South Carolina - Legislative Affairs

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					                                      NOAA In Your State
                                                   South Carolina

“NOAA's work touches the daily lives of every person in the
United States and in much of the world. Our products and
services are the result of the hard work of NOAA’s
dedicated staff and partner organizations located in
program and research offices throughout the country. The
following is a summary of NOAA programs based in, and
focused on, your state. The entries are listed by statewide,
region, and then by congressional districts and cities or
towns.”
                                      -   Dr. Jane Lubchenco
      Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere
                                      and NOAA Administrator




Coastal
National Ocean Service (NOS)
Coastal Services Center
Creating Resilient Communities
The Center is participating in a regional planning effort in Charleston, Dorchester, and Berkeley counties in South Carolina.
The project will make linkages between future development, conservation, and resilience to natural hazards. Areas where
natural hazards (hurricanes, flooding, etc.) threaten future community development are being identified, as are areas where
ecosystem services can help reduce threats to people and infrastructure and should be recognized as potential lands for
conservation.
http://www.csc.noaa.gov/regions/southeast.html

National Ocean Service (NOS)
Integrated Ocean Observing System Program
IOOS Regional Association
The Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association (SECOORA), part of the Integrated Ocean Observing
System Program (IOOS), is one of 11 Regional Associations being established through IOOS. SECOORA is to be
designed and operated to provide data, information and products on marine and estuarine systems. Information will be
provided to users in a common manner and according to sound scientific practice.
http://secoora.org/

National Ocean Service (NOS)
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Mussel Watch Program
Mussel Watch Program is the longest continuous, nationwide contaminant monitoring program in U.S. coastal waters. The
program analyzes sediment and bivalve tissue chemistry for a suite of organic contaminants and trace metals to identify
trends at over 300 selected coastal sites, including South Carolina, from 1986 to present.
http://ccma.nos.noaa.gov/about/coast/nsandt/welcome.html




                                                               1
National Weather Service (NWS)
National Data Buoy Center
South Carolina Buoy
The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) develops, deploys, operates, and maintains the current national data buoy network
of moored and drifting weather buoys and land stations, one of which is along coastal South Carolina. NDBC, located at
NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, supports weather and marine warning and forecast services in real time by
providing deep ocean and coastal meteorological and oceanographic observations. These data provide valuable
information used by NWS super computers to produce computer generated model forecasts of the atmosphere, and
climate. NDBC manages the Volunteer Observing Ship program to acquire additional meteorological and oceanographic
observations supporting NWS mission requirements. NDBC also supports operational and research programs of NOAA
and other national and international organizations.
http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

Statewide
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
Habitat Program
Restoration Center
NMFS Restoration Center works with 16 local partners in South Carolina to rebuild native oyster beds, establish wetland
buffers, and restore tidal wetlands. Nine projects, including over 100 oyster reefs, have been constructed since 1999 and
through the Community-based Restoration Program 2,600 volunteers have contributed their efforts to restore the State’s
coastal habitat.
http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/habitat/restoration/publications/statefactsheets/2007/SC2007_final.pdf

National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
Southeast Region
Southeast Regional Office and Fisheries Science Center
NMFS studies, protects and conserves living marine resources in federal waters (water to 200 miles off the seaward
boundaries of coastal states) to promote healthy, functioning marine ecosystems, afford economic opportunities and
enhance the quality of life for the American public. NMFS’ Southeast Regional Office (SERO) (headquartered in Saint
Petersburg, FL) and Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) (headquartered in Miami, FL) are responsible for living
marine resources in federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic and U.S. Caribbean. . Using the authorities
provided by the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, Endangered Species Act, Marine Mammal
Protection Act and other federal statutes, the SERO and SEFSC partner to assess and predict the status of fish stocks,
marine mammals and other protected resources, develop and ensure compliance with fishery regulations, restore and
protect habitat, and recover threatened and endangered species, such as whales and turtles, in federal waters off South
Carolina and throughout the Southeast Region.
http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/index.html and http://www.sefsc.noaa.gov

National Weather Service (NWS)
Automated Surface Observing Systems
South Carolina Stations
The Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS) program is a joint effort of the National Weather Service (NWS), the
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Department of Defense (DOD). The ASOS systems serve as the nation's
primary surface weather observing network. ASOS is designed to support weather forecast activities and aviation
operations and, at the same time, support the needs of the meteorological, hydrological, and climatological research
communities. ASOS works non-stop, updating observations every minute, 24 hours a day, every day of the year observing
basic weather elements, such as cloud cover, precipitation, wind, sea level pressure, and conditions, such as rain, snow,
freezing rain, thunderstorm, and fog. There are twelve ASOS stations in South Carolina.
http://www.weather.gov/mirs/public/prods/maps/map_images/state-maps/asos_09/sc_asos.pdf and
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/asos/




                                                             2
National Weather Service (NWS)
Cooperative Observer Program
South Carolina Sites
The National Weather Service (NWS) Cooperative Observer Program (COOP) is truly the Nation's weather and climate
observing network of, by and for the people. More than 10,000 volunteers take observations on farms, in urban and
suburban areas, National Parks, seashores, and mountaintops. The data are representative of where people live, work and
play. The COOP was formally created in 1890 under the NWS Organic Act to provide observational meteorological data,
usually consisting of daily maximum and minimum temperatures, snowfall, and 24-hour precipitation totals, required to
define the climate of the United States and to help measure long-term climate changes, and to provide observational
meteorological data in near real-time to support forecast, warning and other public service programs of the NWS. The data
are also used by Department of Homeland security, the insurance industry, and energy sector, and many others. These
and other federal, state and local governments, and private company sectors use the data daily to make billions of dollars
worth of decisions. For example, the energy sector uses COOP data to calculate the Heating and Cooling Degree Days
which are used to determine everyone's energy bill monthly. There are 129 COOP sites in South Carolina.
http://www.weather.gov/mirs/public/prods/maps/map_images/state-maps/coop_09/sc_coop.pdf and
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/coop/

National Weather Service (NWS)
NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards
South Carolina Transmitters
NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards (NWR) is a nationwide network of radio stations broadcasting continuous weather
information directly from the nearest National Weather Service office. NWR broadcasts official Weather Service warnings,
watches, forecasts and other hazard information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Working with the Federal Communication
Commission's (FCC) Emergency Alert System, NWR is an "All Hazards" radio network, making it the single source for
comprehensive weather and emergency information. In conjunction with Federal, state, and local emergency managers
and other public officials, NWR also broadcasts warning and post-event information for all types of hazards – including
natural (such as earthquakes or avalanches), environmental (such as chemical releases or oil spills), and public safety
(such as AMBER alerts or 911 Telephone outages). Known as the "Voice of NOAA's National Weather Service," NWR is
provided as a public service by the NWS. NWR includes 1100 transmitters covering all 50 states, adjacent coastal waters,
Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the U.S. Pacific Territories. There are 16 NWR transmitters in South Carolina.
http://www.weather.gov/mirs/public/prods/maps/map_images/state-maps/nwr_09/sc_nwr.pdf (state). and
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/

Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)
National Sea Grant College Program
South Carolina Sea Grant College Program
NOAA's National Sea Grant College Program is a federal-university partnership that integrates research, education, and
outreach (extension and communications). Sea Grant forms a network of 32 programs in all U.S. coastal and Great Lakes
states, Puerto Rico and Guam. The South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium is a statewide program that generates and
provides science-based information to enhance the practical use and conservation of coastal and marine resources to
foster a sustainable economy and environment. Consortium research, education, and outreach efforts address important
marine and coastal issues, including population growth and land use, ecosystem studies, fisheries and aquaculture,
coastal-dependent businesses, climate and weather, natural hazards, marine education, and public awareness.

The Consortium focuses its efforts on generating information about the function and value of coastal and ocean
ecosystems and communicating this information to decision-makers and the public. They also focus on conducting
investigations and outreach activities to provide science-based information to decision-makers that addresses the effects of
population growth and land-use change on coastal and ocean ecosystems. They generate and deliver information on the
effects of climate and weather; developing technology and extending information to at-risk homeowners, businesses, and
government agencies to help them prepare for and mitigate the impacts coastal hazards. They are supporting research and
technology transfer efforts to enhance sustainable fisheries, aquaculture, and related industries; and are identifying
sustainable community-based economic development and management strategies to support traditional and emerging
coastal-dependent business and industry. They are also designing and implementing K-12 educational programs that
increase proficiency in science and knowledge of coastal and ocean ecosystems; and are supporting the development of a
diverse and scientifically trained workforce.
http://www.scseagrant.org/



                                                             3
SC-1
Charleston
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
Office of Law Enforcement
Field Office
NOAA's Office of Law Enforcement is dedicated primarily to the enforcement of laws that protect and regulate our nation’s
living marine resources and their natural habitat. Office of Law Enforcement special agents and enforcement officers have
specified authority to enforce over 37 statutes, as well as numerous treaties related to the conservation and protection of
marine resources and other matters of concern to NOAA. Stretching across the Gulf of Mexico, up the eastern seaboard
from the Florida Keys to the northern shore of North Carolina and covering U.S. territorial waters in the Caribbean, the
Southeast Enforcement Division's responsibility is vast beyond measure. The Southeast is home to the nation's large
shrimp trawl fishery, and is widely known for its vast coral reefs fisheries, turtle beaches, and highly prized saltwater
gamefish. Georgian waters also play host to the calving grounds for the approximately 350 endangered Northern Right
whales, while Floridian waters hold the only continental coral reef in the United States. The Divisions is also responsible for
enforcement activities within the Florida Keys, Flower Garden Bank, the Monitor and Gray’s Reef National Marine
Sanctuaries.
http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/ole/se_southeast.html

National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
Southeast Regional Office
Charleston Field Office
The Charleston Field Office is co-located with other NOAA facilities on the grounds of the South Carolina Department of
Natural Resources campus near Charleston Harbor. This office oversees NMFS’ habitat protection programs in the South
Atlantic, and implements NMFS’ habitat protection programs in South Carolina and Georgia. In addition to conducting
mandated essential fish habitat consultations associated with extensive energy and coastal development activities, the
Charleston Field Office participates in state and regional habitat planning and restoration efforts and in the planning
processes for major federal water development projects. This office also is responsible for implementing fishway
prescriptions for hydropower re-licensing activities in the Southeast Region.
http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/hcd/hcd.htm

National Ocean Service (NOS)
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Center for Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research
CCEHBR conducts applied research programs to: develop methods to characterize, detect and measure marine biotoxins,
HABs and CECs; and understand the factors linking land use in the coastal zones with the distribution and effects of
environmental contaminants on living marine resources and associated habitats.
http://www.chbr.noaa.gov

National Ocean Service (NOS)
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science
Center for Human Health Risk -- Hollings Marine Laboratory
Located at the Hollings Marine Lab (HML), a NOAA Center of Excellence in Oceans and Human Health, CHHR research is
focused on genomics, environmental chemistry and toxicology, and pathogen source tracking, monitoring, and assessment
to: examine the interrelationships between human health and marine environmental health; and develop and integrate
medical and marine technologies to understand, assess, sustain and protect marine and coastal ecosystems.
http://coastalhealth.noaa.gov/

National Ocean Service (NOS)
NOAA Coastal Services Center
Headquarters
Since 1994, the NOAA Coastal Services Center has served the coastal resource managers of the nation (local, state, and
federal) by providing information, services, and technology. The Center's area of expertise is broad, but the primary focus is
on geographic information systems, coastal remote sensing, and training. The Center works with states and other partners
on over 100 projects annually; each project is geared to resolve a site-specific coastal resource management issue. The
lessons learned from each project are then transferred to the rest of the nation's coastal managers.
http://www.csc.noaa.gov



                                                               4
National Ocean Service (NOS)
Oceans and Human Health Initiative
Headquarters
NOAA's Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our oceans, coasts and
Great Lakes impacts our own health and well-being, in the context of existing knowledge of how our activities affect the
health of aquatic environments. The goal of the OHHI is to understand and predict how the condition of these waters
positively or negatively affect human health. In turn, the OHHI will provide tools, technologies and environmental
information to public health managers and the public to maximize health benefits and reduce or eliminate health risks.
http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/ohhi/

National Ocean Service (NOS)
Office of Coast Survey
Navigation Manager
Navigation Managers serve as Coast Survey’s ambassadors to the maritime community. Located in different regions
throughout the country, Coast Survey Navigation Managers help identify the challenges facing marine transportation in
general, directly supporting the NOAA strategic goal to "promote safe navigation." These agents assist Coast Survey in
overseeing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's nautical chart data collection and information programs,
helping to meet constituent needs. Navigation Managers focus primarily on resolving charting and navigation questions,
educating constituents on emerging charting technologies and their uses, and soliciting feedback on NOAA's navigation
products and services from the commercial maritime industry. OCS has a Navigation Manager located in Charleston, SC to
support mariners and stakeholders in the Southeast region.
http://www.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/nsd/reps.htm

National Ocean Service (NOS)
Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management
South Carolina Coastal Management Program/ South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control
Through a unique Federal-state partnership, NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM) works
with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC) to implement the National Coastal
Management Program in South Carolina. OCRM provides the SC DHEC with financial and technical assistance to further
the goals of the Coastal Zone Management Act to protect, restore and responsibly develop our nation’s coastal
communities and resources by balancing the often competing demands of coastal resource use, economic development
and conservation. South Carolina’s coastal zone encompasses all lands and waters in the counties of the state which
contain any one or more “critical areas” which are defined as coastal waters, tidelands, beaches, and primary oceanfront
sand dunes.
http://coastalmanagement.noaa.gov/mystate/sc.html

National Weather Service (NWS)
Weather Forecast Office
Charleston WFO
Located in Charleston, this National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office (WFO) is staffed around the clock every
day, and provides the best possible weather, water, and climate forecasts and warnings to residents of southeast South
Carolina, and northeast Georgia. Highly trained forecasters issue warnings and forecasts for events over land and sea
including hurricanes and tropical storms, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, winter storms, floods, and heat waves. This
essential information is provided to the general public, media, emergency management and law enforcement officials, the
aviation, and marine communities, agricultural interests, businesses, and others. Information is disseminated in many ways,
including through dedicated government channels, satellite, the Internet, and broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All
Hazards.

Forecasters provide on-site, detailed weather support for critical emergencies, such as wildfires, floods, chemical spills, and
for major recovery efforts such as those following the Greensboro, Kansas, tornado; Hurricane Katrina; and the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attack in New York City. The WFO collects and disseminates precipitation, river, and rainfall data, and
prepares local climatological data. The Warning Coordination Meteorologist actively conducts outreach and educational
programs, which helps build strong working relationships with local partners in emergency management, government, the
media and academic communities. The WFO operates Automated Surface Observing Stations and the local Doppler
Weather Radar. The radar provides critical information about current weather conditions for the forecasters to issue tornado
warnings or flood and flash flood warnings.
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/chs/

                                                              5
Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (OMAO)
Port Office – Charleston
NOAA Ships Ronald H. Brown and Nancy Foster
The NOAA Ships Ronald H. Brown and Nancy Foster are homeported in Charleston and managed by the OMAO Marine
Operations Center-Atlantic in Norfolk, Virginia. The NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown primarily supports the science and
research missions of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research plus a wide range of academic research
institutions. The NOAA Ship Nancy Foster operates in support of NOAA's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource
Management and the National Sea Grant College Program. Both vessels are operated under the direction of officers from
the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps.

The NOAA Corps today provides a cadre of professionals trained in engineering, earth sciences, oceanography,
meteorology, fisheries science, and other related disciplines. Officers operate ships, fly aircraft, manage research projects,
conduct diving operations, and serve in staff positions throughout NOAA.
http://www.moc.noaa.gov/rb/ and http://www.moc.noaa.gov/nf/

Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)
Earth System Research Laboratory/Global Monitoring Division
Monitoring the Atmosphere Aloft - Carbon Cycle Gases and Halocarbons
NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) operates a new and growing small aircraft-based North American
network of sampling sites to measure vertical profiles of important greenhouse gas concentrations. Air is sampled above
the surface up to approximately 25,000 feet above sea level using a relatively small, light, and economical automated
system developed by ESRL researchers. These air samples are delivered to the ESRL laboratory in Boulder, Colorado for
measurements of CO2, CH4, and other greenhouse gasses. This data will improve understanding and models of the global
carbon cycle. Halocarbon measurements help determine the effectiveness of efforts to protect and restore the ozone layer
so it can protect us from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation.
http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/about/climate.html

Georgetown
National Ocean Service (NOS)
Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management
Centralized Data Management Office
Monitoring data for each National Estuarine Research Reserve are available from the Centralized Data Management
Office. To understand changes in water quality, each reserve uses automated data loggers to monitor physical and
chemical variables. Each reserve collects data at a minimum of four stations, at 15-minute intervals. Data are collected on:
Water Temperature, Water Depth, Salinity, pH, Dissolved Oxygen, Turbidity (cloudiness or clarity). These parameters are
important indicators of habitat quality for numerous estuarine species and in being able to determine health criteria and
human uses.
http://cdmo.baruch.sc.edu/

National Ocean Service (NOS)
Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management
North Inlet-- Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
The 12,000+ acre North Inlet--Winyah Bay Reserve was designated in 1992 and is managed by the University of South
Carolina. The Reserve is composed of salt marshes and ocean dominated tidal creeks of the North Inlet Estuary, and the
brackish waters and marshes of the adjacent Winyah Bay Estuary. The National Estuarine Research Reserve System is a
Federal-state partnership consisting of a network of estuarine areas protected for long-term research and monitoring,
stewardship and education. The Reserve provides year-round educational programs for adults and children on coastal
issues, as well as public forums and seminars, many of which draw on data collected by the Reserve. A comprehensive
research program, which includes studies of molecular processes and studies of climate change impacts on estuaries,
takes place at the Reserve, and includes the NERR system-wide monitoring program.
http://nerrs.noaa.gov/NorthInlet/




                                                               6
McClellanville
National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) and Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric
Research (OAR)
Climate Reference Network
McClellanville Station
The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) is an operational network of climate stations. Data from the USCRN will be
used in operational climate monitoring activities and for placing current climate anomalies into an historical perspective.
NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) manages the USCRN. The USCRN will also provide the United States with
a reference network that contributes to an International network under the auspices of the Global Climate Observing
System (GCOS). NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service and NOAA’s Office of Oceanic
and Atmospheric Research jointly manage USCRN.
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/uscrn/

Springmaid Pier
National Ocean Service (NOS)
Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services
National Water Level Observation Network
The National Ocean Service (NOS) operates two long-term continuously operating tide stations in the state of South
Carolina that provide data and information on tidal datums and relative sea level trends, and are capable of producing real-
time data for storm surge warning. These stations are located at Springmaid Pier and Charleston. NOS also operates a
long-term station at North Inlet in cooperation with the Baruch Institute, University of South Carolina.
http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov

SC-2
Blackville
National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) and Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric
Research (OAR)
Climate Reference Network
Blackville Station
The U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) is an operational network of climate stations. Data from the USCRN will be
used in operational climate monitoring activities and for placing current climate anomalies into an historical perspective.
NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) manages the USCRN. The USCRN will also provide the United States with
a reference network that contributes to an International network under the auspices of the Global Climate Observing
System (GCOS). NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service and NOAA’s Office of Oceanic
and Atmospheric Research jointly manage USCRN.
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/uscrn/

SC-2, 6
Bennetts Point
National Ocean Service (NOS)
Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM)
ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve
The 130,000+ acres of the ACE Basin Reserve was designated in 1992 and is managed by the South Carolina Department
of Natural Resources. The National Estuarine Research Reserve System is a Federal-state partnership consisting of a
network of estuarine areas protected for long-term research and monitoring, stewardship and education. The Reserve
includes salt marshes, brackish marshes, tidal flats, maritime forests and pine-mixed hardwoods. It is especially rich in its
diversity of endangered and threatened species. Research enhances the protection of the Reserve’s commercial and
recreational uses by monitoring water quality, providing information on the abundance and types of important plant and
animal species, and evaluating the overall health of the ACE Basin ecosystem. Through its education programs, the
Reserve provides timely information to coastal decision makers, lawmakers, teachers, students and the public. American
alligator, Atlantic loggerhead turtle, shortnose sturgeon, bald eagle and wood stork are among the many species found
within the Reserve’s boundaries.
http://nerrs.noaa.gov/ACEBasin/




                                                              7
Columbia
National Ocean Service (NOS)
National Geodetic Survey
Geodetic Coordinator
Through a cooperative agreement and part of the National Ocean Service (NOS) State Advisor Program, the State
Geodetic Coordinator is a State employee that serves as liaison between NOS and the host state. In this method, NOS
helps guide and assist the State's charting, geodetic and surveying programs through technical transfer. This program also
provides assistance in planning and implementing Geographic/Land Information System (GIS/LIS) projects.
http://http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/ADVISORS/AdvisorsIndex.shtml

National Weather Service (NWS)
Weather Forecast Office
Columbia WFO
Located at the Columbia Metropolitan Airport complex, this National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office (WFO) is
staffed around the clock every day, and provides the best possible weather, water, and climate forecasts and warnings to
residents of central South Carolina. Highly trained forecasters issue warnings and forecasts for events including hurricanes
and tropical storms, severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, winter storms, floods, and heat waves. This essential information is
provided to the general public, media, emergency management and law enforcement officials, the aviation, and marine
communities, agricultural interests, businesses, and others. Information is disseminated in many ways, including through
dedicated government channels, satellite, the Internet, and broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards.

Forecasters provide on-site, detailed weather support for critical emergencies, such as wildfires, floods, chemical spills, and
for major recovery efforts such as those following the Greensboro, Kansas, tornado; Hurricane Katrina; and the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attack in New York City. The WFO collects and disseminates precipitation, river, and rainfall data, and
prepares local climatological data. The Warning Coordination Meteorologist actively conducts outreach and educational
programs, which helps build strong working relationships with local partners in emergency management, government, the
media and academic communities. These relationships are invaluable in helping to prepare people to respond appropriately
when threatened by severe weather or other hazards. The WFO operates Automated Surface Observing Stations and the
local Doppler Weather Radar. The radar provides critical information about current weather conditions for the forecasters to
issue tornado warnings or flood and flash flood warnings.
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/cae/

SC-4
Greenville/Spartanburg
National Weather Service (NWS)
Weather Forecast Office
Greenville/Spartanburg WFO
Located at the Greenville/ Spartanburg International Airport, this National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office (WFO)
is staffed around the clock every day, and provides the best possible weather, water, and climate forecasts and warnings to
residents of upstate South Carolina, western and central North Carolina, and extreme northeast Georgia. Highly trained
forecasters issue warnings and forecasts for events including hurricanes and tropical storms, severe thunderstorms,
tornadoes, winter storms, floods, and heat waves. This essential information is provided to the general public, media,
emergency management and law enforcement officials, the aviation, and marine communities, agricultural interests,
businesses, and others. Information is disseminated in many ways, including through dedicated government channels,
satellite, the Internet, and broadcast on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards.

Forecasters provide on-site, detailed weather support for critical emergencies, such as wildfires, floods, chemical spills, and
for major recovery efforts such as those following the Greensboro, Kansas, tornado; Hurricane Katrina; and the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attack in New York City. The WFO collects and disseminates precipitation, river, and rainfall data, and
prepares local climatological data. The Warning Coordination Meteorologist actively conducts outreach and educational
programs, which helps build strong working relationships with local partners in emergency management, government, the
media and academic communities. These relationships are invaluable in helping to prepare people to respond appropriately
when threatened by severe weather or other hazards. The WFO operates Automated Surface Observing Stations and the
local Doppler Weather Radar. The radar provides critical information about current weather conditions for the forecasters to
issue tornado warnings or flood and flash flood warnings.
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/gsp



                                                              8
SC-6
Columbia
Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)
Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments
Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments
The Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments (CISA) was established as a cooperative agreement between
NOAA's Climate Program Office and University of South Carolina. CISA investigates how decision makers currently use
climate information to manage water and how such use could be expanded most beneficially. Cooperating Institutions are
University of South Carolina, Southeast Regional Climate Center, and South Carolina State Climate Office with funding
from NOAA's Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program.
http://www.cas.sc.edu/geog/cisa




                             NOAA’s Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs
                                         http://www.legislative.noaa.gov



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