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					Aboriginal ICT Infrastructure /
     Application Assessment

          (DRAFT IN PROGRESS)
Aboriginal ICT Infrastructure / Application Assessment (DRAFT IN PROGRESS)                                                                    Page 1




TABLE OF CONTENTS

         1. INDIAN AND NORTHERN AFFAIRS DIRECTORATE PROFILES ................................................ 4
              1.1. INAC – ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT .............................................................................. 4
                    1.1.1. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or Department ............................................. 6
                    1.1.2. Program Specifics ................................................................................................ 7
                    1.1.3. Connectivity Needs .............................................................................................. 8
                    1.1.4. Partnerships.......................................................................................................... 9
                    1.1.5. Success Stories..................................................................................................... 9
              1.2. INAC – EDUCATION...................................................................................................... 10
                    1.2.1. Key Initiatives .................................................................................................... 11
                    1.2.2. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or Department ........................................... 11
                    1.2.3. Program Specifics .............................................................................................. 12
                    1.2.4. Connectivity Needs ............................................................................................ 12
                    1.2.5. Partnerships........................................................................................................ 13
                    1.2.6. Success Stories................................................................................................... 13
              1.3. INAC – INDIAN REGISTRY SYSTEM/ CERTIFICATE OF INDIAN STATUS
                   PROJECT ........................................................................................................................ 14
                    1.3.1. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or Department ........................................... 15
                    1.3.2. Program Specifics .............................................................................................. 15
                    1.3.3. Connectivity Needs ............................................................................................ 16
                    1.3.4. Partnerships........................................................................................................ 16
                    1.3.5. Success Stories................................................................................................... 17

         2. CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION – ABORIGINAL PROGRAMS ............ 18

         3. HEALTH CANADA ................................................................................................................... 19
              3.1.    FIRST NATIONS AND INUIT HEALTH BRANCH (FNIHB) ............................................ 20
              3.2.    BENEFITS TO ABORIGINAL PEOPLES AND/OR DEPARTMENT ..................................... 20
              3.3.    PROGRAM SPECIFICS .................................................................................................... 21
              3.4.    CONNECTIVITY NEEDS ................................................................................................. 22
              3.5.    PARTNERSHIPS .............................................................................................................. 22
              3.6.    SUCCESS STORY ............................................................................................................ 23

         4. HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CANADA .................................................................... 24




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              4.1. INFORMATION SYSTEMS & SERVICES – ABORIGINAL RELATIONS OFFICE
                   (ARO) 24
                    4.1.1. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or department ............................................ 24
                    4.1.2. Program Specifics .............................................................................................. 25
                    4.1.3. Connectivity Needs ............................................................................................ 25
                    4.1.4. Partnerships........................................................................................................ 26
                    4.1.5. Success Stories................................................................................................... 26
              4.2. OFFICE OF LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES ....................................................................... 27
                    4.2.1. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or department ............................................ 28
                    4.2.2. Program Specifics .............................................................................................. 29
                    4.2.3. Connectivity Needs ............................................................................................ 30
                    4.2.4. Partnerships........................................................................................................ 31
                    4.2.5. Success Stories................................................................................................... 31

         5. INDUSTRY CANADA ................................................................................................................ 32
              5.1. ABORIGINAL BUSINESS CANADA (ABC) ..................................................................... 32
                   5.1.1. Benefits to Aboriginal Peoples and/or Department ........................................... 32
                   5.1.2. Program Specifics .............................................................................................. 32
                   5.1.3. Connectivity Needs............................................................................................ 33
                   5.1.4. Partnerships........................................................................................................ 36
                   5.1.5. Success Stories................................................................................................... 36
              5.2. FIRST NATIONS SCHOOLNET ....................................................................................... 37
                   5.2.1. Benefits to Aboriginal Peoples and/or Department ........................................... 37
                   5.2.2. Program Specifics .............................................................................................. 38
                   5.2.3. Connectivity Needs ............................................................................................ 39
                   5.2.4. Partnerships........................................................................................................ 40
                   5.2.5. Success Stories................................................................................................... 40
              5.3. BROADBAND FOR RURAL AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT (BRAND) ..................... 41
              5.4. COMMUNITY ACCESS PROGRAM (CAP) ..................................................................... 41

         6. ATLANTIC CANADA OPPORTUNITIES AGENCY .................................................................... 42
              6.1. BENEFITS TO ABORIGINAL PEOPLES AND/OR DEPARTMENT ..................................... 43
              6.2. PROGRAM SPECIFICS .................................................................................................... 44
              6.3. CONNECTIVITY NEEDS ................................................................................................. 45
                   6.3.1. Partnerships........................................................................................................ 45
                   6.3.2. Success Stories - SMART LABRADOR........................................................... 46




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         7. ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE- ABORIGINAL POLICING ....................................... 47
              7.1. BENEFITS TO ABORIGINAL PEOPLES AND/OR DEPARTMENT ..................................... 49
              7.2. PROGRAM SPECIFICS .................................................................................................... 49
              7.3. CONNECTIVITY NEEDS ................................................................................................. 50
                   7.3.1. Partnerships........................................................................................................ 50
                   7.3.2. Success Stories - ................................................................................................ 50

         8. INFRASTRUCTURE CANADA ................................................................................................... 52
              8.1. NATIONAL SATELLITE INITIATIVE, STRATEGIC INFRASTRUCTURE FUND,
                   MUNICIPAL RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE FUND ............................................................. 52

         9. TREASURY BOARD/GOVERNMENT ONLINE ......................................................................... 53




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1.       INDIAN AND NORTHERN AFFAIRS DIRECTORATE PROFILES

1.1. INAC – Economic Development

         The development of economic self-sustaining activities for Aboriginal people and
         communities is critical and has been recognized as one of the key priorities from
         Gathering Strength – Canada’s Aboriginal Action Plan. Helping move this process
         forward is one of the major roles of the Economic Development Programs Directorate.
         Their role supports Aboriginal economic development and has as its long-term objective,
         the closing of the gap between First Nations and Inuit individuals and communities and
         non-Aboriginal Canadians.


          It is anticipated that these goals will be achieved by strategic, partnership-based
         initiatives and programs that facilitate the generation of wealth, the creation of self-
         sustaining First Nations and Inuit communities and increase their participation in
         Canadian and global economies.1


         This directorate supports a number of programs specially designed for the following
         Aboriginal client groups:



             Economic Development                         Client Group                      Purpose
             Program

             Community Economic                 First Nations or Inuit Government   Fund the operation of
             Development Program                (band, tribal council)              Community Economic
                                                                                    Development
                                                                                    Organizations (CEDOS).
             Resource Partnerships              First Nations or Inuit Government   Help fund activities leading
             Program                            (band, tribal council)              to a joint working
                                                Community-owned and controlled      agreement for participation
                                                enterprises                         in major regional resource
                                                Aboriginal Business                 development projects
             Resource Access                    First Nations or Inuit Government   Help with negotiations
             Negotiations Program               (band, tribal council)              Involving natural resources
                                                Community-owned and controlled      opportunities.


         1
             http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20032004/INAC-AINC/INAC-AINCr34_e.asp




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             Economic Development                         Client Group                       Purpose
             Program

                                                enterprises
             Regional Partnerships Fund         First Nations or Inuit Government   Participate in major
                                                (band, tribal council)              regional economic
                                                Community-owned and controlled      infrastructure initiatives.
                                                enterprises
             First Nations Forestry             First Nations or Inuit Government   Engage in sustainable
             Program                            (band, tribal council)              forest management, forest-
                                                Community-owned and controlled      based businesses and
                                                enterprises                         silviculture projects.
             Aboriginal Workforce               First Nations or Inuit Government   Increase the participation
                                      2
             Participation Initiative           (band, tribal council)              of Aboriginal people in the
                                                Community-owned and controlled      labour market.
                                                enterprises
             Opportunity Fund                   Community-owned and controlled      Obtain matching equity
                                                enterprises                         funding to access
                                                Aboriginal Business                 conventional debt
                                                                                    financing for a business
                                                                                    start-up or expansion.
             Resource Acquisition Initiative    Community-owned and controlled      Obtain matching equity
                                                enterprises                         funding to access
                                                Aboriginal Business                 conventional debt
                                                                                    financing for resource-
                                                                                    sector and related
                                                                                    business opportunities
                                                                                    including the acquisition of
                                                                                    natural resource permits
                                                                                    and licenses.
             Major Business Projects            Community-owned and controlled      Obtain matching equity
             Program                            enterprises                         funding to access
                                                Aboriginal Business                 conventional debt
                                                                                    financing for a business
                                                                                    start-up or expansion to
                                                                                    pursue a major industrial,
                                                                                    commercial or resource-
                                                                                    based opportunity where
                                                                                    the contribution required
                                                                                    exceeds $500,000
             Procurement Strategy for           Community-owned and controlled      Promote opportunities for
             Aboriginal Business                enterprises                         doing business with the
                                                Aboriginal Business                 federal government

         2
          Employers, unions, governments and educational institutions may also be eligible for
         Aboriginal Workforce Participation Initiative Assistance in addition to Aboriginal
         communities, businesses and organizations. This program strives to increase Aboriginal
         participation in the labour market.




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             Economic Development                         Client Group                  Purpose
             Program

             Aboriginal Contract                Community-owned and controlled   Access bonding products
             Guarantee Instrument               enterprises                      and services
                                                Aboriginal Business




1.1.1. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or Department
         INAC’s strategic investments support First National and Inuit initiatives that are helping
         to start new businesses, create jobs, build partnerships, and attract additional resources
         from the private sector.

         Ventures, ranging in scope from high-tech service providers to large-scale irrigation
         projects, are supported through economic development programs. The Aboriginal
         Business Development Committee co-ordinates with Human Resources Development
         Canada (HRDC), Heritage Canada and other federal departments to ensure Aboriginal
         companies are profiled. Focus is on Trade and Tourism.

         Marketing efforts include awareness, brokering, collaborating, as well as supporting
         direct job creation and purchases from Aboriginal community businesses. They help with
         business start-ups, as well as helping with the development of infrastructure activities in
         the community.


         1.1.1.1. INAC Support of AboriginalTrade and Tourism


         Gathering Strength, Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan, guide INAC's commitment to
         International Trade and Tourism.

         INAC provides support to Aboriginal trade and tourism as an important and integral
         component of the Economic Development Programs Directorate's (EDPD) objectives, as
         follows.

         Trade:

              While INAC does not have the lead on trade, INAC does play an important role in
               supporting Aboriginal trade development through its membership in Team Canada
               Inc (TCI), the virtual agency responsible for coordinating Canada's international trade
               and investment policies and activities.

              The EDPD, builds and compliments existing economic development programs while
               utilizing the Aboriginal International Business Development (AIBD) Committee, made



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              up of 23 federal government departments and agencies who are working collectively
              to promote the success of Aboriginal small to medium-size enterprises (SMEs) in
              export markets.

             INAC's emphasis is on internal co-ordination between regions and headquarters, and
              external collaboration with our AIBD partners, national and sectoral Aboriginal
              organizations.

         Tourism:

             INAC does not have a tourism program but has supported Aboriginal tourism for
              many years through INAC's existing economic development programs.

             INAC is an honorary member of the Aboriginal Tourism Team Canada (ATTC) Board
              of Directors along with Aboriginal Business Canada (ABC), Canadian Tourism
              Commission (CTC), Parks Canada, and Canadian Heritage.

             INAC supports the development of the Aboriginal tourism sector through
              partnerships and strategic initiatives.


1.1.2. Program Specifics

         An important concern is the need for infrastructure in a community to enable the
         economic development and this cuts across a number of jurisdictions for improvement.
         INAC’s Economic Development staff work with 21 other federal departments, such as
         Heritage, Natural Resources, Agriculture, Industry Canada, in doing infrastructure
         development work as well as in the promotion of marketing activities and trade shows
         and other trade related activities.

         The EDPD also supports the promotion and success of Aboriginal SMEs in export
         markets through the AIBD membership of 23 federal government departments and
         agencies. Recently the Cultural Trade Working Group (CTWG) of the AIBD, working in
         partnership with the Aboriginal Canada Portal (ACP), designed and developed the
         Virtual Aboriginal Trade Show (VATS).

          The CTWG is comprised of the following government partners:

         Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT), INAC, Canadian
         Heritage, and Industry Canada, as well as INAC’s Aboriginal Cultural Trade
         Representative. VATS showcase Aboriginal companies and their products and services
         worldwide.




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         Despite the fact that these programs are open to all Aboriginal communities, their
         statistics indicated that 85% of the business activities occurred in only 15% of the eligible
         communities. Approximately 40% of the communities had no businesses registered.
         Department representative are working on finding out why this situation occurs. They
         noted that increasingly the work is being co-ordinated by Tribal Councils, especially in
         Saskatchewan, so this can partially explain the smaller percentage of communities
         registered. Other factors reflect that some businesses were smaller individual operators;
         potential underground economy activity; or some couldn’t afford to do business studies,
         proposals or plans.

         The funding is done at the national level and each project is funded separately.
         Approximately 25% is spent on regional initiatives. They anticipate the need for these
         programs for at least a ten-year time frame.

1.1.3. Connectivity Needs

         Connectivity was considered very important in helping individuals and community groups
         do research, facilitate communications and access information. They felt that this could
         be a very important resource and would help with the infrastructure supporting business
         in communities. Connectivity concerns involve the long download times for phone
         access and ensuring stable and quicker connections. The ability to have a website would
         be important for a number of businesses, especially product based companies.

         They noted that if people were able to access data via the Internet, it could really help
         them as INAC had massive amounts of data, such as their inventory of all mineral data
         and studies (2400 reports were done in 2000 alone). This could be accessed by
         communities for potential development or partnerships with appropriate players (i.e.
         such as was done for Voisey’s Bay in Labrador).

         This information could be tailored and packaged to community government needs and
         would be helpful for the governance preparation work that was being done for the
         movement to self-governance of communities. Having internet access with search
         capabilities would be very important to increasing business and economic development
         activities.

         With regards to their own programs, background information is available on the INAC
         website. They noted, however, that most of the actual program work is done through the
         regional offices. Most people in the client groups prefer the face-to-face interaction and
         few want the electronic forms, except to reduce some administrative work. Due to the
         need for sending in supporting documentation, web applications are not a consideration.




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1.1.4. Partnerships

         INAC’s support of the Aboriginal trade and tourism industry is through advocacy,
         brokering and strategic support to Aboriginal economic development organizations and
         businesses.

         INAC Economic Development staff work with 21 other federal departments in doing
         infrastructure development work, which is critically needed to support the growth and
         development of Aboriginal communities and businesses.

         In the development and promotion of marketing activities and trade shows, there is an
         increasing number of departments working together, such as Heritage, Natural
         Resources, Agriculture, Industry Canada, etc in trade related activities.

1.1.5. Success Stories

         PSAB Program: http://www.ainc-INAC.gc.ca/saea-psab/index_e.html

         Contact Information for program: Mr. Allan Frost




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1.2. INAC – Education

         Responsibility for Education is under the Learning, Employment and Human
         Development Directorate at the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
         (INAC). Their role has evolved over time and is currently primarily focused on funding
         band councils or other First Nation education authorities to support instructional services
         for status Indians residing on reserve. Funding arrangements include instructional
         services for 494 First Nation-operated and federal on-reserve schools, or the
         reimbursement of costs of on-reserve students attending provincial schools as well as
         funding for the provision of student support services such as transportation, counselling,
         accommodation and financial assistance3.

         The two main programs include the:

              Elementary/Secondary Education Program which ensures that eligible Aboriginal
               students have access to the education programs and services available in public
               schools in the province in which the reserve is located. The budget is based on
               standard units (i.e., number of students, etc); however, how the program is organized
               is normally determined locally in the region.

               Decisions around connectivity are determined by the First Nations Regional
               Managing Organization (similar in mandate to the role of a school board) or with the
               region. Given its importance and increasing demand for it, all new INAC financed
               schools being built or older ones being renovated are all being pre-wired for
               connectivity and other e-Learning activities. Many of the provincially funded schools
               are already connected.

               In addition, there are a number of upgrading programs for adults under the school
               program. These programs can involve use of traditional classrooms or distance
               education methodologies. Most of the similar programs in provincial school systems
               use distance education and connectivity is very important for this type of activity.

              Post-Secondary Education (PSE) which provides support to eligible Aboriginal and
               Inuit students through the Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) and
               the University College Entrance Preparation Program (UCEP). This funding assists
               First Nation students with the cost of tuition fees, books and travel, and living
               allowances, when applicable. The long-range objective of PSE is to support the


         3
             http://www.ainc-INAC.gc.ca/ps/edu/index_e.html




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              increased participation and success of treaty/status Indians and Inuit students in
              recognized PSE programs, which increases participant employability.

              Support is also provided to post-secondary institutions for the development and
              delivery of special programs for Indians through the Indian Studies Support Program
              (ISSP). For example, the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College (SIFC) receives
              funding for the development and delivery of programs to First Nation students.

              The PSE Program is funded as a matter of social policy by the Canadian
              government. The program has evolved over time as a result of government policy
              and is operated under the broad authorities provided through the Department of
              Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act. Students wishing to pursue post-
              secondary studies do so through their band office or the regional office of INAC.

1.2.1. Key Initiatives

         In addition to these key programs, INAC also provides funding for the Special
         Education Program that is designed as an investment in programs and services for
         First Nation children with identified special needs. Program funds are provided to First
         Nations to improve the quality of education and level of support services for eligible
         students identified with moderate to profound special needs. Again, these programs are
         determined at the regional level and may involve educational solutions based on
         technology and connectivity in addition to specially designed curriculum supports.

         INAC Education has distributed the third edition of the directory, Scholarships, Bursaries,
         and Awards for Aboriginal Students, to First Nation and Inuit communities in April 2000.
         This resource identifies more than 300 sources of funding available to Aboriginal
         Canadians entering or returning to post-secondary studies. A regularly updated
         addendum to the online version has been developed to identify new sources of
         assistance.

         A National Association of Indigenous Institutes of Higher Learning has been established.
         This association will focus on advancing, advocating for and supporting post-secondary,
         technical, adult and related Indigenous education for the betterment of Indigenous
         institutions, communities, and people.



1.2.2. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or Department

         The intention of the regular school program is to ensure an environment that is in
         compliance with the provincial curriculums and standards, including teacher certification




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         while also providing the flexibility to include an emphasis on Aboriginal culture, content
         and heritage. Local control of education is very strong within this framework.

         Inuit and Status Indian students residing on or off reserve and ordinarily a resident in
         Canada are eligible for the PSE program. Support is subject to the selection criteria
         defined in the Band Council policy.

         The overall goal of all educational programming is to provide a solid foundation for future
         employability of the individual and for helping the economic development of the
         community.

1.2.3. Program Specifics

         Elementary/secondary education expenditures have increased from $703.8 million in
         1992-1993 to an estimated $1,029.6 million in 2001-2002. Since 1991-1992, the
         enrolment of First Nation children in elementary and secondary schools has increased
         from 96,594 to more than 119,000 in 2002-2003. . There are presently 502 schools on
         reserve, all but 8 are under First Nation management.

         As of 2002-2003, regional core budgets for PSE totalled $298 million. Nationally, almost
         100 percent of the combined PSSSP, the UCEP Program and the Indian Studies
         Support Program (ISSP) is delivered directly by First Nations or their administering
         organizations.

         The number of students supported has increased from about 3,600 in 1977-1978 to
         approximately 27,500 in 1999-2000. Between 1981 and 1996, the proportion of
         Aboriginal people aged 20 to 29 with a post-secondary degree or diploma improved from
         19 to 23 percent.

1.2.4. Connectivity Needs

         INAC normally does not provide connectivity and all work is done through third parties.
         Some of the regional managing organizations have hired their own technical support
         people for their operations.

         There is a solid understanding in the educational community that connectivity is very
         helpful in developing the students and in providing the same level of education as is
         done in the provincial school systems. Therefore, the more all of the schools are
         connected with effective communications, the better this consistency can be achieved.
         In some areas, the costs for connectivity could balance off with decreased costs for
         shipping costs, etc of resources to support curriculum research needs, etc. Having
         access to educational databases and student e-Learning resources was very important.




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1.2.5. Partnerships

         Partnership arrangements were done at the local and regional level. They were in
         connection with other programs, such as SchoolNet (See Section 7.1). This provides the
         most effective means of matching community needs with other resources available.

1.2.6. Success Stories

         There are many success stories within the INAC Education system and schools have set
         up their own websites and “e-pen pal” with other schools in both Canada as well as
         around the world. One example of this is Nelson House School, which is a Manitoba
         First Nations School which operates under the Nelson House Educational Authority.

         http://netra.mysterynet.mb.ca/otetiskiwin

         Contact: Lorne Keeper. See www.mfnerc.com




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1.3. INAC – Indian Registry System/ Certificate of Indian Status Project
         The Systems Development and Integration unit is developing the new Indian Registry
         System/ Certificate of Indian Status (IRS CIS) project. Its primary objectives are to:
          Improve program business processes;
          Improve the Indian Registry System (IRS) user access in support of the Government-
            On-Line (GOL) initiative; and
          Introduce a more secure and dignified Certificate of Indian Status (CIS) to replace
            the existing CIS card.

         There are four main stages in this large project. They are as follows:

         1. Alberta Treaty 7 CIS Pilot Enhancement – This involved the enhancement of
            existing Alberta Treaty 7 CIS Pilot Project technology infrastructure to enable real-
            time validation and card issuance by Indian Registry Administrators (IRAs). From
            this, they issued an updated and secure CIS and used this to identify opportunities,
            issues and lessons learned for the national deployment stage. Time frame: Jan 2002
            to March 2004.

         2. IRS Re-Engineering Stage – This stage focuses on streamlining and standardizing
            IRS maintenance and card issuances processes, including high level functions:

                  o    Registration
                  o    Life Events
                  o    Entitlement
                  o    Band Name System
                  o    Enquiries
                  o    Adoption
                  o    Protest
                  o    Conversion
                  o    Reports

              After this stage is completed, on-line secure accessibility will be enabled for
              registration and card issuance functions. The existing legacy IRS will be replaced for
              this new online system with its improved data integrity capabilities. (April 2002 – April
              2003).

         3. Implementation of IRS Nationwide - During this stage, the existing IRS will be
            replaced with the new web-enabled IRS application. All existing IRS active users will
            be trained in May 2003 on the new web-based application and the improved access
            (Write Access) on the new web-enabled IRS application for the IRAs will be deployed
            over the June to December 2003 timeframe.




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         4. Implementation of CIS Nationwide – This final stage will deploy the implementation
            of the new sophisticated equipment to IRAs for the issuance of the new enhanced
            cards. Other activities include the deployment and implementation of the Print
            Centre for the printing of the new enhances CIS, the streamlining of the card
            issuance and acceptance processes nationwide; and the enhanced partnerships with
            Health Canada, provincial and territorial governments and other government
            departments affected by this process.


1.3.1. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or Department

         With this new system, INAC will be able to provide a consistent and accountable process
         that is accessible at the band community level (470 communities as a first stage focus
         out of the 634), as well as to INAC Headquarters and regional levels. Reports will be
         consistently up-to-date. This will assist First Nations communities in their planning and
         budget submissions, as they will have access to accurate and immediate data.

         This project has been piloted with Treaty 7 and they work together as a team in ensuring
         that First Nations needs were identified and addressed. Focus groups were also
         conducted with a number of Aboriginal end users across the country for input and
         acceptance of card features and format. The card itself has the security features on it,
         required by police and other security authorities (i.e. CISI, RCMP). It has a bar code,
         embossed letters, distinct definition on the background and has a 5 year time limit.

         The new card provides a more dignified and sophisticated look than the old card. The
         card will note associated community; however, it will not need changing when a person
         moves as address info is not on the card.

         The new system will be “self-serve” in the regions with multi-access, so any First Nations
         person can have it done at any point of access, regardless of where they live or
         associated community. This supports the concept of Aboriginal self-determination.

         The biggest benefit to end-users is that the information will be available electronically on-
         line to suppliers of federal benefits, especially Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) from
         Health Canada as soon as the information is entered.

1.3.2. Program Specifics

         The IRS CIS provides a card and issuance process (approximately 10% of project) and
         supporting infrastructure (approximately 90%) that will be electronic in nature. This will
         facilitate immediate entry in system, Currently, problems occur due to time delay of




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         about one month between time of local entry to being available to other government
         departments for access to benefits, i.e. NIHB at Health Canada.

         Project expenditures are all done through third party agreements and are delivered by
         their parties in the regions.

1.3.3. Connectivity Needs

         INAC normally does not provide connectivity funding or support to third party delivery
         agents, however, in this unique situation, funding will probably be made for the initial
         deployment from the program. After that, funding will probably be from the regional
         level.

         Funds will be provided to the bands for the maintenance and upgrading of equipment
         through Contribution Agreements (CAs). This will be very important to ensure the
         process works once equipment is deployed out to the communities.

         Additional connectivity will be required to add on new users so all bands can access the
         system. This is an area that is currently under review for the current group of 470
         connected users as they need to look at the current access capability in the band offices
         to see if they have the physical space, security and other requirements for the
         equipment to run the IRS system.

         Access will be secure and available through a web accessed Intranet with Secure
         Remote Access (SRA). Initial training and support will be done by the Project to the
         regions and then will be move out from there. Updates and changes will come from IRS
         program to regions.

         There will need to be Help Desk support that can respond to a wide variety of queries,
         from policy based to technical and training. This is still an evolving process with some
         issues still under discussion.

         Delivery agents training will be done by a “Train the Trainer” approach to the regions.
         Given the nature of this project, there was a lot of pre-deployment work done involving
         end users. Workshops and validation work was done with groups of end users. Selected
         groups of users were also given access to the testing environment. Initial deployment
         will be from the program, after that, it will likely be from the regional level.

1.3.4. Partnerships

         Partnership arrangements will need to be made to ensure that equipment gets the
         ongoing maintenance and support needed to keep system running optionally. Support



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         for training and re-training needs at the band level. INAC’s traditional position has been
         not to be involved with equipment process; however, this program will require that the
         equipment be placed in the communities. Therefore, it seems best resolution will be for
         local control through the CA.

         Ongoing support concerns is also being examined with regards to all the various types of
         queries they are expecting, such as training policies, servicing problems in the system,
         addressing lack of training or retraining issues, and addressing “rights” questions. There
         will be a need for a technical Help Desk function that can direct all kinds of questions to
         the right area for service referrals.

         As mentioned, partnership arrangements also need to be made with other federal
         departments, especially Health Canada (NIHB) and provincial and territorial
         governments.

1.3.5. Success Stories

         As this is an internal program, its key success story has been the Treaty 7 pilot done in
         Alberta.

         Contact Information for program:

         Christian Dussault (See Appendix A).




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2.       CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION –
         ABORIGINAL PROGRAMS
         (TEMPORARILY REMOVED BY REQUET FROM CMHC)




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3.       HEALTH CANADA

         Health Canada is responsible for the health of the people in Canada and for the
         administration of the Canada Health Act. Working in partnership with all provincial and
         territorial governments, they provide the health policy, enforcement of health regulations
         and disease control along with the promotion of health lifestyles. Given this large
         mandate, this report will focus on their work in the area of health connectivity and
         information.

         Over the last three years, the Government of Canada provided funding of $50 million to
         begin developing a national strategy for a Canadian Health Infostructure, which is
         envisioned as a network of networks, applications and people that collectively support a
         wide range of health related systems, activities and services in support of Canadians
         across the country.

         As a federal contribution to the Canadian Health Initiative, Health Canada proposed the
         development of three interrelated initiatives:
             National Health Surveillance Infostructure (NHSI) - supports a wide range of
              health-related systems, activities and services containing five key elements:
              1. an integrated national public health architecture linking key public health “nodes”
              2. global surveillance and early warning networks
              3. policy and program decision support systems
              4. integration of human health surveillance information with other determinants of
                 health information
              5. development of a comprehensive, Internet-based health information resource


             Canadian Health Network (CHN) - a fully bilingual means to consolidate, organize
              and disseminate public health information about such issues as family violence,
              substance abuse and preventative health care. It provides up-to-date, reliable
              information on health related issues enabling health professionals and the general
              public to make informed decisions. The CHN provides a one-window access to
              expertise, knowledge and facilitates access to information by various means,
              including a 1-888 number, Internet, fax, by post, etc.

             First Nations Health Information System (FNHIS) - contains information about
              Status and non-Status First Nations residents of all regions who access health
              services on-reserve and/or at health facilities off-reserve. Information includes
              baseline identification information, such as name, address, status, and as well as
              data pertaining to reportable and chronic diseases, and other medically related
              information in a highly secure Intranet environment.




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         The three initiatives are interrelated. The FNHIS, for example, collects the same kind of
         First Nations health program information as will be collected on Canadians in general by
         the NHSI. Once information release is negotiated with First Nations, under appropriate
         negotiated controls, is integrate as one system providing a single, “seamless” system for
         health surveillance.


3.1. First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB)

         First Nations and Inuit Health Branch’s mandate is to ensure the availability of, or access
         to, health services for First Nations and Inuit communities; assist First Nations and Inuit
         communities address health barriers, disease threats, and attain health levels
         comparable to other Canadians living in similar locations; and build strong partnerships
         with First Nations and Inuit to improve the health system. Similarly, this section will focus
         on FNIHB programs that relate to information flow.

         A major thrust of the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch has been in the direction of e-
         Health and the leveraging of information and communication technology (ICT) to connect
         the health care providers, clients and governments for more effective health care
         delivery and health system management.             The main programs associated with
         information flow and e-Health are FNIHIS and telehealth.


3.2. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or department

         E-Health is the modernization of health care delivery and it is showing its benefits to both
         the community as well as to the care team. Staff has access to better information and
         can more easily co-ordinate the care required. They are able to keep up their skills and
         learn new ones and that helps with retention in the community, which is very positive for
         the residents.

         Having FNIHIS functional in the community’s health centers also provides information
         needed for program planning and for improving care to the clients.

         Specific benefits of telehealth include:

             Telehealth also allows patients to stay in their own community and that is much less
              disruptive to their personal and work lives. If people need to fly out, this can be
              lengthy due to weather and other circumstances. Therefore, a checkup or
              consultation can take over a week.




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             Families can stay in touch with people who are out of the community for health care
              and this is very important for them. This is especially important for mothers out
              having babies as they normally have to leave remote communities in advance of the
              delivery date. This allows them to keep in touch with their other children and or
              family members.

             There are also economic benefits as jobs are created in the community as telehealth
              co-coordinators and /or for the maintenance and support of the technical system.
              This helps with capacity building in First Nations and Inuit communities.


3.3. Program Specifics

         The FNHIS aims to produce the following outcomes:

             to better address health inequities experienced by First Nations and Inuit by
              developing reliable community-based information that will assist decision makers in
              understanding and addressing the inequities and to support evaluation, review and
              accountability;

             to build capacity to support seamless delivery of health services through all
              jurisdictions, recognizing that there is currently no health infostructure for Aboriginal
              communities;

             to empower First Nations communities through joint Health Canada/First Nation and
              Inuit training related to information management tools; and, to develop FNHIS at the
              community and regional levels in a manner consistent with the objectives of health
              program transfer, and

             to integrate First Nations and Inuit health information with provincial health
              information systems.

         Current difficulties in the system are data that is fragmented, out of date, and cannot be
         integrated in any efficient way. A capacity is required to allow the cascading of
         information to assist in identifying actual or potential public health problems in a timely
         manner to the communities at risk and to facilitate the sharing and analysis of this
         information amongst First Nation and Inuit communities and at a provincial and national
         level.


         FNHIS is designed, first and foremost, to be useful at the local level. This requires an
         emphasis on building, training and sustaining human capacity in the community.




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         Although the FNHIS involves IT-based solutions, it is not viewed as such by most FNHIS
         stakeholders.


3.4. Connectivity Needs

         Moving fully to e-Health will take place over the next ten years and health care budgets
         will be supporting it. Some decisions made centrally, others at the health facility level as
         to what level of service is needed for their operations and situation. In some situations,
         OCAP4 considerations need to be discussed and determined between the communities
         involved and Health Canada.

         With regard to e-Health and connectivity, Health Canada’s focus is on getting the larger
         communities connected first and then they will look at most optimal solution for smaller
         communities. Health Canada does get requests from the very small communities for
         connectivity as their communities have determined that is what they need. Community
         readiness factors and acceptance of technology are important components in the
         determination of these initiatives.



3.5. Partnerships

         As the provision of health services becomes more distributed, not only to Aboriginal
         peoples through the Transfer process, but throughout all orders of government,
         coordination, cooperation and partnership become more critical than ever.

         Health Canada is involved in a number of projects with five major federal departments
         (HRDC, INAC, Heritage, IC, ICT) in delivering special projects or programs. These
         programs usually are very complex and difficulties may arise on who should take the
         lead over certain initiatives, depending on mandates. Jurisdictional overlaps and gaps
         may also affect certain initiatives.

         Health Canada also needs to ensure that the infrastructure respects the health
         confidentiality and other factors. They would need to know what other uses might be
         happening in pipe and to ensure that any leakage from their systems do not put
         confidentiality at risk. To determine broadband, it is critical to know the content uses and
         how things will be done.




         4
             OCAP refers to ownership, control, access and privacy principles.




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         It was felt that the E-Health policy framework could move four times faster if the playing
         fields and what each group can and cannot do were clearly established. They are now
         working on ten key policy issues to ameliorate the situation. Again, important to the
         work is the determination of OCAP considerations over what is guarded in the
         community, what is shared and confidentiality issues. Need to work on balancing what
         helps individuals (i.e. access to health record) and community concerns over data
         access, etc.

         All health information needs secure channel network and that limits others having
         access and or potential sharing of resources.




3.6. Success Story

         Sioux Lookout First Nation Health Authority

         www.siouxlookout.com/firstnations2000.html




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4.       HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CANADA

4.1.      Information Systems & Services – Aboriginal Relations Office (ARO)

         The Information Systems and Services – Aboriginal Relations Office is a relatively small,
         dynamic unit at HRDC dedicated to supporting Aboriginal communities across Canada.
         Their goal is to work in partnership with HRDC Regional offices and communities, in
         developing the employability of Aboriginal peoples and in creating meaningful job
         opportunities for them wherever they may be, on reserves or in rural or urban areas.

         They contribute to this goal primarily through the Aboriginal Human Resource
         Development Strategy (AHRDS). In conjunction with HRDC Regional Offices, HRDC
         ARO has established over seventy agreements under the AHRDS across Canada.

         As well as maintaining their own agreements with Aboriginal groups at ARO, they
         provide the HRDC regional delivery sites with program frameworks, guidance and
         direction in policy and procedures to assist with the understanding of the flexibility of the
         program. This works to maintain a high level of accountability and ensuring the sound
         performance of this strategy.

         Under the AHRDS, HRDC - ARO and the Regional offices support programs focusing on
         Aboriginal youth, childcare, disabled persons, and urban residents.




4.1.1. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or department

         The transferring of funding and responsibility agreements for skills development and
         employment initiatives to Aboriginal communities in 1997 was based on the recognition
         that Aboriginal peoples best understand their own needs and are best able to design and
         implement effective programs and services.

         As a result, First Nations, Métis, and Inuit organizations have become more efficient and
         effective as a result of this capacity building program. As they are closer to the
         community, they can ensure that the unique needs of the organizations and people
         within their mandate are met. These include the provision of employment programs and
         services, youth programs, funding for persons with disabilities and child care services.

         All of their activities have formal evaluations,. These results are reviewed by the
         AHRDAs for program improvement. Summary data is uploaded to HRDC by AHRDAs.




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4.1.2. Program Specifics

         The program involves 1.6 billion over five years. This covers funding for Aboriginal
         Labour Market Training, Youth, Disabled and Child Care spaces creation &
         maintenance. The program is all delivery by third party organizations with 300 points of
         service.

         There are 79 signed Aboriginal Human Resources Development Agreements (AHRDA)
         with non-profit Aboriginal organizations with HRDC. AHRDAs design and deliver labour
         market programs. AHRDAs also provide accountability information to HRDC. However,
         the communications and e-mail systems all use various channels.

         These financial agreements are in place for five years. The renewal process has started
         and is being negotiated, as new agreements will need to be in place for March 2004.
         Agreements vary in size based on prescribed model and composition of delivery
         environment. All agreements include monitoring criteria for results, program performance
         and the like.

4.1.3. Connectivity Needs

         Information is shared through the web site, exchange of data electronically for
         accountability purposes. Any place not having access, sends in a disc to a regional
         office that uploads the data to HRDC.

         Technical support is at the delivery level within the AHRDA. HRDC is currently reviewing
         its support role. Funds for training have set aside funding under a Capacity Building
         component into the AHRDA agreements. These funds may be used for training internally
         to the organization. AHRDAs at their discretion may use Capacity Building funds for their
         training and support needs.

         Approximately 60% of AHRDAs use Contact 4, which is an older technology used to
         manage client files. CATS is used in Newfoundland and Connector in Alberta – both
         these systems are based on Contact 4.

         There is not really a common system for grants and contributions, as third parties are not
         supported. They are looking at a new module for this and it will be done for everyone,
         not just Aboriginal organizations.

         The successor program to Contact 4 will be out in the near future and it is expected to
         respond better to the needs of the organizations. It was developed with the users. At
         present, there are no support or enhancement commitments. Deployment and support
         is currently under review. The agreement holders determine how and what local delivery




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         mechanisms they will use. Everything is rolled up under one AHRDA – jobs created,
         steps on road, and the like.

         Data uploaded by AHRDAs is further processed by HRDC and re-published to the
         AHRDAs; however, some AHRDAs are concerned that there may be possible
         underreporting. This is a result of a number of factors, such as duplicate records, time
         of year recording. It is a complex system. In some of the reports, reasons are given on
         upstream statistics, but it is intermediary feedback.

         All AHRDAs are able to provide results data, either directly through upload to HRDC or
         through provision of file to HRDC regional office. As more communities become
         connected, this will be of benefit to them. They use the Internet for data exchange as
         there is password-protected information on the site. This allows them to see their own
         data and the region they are in, etc. All AHRDA information is privacy protected and is
         self-serve to its own contact members.

4.1.4. Partnerships

         There is no agreement amongst the AHRDAs to share data or to work together in border
         areas, although they normally co-operate. There is capacity for aggregate reporting,
         such as First Nations in BC, the Métis organizations, so there has been some regional
         comparison data.

         The Portal Group also does some sharing of secondary data for success stories which
         can help with sharing ideas and information.

         This is limited to some extent due to differences for clients from varying reporting and
         funding requirements. They would need to have mechanism in the contract to support it.
         They also need to be able to justify it re: their mandate requirements. There are
         challenges for business opportunities when it is only one of and not the “whole”.

4.1.5. Success Stories

         See booklet: Many Path to Success: AHRDA Stories by HRDC.

         Contact Information for Program:

         Joan McEwen, BC HRDC regional office ph: 604-666-8262




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4.2. Office of Learning Technologies

         The federal government created the Office of Learning Technology (OLT) in 1995 within
         Human Resources Development Canada. The mission of OLT is to engage “partners
         and sponsors using technology to enhance learning and skills development, allowing
         Canadians to participate fully in the workplace and their community. OLT achieves this
         through contribution funding, awareness activities, and research initiatives.5
         Program Objectives

         The main objectives of the OLT are to:

               Enable Canadians to develop new knowledge and improve skills through technology;
               Increase abilities of Canadians to use technology, thus contributing to reducing the
                Digital Divide;
               Support the assessment, research and testing related to the use of learning
                technologies; and,
               Increase the availability and sharing of knowledge and quality information about
                learning technologies.

         Key Activities

         As a relatively new area, the format of how activities are achieved is still evolving with
         experience. Their main focus is on helping to develop policies and strategies that serve
         to guide the evolution and application of learning technologies in ways that best meet the
         lifelong learning needs of Canadians. Additionally, OLT supports and monitors research
         in Canada with regards to the use of learning technologies. Information on research and
         other Canadian initiatives, key players, and significant developments in the application of
         learning technologies are also widely shared by OLT.

         Other activities include providing opportunities that demonstrate Canadian learning
         products and services. This is normally done in partnership with developers, educators,
         employers, employees, trainers and learners.

         OLT also promotes and supports the development and evolution of Community Learning
         Networks (CLNs) which enable lifelong learning and community capacity-building
         through the use of network technologies.

         These activities are conducted under four main funding initiatives:


         5
             http://olt-bta.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/indexx.html




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         1. New Practices in Learning Technologies - NPLT funds projects that contribute to
            the understanding, development and awareness of new and innovative practices in
            learning technologies for adult learners. The majority of sponsors under this initiative
            are Universities and Community Colleges.

         2. Learning Technologies in the Workplace - LWT was established in 2000 and
            provides support to workplace associations for projects that demonstrate the direct
            application of learning technologies in the workplace. This funding initiative is
            specifically aimed at associations representing small and medium sized enterprises
            and disadvantaged workers.

         3. Research in e-Learning - ReL was established in 2001 to fund projects that
            demonstrate the effectiveness of e-Learning in the provision of skills enhancement
            for adult learners who adopt learning technologies.

         4. Community Learning Networks Initiative - CLN was established in 1998 to
            support time limited (3-year) pilot projects in partnership with community
            organizations. These projects offer access to a variety of learning resources and
            assists communities in establishing their own computer networks by:

                 Developing and testing innovative approaches to enable individuals to secure
                  employment in the knowledge-based economy and support lifelong learning
                  using information/communication technologies;
                 Developing and providing ways to ensure access points in the community and
                  interactive networks to reduce barriers to the use of learning technologies;
                 Promoting the inclusion of individuals and groups facing barriers to participation
                  in the knowledge-based economy and reducing the disparity between those with
                  technical skills and those without; and,
                 Increasing the knowledge and skills about the creative and interactive uses of
                  learning technologies in communities where organizational capabilities and
                  partnerships can ensure long-term success

              CLN projects typically have two Phases, consisting of a Developmental Phase and a
              Pilot Phase. The developmental phase, which can be up to six months duration,
              includes doing a community inventory of learning assets, developing partnership
              agreements and the preparation of community skills and learning action plan for the
              subsequent project pilot.


4.2.1. Benefits to Aboriginal peoples and/or department
         As these programs are comprehensive in a physical area, there is not a specific
         allocated portion of the funding set for Aboriginal communities. Normally, they do not




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         split between on and off reserve components in a project. Being respectful of the need
         to support Aboriginal communities, they are classed as a priority area in 2003.

         While some projects are 100% aboriginal, however, usually other projects are mixed as
         the intent of program is to integrate learning technologies into a community. It helps
         communities pull their efforts together so there is no duplication. It helps develop their
         capability for both formal and informal learning and facilitates e-Learning. They are
         linked into the surrounding community network. For projects relating to Aboriginal
         communities, it is usually done in a partnership between INAC and CIC in conjunction
         with the First Nations communities involved. They don’t currently track these projects
         under “aboriginal” funding; however, they may do so in the future. In 1998, Aboriginal
         funding is approximately 11% of total monies spent.

         Where OLT has had projects in Aboriginal communities, they have had significant
         outcomes. These include the ability to develop and retain culturally relevant education
         and training.    Staff and residents can use the information and communication
         technologies to facilitate the work of their economic, health and social programs.

         These projects are highly valued for three main reasons:
          Their relatively long term nature of funding;
          Flexibility of criteria to cover learning, community development and information
            technology activities; and the
          Ability to experiment and test innovative approaches.


4.2.2. Program Specifics
         The project funding is set at $18 million for the program projects. Of this, six million
         dollars is designated for new projects each year.

         The normal process for how the CLN works involve not-for-profit organizations applying
         for developmental funding. Up to $50,000 is available for a community partnership to
         develop a proposal for a 3-year pilot. If the project is accepted, the CLN is formed and
         will be eligible for up to $300,000 over three years.

         Infrastructure, such as computers or internet access, is not provided by CLN. In order to
         access this funding, the community must demonstrate they meet this requirement.
         Proposals are based on a specific requirement identified by a community itself.

         Programs are conducted as Pilot Projects over a three-year time period. The normal
         cycle for the Pilot Phase includes the following components:

             Implementation of community skills and learning action plan;
             Development of a comprehensive strategy for achieving clearly defined learning and
              skills development objectives that use technology;




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             Building and consolidation of partnerships to ensure long term sustainability; and
             Completion of a comprehensive evaluation and dissemination of results.

         A number of changes are currently happening with the program. These include
         refocusing OLT Programming in 2003 on one initiative instead of four. The main focus
         will be on the CLN as they help support individuals to acquire information,
         communications, and technology (ICT) skills, which lead to the development of a more
         skilled and enabled workforce for Canada. Having access to a variety of ICTs, including
         internet based learning will help overcome special learning needs or barriers to learning,
         especially in remote communities.

         New activities for the development phase include Community Mapping, which help
         assess gaps, challenges and potential for learning resources. Factors they look for in the
         development phase of projects are goals for individual learners; learning needs; social
         capital and projects that are sustainable in future.

         Since 1998, over 100 CLNs have been created. As mentioned, the CLN – Call for
         Proposals priorities for 2003 include:

             Aboriginal/First Nation communities;
             Involvement with persons with disabilities; and,
             Rural and remote communities, especially in Atlantic Canada, the Prairies and
              northern communities throughout Canada.



4.2.3. Connectivity Needs


         All communities need to be connected before being eligible for this program. OLT
         normally builds on CAP sites and works with them in determining what Broadband
         solutions are needed. They normally provide physical and human support and respond
         to questions from the communities involved re; technology support requirements. They
         normally are not involved in training support. Given that, however, they did support
         training in a project with Nunavut to help them over the hump as there was so much
         training to be done.

         OLT is very supportive of any work that supports connectivity. As more Aboriginal
         communities are connected, then, the more they can access the program. Otherwise,
         they are not eligible.




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4.2.4. Partnerships
         The largest impediment in administering the program is helping get the partnerships off
         the ground. Partners need to understand that they need to be there for the long haul
         and to support the communities to build on what they are doing.

         The project work is done using a very decentralized model, which can create challenges
         for maintaining, supporting and doing all the training requirements to make project
         successful.

         Some communities, especially Aboriginal and rural communities have a harder time
         doing the applications as the people involved need to be wearing many hats or they are
         the sole representative in an organization (e.g. librarians in First Nations libraries). This
         means that they do not have the time to do the proposal development work.
         Consequently, OLT is looking at providing more support to get the proposals written and
         to help them carry out the objectives, especially for Aboriginal and remote communities.



4.2.5. Success Stories


         Contact Information for Program: Norm Leech in BC




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5.       INDUSTRY CANADA

5.1. Aboriginal Business Canada (ABC)
         The Aboriginal Business Canada Program (ABC) is part of the family of Industry Canada
         initiatives serving Aboriginal business clients of all heritage groups. Their mandate is to
         promote the growth of commerce as a means towards economic self-sufficiency for
         Aboriginal entrepreneurs. Additionally, they also assist First Nations, Métis and Inuit
         businesses and financial institutions to expand their services and networks creating a
         stronger economy for Canada’s First Nations Peoples.

         Aboriginal Business Canada (ABC) provides financial assistance, information, resource
         materials and referrals to other possible sources of financing or business support. In this
         way, they are working towards the shared goal of an inclusive and prosperous economy
         for all Canadians.


5.1.1. Benefits to Aboriginal Peoples and/or Department
         Clients must be individuals of Canadian Indian, Métis or Inuit heritage, or majority-owned
         Aboriginal organizations or development corporations. ABC also works in partnership
         with Aboriginal financial and business organizations, and with a range of other agencies,
         boards and departments on initiatives that are helping to strengthen business skills and
         promote greater awareness of Aboriginal business achievement.

         Additionally, ABC staff have developed considerable expertise over time and can assist
         Aboriginal entrepreneurs in ensuring their business plans are feasible to achieve the
         results they are looking for from their proposals.

5.1.2. Program Specifics
         Although supporting a broad framework of government and departmental objectives,
         Aboriginal Business Canada focuses on a specific set of priorities intended to promote
         the establishment, growth and expansion of firms in today's rapidly changing
         environment.

         These priorities are innovation, trade and market expansion, tourism, youth
         entrepreneurship development, and strengthening Aboriginal financial and
         business development organizations that will continue this work in the years to come.
         Support is designed to take advantage of regional opportunities as well as those in
         urban and other centres.




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5.1.3. Connectivity Needs

         ABC conducted a study to find out their clients’ needs and satisfaction levels with the
         use of the information. The following contains excerpts from this report. 6 It should be
         noted that this study was done in 2002 and since that time, many Aboriginal
         communities attitudes have shifted from “Why Connectivity?” to “How soon can we get
         it?”   as more people realize the benefits from having faster and immediate
         communications.

         5.1.3.1. Vast Majority Have Access to Internet

         Nearly all surveyed                                     Access to Internet
         clients (90%) have
         access to the
         Internet, either at
         home, work, or
         from some other                          Yes
         location.                                90%



                                                                                              No
                                                                                             10%




                                         COMPAS for Aboriginal Business Canada; March 2002




         5.1.3.2. Strong Interest in Using the Internet to Deal With ABC

         Clients who have access to the Internet were asked how interested they would be in
         using the Internet to deal with ABC. This was said to include submitting applications,
         business plans or claims for payment, or finding out about the status of their project or
         claim.




         6
             COMPAS for Aboriginal Business Canada: March 2002




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         A strong
         majority                   Interest in Using Internet to Deal With ABC
                                          (N= 445; asked only to those with access to internet)
         (81%)
         expressed                                            Percentage
         interest in
                                                                                                                       59
         using the                    Very interested
         Internet for
         ABC                                                                 22
                                Moderately interested
         dealings.
         (59%                                                       10
                                   Not very interested
         expressed
         strong
                                                                    9
         interest).               Not at all interested


                                DK/NR= less than 1% 0          10       20    30            40           50       60        70
                                COMPAS for Aboriginal Business Canada; March 2002


         Approximately one in five were not interested.

         5.1.3.3. Ways to Maximize Effectiveness of Internet



         Clients      who
         expressed                 Ways to Maximize Effectiveness of Internet Dealings
         interest     were                             With ABC
                                         (N= 365; asked to those interested in dealing with ABC by Internet)
         asked what ABC                                                               Percentage
         could     do    to                      Provide clear, complete info.                                                    14

         maximize      the                         Ensure info. is easy to find                                                  13
                                          Allow electronic application process                                               12
         effectiveness of
                                                 Keep information up-to-date                                  7
         the Internet in
                                                                  Q&A section                            5
         terms     of   its
                                       Access to info. on status of application                      4
         usefulness      to                 Provide links to other useful sites                      4
         their business in                                  Advertise website                   3
         its dealings with                                Provide contact info.                 3
         ABC.            In                        Electronic mail-out of info.             2
         response, almost              Two responses accepted
                                                                         Other                                    8

         equal numbers                 DK/NR= 44%                                 0     2        4       6    8        10 12 14 16
                                       COMPAS for Aboriginal Business Canada; March 2002




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         (12-14%) suggested providing clear, complete information, ensuring that the information
         is easy to find, and allowing the application process to be done on-line (two responses
         accepted). Other suggestions were keeping the information up-to-date, providing a
         question and answer section, allowing access to information on the status of an
         application, providing links to other useful websites, advertising the website, providing
         contact information, and sending out information electronically. Nearly half of those
         interested in dealing with ABC by Internet did not provide an answer to this question.

         5.1.3.4. Security of Information – Top Concern in Using Internet to Deal With ABC




         All clients with
                                       Concerns Using Internet for Dealings With ABC
                                           (N= 445; asked to those who have access to Internet)
         access to the
                                                                                 Percentage
         Internet      were
                                                      Security of information               29
         asked if they had
                                                    Lack of personal contact         9
         any      concerns
         about using the          Being required to use Internet exclusively       4

         Internet to deal                                 Technical problems      3
         with ABC. Half                                           Poor service 3
         indicated      that                       Lack of computer literacy 2
         they     had    no                        Timeliness/having to wait 2
         concerns.      The                                      None/nothing                   51
         most commonly
                                                                         Other 3
         identified               Two responses accepted
                                                                                0 10 20 30 40 50 60
         concern        was       DK/NR= 2%
                                  COMPAS for Aboriginal Business Canada; March 2002
         security         of
         information, identified by just over one-quarter (29%) of clients. The only other issue to
         receive noteworthy attention was lack of personal contact (9%) (two responses
         accepted). Small numbers were concerned with being obliged to use the Internet
         exclusively, technical problems, poor service, lack of computer literacy, and timeliness or
         having to wait.




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5.1.4. Partnerships

         As this is a funding body for Aboriginal businesses, partnership arrangements are made
         at that level. ABC also works in partnership with other federal departments as described
         under INAC- Economic Development (See Section 3.1.4).

5.1.5. Success Stories

         ABC has been a major factor in the success story of hundreds of Aboriginal businesses.
         The stories and video clips of many of their success story are located on their website:

         http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/ab00069e.html




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5.2. First Nations SchoolNet

          The First Nations SchoolNet Program (FNS) is part of the family of Industry Canada
         initiatives to connect schools to the Internet. They are nested under Canada’s School
         Net, which is part of Connecting Canadians, the Government of Canada’s strategy to
         keep Canada among the leaders in connecting Canadians to the Internet.

          First Nations SchoolNet helps Canada’s Aboriginal communities connect to the Internet
         via satellite technology. This allows First Nations schools to develop and customize e-
         Learning content in their curriculum and provides tools that will reflect their cultures and
         values. The program helps to provide schools with computers and other digital
         equipment, high-speed connectivity, technical support, and basic Information and
         Communications Technology (ICT) training. Their focus right now is purely on
         connectivity. Content issues may be examined later.




5.2.1. Benefits to Aboriginal Peoples and/or Department

         The FNS program is available for all Aboriginal schools in First Nations communities.
         Métis or Inuit schools are not eligible for this program as they are covered by
         provincial/territorial legislation.

         FNS staff have not used formal program evaluation; however, they are planning a formal
         evaluation for fall 2004. The focus has been on service delivery and they have been
         promoting e-Learning with Aboriginal communities. They do maintain statistics on the
         program and from this they see increased patterns of schools wanting Broadband (BB)
         solutions.

         Schools that have been connected also continue with service for the most part and have
         integrated the computers into their learning activities. Respondents also believe that
         dropout rates could be positively impacted as students can stay in their community
         schools longer and having access to resources via the Internet, in the same way as
         urban schools.

         Respondents also noted that connectivity was very helpful to teachers as they could
         access professional development material as well as being able to have communications
         with peers on both work and personal development activities. They noted that FN




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         schools tend to have high turnover rates for teachers and directors. Having the Internet
         access would help reduce the isolation in this regard.

5.2.2. Program Specifics

         The First Nations SchoolNet Program (FNS) has recently undergone a major
         restructuring. Until recently FNS National Office dealt directly with the more than 600 on-
         reserve First Nations Schools. As of December 1st, 2003, six First Nations Regional
         Management Organizations (RMOs) have been contracted to deliver the program to the
         schools in their region.

         The scope of the FNS project is $6.4 million to March 2004. It should be that noted that
         while they have applied for additional funding from Treasury Board, no assurance of
         continued funding has been given at this time. FNS National Office has signed
         Contribution Agreements with the RMOs that may provide them with more than one
         million dollars to the close of fiscal year 2003-2004.

         The RMOs for each region are:

                 British Columbia: First Nations Education Steering Committee;

                 Saskatchewan/Alberta: Keewatin Career Development Centre;

                 Manitoba: Keewatin Tribal Council;

                 Ontario: Keewaytinook Okimakanak, K-Net Services;

                 Québec: Conseil en Éducation des Premières Nations;

                 Atlantic: Mi’Kmaw Kina’matnewey.

         The RMOs provide a localized approach to assessing the needs of each school and
         community and work with other federal, provincial, private sector and Aboriginal
         organizations. This allows them to pool resources, reduce duplication, save costs and
         speed the delivery of all services. Each RMO has been paired with an Industry Canada
         Information Highway Applications Branch regional office, which can facilitate their work.
         To date, 479 First Nations Schools have been connected and are being served by the
         RMO network. Two of the six regions are broadband applicants.

         Training will be delivered by the RMOs with assistance from HRDC. A big push for this
         will be on in Sept 2003 as a big investment is being made in the training area. Right




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         now over 50% of the schools are on slow PCs and they anticipate they will be moved to
         faster connectivity by September 2003. Many of these “slow connections” schools were
         from the time of the original contract when no other technical options for remote
         locations were available. As mentioned, that will be changed shortly under the new
         contracts.

         FNS used to have a central Help Desk support; however, with the restructuring, that has
         been changed to Regional Help Desks. This was done to allow for more emphasis on
         having locally trained computer support in the communities.

         Of the 529 communities served, 127 are on Broadband, and 402 are on slow
         connections. Getting them connectivity is the first priority. Over $1.5 Million has been
         designated for Broadband (BB) solutions. Over the next five years, FNS wants to move
         every school to a BB solution and then they expect to see a big difference for the
         schools. Once this is done, FNS is considering doing more in the content area, such as
         e-Learning tools for the schools and the like.

         The RMOs are also able to leverage other programs, such as the “Computers for
         Schools” which is open to any Canadian school. FN schools are a priority for these
         refurbished computers.

         They also noted that the Technology Work Experience Program has been taking youth
         at risk and developing their computer skills, so they can gain legitimate employment.

5.2.3. Connectivity Needs

         Connection to the Internet and e-Learning will allow First Nations students to have a
         similar education as provided in urban schools and, in the future, to complete high
         school without ever leaving their community. It will also permit communities to link to
         each other to share best practices for the preservation of their heritage and languages,
         and for their social and economic development.

         RMOs Help Desk is now handling the technical support for the schools. They noted that
         in the past, if there were technical problems or staff had a lack of experience in doing
         set-ups, equipment would just stay in school, but not be used for Internet access. This
         was one of the drivers behind having more local technical support and solutions.

         Training for this is still being done by FNS; however, it is done on a decentralized model.

         Regarding the current level of connectivity (number of connections and bandwidth), FNS
         indicated they need an increase in need for faster connections as well as more
         computers for the learning process in the schools. They noted that there was over a




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         75% drop-out rate from the schools and the more they could hook the kids on the
         computers by making learning interactive, the more likely they would stay in their
         communities. They have received some verbal reports of seeing early signs of success
         from schools with this function.

5.2.4. Partnerships

         FNS staff are now working more closely with other federal departments, such as Health
         Canada, in working with the RMOs and getting programs to use the local Help Desk
         support. These services provide training and employment for the graduates of the “Youth
         at Risk “ programs. They are actively working to further expand and develop these
         partnerships.

         As part of their challenges, they noted that some provinces are less interested in looking
         at partnerships, especially Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia. These tend to be
         issues over the varying mandates in providing education. Others are more inclined to
         see the benefits. Having the local agreements is more helpful for this arrangement.

         They noted that the youth were the feeder group for the ABC entrepreneurship program
         and other private companies were also getting on board with this, such as the BDC – e-
         spirit program out of the Winnipeg office of the Business Development Bank.




5.2.5. Success Stories

         Children in First Nation schools are using the Internet to develop exciting new e-
         Learning tools, including on-line learning circles, school websites and Aboriginal learning
         projects. These projects allow them to reflect the traditional values of their communities.
         The FNS website at www.schoolnet.ca/aboriginal links to a wide variety of educational
         and cultural resources reflecting the needs of today’s Aboriginal students and schools.

         A special project is the K-Net initiative.

         Contact Information for program:___Brian Beaton




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5.3. Broadband for Rural and Northern Development (BRAND)

         (INTERVIEW IN PROGRESS)


5.4. Community Access Program (CAP)

         (INTERVIEW IN PROGRESS)




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6.       ATLANTIC CANADA OPPORTUNITIES AGENCY

         The Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency’s (ACOA) mandate is to work in partnership
         with the people of Atlantic Canada in economic development activities. This is
         accomplished through a suite of programs and services. In addition, the Agency
         provides business tools and resources to Atlantic entrepreneurs at all stages in their
         business cycle. The focus is on growth through innovation; research and development
         initiatives; expansion of existing businesses in Atlantic Canada as well as community
         economic development (especially in rural areas) and building infrastructure.

         There are six strategic priority areas:

             Policy, Advocacy and Coordination – Focus is on emerging regional, provincial
              and local economic issues; structural conditions within the Atlantic region; sector-
              specific considerations; key federal policies as well as ACOA’s own priorities and
              program initiatives.

             Innovation and Technology – Work on improving the region’s capacity to carry out
              leading edge research and development; facilitating the commercialization of new
              technologies; helping companies adopt the latest technologies and upgrading
              technology skills. They encourage partnerships and alliances among private sector
              firms, universities and research institutions.

             Trade, Tourism and Investment – Works in partnership to increase exports activity
              and to position Atlantic Canada for foreign direct investments. Tourism strategy
              promotes high quality tourism products and to promote the region as a world-class
              destination with its partners.

             Entrepreneurship and Business Skills Development – Work to enhance the
              business management and technology skills of small to medium sized businesses,
              especially with youth and women, and in helping these business owners and their
              employees to survive and grow.

             Community Economic Development – Assist with helping communities plan and
              implement their own visions for long-term, self-sustaining economic activity. Working
              with their regional and local partners, they support counseling and financial services
              for entrepreneurs; improve the availability of business capital in rural areas; create
              sustainable jobs, strengthen the strategic planning process and empower each
              community to successfully direct their own future.




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              Access to Capital and Information – Provides interest free loans for business start-
               ups, expansions, modernization as well as for investment in technology,
               organizational and export development. The Agency also helps bridge the flow of
               information to Atlantic entrepreneurs by providing a client-centred business
               information network through the Atlantic Canada Business Services Centres and
               other support organizations.7


6.1. Benefits to Aboriginal Peoples and/or department

         ACOA supports economic development to Atlantic based entrepreneurs, this is done in a
         number of ways, including providing support to a number of specific initiatives for
         Aboriginal business. This is an area where they want to place more of a focus since
         only 3.5% of all Aboriginal entrepreneurs are in Atlantic Canada (representing 1.8% of
         Atlantic Aboriginal population).    In working on expanding that number, ACOA
         participates in a number of programs to support Aboriginal business initiatives.

         The Agency is part of the Canada wide Aboriginal Business Development Initiative
         (ABDI), which has three focus programs:

              Access to Capital: Refinancing of Aboriginal Credit Corporations; Aboriginal CFDCs

              Aboriginal Business Services Network (ABSN): Provides links to all bands;
               selected off-reserve sites; delivered through CBSC network

              Program Uptake: Increasing Aboriginal awareness of or access to existing business
               development programs.

         It should be noted that ACOA is the driver/deliverer on the Atlantic component of ABSN.
         They are part of the ABSN working committee with Aboriginal and CBSC
         representatives. There are 42 identified ABSN sites in Aboriginal communities in Atlantic
         Canada. Of these, 40 have completed operational Internet access. There are also
         seven CAP sites.

         Additionally, ACOA have also participated in ICT Round Tables sponsored by the
         Atlantic Policy Congress and with specific Aboriginal Community driven initiatives.



         7
             Detailed information provided on website: www.acoa.ca/e/about/profile.shtml




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         The Agency works in partnership arrangements with Aboriginal Communities and
         Aboriginal businesses work along with other government partners, such as Industry
         Canada in Atlantic Canada on these initiatives. They have also worked as part of the
         Joint Economic Development Initiative (JEDI), which was founded in 1995. It is a tri-party
         agreement with federal and provincial governments and First Nations communities in
         New Brunswick designed to identify and pursue undertakings that contribute to
         economic development for Aboriginal peoples and increasing cross-cultural awareness
         and understanding.

         The SMART Community initiative in Labrador is a major benefit to Aboriginal people.
         Waylon Williams from Makkovik noted that “Smart Labrador’s technology has broken
         barriers to make Labrador a community of communities while at the same time holding
         strong to our many unique cultural backgrounds.”8

         ACOA have also been active in promoting BRAND - the Broadband to Rural and
         Northern Development program. BRAND is an Industry Canada’s program supporting
         the provision of Broadband to First Nations Communities.




6.2. Program Specifics

         There is not one specific program for Aboriginal communities or entrepreneurs as they
         normally work in partnerships or in joint projects with Aboriginal businesses and with
         other federal and provincial government departments. Therefore, a complete total is not
         available.

         With regards to some of the larger programs, ACOA contributed $1.3M to ABDI with
         $391,000 for refinancing ACCs and provided $909,000 for the Atlantic section of ABSN.




         8
          Presentation by Sheila Downer on Labrador, Aboriginal Smart Community Example to the 2nd Annual
         National Aboriginal Canadians Forum (March 24-25, 2003)




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6.3. Connectivity Needs

         ACOA is a strong believer in connectivity as an area where more investment can be very
         important in the future. In alignment with their support of working together, they feel that
         this is an area where coordination and a strategic approach could enhance the impact.
         The Agency has and continues to be interested in being involved with INAC, Industry
         Canada, Health Canada and other federal partners as well as the First Nations
         Communities and people to provide more and better information technology and
         connectivity to improve service delivery and the quality of life. For business purposes,
         quality connectivity is critical and needs to have high reliability for it to be used in a major
         way. Additionally, they could have more CAP sites, if communities connected.

         The lack of Broadband is considered to be especially important for the remote areas.
         Currently, where they do have connectivity, many of the connections are slow and are
         not designed for heavy downloads. If there could be effective connectivity, more uses
         of technology could be integrated in the communities.

          It could also significantly reduce the need for travel as connectivity could allow for the
         incorporation of other methods, such as video conferencing, e-Learning and telehealth
         to replace some of the face-to-face meetings or for training, etc. In Labrador, for
         example, travel in winter is not conducive to safety, due to need to travel almost
         everywhere by air. Weather conditions can be extreme, involving heavy snowfalls and
         the like. Being able to reduce the need for travel and the time involved with weather
         delays will be very important.

         ACOA also would welcome more investment for technological support, as this is an
         issue in some areas of the region, especially for the more rural or remote communities.
         Currently, support is done on a third party basis.

6.3.1. Partnerships

         ACOA did not have a problem in making investments in or on-reserve
         telecommunications infrastructure. Their normal methodology involves partnering with
         other players and their programs support that format.




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6.3.2. Success Stories - SMART LABRADOR


         http://www.smartlabrador.ca

         Contact Information for program:

         Sheila Downer, Executive Director
         Smart Labrador
         Box 41
         Forteau, Labrador NF A0K 2P0
         Tel: 1-866-931-2072
         Fax: 1-709-931-2370




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7.       ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE- ABORIGINAL
         POLICING

         The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is Canada’s national police force and is an
         agency in the Ministry of the Solicitor General of Canada. Their services are unique in
         the work as they provide national, provincial, territorial, and municipal police services.
         Each of the four RCMP regions has an Aboriginal policing unit.

         There is a central group at RCMP Headquarters in Ottawa that functions primarily as a
         national policy center with a lesser responsibility as a program area. They function under
         the Community, Contract and Aboriginal Policing.

         Aboriginal Policing Branch (APB) is responsible for the initiation, development and
         evaluation of practical and culturally sensitive policing services which are acceptable to
         Aboriginal peoples. Consultation is maintained with the national Aboriginal organizations
         in order that policies and programs reflect the needs of Aboriginal communities. The
         Branch also promotes and encourages the recruitment of Aboriginal people into the
         RCMP and is actively involved in the development and sponsorship of proactive and
         preventive programs specific to Aboriginal communities.

         Aboriginal Policing Branch is involved with a number of initiatives including the following:

             Aboriginal Cadet Development Program (ACDP) was first implemented by the
              RCMP in 1990. Since 1995, the program had been made possible through a funding
              partnership with Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC). Aboriginal
              people interested in a career with the RCMP who did not meet the basic entrance
              requirements, but otherwise would be suitable candidates were enrolled as cadets
              on the ACDP. Following a three week assessment period at Depot Division in
              Regina, Saskatchewan, the cadets returned to a detachment in their home area
              (usually) with a program designed to help them overcome identified shortcomings.
              The cadets received an allowance, and had up to two years to attain the basic
              entrance requirements; once successful they proceeded to Regina to undergo basic
              cadet training. Since 1990, 337 Aboriginal applicants took advantage of the program
              and over 200 graduated from the academy.

             RCMP Aboriginal Youth Training Program (AYTP) which provides Aboriginal
              young people with 17 weeks of summer employment, including three weeks training
              at Regina, Saskatchewan. Upon their return to a detachment near their home,
              students work under the direct supervision and guidance of a regular member of the
              RCMP for the remainder of their employment. The major funding partner has been
              the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. The number of




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              candidates each year is dependent on the amount of funding that can be raised; last
              summer (1999), 31 candidates from across Canada experienced police work while
              on the AYTP.

             RCMP/Community Suicide Intervention Program (The RCMP is currently seeking
              alternative funding for this program that began in 1994.) provides training in a
              flexible 5-day format that includes: two days of suicide intervention training, a one
              day healing/talking circle, a component of Aboriginal spirituality, training in critical
              incident stress debriefing, and community development. This initiative takes a
              community-based approach to suicide intervention by linking existing national
              training resources to people and organizations at the community level. Community
              partnerships are essential to this process. More than 1240 people received training
              in 49 workshop sessions in locations such as: Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Iqaluit,
              Terrace, Puvirnituq, Haines-Junction and Inuvik.

               Building upon the knowledge and successes achieved through the original initiative,
              Aboriginal Policing Branch is spearheading a project to adapt the program into a
              peer suicide approach and Youth involvement in a process to confront the high
              incidence of youth suicides in Aboriginal communities. This initiative will include
              youth training and peer support and a pilot for evaluation purposes in six (6) schools
              across the country. The five-year funding agreement for this new phase is being
              provided by the National Crime Prevention Centre.

             The Commissioner's National Aboriginal Advisory Committee (CNAAC) is
              comprised of 13 Aboriginal people who meet in various communities across the
              country, as decided by the committee. The mandate of the committee is to provide a
              forum for the continuing discussion of recruiting, training and community relations
              with respect to Aboriginal people, intercultural relations and other related matters that
              may emerge from time to time.

             Community Justice Forums (CJF) focuses on a community-based approach,
              usually pre-charge, that brings together all people touched by a crime, including
              family and friends of both victim and disputant. In the safety of the forum, they
              discuss the incident and negotiate a resolution aimed at "making things right". The
              RCMP has become an active partner with Justice Canada, through a commitment to
              the Aboriginal Justice Strategy (AJS) of which Community Justice Forums is one
              component. The RCMP has trained a core group of members and community people
              from across Canada to facilitate Community Justice Forums and set in motion the
              restorative justice process in the police community. CJF training is now a component
              of the Cadet Training Program. A multi-dimensional package is being developed by
              the Canadian Police College and the RCMP to make Community Justice Forums
              accessible to all police organizations.




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             RCMP First Nations Community Policing Service (FNCPS) has provided First
              Nations (including Inuit communities) access to police services that are professional,
              effective, culturally appropriate, and accountable to the communities. While started in
              1991, after April 1992, the Department of the Solicitor General has administered the
              FNPP. Under this policy, the federal, provincial/territorial governments, and the
              communities work together to negotiate community tripartite agreements for police
              services that meet the particular needs of each community. The RCMP-FNCPS
              model includes: service levels equivalent to those of non-First Nations communities;
              compatibility and sensitivity to First Nations culture and beliefs; flexibility to
              accommodate local variations in policing needs and, a framework which allows for
              transition to an independent First Nations-administered police service where this is
              desired by the community. The RCMP will ensure that communities are involved
              from the start in the design, implementation and on-going delivery of their police
              services.


7.1. Benefits to Aboriginal Peoples and/or department

         As much as possible, the Aboriginal policing policy builds on strong relations in the
         community. It is more culturally sensitive than regular policing services. It also provides
         role models to Aboriginal youth and programs are specifically designed for Aboriginal
         communities.

         The focus of the Aboriginal policy programs is geared 100% to Aboriginal
         communities/individuals.


7.2. Program Specifics

         The budgets and timeframes for programs are set as part of the normal RCMP budget
         process. Program evaluation is done as part of RCMP reporting requirements.

         It was noted that due to security and other internal requirements, all RCMP detachments
         cannot be part of other application systems in a community. Their buildings have to have
         high security considerations due to weapons storage, documentation, etc.

          All RCMP detachments have secure intranet access. They need to be on separate
         systems from any other organization, due to concerns re: security or “leakage” concerns
         from towers. Training and support are all internal to RCMP and as such can’t be shared
         due to security requirements. Their support personnel also can’t be on call for non-
         RCMP needs as priorities may change as well as access to planes, etc. in the remote
         communities.




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7.3. Connectivity Needs

         Connectivity is in alignment with RCMP policies. In British Columbia, negotiations are
         occurring with provincial partners re: upgrade requirements and systems development.

         With regard to community connectivity, they noted that the more the communities were
         connected, the more information they have access to and that is very positive. They felt
         connectivity was very important in a community, especially for the Aboriginal youth.

         Access to communication in remote communities was also noted as being very
         important for people moving there. It facilitated people in keeping up with their work
         skills, access to subject matter experts and getting information for their needs. In
         support of their own needs as well as a benefit to others, the RCMP have a number of
         good programs and information that is available to the public from the RCMP website
         http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/index_e.htm. They also have an excellent youth program that
         is increasing its focus to connect with Aboriginal youth. The website is www.deal.org.




7.3.1. Partnerships

         There are 190 tri-party and/or provincial/territorial agreements. Due to security and
         policy arrangements, while they support community initiatives for connectivity and
         support, they cannot participate in them for security reasons. These RCMP negotiations
         for Aboriginal Policing services occur with the respective provincial, territorial
         governments along with the Aboriginal Communities involved. Input from the CNAAC is
         taken into account in these discussions.

7.3.2. Success Stories -

         Deal.org - www.deal.org
         Contact Information for program:
          Patrice Poitevin
          Program Manager – RCMP DEAL Program, National Youth Strategy
         1200 Vanier Parkway
         Ottawa, ON K1A 0R2
         Tel: 613 993-6369
         Pat.poitevin@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

         Or




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         Francisco Chaves, Program Administrator
         RCMP DEAL.org Program
         1200 Vanier Parkway
         Ottawa, ON K1A 0R2
         Tel: 613 993-4023
         fchaves@deal.org




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8.       INFRASTRUCTURE CANADA

8.1. National Satellite Initiative, Strategic Infrastructure Fund, Municipal
     Rural Infrastructure Fund

         (INTERVIEWS IN PROGRESS)




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9.       TREASURY BOARD/GOVERNMENT ONLINE

         (INTERVIEWS IN PROGRESS)




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APPENDIX A – INTERVIEW RESPONDENTS

Contacts :

Department           Program /                       Main Contact Information       Program Type
                     Directorate
                                                     Ian Gadbois
Industry             Aboriginal Business             Manager                        Applications
Canada               Canada                          235 Queen St.
                                                     Ottawa, ON K1A 0H5
                                                     Tel: (613) 954-8078
                                                     Gadbois.ian@ic.gc.ca
                                                     Suzanne Robert
Industry             First Nations School            Manager                        Infrastructure
Canada               Net Program                     155 Queen Street, #432
                                                     Ottawa, Ontario
                                                     Tel: (613) 952-0598
                                                     Fax: (613) 941-1296
                                                     ROBERT.SUZANNE@ic.gc.ca
                                                     Ernie Dal Grande
Health               E-Health                        Tunney’s Pasture               Infrastructure
Canada                                               Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9
                                                     Ernie_Dal_Grande@hc-sc.gc.ca
                                                     Christian Dussault
INAC                 Indian Registry                 Program Manager                Infrastructure
                     Administration                  10 Wellington St.
                                                      Hull PQ K1A 0H4
                                                     Tel: (819) 953-9639
                                                     DussaultC@ainc-INAC.gc.ca
                     Economic                        Diane Riley, Peter Wyse,
INAC                 Development                     Gregory Weir                   Applications
                     Programs                        10 Wellington St.
                                                     Tel: (819) 997-8746
                                                     rileyd@INAC.gc.ca
                                                     Barbara Caverhill
INAC                 Education                       15 Eddy St. Hull, PQ K1A 0H4   Applications
                                                     caverhillb@INAC.gc.ca
                                                     (on leave till Nov. 2003)




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                                                     Marc Trudeau
HRDC                 AHRDA                           Program Manager – HRDC           Applications
                                                     Aboriginal Program Operations
                                                     140 Promenade du Portage Hull,
                                                     PQ K1A 0J9
                                                     Tel: (819) 997-4779
                                                     marctrudeau@hrdc-drhc.gc.ca
                                                     Rob Mastin
HRDC                 OLT CLN                         Mgr, Program Delivery            Applications
                                                     HRDC -OLT
                                                     200 Montcalm Street
                                                     Hull, Quebec Tel 994-5278
                                                     Rob.mastin@hrdc-drhc.gc.ca

                                                     Wes Heron A/Cpl.
RCMP                 Aboriginal Policing             Program/Policy Analyst           Infrastructure
(Solicitor           Directorate                     Royal Canadian Mounted Police
General)                                             National Aboriginal Policing
                                                     Services
                                                     Ottawa, Ontario
                                                     (613) 993-0448 - Office
                                                     (613) 998-2405 - Fax
                                                     E-mail: Wes.Heron@rcmp-
                                                     grc.gc.ca
CMHC                                                 Ray Bursey                       Applications
                                                     Sylvie Rouleau
                                                     Marketing Consultant
                                                     CMHC
                                                     700 Montreal Road
                                                     Ottawa, Ontario
                                                     T: (613) 748-2300x3925
                                                     F: (613) 748-4097
                                                     srouleau@cmhc-schl.gc.ca

ACOA                                                 Kevin Hynes                      Infrastructure
                                                     Senior Advisor
                                                     ACOA
                                                     4th Floor, 60 Queen St
                                                     Ottawa, Ontario
                                                     Tel: (613) 954-3308
                                                     khynes@acoa-apeca.gc.ca




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