerations for Risk Assessment

      Schools must include pupils when carrying out risk assessments for first-aid needs.
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      The minimum first-aid provision is:

            a suitably stocked first-aid box;

            an appointed person to take charge of first-aid arrangements.

      First-aid provision needs to be available at all times while people are on school
      premises, this includes evening lettings, school performances etc.

      What size is the school and is it on split sites and/or levels?

      The governing body/headteacher may need to consider additional first-aid provision
      if there is more than one building. They should consider how many first-aiders or
      appointed persons are needed to provide proper cover on each floor on a split-level
      site.

      Location of school

      It is good practice to inform the local emergency services, in writing, of the school's
      location and any particular circumstances that may affect access to the school. If
      the school has more than one entrance, emergency services should be given clear
      instructions on where or who they should report to when the emergency is reported.

      Temporary hazards

      Temporary hazards, such as building or maintenance work, should also be
      considered and suitable short-term measures put in place.

      See Appendix 1 for further guidance on Risk Assessment and a recommended
      form for completion.

3.3   Specific Needs

      If there are staff or pupils with special health needs or disabilities, these need to be
      considered when carrying out the risk assessment. In addition, specialist training
      can be arranged to ensure adequate assistance can be given prior to the arrival of
      the emergency services. The health and safety officer can assist in arranging this
      training, tel: 0151 666 5602/4693.

3.4   Accident Statistics

      Accident statistics can indicate the most common injuries, times, locations and
      activities at a particular site. These can be a useful tool in risk assessment,
      highlighting areas to concentrate on and tailor first-aid provision to.




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4.0   NUMBERS OF FIRST-AIDERS REQUIRED

      There are no rules on exact numbers. Employers have to make a judgement based
      on their own circumstances and the risk assessment.

      The following table should provide some assistance, Authority recommendations are
      also given:


      HSE GUIDANCE

      Category of risk        Numbers employed    Suggested number
                              at location         of first-aid personnel
      ___________________________________________________________________

      Lower risk                      Fewer than 50                 At least one appointed person
      eg shops, offices
      libraries,                      50-100                        At least one first-aider
      (Primary Schools)
                                      More than 100                 One additional first-aider for
                                                                    every 100 employed
      Medium risk                     Fewer than 20                 At least one appointed person
      eg light engineering
      and assembly work,              20-100                        At least one first-aider for
      horticulture, parks and                                       every 50 employed (or part
      open spaces                                                   thereof)
      food processing
      (Secondary Schools)             More than 100                 One additional first-aider for
                                                                    every 100 employed

      Authority GUIDANCE

      Primary Schools                                At least one appointed person

                                                     At least one first-aider

                                                     One emergency first-aid trained
                                                      person per 100 pupils

      Secondary Schools                              At least one appointed first-aider

                                                     At least two first-aiders with an
                                                      additional one for split sites

                                                     One emergency first-aider per 100
                                                      pupils

      When considering how many first-aiders are required,                          the    governing
      body/headteacher/Head of Department should consider:

            proper cover at lunch-time and breaks. It is good practice to encourage
             lunch-time supervisors to have first-aid training;

            proper first-aid cover for leave and absences;

            first-aid cover for off-site activities ie school trips. If a first-aider accompanies
             pupils off-site, will there be adequate first-aid cover in the school?;


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            trainees working on site. They have the same status as staff for the purposes
             of health and safety legislation;

            special schools or schools having pupils with special needs, may consider
             having additional trained staff;

            adequate provision for out of doors activities eg sports activities, clubs;

            any agreements with contractors on joint provision for first-aid;

            peripatetic and loneworkers may consider Emergency Appointed Persons
             training.

      Due consideration must be given when carrying out hazardous curriculum activities
      such as Sciences, Design Technology, Arts and Crafts, Drama and Physical
      Education.


5.0   DUTIES OF FIRST-AIDERS

      The main duties of a first-aider are to:

            give immediate help to casualties with common injuries or illnesses and those
             arising from specific hazards at that location;

            when necessary, call an ambulance or other professional help.

      They must complete a first-aid training course approved by HSE.

5.1   Selection of first-aiders

      Unless first-aid cover is part of a member of staff's contract of employment, people
      who agree to become first-aiders do so on a voluntary basis. Staff should not be
      pressurised into first-aid training.     When selecting first-aiders, governing
      bodies/headteachers/section heads should consider the individual's:

            reliability and communication skills;

            aptitude and ability to absorb new knowledge and learn new skills;

            ability to cope with stressful and physically demanding emergency
             procedures;

            normal duties. A first-aider must be able to leave to go immediately to an
             emergency. Many schools appoint school secretaries, laboratory technicians
             etc for this reason.

5.2   Contacting first-aid personnel

      Do all staff know how to contact a first-aider? Are there agreed procedures in
      place if an emergency occurs in an isolated area eg on the playing
      field/parks/open spaces.

      Governing bodies/headteachers/Heads of Departments should consider how best to
      let everyone know the school's/Department’s first-aid arrangements. Procedures
      need to be in place that are known, understood and accepted by all. Information

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      must be given about the location of first-aid equipment, facilities and personnel.
      First-aid notices must be displayed which are clear and easily understood by all.


6.0   QUALIFICATIONS AND TRAINING

      A first-aider must hold a valid certificate of competence, issued by an organisation
      whose training and qualifications are approved by the HSE.

      Training courses cover a range of first-aid competences, with training organisations
      often tailoring courses to specific needs of schools.

6.1   Qualified "First-Aider" (HSE approved)

      First-aid at work certificates are only valid for three years. Schools/Departments
      must arrange refresher training and re-testing of competence before certificates
      expire. If a certificate expires, the individual will have to undertake another full
      course of training to become a first-aider. However, arrangements can be made for
      first-aiders to attend a refresher course up to three months before the expiry date of
      their certificate. The new certificate takes effect from the date of expiry. Schools
      and Departments must keep a record of first-aiders and certification dates and
      ensure that they and departments receive any relevant information that is frequently
      circulated by the Authority.

      Persons obtaining this qualification are deemed competent to carry out first-aid to
      the level to which they have been trained. The Council's insurance policy fully
      indemnifies any treatment given by a first-aider in connection with their work.

      Four day HSE approved first-aid courses are run throughout the year by the
      Council's Personnel & Policy unit, applications to attend these courses should be
      made via a T1 training form, submitted to Internal Training Section c/o Acre Lane
      PDC.

6.2   "Emergency First-Aid" qualification

      These courses last for 4 hours and include:

           incident management                    Additional topics can be included for
                                                   schools (5½ hours in total):
           shock                                     control of bleeding
           unconsciousness                           resuscitation
           fractures                                 burns and scalds
                                                      head injuries
                                                      asthma, eczema, diabetes, epilepsy

      Staff having duties such as playground supervision, P.E., outdoor activities, Design
      Technology, Science are advised to undertake the emergency first-aid qualification.

6.3   Life Saver and Life Saver Plus courses

      These have replaced the old public first-aid courses that many teachers have
      undertaken. They give the same competency as the above 'emergency first-aid'
      course.

6.4   Appointed Person

      An appointed person is someone who:

            takes charge when someone is injured or becomes ill;
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            looks after the first-aid equipment eg re-stocking the first-aid box.

      Appointed persons are not first-aiders. They should not give first-aid treatment for
      which they have not been trained. However, it is good practice to ensure that
      appointed persons have emergency first-aid training.

6.5   Insurance

      In the event of a claim alleging negligence by a member of the school staff, action is
      likely to be taken against the employer rather than the employee. Wirral Authority
      has provided full cover for claims arising from actions of staff within the scope of
      their employment. However, training must be obtained where specialist first-aid
      treatment is required. Staff will be fully indemnified if they carry out treatment for
      which they have been trained to do.

      Please contact the Health and Safety Section if you require further information.

6.6   Payment for first-aid duties

      A small payment can be paid to salaried staff who are the qualified first-aiders for
      that establishment. Currently £105 per annum or an extra 5 pence per hour for
      weekly paid staff. In schools, this requires authorisation from the Governing Body
      and will be paid from the schools’ own budget. In non-school establishments the
      section head will be required to authorise the payment. In both cases the Authority
      staffing section will require written confirmation of this agreement before any
      payments can be made.


7.0   FIRST-AID MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT AND FIRST-AID FACILITIES

      Schools must provide the proper materials, equipment and facilities at all times.
      First-aid equipment must be clearly labelled and easily accessible.

7.1   How many first-aid boxes should a school have?

      Every employer should provide at least one fully stocked first-aid box for each site.
      A school's assessment of first-aid needs should include the number of first-aid
      boxes. Additional first-aid boxes will be needed for split-sites/levels, sports fields or
      playgrounds and any off-site activities. Peripatetic workers/lone workers should
      have access to first-aid equipment. In addition, secondary schools should also have
      first-aid boxes located in:

            DT food rooms and workshops, science laboratories and gymnasiums/sports
             halls.

7.2   Contents of a first-aid box

      There is not a standard list of contents for a first-aid box. However, the Health and
      Safety Executive (HSE) recommend that, where there is no special risk identified, a
      minimum stock of first-aid items would be:

            a leaflet giving general advice on first-aid (see list of publications in Annex A);

            20 individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings (assorted sizes);

            two sterile eye pads;
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            four individually wrapped triangular bandages (preferably sterile);

            six safety pins;

            six medium sized (approximately 12cm x 12cm) individually wrapped sterile
             unmedicated wound dressings;

            two large (approximately 18cm x 18cm) sterile individually wrapped
             unmedicated wound dressings;

            one pair of disposable gloves.

      Equivalent items are acceptable.

      The contents of first-aid boxes should be examined frequently and re-stocked as
      soon as possible after use. There should be extra stock in the school/department.
      Items should be discarded safely after the expiry date has passed.

      Creams, lotions and sprays are not recommended for use in schools and must be
      removed from first-aid boxes where fresh running water is not available. The use of
      tissues moistened with water and a small amount of soap is recommended for
      bathing grazes and small cuts. All swabs used on open wounds must be disposed
      of correctly in the clinical waste bin, provided by the Authority.

7.3   Travelling first-aid kits

      Before undertaking any off-site activities, the school/department should assess what
      level of first-aid provision is needed. The HSE recommend that, where there is no
      special risk identified, a minimum stock of first-aid items for travelling is:

            a leaflet giving general advice on first-aid;

            six individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings;

            one large sterile unmedicated wound dressing - approximately 18cm x 18cm;

            two triangular bandages;

            two safety pins;

            individually wrapped moist cleaning wipes;

            one pair of disposable gloves.

      Equivalent items are acceptable.

      The contents of first-aid kits should be kept fully stocked.

      WATER SPRAY BOTTLES MUST NOT BE USED DUE TO RISK OF INFECTION.

7.4   Public Service Vehicles

      Transport Regulations require that all minibuses and public service vehicles used
      either as an express carriage or contract carriage have on board a first-aid box with
      the following items:


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            ten antiseptic wipes, foil packaged;

            one conforming disposable bandage (not less than 7.5cms wide);

            two triangular bandages;

            one packet of 24 assorted adhesive dressings;

            three large sterile unmedicated ambulance dressings (not less than 15cm x
             20cm);

            two sterile eye pads, with attachments;

            twelve assorted safety pins;

            one pair of rustless blunt-ended scissors.

      This first-aid box shall be:

            maintained in a good condition;

            suitable for the purpose of keeping the items referred to above in good
             condition;

            readily available for use; and

            prominently marked as a first-aid container.

7.5   First-aid accommodation

      The Education (School Premises) Regulations 1996 indicate that every school
      should have a room for medical or dental treatment, and for the care of pupils during
      school hours. It need not be used solely for medical purposes, but it should be
      appropriate for that purpose and readily available for use when needed. The room
      should also have access to a fresh supply of running water. Schools should
      consider using the medical room for first-aid. However, first-aid facilities may need
      to be made available quickly, and be easily accessible to areas where accidents are
      likely to occur, ie playgrounds. In non-educational establishments a designated area
      must be made available for treatment of injuries at work.

7.6   Disposal of Clinical Waste

      The Authority has secured a contract for the safe disposal of clinical (first-aid) waste,
      medical waste and sharps, for all Wirral schools. Schools must ensure that all staff
      including; mid-day supervisors, parent helpers etc are aware of the procedures, in
      that; all first-aid and incontinence waste must be disposed of in the bins provided.
      Where there is more than one first-aid point in a school, a clinical waste (yellow) bag
      should be used to transfer the generated waste to the main disposal unit. Please
      contact the Health and Safety Section for suppliers of these small yellow bags.
      Under no circumstances should soiled dressings be placed in general waste-paper
      bins.

7.7   Hygiene/Infection Control

      All staff should take precautions to avoid infection and must follow basis hygiene
      procedures. Staff should have access to single-use disposable gloves and hand
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      washing facilities, and should take care when dealing with blood or other body fluids
      and disposing of dressings or equipment. Further guidance is available in the DfEE
      publication HIV and AIDS: A Guide for the Education Service (see Section 11.0).
      The Authority has produced guidance on this issue, see HS/ECS/043 “A
      Management Guide to Childhood Illnesses and Communicable Diseases”.


8.0   REPORTING ACCIDENTS AND RECORD KEEPING

8.1   Statutory Requirements

      Under RIDDOR 1995 (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences
      Regulations) some accidents must be reported to the HSE.

8.2   These regulations are fully explained in the Authority Policy & Guidance Document
      RIDDOR 1995 - HS/ECS/008 Dated November 2003.

      A Summary is as follows:

      What accidents to employees do schools/departments need to report?

      The following accidents must be reported to HSE via the Health and Safety Section
      if they injure either the school's employees, or self-employed people working on the
      premises:

            accidents resulting in death or major injury;

            accidents which prevent the injured person from working for more than three
             days.

            unconsciousness resulting in hospitalisation for 24 hour period.

            any injury.

      How should schools report them?

      This is done when schools notify the Authority's Health and Safety Section by
      telephone or via the M13 Accident Form.

      HSE must be notified of fatal and major injuries without delay (eg by telephone).
      This must be followed up within ten days with a written report on Form 2508. Other
      accidents do not need immediate notification, but they must be reported to HSE
      within ten days on Form 2508.

      NB     The Authority carries this reporting duty for all Wirral schools and
             Departments except Voluntary Aided and Foundation schools and the 6th
             Form College.

             Failure to follow the above procedures is a serious breach of regulations
             which may result in fines of up to £5000.

      What about pupils and other people who are not at work?

      An accident that happens to pupils, visitors, contractors or members of public must
      be reported if:

            the person involved is killed or is taken to hospital; and

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            the accident arises out of or in connection with work.

      Like fatal and major injuries to employees, these accidents must be notified to HSE
      without delay and followed up in writing within ten days on Form 2508.

      How do I decide whether an accident “arises out of or is in connection with
      work”?

      An accident must be reported if it relates to:

           any school/work activity, both on or off the premises;

           the way a school/work activity has been organised (eg the supervision of a field
            trip);

           lifts, machinery or substances;

           the condition of the premises;

           equipment, machinery or substances.

      Any accident to pupils, staff, visitors or members of the public arising out of or in
      connection with work eg the condition of the premises or equipment or the level of
      supervision must be reported to the Authority via the M13 accident form. A copy of
      the accident report must be kept at the school/place of work.

8.3   Record Keeping

      Accident Records in either written or electronic form must be kept in a secure
      location. Pupil Accident Reports must be kept until the pupil has attained the age of
      21. For injuries to employees, visitors, contractors, members of the public over the
      age of 21, copies must be kept for a period of three years.

      Central Recording

      Schools/Departments must keep a central record ie M13 for all reportable accidents
      for first-aiders and appointed persons to log incidents.

      Under The Data Protection Act it is an offence to disclose personal information to a
      third party without the prior permission in writing of the individual or their
      parent/guardian. It is therefore essential that all individual accident forms are kept in
      a secure location.

      With effect from December 2003, Statutory Accident Book B1510 and the M36
      Collective Pupil Accident Record are no longer legal.

      The information on the record sheet:

            helps the school/department identify accident trends and possible areas for
             improvement in the control of health and safety risks;

            can be used for reference in future first-aid needs assessments;

            is essential for insurance and investigative purposes.

8.4   Information to Parents/Next of Kin

      In an emergency, the headteacher/teacher/Head of Department in charge should try
      to contact individual’s next of kin as soon as possible. It is also good practice to
      report all incidents requiring first-aid treatment. In schools where a child has
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       sustained a bump to the head a letter should be sent home to parent/guardian with
       the child, or telephone the parents.

8.5    Taking Pupils to Hospital

       Parents or guardians should always be informed if their child is being taken to
       hospital for treatment.

       Depending on the injury or illness, arrangements should be made for the parents to
       either take the child to hospital themselves or to meet the child at hospital. On no
       account should the provision of urgently needed medical treatment be delayed
       pending the arrival at school of parents.

       A responsible adult should always accompany a pupil wherever possible to the
       hospital. Sending another pupil with the injured/sick pupil is definitely not
       recommended.

       If under the unlikely circumstances a pupil needs emergency treatment and the
       parents cannot be contacted, then the hospital would, under normal situations hold
       full responsibility of authorising treatment.


9.0    HYGIENE/INFECTION CONTROL

       All staff should take precautions to avoid infection and must follow basic hygiene
       procedures. Staff should have access to disposable gloves and take care when
       dealing with blood or other body fluids and disposing of dressings or equipment.
       Further guidance is available in the DfEE publication HIV and AIDS: A Guide for
       the Education Service.


10.0   OTHER AUTHORITY GUIDANCE DOCUMENTS

       HS/ECS/043     A Management Guide to Childhood Illnesses & Communicable
                      Diseases

       HS/ECS/008     A Guide to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous
                      Occurrences


11.0   OTHER GUIDANCE THAT SCHOOLS MAY FIND USEFUL

       Department for Education and Employment (DfEE)

       Circular 3/94 – The Development of Special Schools

       Supporting Pupils with Medical Needs in School - Good Practice Guide*

       HIV and AIDS: A Guide for the Education Service

       Circular 10/96 - The 1996 School Premises Regulations

       School Governors – A Guide to the Law




HS/ECS/007-FIRST AID AT WORK POLICY & GUIDANCE – NOVEMBER 2003/MTB                       14
      All these publications are available free of charge from:

      DfEE Publications Centre
      P O Box 5050
      Sudbury
      Suffolk
      CO10 6ZQ           Tel: 0845 6022260             Fax: 0845 6033360

      Health & Safety Commission (HSC)/Executive (HSE)

      First-aid at work - Approved Code of Practice and Guidance (1997) L74 1997 ISBN
      0 7176 1050 0 - £6.95

      5 steps to successful health and safety management IND(G)163 - free leaflet

      5 steps to risk assessment (1995) IND(G)163 - free leaflet or available in priced
      packs ISBN 0 7176 0904 9

      A guide to risk assessment requirements: common provisions in health and safety
      law (1996) IND(G)218 - free leaflet or available in priced packs ISBN 0 7176 1211 2

      Everyone's guide to RIDDOR '95 (1996) HSE31 - free leaflet or available in priced
      packs ISBN 0 7176 1077 2

      Reporting school incidents (1997) EDIS 1 - free information sheet

      Workplace Health, Safety & Welfare Regulations 1992 (1995) IACL97 - free leaflet
      or available in priced packs ISBN 0 7176 1049 7

      Workplace health, safety and welfare - a short guide (1995) - free leaflet or available
      in priced packs ISBN 0 7176 0890 5

      Essentials of health & safety at work (1994) ISBN 0 7176 0716 X - £5.95

      Signpost to safety signs regulations (1996) IND(G)184 - free leaflet or available in
      priced packs ISBN 0 7176 1139 6

      List of current health & safety legislation 1996: Book and disk ISBN 0 7176 1311 9 -
      £11.95

      HSE priced and free publications are available from:

      HSE Books
      P O Box 1999
      Sudbury
      Suffolk
      CO10 6FS Tel: 01787 881165                Fax: 01787 313995

      HSE priced publications are also available from good booksellers.

      Department of Health (DH)

      Child Health in the Community: A Guide to Good Practice

      Developing Emergency Services in the Community: The Final Report

      EL(96)28 - Children's Services Planning: Guidance
HS/ECS/007-FIRST AID AT WORK POLICY & GUIDANCE – NOVEMBER 2003/MTB                        15
      These publications are available free of charge from:

      Department of Health
      P O Box 410
      Wetherby
      LS23 7LL    Fax: 01937 845381

      Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR)

      Public Service Vehicles Conditions of Fitness, Equipment, Use and Certification
      Regulations 1981 ISBN 0110162579 - £3.00

      St John Ambulance

      Emergency Aid in Schools - gives advice on basic first-aid procedures (price ?
      contact address/no)

      Young Lifesaver Award Scheme - pack for teaching pupils aged 7 and above first-
      aid skills, including video, teachers' guide and work sheets.

      Emergency Aid Handbook

      These priced publications and first-aid equipment are available from:
      P O Box 707a
      Friend Street
      London
      EC1V 7NE Enquiry Line: 0171 278 7888




HS/ECS/007-FIRST AID AT WORK POLICY & GUIDANCE – NOVEMBER 2003/MTB                 16
MetMetropolitan
   Borough of Wirral
                                                                               APPENDIX 1

                            RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE

  Risk Assessment

  The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992 require risk assessments
  to be carried out where significant risks have been identified. There are many texts
  available to assist you in the Risk Assessment process; choose one that is suitable to your
  needs. Ensure that Risk Assessments are referred to, when an activity requires specific
  health and safety guidance. Wherever possible, use existing curriculum paper systems
  such as: lesson plans or schemes of work to incorporate your risk assessment information
  or to refer to more detailed guidance.

  What is Risk Assessment?

  An assessment of risk is nothing more than a careful examination of your work activities,
  the aim ultimately is to ensure that safe systems of work are in place to make sure no-one
  is harmed either by injury or ill health.

  What is Hazard?

  A hazard means anything that has the potential to cause harm eg chemicals, electricity,
  equipment, environment.

  What is Risk?

  Is the chance, great or small, that someone will be harmed by the hazard.

  There are 5 steps to risk assessment:

  Step 1    Look for the hazards

  If you are doing the assessments yourself, walk around your workplaces and look afresh at
  what could reasonably be expected to cause harm. Other persons working in a particular
  area can also help. Ignore the trivial and concentrate on significant hazards which could
  result in harm or affect several people. Accident records can help identify hazards.

  Step 2    Decide who might be harmed and how

  Think about people who may not be in the workplace all the time eg cleaners, adult
  helpers, maintenance personnel etc. Include members of the public or others sharing your
  facilities.

  Step 3    Evaluate the risk arising from the hazards and decide whether existing
            precautions are adequate or more should be done

  Even after all precautions have been taken, usually some risk remains. What you have to
  decide for each significant hazard is whether the risk is high, medium or low.

  First ask yourself whether you have done all that the law says you must do. Then think
  whether you have done all this is reasonably practicable to keep your workplace safe.

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Step 4    Record your findings

You must record your findings of your assessment and be able to show that:

i)     a proper check was made;
ii)    you asked who might be affected;
iii)   you dealt with all the significant hazards;
iv)    the precautions are reasonable and the remaining risk is low.

Keep the written documentation for future reference. To make things simpler you can refer
to other documents in your assessment.

Step 5    Review your assessment from time to time and revise it if necessary

Sooner or later you will introduce new machines, apparatus, substances and procedures
which could lead to new hazards. If there is any significant change you should amend your
assessment.

Evaluating the risk using a scoring system

The following scoring system will assist you in focusing your attention to the significant risks
you have identified. Grade both the severity of a potential accident and the likelihood of it
happening, on a 1 – 5 scale; multiply the two numbers, this will then give you guidance on
what is required:
                a) Severity
                Rating
                5    Dying or being permanently disabled
                4    Serious injury/long-term illness
                3    Temporary disability/3 days off sick
                2    Will need medical attention
                1    Minor injury eg bruise, graze
                b) Likelihood
                Rating
                5    Will almost certainly happen
                4    Highly likely to happen
                3    Not so likely
                2    Even less likely
                1    Unlikely to happen at all
                                      So: a x b = c
                c) Final score rating: What needs to be done?
                16-25 Stop? Do not start activity again until risk is
                controlled
                10-15 High risk level, High priority. Take action straight
                     away to control the risk.
                6-9 Medium risk level. Tighten up controls and make a
                plan to do something about risk.
                3-5 Fairly low risk level. Low priority but keep possible
                     action in mind.
                1-2 Low or trivial risk. No further action required.




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MetMetropolitan
   Borough of Wirral
                                                                                                                                                                               M34
                 When completed a copy of this form must be sent to your Headteache/Line Manager
Location or                                                   Date assessment                                               Assessment undertaken
Address:                                                      undertaken:                                                   by:
Activity or                                                   Review                                                        Signature:
Situation:                                                    Date:


(1) Hazard                       Risk         (2) Who might be harmed               (3) What controls exist to reduce risk?              (4) What action can be taken to further
                                                  and how?                                                                                   reduce risk?




(1) List hazards something with the potential to cause harm here:
    Seek to quantify the level of risk the likelihood of harm arising based on the number of persons affected, how often they are exposed to the hazard and the severity of
    any consequence.
(2) List groups of people who are especially at risk from the significant hazards which you have identified:
(3) List existing controls here or note where the information may be found:
(4) List the risks which are not adequately controlled and the action you will take. Have regard for the level of risk, the cost of any action and the benefit you expect to gain:




HS/ECS/007-FIRST AID AT WORK POLICY & GUIDANCE – NOVEMBER 2003/MTB                                                                                                                   19
(1) Hazard                     Risk      (2) Who might be harmed           (3) What controls exist to reduce risk?          (4) What action can be taken to further
                                             and how?                                                                           reduce risk?




RISK RATING
a SEVERITY                                         b LIKELIHOOD                                           c FINAL SCORE RATING: WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE

5 Dying or being permanently disabled              5 Will almost certainly happen                         16–25 Stop! Do not start activity again until risk is
controlled
4 Serious injury/long-term illness                 4 Highly likely to happen                              10-15   High risk level, High priority. Take action straight
away
3 Temporary disability/3 days off sick             3 Not so likely                                                to control the risk
2 Will need medical attention                      2 Even less likely                                     6-9     Medium risk level. Tighten up controls and make a
1 Minor injury eg bruise, graze                    1 Unlikely to happen at all                                    plan to do something about risk
                                                                                                          3-5     Fairly low risk level. Low priority but keep possible
                                                                                                                  action in mind.
                                                                                                          1-2     Low or trivial risk. No further action required.
                                                                       So: a x b = c
ACTION PLAN
Action Required                                                             Responsible Person                               Date for Completion




HS/ECS/007-FIRST AID AT WORK POLICY & GUIDANCE – NOVEMBER 2003/MTB                                                                                                       20
                                                                            APPENDIX 2




Dear Parent

Your son/daughter (name) has bumped their head today (date) whilst at school. Basic first-
aid treatment has been administered by the school. You are advised to seek medical
attention if they show the following symptoms: vomiting, blurred vision, headaches or
drowsiness.

Yours sincerely




Headteacher




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