Emergency Preparedness Home Owners Association Template

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					Dear Coalition Member,

Thank you for becoming a National Preparedness Month (NPM) 2009 Coalition Member and making a
commitment to help your community become better prepared! We look forward to working with you this
September to encourage individuals, families, businesses and communities to take acti
2

Dear National Preparedness Month 2010 Coalition Member,

On behalf of FEMA, the Ready Campaign, and Citizen Corps, thank you for becoming a
National Preparedness Month (NPM) 2010 Coalition Member. Helping individuals, families,
businesses, and communities increase their preparedness is a shared responsibility. Your efforts,
and your willingness to be a part of the team, will play an essential role in encouraging your
community to be Ready.

Throughout NPM 2010, we will encourage Americans to work together, neighbor to neighbor, to
support each other in planning and preparing for disaster. Unfortunately, we don’t get to pick the
next disaster, so it’s important for our communities to be informed about the threats and hazards
they face.

Coalition Members like you play a crucial role in helping Americans take concrete steps toward
preparedness by educating them about what it means and what it takes to be Ready. I often
remind people that FEMA is only part of the nation’s emergency response team. Members of the
public are the most critical part of the team, and the more we work together now to encourage
their preparedness, the better our collective response will be.

As you support NPM 2010, I ask you to reach out to your employees, neighbors, constituent
groups, communities, stakeholders, and all types of audiences to encourage them to take active
steps toward preparedness for their families. Concrete, simple steps like encouraging people to
Get a Kit, Make a Plan, and Be Informed, make a difference. By working together as a team and
supporting each other’s efforts can we ensure that everyone is better prepared.

Through your participation in NPM 2010, you are taking action toward helping us create a
culture of preparedness in America. Thank you for your support and your efforts.

Sincerely,
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section I: What is NPM? ........................................................................................................ 5
Section II: What’s my role in NPM 2010?................................................................................ 6
   HOW TO REACH YOUR AUDIENCES .................................................................................................6
   WHAT’S IN THE TOOLKIT?...............................................................................................................7
Section III: How to Promote NPM .......................................................................................... 8
   Work with Your Community Partners .............................................................................................8
   Prepare Your Neighborhood ...........................................................................................................8
   Prepare Your Community ...............................................................................................................9
   Prepare Your Workplace ..............................................................................................................10
   Prepare Your Local Military Installation ........................................................................................11
   Prepare Youth..............................................................................................................................12
   Prepare Pet Owners .....................................................................................................................12
   Prepare Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities and Other Access and Functional Needs ............. 13
   TACTICS FOR GETTING YOUR PREPAREDNESS MESSAGE OUT ........................................................15
   KEY MESSAGES TO CONVEY ..........................................................................................................16
   NPM 2009 HIGHLIGHTS ................................................................................................................17
Section IV: Share your story ................................................................................................. 23
Section V: Beyond September .............................................................................................. 24
APPENDICES ........................................................................................................................ 27
APPENDIX A: GRAPHIC TOOLS.............................................................................................. 28
      NPM WEB BANNER............................................................................................................................. 28
      NPM POWERPOINT PRESENTATION .................................................................................................. 29
      NPM EMPLOYEE/CUSTOMER POSTER................................................................................................ 30
      NPM “DID YOU KNOW?” POSTER ...................................................................................................... 31
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS BILL STUFFER....................................................................................... 32
      NPM 2010 CUSTOMIZABLE COLLATERAL ........................................................................................... 34
APPENDIX B: ARTICLES, NOTICES, PROCLAMATIONS, AND OTHER NOTIFICATIONS ............... 36
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS E-MAIL FOR EMPLOYEES, MEMBERS, AND STAKEHOLDERS .............. 36
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG ENTRY FOR A GENERAL
      AUDIENCE ........................................................................................................................................... 37
      COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG ENTRY FOR A GENERAL
      AUDIENCE ........................................................................................................................................... 38
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG ENTRY FOR A FAMILY
      AUDIENCE ........................................................................................................................................... 40
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG ENTRY PREPAREDNESS ON A
      BUDGET .............................................................................................................................................. 41
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG POST FOR PET OWNERS ...... 42
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG POST FOR BUSINESS
      OWNERS/MANAGERS AUDIENCE....................................................................................................... 43
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SAMPLE TWEETS ................................................................................. 44
      NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH PROCLAMATION REQUEST ....................................................... 46
      NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH PROCLAMATION TEMPLATE ..................................................... 47


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      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS EVENT INVITATION FLYER ................................................................... 48
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SPEAKER INVITATION.......................................................................... 49
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS QUIZ .................................................................................................... 50
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS QUIZ FOR KIDS .................................................................................... 51
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ....................................................... 52
Appendix C: READY TOOLS................................................................................................... 57
      EMERGENCY SUPPLY KIT CHECKLIST .................................................................................................. 57
      FAMILY EMERGENCY PLAN TEMPLATE .............................................................................................. 57
      READY AND CITIZEN CORPS BROCHURES........................................................................................... 57
      READY ORDER FORM .......................................................................................................................... 58
      CITIZEN CORPS ORDER FORM ............................................................................................................ 59
      REX ORDER FORM .............................................................................................................................. 60
      READY PUBLIC SERVICE ADVERTISEMENTS (PSAs) ............................................................................. 61
      INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEOS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD ..................................................................... 62
Appendix D: Media Tools ..................................................................................................... 63
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE ................................................................. 63
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS EVENT MEDIA ADVISORY .................................................................... 64
      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSPAPER CALENDAR SECTION SUBMISSION ................................ 65




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                             SECTION I: WHAT IS NPM?
National Preparedness Month (NPM) is sponsored by the Ready Campaign and Citizen Corps.
NPM is held each September to encourage Americans to take simple steps to prepare for
emergencies in their homes, businesses, and communities.

September 2010 is the seventh annual NPM. This year will focus on encouraging Americans to
work together to take concrete actions toward emergency preparedness. We are encouraging all
Americans to join the readiness team and truly help themselves, their neighbors and their
communities be Ready.


   •   NPM Coalition membership is open to all public and private sector organizations. Groups
       can register to become an NPM Coalition Member by visiting ready.gov and clicking on
       the NPM banner.

   •   In 2009, nearly 2,700 organizations joined the Ready Campaign in promoting the
       readiness message across the country in homes, schools, businesses, and communities to
       highlight the importance of individual and community public emergency preparedness
       throughout September.

   •   During NPM, Coalition Members share preparedness information with their members,
       customers, employees, and communities. Members spearhead activities that encourage
       specific steps for individual, neighborhood, and community preparedness.

   •   Throughout the year, the Ready Campaign promotes individual emergency preparedness.
       Ready is a national public service advertising (PSA) campaign, produced in partnership
       with The Advertising Council, to educate and empower Americans to prepare for and
       respond to emergencies, including natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks.

   •   The Campaign’s Web sites (ready.gov and listo.gov) and toll-free numbers (1-800-BE-
       READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585, and 1-888-SE-LISTO) provide Americans with free
       emergency preparedness information.

   •   Citizen Corps is FEMA's grassroots strategy to bring together government and
       community leaders to involve citizens in all-hazards emergency preparedness and
       resilience. Local Citizen Corps Councils enable collaborative planning between
       government and civic leaders and provide localized support for: outreach and educational
       efforts to the public; training and exercises that effectively integrate all sectors of the
       community; and volunteer programs that augment the full range of emergency response
       services. For more information about Citizen Corps, visit www.citizencorps.gov.




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                 SECTION II: WHAT’S MY ROLE IN NPM 2010?
NPM couldn’t happen without you, our Coalition Members. Unlike many outreach efforts, NPM
and the Ready campaign aren’t just trying to create awareness of an issue among the public. We
rely on you to reach out to many different audiences within the general public and motivate them
to become prepared for disasters and emergencies.

HOW TO REACH YOUR AUDIENCES

Here are some keys to bringing action-based NPM messages to your audiences:

Understand your audience
Know what groups of people you are trying to reach. Are you targeting groups with additional
needs, such as people with access and functional needs like seniors, people with disabilities and
people who don’t speak English, who may need extra help in becoming prepared? Does your
community have specific demographic groups, such as college-aged students? Knowing who is
receiving your message is important to what you say and do.

Know the specific risks in your area
According to the 2009 Citizen Corps National Survey, only 36 percent of individuals believed
there was a high likelihood of a natural disaster to EVER happen in their community. Yet, all
across the country there are examples of disasters, both natural and otherwise, that affect people
daily. It’s not just hurricanes and earthquakes. Snowstorms, power outages, and even non-natural
events such as terrorist attacks can affect anyone in the country. By knowing your risks and
tailoring your preparedness message to those risks, you can help your community prepare for the
most likely emergencies.

Make it meaningful
Tailor your message to each particular audience, whether it’s individuals or families, employees,
professionals in specific fields (such as education or medicine), young people, people with
disabilities, or other audiences with access and functional needs. Reaching out to these audiences
with messages that resonate with them will help engage them better.

Make it accessible
Create messages and tools that are accessible to all audiences. Offer accessible PDFs to
audiences with disabilities or those with access and functional needs. Ensure that Websites are
508 compliant. Offer closed and open captioning on videos and other visual material. Make
meetings physically accessible to those with disabilities, and include programming and
communications options that ensure accessibility to all. Visit Disability.gov for more information
on accessibility.

Engage your audience
Create activities that engage your particular audiences: offer preparedness activities and games,
prepare checklists, run drills, or exercises. Include a “call to action” in your printed messaging to
encourage people to take active steps toward preparedness.




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WHAT’S IN THE TOOLKIT?

In this Toolkit are suggestions for activities and events you can sponsor to help spread the NPM
message, along with templates and drafts of articles, posters, and other collateral that you can use
in your outreach efforts. As you familiarize yourself with the Toolkit, keep an eye out for the
audiences that you work with and select the tools that can help you reach them most effectively.

As always, the Ready campaign welcomes your input on our Toolkit, as well as suggestions for
activities, audiences, or outreach efforts that we can include in future NPM efforts. Preparedness
works best when we work together. Please share with us your suggestions and stories for how to
make the most of NPM 2010 and all of your efforts to make us a better-prepared nation. Send
ideas, questions, or suggestions to npm@dhs.gov.




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                     SECTION III: HOW TO PROMOTE NPM
This section provides sample activities you can use and ways you can partner with organizations
throughout September to highlight the preparedness message and encourage concrete
preparedness activities throughout your communities. Sample preparedness materials can be
found in the appendices to assist you with the activities and events listed below.

The Ready Campaign encourages you to plan ahead for your NPM activities and involve
community and business leaders in the planning process.

Work with Your Community Partners
  • Reach Out to Your Local Citizen Corps Council
                 Through Citizen Corps Councils and Citizen Corps’ program partners and
                 affiliates, you can find training and volunteer opportunities to support you,
                 your family, first responders, and the community in an emergency. Visit
                 www.citizencorps.gov to learn more. Citizen Corps partners and affiliates
                 include organizations in emergency management, emergency medicine and
                 public health services, law enforcement organizations, volunteer
                 organizations, private sector associations, youth organizations, education
                 groups and more:
                 •   American Association of Community
                     Colleges                                    •   National Association for Search and Rescue
                 •   The American Legion                         •   National Crime Prevention Council
                 •   The American Legion Auxiliary               •   National Fire Protection Association
                 •   American Red Cross                          •   National Oceanic and Atmospheric
                 •   American Radio Relay League                     Administration
                 •   Association of Public Television Stations   •   National Safety Council
                 •   Civil Air Patrol                            •   National Volunteer Fire Council
                 •   Community Emergency Response Teams          •   National Voluntary Organizations Active in
                     (CERT)                                          Disaster (National VOAD)
                 •   E9-1-1 Institute                            •   Operation HOPE, Inc.
                 •   Environmental Protection Agency             •   Points of Light Institute and the HandsOn
                 •   Fire Corps                                      Network
                 •   Girl Scouts of USA                          •   U.S. Department of Education
                 •   Home Safety Council                         •   United States Power Squadrons
                 •   Jaycees                                     •   USA On Watch/ Neighborhood Watch
                 •   Meals on Wheels Association of America      •   Veterans of Foreign Wars
                 •   Medical Reserve Corps (MRC)                 •   Volunteers In Police Service (VIPS
                 •   Mercy Medical Airlift
                 •   www.myGoodDeed.org

Prepare Your Neighborhood
  • Discuss Preparedness in your Neighborhood
              Ask your Home Owners Association or Neighborhood Civic Association to make
              emergency preparedness an agenda item during its September meeting. This is a great
              way to make sure there is an evacuation plan for your neighborhood and to
              communicate it to your neighbors. Invite neighbors who feel they may need a bit of
              extra help to let others know; make a commitment as a community to help one
              another.
              Blog about it. Include articles or write-ups in your blog or community Web site
              encouraging your community to become prepared.

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  •   Distribute Family Emergency Plan Templates and Emergency Supply Checklists
               You can download Family Emergency Plan templates and Emergency Supply Kit
               checklists at ready.gov.
  •   Review Emergency Plans
               Review emergency plans for the places where you and your family spend your time
               such as schools, workplaces, places of worship, and at home.

Prepare Your Community
  • Include Preparedness Activities at Community Events
                Include emergency preparedness in existing community events by conducting
                demonstrations or handing out materials.
                        Consider local events already scheduled in your community during
                        September such as state or county fairs, festivals, parades, or sporting
                        events. This is an opportunity to have a table or booth set up to distribute
                        emergency preparedness information, recruit volunteers, and/or share with
                        the community what your organization is doing.
                        For the past six years, Minor League Baseball has worked with the Ready
                        Campaign and Citizen Corps to help spread the emergency preparedness
                        message to baseball fans nationwide, so your local Minor League Baseball
                        team might be able to assist in your efforts. To find out more about this
                        effort, visit http://ready.gov/america/about/milb.html.
  • Host a Preparedness Fair for Your Community
              During the event, you could demonstrate how to build an emergency kit using the
              Ready Emergency Supply Checklist and walk through how to develop a Family
              Emergency Plan by using Ready’s Family Emergency Plan Template. Both are
              available at ready.gov.
              Invite local government officials, first responders, and/or your local Citizen Corps
              Council to give a brief emergency preparedness presentation at a community
              recreation center, library, or other family gathering place.
              This would also be an opportunity to present the community’s emergency
              preparedness plan. The local first responder could discuss emergencies that could
              affect your area and the appropriate responses. You could also contact your local
              meteorologist to gauge his/her interest in participating.
              During events, you could air the latest Ready Public Service Advertisements on a
              video monitor. See page 60 for instructions on how to access and download them or
              you may also request them on DVD by sending an e-mail to npm@dhs.gov
  • Encourage Your City or Town to Promote NPM Directly
              Include preparedness as an item for discussion in monthly town meetings
              Add preparedness messages to utility bills, newsletters, and on Web sites
              Tweet about it. Does your town have a Twitter feed? Include messages throughout
              the month of September encouraging preparedness.




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Prepare Your Workplace
  • Update Your Employee Contact List and Distribute it to Your Employees
  • Host a Business Preparedness Review
              Organize an emergency preparedness procedures review with employees to review
              your company’s emergency plans and practice emergency drills with employees. For
              more information about business preparedness, go to ready.gov and click on “Ready
              Business.” There are many resources and tools that you can order or download.
  • Put an Emergency Kit on Display
              Showcase an Emergency Supply Kit in your break room or other high-traffic
              locations and encourage employees to get their own Emergency Supply Kits for their
              homes.
  • Showcase Instructional Videos
              Instructional videos are available on the Ready Web site
              (http://ready.gov/america/about/instructional_index.html) for families, older
              Americans, individuals with disabilities and other access and functional needs, and pet
              owners. You could play them in your lobbies, waiting rooms, break rooms, and/or at
              events.
  • Leave Emergency Kit Items on Employee Desks
              Put a bottle of water on each employee’s desk along with a note that says “If there is
              an emergency, do you have enough water to last you and your family for three days?”
              and a printout of the emergency supply checklist.
  • Host a Preparedness Day
              Invite your employees to a Preparedness Day and arrange for your local Citizen
              Corps Council or Office of Emergency Management to teach your employees and/or
              customers how to build an Emergency Supply Kit and create a Family Emergency
              Plan. You could also incorporate a local weather expert to educate the audience about
              various weather-related emergencies that impact your area and the best ways to
              prepare for them.
  • Give an Emergency Preparedness Quiz
              The quiz can be included in your newsletter, on your Web site, or you could give it to
              your members, employees, or customers at local events. Sample quizzes are included
              in this toolkit on pages 49 and 50.
  • Host a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training or Offer Free
     CPR/First Aid Training to Employees
              Contact your local Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) for more
              information about hosting a CERT training for interested employees, constituents, or
              members. To find your local CERT Program, go to
              http://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/and look for the link “Find Nearby CERTs”.
  • Encourage Employees to Back Up Their Important Information
              Remind employees that it’s important to have copies of their important financial and
              legal documents. Allow employees to use the office scanner and copy machine to
              make copies their important documents (insurance papers, wills, bank account
              information, etc.).




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  •   Host a Business Preparedness Workshop
               Contact a local business or commerce organization and work together to host
               workshops for business leaders about the importance of business preparedness. The
               U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Better Business Bureau have worked with the
               Ready Campaign and their local organizations may be interested in serving as a
               resource for you.
  •   Conduct an Office Evacuation/Shelter-in-Place Exercises and Drills
               During the month of September, schedule emergency exercises and drills. Once
               completed, evaluate how well they worked and if additional training or exercises are
               needed. For information on addressing the needs of employees with disabilities, visit
               http://www.dol.gov/odep/pubs/fact/effective.htm
  •   Distribute Emergency Preparedness Messages
               Include emergency preparedness messages in communication touch points such as e-
               mails, newsletter articles, bill stuffers, or on receipts. These messages could include:
               an Emergency Supply Kit tip of the day; a Family Emergency Plan reminder; or a
               link to the “Be Informed” portion of the Ready Campaign Web site
               (http://ready.gov/america/beinformed/index.html). See pages 36-43 for templates and
               sample language.
               Tweet and blog about it. Does your company engage in social media marketing and
               outreach via Twitter, Facebook and other social media technologies? Use those
               venues throughout September to encourage friends and followers to take steps toward
               preparedness.
  •   Host a Brown Bag Lunch
               Host a brown bag lunch and discuss preparedness. During this time, you could give
               an emergency preparedness quiz (included on page 49), show instructional videos,
               have the Red Cross train your office in CPR, or have someone from Citizen Corps
               speak about how to get involved in community preparedness in your community,
               including outreach efforts, training and exercises, and volunteer programs, such as
               Volunteers in Police Service (VIPS); Community Emergency Response Teams
               (CERT); Fire Corps; Neighborhood Watch; and Medical Reserve Corps.

Prepare Your Local Military Installation
  • Promote Emergency Preparedness to Military Families
              The Ready Campaign Web site includes information for military families. Visit
              http://ready.gov/america/getakit/military.html.
  • Distribute Emergency Preparedness Messages
              Include preparedness messages in installation newsletters
              Host preparedness events that include representatives from the installation’s
              emergency management services, distribute information on the installation’s
              emergency preparedness plans, and include information on weather-related hazards
              specific to your area.
              Set up emergency preparedness supplies and pamphlets at youth and adult sporting
              events on the installation




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Prepare Youth
  • Organize a Scavenger Hunt
              Organize a scavenger hunt at a local community center for kids to search for items
              that should be included in an Emergency Supply Kit. While the kids are hunting for
              supply kit items, it’s a great opportunity to hand out Family Emergency Plan
              templates to their parents and/or caregivers.
  • Plan Preparedness Activities for Scouts and Other Youth Organizations
              Make preparedness a priority during September for scout meetings and activities.
              Conduct preparedness quizzes, download and create personalized checklists; draft
              family plans.
              Girl Scouts can work toward achieving the new Preparedness Patch.
              Boy Scouts can work toward the Emergency Preparedness Award.
  • Offer Your Help to Schools
              Volunteer to bring preparedness information into your child’s class and/or PTO or
              PTA meetings.
  • Plan Preparedness Programs at Back-to-School Nights
              September is also back-to-school for many schools and a great opportunity to work
              with the school community to make emergency preparedness a part of those efforts.
              For example, by working with your local schools, Office of Emergency Management
              or Citizen Corps Council during back-to-school nights, families could be invited to
              hear from local officials about the school and community emergency plans. In
              addition, it could be a good time to encourage families to prepare for emergencies.
              Consider having a local first responder teach parents how to make an Emergency
              Supply Kit and a Family Emergency Plan.
  • Download and Distribute Games and Puzzles from the Ready Kids Web Site
              Visit ready.gov/kids/ to download word search games, coloring pages, hidden
              treasure activities, and more.
  • Get Rex Involved
              Don’t forget that Rex, the official Ready Kids mascot, is available to make an
              appearance at events. All reservations and requests for the Rex costume must be
              coordinated through your state or local government, local Office of Emergency
              Management, or Citizen Corps Council. These organizations are responsible for
              ordering the costume. It is strongly recommended that requests for Rex be submitted
              at least four weeks prior to an event. Order information is available on page 59.

Prepare Pet Owners
  • Work with Your Local Pet Store, Veterinarian Practice, or Shelter to Distribute
     Emergency Preparedness Information to Pet Owners.
              The Ready Campaign has pet preparedness materials available that can be ordered or
              downloaded. There are also printer-friendly versions available. These two-page
              printer-friendly handouts are condensed versions of our brochures and are an easy
              and inexpensive way to supplement the Ready brochures for occasions with a large
              attendance or high traffic. These can also be easily sent to employees, colleagues,
              members, or stakeholders via e-mail. Visit
              http://ready.gov/america/publications/allpubs.html.


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               Coordinate with local rescue organizations to provide the two-pager to all new pet
               owners who rescue or adopt a pet.
      •   Host a Pet Preparedness Day
                 Host a preparedness event in conjunction with local pet events or pet walks, and
                 distribute the Ready “Preparing Your Pets for Emergencies Makes Sense”
                 brochure. This event could bring together animal lovers in the community and help
                 them develop emergency plans that take into consideration the special needs of
                 their animals and plan what to do in case of an evacuation. The Humane Society of
                 the United States, American Kennel Club, American Society for the Prevention of
                 Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), and the American Veterinary Medical Association
                 have worked with the Ready Campaign and their local organizations or members
                 may be interested in participating.
      •   Use the Pet Preparedness Toolkit
                 FEMA’s Ready Campaign and Citizen Corps Program, The American Red Cross,
                 and The Humane Society of the United States have come together to develop an
                 emergency preparedness toolkit that can assist you in your planning efforts as you
                 work toward keeping your community—and specifically, the pets and people who
                 care for them—safe from disasters. This toolkit provides you with the resources on
                 how to promote preparedness in your communities and engage other organizations
                 in your efforts; as well as resources to educate the community about how to
                 assemble a pet Emergency Supply Kit and make a Family Emergency Plan. In
                 addition, there is a tools section that provides sample preparedness brochures,
                 PowerPoint templates, and press materials you can use to develop and distribute
                 your internal and external preparedness messaging. Visit
                 http://ready.gov/america/toolkit_pets/index.html.
      •   Showcase Instructional Videos
                 Instructional videos are available on the Ready Web site
                 (http://ready.gov/america/about/instructional_index.html) for pet owners. You
                 could play them in your lobbies, waiting rooms, break rooms, and at events.

Prepare Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities and Other Access and Functional Needs
  • Check on your senior neighbors and those who may need additional assistance
              Seniors and individuals with disabilities may need a little extra help in getting
              prepared and during a disaster or emergency.
              Next time you are visiting, tell them about your own preparedness efforts, ask about
              their needs and how you can help.
  • Partner with an Organization that Works with Older Americans or Individuals with
     Disabilities and Other Access and Functional Needs in Your Community
              This could include meal delivery or faith-based organizations to help communicate
              emergency preparedness messages. Work with your local hospital, mental health
              center, library, church, community center, independent living center, or nursing home
              to host a training or event. You can distribute the Ready “Preparing Makes Sense for
              Older Americans” brochure and the Ready “Preparing Makes Sense for People with
              Disabilities and Other Special Needs” brochure.
  • Spread the Word about Financial Preparedness


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           Your organization can help those who rely on Federal benefits learn about safer,
           more convenient ways to get their money. Switching from paper checks to electronic
           payment is a simple but significant step people can take to protect themselves before
           disaster strikes. The Go Direct® campaign gives people who have checking or
           savings accounts a fast, free way to sign up for direct deposit. And the Direct
           Express® Debit Master Card gives people without bank accounts a secure,
           convenient and the U.S. Department of Treasury-recommended way to receive their
           Social Security payments. Visit http://www.godirect.org/ for more information.
•   Showcase Instructional Videos
           Instructional videos are available on the Ready Web site
           (http://ready.gov/america/about/instructional_index.html) for older Americans and
           individuals with disabilities. You could play them in your lobbies, waiting rooms,
           break rooms, and at events.




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TACTICS FOR GETTING YOUR PREPAREDNESS MESSAGE OUT

Use the Internet
       • Promote Preparedness on Your Web Site
                 Post NPM 2010 Web banners to your Web site. See page 28 for more information.
                 Post links to Ready’s public service advertisements (PSAs) or instructional videos to
                 your Web site. See page 60 for more information.
                 Post readiness information directly on your site. See pages 36-42 for several articles
                 you can post on your site.
       • Promote Ready’s Online Tools
                 Encourage individuals to check out Ready’s new interactive online tools at
                 http://ready.adcouncil.org/beprepared/, which includes Ready’s new online Family
                 Emergency Plan at http://ready.adcouncil.org/beprepared/fep/index.jsp.



       •   Promote Preparedness Through Social Media
                  Promote NPM on Facebook. For example, change your Facebook status to
                        “Helping Americans get Ready during National Preparedness Month. Join me at
                        ready.gov.”
                        “Putting together our emergency supply kit and making a family plan with
                        information I found at ready.gov.
                  Tweet about NPM. For example, “September is National Preparedness Month. Time
                  to get Ready. Find out how at ready.gov.” There are additional examples in the
                  Appendices to this toolkit.
                  Follow the Ready Campaign on Twitter. Our username is readydotgov.
                  Blog about your readiness efforts.




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KEY MESSAGES TO CONVEY

In outreach materials:

   Highlight the need for individuals and families to be self-reliant during disasters.
                   Preparedness is an individual responsibility. By being prepared as individuals, we
                   free up valuable resources, enabling our first responders to assist those who are in the
                   greatest need.
                   Self-reliance extends to helping neighbors and friends, if you can. It is much more
                   likely that your friends or neighbors will reach you first, than emergency responders.
                   Some people may need extra help. Be ready to lend a hand to those with different
                   capabilities or functional needs.

   Encourage individuals, families and businesses to start preparing now
                 It is important to prepare now. Families may not be together when an emergency
                 happens and you may not have access to cell phones, gas stations, grocery stores or
                 some of the other things that you used to having every day.
                 Make a plan, Get an emergency supply kit, Stay informed, Work as a team to keep
                 everyone safe

   Help community members understand preparedness kits are needed in multiple locations such
   as their homes, cars, and workplaces.
                   Disasters can happen at any time, so it is important for individuals and families to be
                   prepared at places where they spend large amounts of time, such as at home, at the
                   office, and in the car.

   Work with local emergency management and Citizen Corps Councils to include information in
   outreach materials about community specific hazards, alerts and warning systems, evacuation
   routes, and emergency shelter locations and processes (e.g. pet policies, items to take to the
   shelter, etc).
                  Good preparedness practices include having an understanding of local hazards and
                  the appropriate response individuals and families should take during an emergency
                  situation. In (AREA), we are most prone to (TYPES OF EMERGENCIES).




                                                                                                              16
NPM 2009 HIGHLIGHTS

Some great events took place during NPM 2009. Here are a few highlights of how preparedness activities
were conducted across the country.

Ready Colorado—2009 Ready Colorado’s “Preparedness on a Budget” promotion

During NPM, Ready Colorado developed an awareness campaign to encourage the public to get prepared
by building their emergency supply kit. They wanted this campaign to be current and relevant, so they
decided to on a “Preparedness on a Budget” promotion. Using the theme of 72 hours for $72, this
campaign targeted adults age 18 and older of all income levels throughout Colorado. The local Denver
CBS affiliated promoted this effect with a contest for viewers to post video or photos of their 72-hour kits
on the station’s website. As part of the TV campaign, Ready Colorado bought $28,000 (using UASI
funds) worth of advertising space. This got them 96 spots and additional ($35,000 worth) promotion
through the CBS affiliate. The CBS 4 meteorologist served as the spokesman. An electronic newsletter
with an emphasis on Being Ready on a Budget was distributed, and campaign artwork for flyers, posters,
and emails were distributed to 9 all-hazard regions for promotions in their individual counties.




CAPTION: “Top 10 List for Preparedness on a Budget”




                                                                                                               17
Nassau County, New York—2009 CERT Training Exercise

On September 13, 2009 Nassau County CERT held its third annual training and exercise drill. Participants
included representatives from Nassau Country American Red Cross, ARES, Medical Reserve Corps
(MRC), and Medical Services as well as Suffolk County CERT, Westchester County MRC and New York
City CERT. Local Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) played the victim
roles.

The exercise scenario involved a category three hurricane hitting Nassau County, Long Island, with
severe storm damage in the area. Nassau County CERT was activated and deployed as a response to this
disaster. Volunteers signed in and were assigned to teams, each with a designated Team Leader. The
teams navigated through a number of stations. Their skills were tested in fire suppression, searching
lightly damaged buildings and evacuating occupants and injured persons, conducting triage and preparing
them for transport by emergency medical services, and supporting the American Red Cross in setting up
and running a shelter. A commodities Point of Distribution (POD) operation was established and the
staging area was incorporated into the exercise. The directing of the CERT teams and the victims flow
was conducted by CERT, from an Incident Command Post, under the direction of the Nassau County
Office of Emergency Management, who was in charge of coordinating the County’s overall response to
the storm.




CAPTION: “Triage and Transport Station”




                                                                                                           18
Lehigh County, PA—2009 Iron Pigs Community Safety Day

As part of NPM, Lehigh County Citizen Corps developed numerous partnerships resulting in multiple
events, activities, and trainings for volunteers and for the public.

In a private-public partnership with the Lehigh Valley Iron Pigs Minor League Baseball Team, Lehigh
County Citizen Corps and its partners hosted the Iron Pigs Community Safety Day at an Iron Pigs game.
Pamphlets and brochures on citizen preparedness were available for patrons of the event. In addition,
Citizen Corps, CERT, and Allentown Health Bureau personnel were available to answer questions on the
importance of these programs to the county and communities in the Lehigh Valley.

Upper Macungie Township, in coordination with Lehigh County Citizen Corps and Emergency Services
and various other community partners, sponsored a Health and Safety Fair. There were demonstrations,
displays, and emergency preparedness information available on all types of hazards.

As part of the Get Ready 2009 Autumn Academy, the Lehigh Carbon Community College (LCC) hosted
a 3-Dimensional Table Top Drill and several Psychological First Aid trainings. Teams problem solved
and worked together during a “critical event” in an environment that rehearsed coordination, command,
communications and interoperability.




CAPTION: “Health and Safety Fair in Upper Macungie Township”




                                                                                                        19
Ready Georgia-- “Get Ready Georgia” Essay Contest

Ready Georgia asked fifth-grade students across the state to recognize NPM with a creative art and essay
contest about preparing for the unexpected. The contest theme was “Get Ready Georgia,” and students
were encouraged to draw upon their personal experiences of how their families have already prepared for
an emergency or how they plan to prepare. Students can produce original artwork that portrays one or
more of the steps of emergency preparedness, or write an essay of 500 words or less that describes the
steps for emergency preparedness and why it is important. Children and their parents are encouraged to
visit www.ready.ga.gov together to learn more about the three simple steps it takes to be ready – create a
Ready kit, develop a family communications plan and stay informed about potential local threats– and use
what they learn to create their entry. Three judges from across the state reviewed the entries and selected
winners in October, prizes included a Ready kit donated by sponsor The Home Depot, a Disney DVD and
CD prize pack donated by Radio Disney and a glow-in-the-dark star kit donated by Imagine it! The
Children’s Museum of Atlanta.




CAPTION: “First Place Art Winner Raven Ortiz of Johnston Elementary, Woodstock, GA”




                                                                                                              20
CAPTION: “Second Place Art Winner Emerson Cruz of Jarnell Elementary, Dalton”




                                                                                21
The Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Washington—Preparedness Kits to Army
Personnel

On September 1, 2009 the Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Department of Washington,
presented 500 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kits, carrying a 5-year shelf life, to Army junior enlisted
personnel and their immediate family members stationed at Fort Lewis, WA. Supporters of the LA-VFW
Project Protect Program in attendance at the event included the First Gentleman of Washington State,
Mike Gregoire, FEMA- DHS Region 10 Community Preparedness Officer, Fred Bretsch, Citizen Corps
Coordinator - Denise Mack, and Puyallup Indian Tribal Council Vice- Chairman, Bill Sterud. The
mission of this program was to provide valuable kits free of charge to all junior enlisted armed forces in
all branches of the military, including the National Guard and Reserves, through charitable donations and
grants from entities interested in protecting those protecting America.




CAPTION: “Herring Family receiving emergency preparedness kits from LA-VFW Sr. Vice President &
Project Protect Chairman, Diane Small and Dept. Sr. Vice Commander Jerry Herker”




                                                                                                             22
                             SECTION IV: SHARE YOUR STORY
Share Your Success:
Post your successes and view success stories submitted by fellow NPM Coalition Members. Members
who submit ideas can decide if they are willing to be contacted about their events. If so, you can reach out
to them to brainstorm new, successful ideas for your organization or find ways to work together to jointly
host an event. We encourage you to share your successes with others so that everyone can learn best
practices. Only registered Coalition Members can access the Success Stories on the Coalition Member
Web site. Once registered, access to the Coalition Member Web site will be sent via e-mail.


How to Post NPM Events:
Please post your events on the NPM calendar by following these simple steps:
    • Go the Coalition Member Web site (For access you must be registered. If you are not registered,
       visit http://ready.adcouncil.org/).
    • Click on the event calendar.
    • Fill out the required information in the fields provided as completely as possible.
    • Submit your event for approval.


Common Questions and Answers About the Calendar:
Q: Who can submit events to the calendar?
A: All Coalition Members can submit events for the calendar.

Q: Why isn’t my submitted event showing up on the calendar?
A: After your event is submitted, it has to be approved for posting. It will be posted upon approval.

Q: What should I put in the description box?
A: Please briefly describe the event, including the nature and purpose of the event.

Q: Do I have to re-enter the event for multiple dates if it will be occurring more than once?
A: Yes. Please enter your event for each date that it will take place.

Q: Can I enter in events for any month?
A: You can enter events that take place during August, September, and October.




                                                                                                               23
                             SECTION V: BEYOND SEPTEMBER
NPM is a great time to promote emergency preparedness and get your family’s plan and business’ plan
together, but emergencies can happen at any time so it is important to be prepared and involved
throughout the year. We’ve included other times of year you can get involved to raise awareness year-
round.

Use these events as an opportunity to jumpstart work with Citizen Corps partners and affiliates and other
partners mentioned in this toolkit on promoting awareness, planning events, and media outreach to
strengthen community preparedness at the state and local level. Local Citizen Corps Councils and partners
may contact local representatives from the organizations below to learn how the community can benefit
from involvement, reach out to citizens about participation, and involve the local media in distributing
information on these events. The specific dates given are for 2010, but the events and themes can be used
year after year.

In addition to the suggestions below, Citizen Corps maintains a comprehensive list of national holidays,
days of recognition, and weekly and monthly themes that may be used to encourage and promote civic
engagement, public safety, preparedness, resilience, and volunteerism. Please visit
http://www.citizencorps.gov/news/themes.shtm for the comprehensive listing of themes.

Event: National Blood Donor Month
Date(s): January
Description: Blood is traditionally in short supply during the winter months due to the holidays,
travel schedules, inclement weather and illness. January, in particular, is a difficult month for
blood centers to collect blood donations. The America Association of Blood Banks, in
conjunction with America's Blood Centers and the American Red Cross, celebrates National
Blood Donor Month (NBDM) to encourage donors to give or pledge to give blood. www.aabb.org

Event: Go Direct Month
Date(s): February
Description: Each year, the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Federal Reserve Banks
sponsor Go Direct Month, a campaign to motivate people who receive federal benefit checks to
sign up for direct deposit. For those who depend on the mail for their Social Security benefits, a
difficult situation can become worse if they are evacuated or lose their mail service – as 85,000
check recipients learned after Hurricane Katrina, and thousands more learned in 2008 during
Hurricanes Gustav, Hanna and Ike. Switching to electronic payment is one simple, significant way
people can protect themselves before disaster strikes. It also eliminates the risk of stolen checks.
More information, including the Go Direct Disaster Preparedness Toolkit, talking points, and web
banners, is available at http://www.godirect.org/partners/Disaster_Preparedness.cfm.

Event: American Red Cross Month
Date(s): March
Description: March is American Red Cross Month, a month long celebration of Red Cross
accomplishments and a look forward to future goals. The month-long commemoration was created
in the 1940s when the Red Cross started a "Roll Call" drive to increase public support during
wartime. After discussions with President Franklin Roosevelt, the honorary chairman of the Red
Cross, an official call for support was issued, and he declared the whole month of March Red
Cross Month. Each President since has issued a proclamation for the month. Visit
http://www.redcross.org/

                                                                                                            24
Event: Flood Safety Awareness Week
Date(s): March 14-18, 2011 (usually 3rd week of March)
Description: Flooding is a coast-to-coast threat to the United States and its territories in all months of the
year. National Flood Safety Awareness Week is intended to highlight some of the many ways floods can
occur, the hazards associated with floods, and what you can do to save life and property. For more
information: www.floodsafety.noaa.gov.

Event: National Hurricane Preparedness Week
Date(s): May 24-28, 2010 (usually last week in May)
Description: Hurricane hazards come in many forms: storm surge, high winds, tornadoes and flooding.
This means it is important for your family to have a plan that includes all of these hazards. Look carefully
at the safety actions associated with each type of hurricane hazard and prepare your family disaster plan
accordingly. But, remember this is only a guide. The first and most important thing anyone should do
when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions
you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster. For more information:
www.hurricanes.gov/prepare.

Event: National Lightning Safety Awareness Week
Date(s): June 20-26, 2010 Description: Summer is the peak season for one of the nation's deadliest
weather phenomena - lightning. But don't be fooled, lightning strikes year-round. The goal of Lightning
Safety Awareness week is to safeguard U.S. residents from lightning and teach them what they can do
when lightning strikes. For more information: www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov.

Event: National Safety Month
Date(s): June
Description: Founded in 1913 and charted by the U.S. Congress in 1953, the National Safety Council is
the nation’s only organization committed to promoting safety in all aspects of American Life. National
Safety Month addresses the nation’s safety issues in the home and community, on our roads and highways
and in our workplaces. For more information: www.nsc.org

Event: National Cyber Security Awareness Month
Date(s): October
Description: The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's National Cyber Security Division sponsors
National Cyber Security Awareness Month in October, designed to educate the public on the shared
responsibility of protecting cyberspace. DHS employs numerous strategies to increase the security,
resiliency, and reliability of the nation's information technology (IT) and communications infrastructure.
For more information, visit http://www.dhs.gov/xprevprot/programs/gc_1158611596104.shtm

Event: National Fire Prevention Month
Date(s): October 3-9, 2010 (annually the week that includes Oct. 9)
Description: The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) sponsors this week annually. Contact
your local newspaper, radio, and television outlets to let reporters know that this week is National Fire
Prevention Week. Provide local statistics and information about the damage fires have done and can do,
as well as information on preventing fires. Consider arranging for local firefighters to visit middle and
high schools to talk to students about fire prevention. Organize door-to-door campaigns to check smoke
detectors and carbon monoxide monitors. Contact local NFPA groups to work with them to help spread
the fire safety message. For more information, visit www.nfpa.org



                                                                                                                 25
Event: National Animal Safety and Protection Month
Date(s): October
Description: Observance to promote the appropriate ways to protect and care for domestic and wild
animals and help people strengthen their ability to stay safe around animals. For more information:
www.PALS.R8.org.




                                                                                                      26
                                            APPENDICES

                                     NPM TOOLS YOU CAN USE



In these appendices, you will find tools to assist you in disseminating emergency preparedness messaging,
including distributing brochures, e-mails, PSAs and other preparedness materials to your employees,
members, community, or stakeholders.

Remember, it is important to tailor many of these materials to fit your audience and needs. Be creative. Be
meaningful. Be actionable.




                                                                                                              27
                              APPENDIX A: GRAPHIC TOOLS

                                        NPM WEB BANNER

Add an NPM Web banner to your organization or community Web site throughout the summer and fall.
Registered Coalition Members can download various sizes of banner ads on the Coalition Member Web
site. Once registered, access to the Coalition Member Web site will be sent via e-mail.




Please see http://ready.adcouncil.org/PreparednessToolKit.asp after registering to download these web
banners.




                                                                                                        28
                              NPM POWERPOINT PRESENTATION

The toolkit includes a general emergency preparedness PowerPoint presentation for you to use to educate
your employees, members, customers, or other local organizations and businesses.




  Please see http://ready.adcouncil.org/PreparednessToolKit.asp to download the PowerPoint template.




                                                                                                          29
                              NPM EMPLOYEE/CUSTOMER POSTER

Display one of these posters in your place of business or prominently in your community during the
summer and fall to encourage your employees, customers, and community members of the simple steps
they can take to better prepare their families for emergencies. Use the posters at the events you are
sponsoring, and print them as handouts. You will also find these graphics available in 8½ x 11 flyers that
you can print as a handout. Registered Coalition Members can download this poster on the Coalition
Member Web site. Once registered, access to the Coalition Member Web site will be sent via e-mail.




Please see http://ready.adcouncil.org/PreparednessToolKit.asp to download the posters.




                                                                                                             30
                                 NPM “DID YOU KNOW?” POSTER




Please see http://ready.adcouncil.org/PreparednessToolKit.asp after registering to download the posters.



                                                                                                           31
                         EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS BILL STUFFER
                            AND INVOICE/RECEIPT MESSAGES

Create and distribute messages about emergency preparedness with paycheck messages to employees or
with bill stuffers and register tape messages to customers.

Below is a sample bill stuffer as well as sample register tape messages. Consider printing and including
these in your summer and fall customer billing statements/invoices. Registered Coalition Members can
download the bill stuffer on the Coalition Member Web site. Once registered, access to the Coalition
Member Web site will be sent via e-mail.




Please see http://ready.adcouncil.org/PreparednessToolKit.asp to download the bill stuffer.


Sample Bill Stuffer Language:
September is National Preparedness Month. Be a part of the Readiness Team.

Preparedness is everyone’s responsibility. We have to work together, as a team, to ensure that individuals,
families, neighborhoods, and communities are ready. Get an emergency supply kit. Make a family
emergency plan. Be informed about the risks in your area. Work as part of the team to keep everyone safe.

To learn more about how you, your family, your business, and your community can prepare for
emergencies and get involved, please visit ready.gov or call 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585.

Sample Invoice/Receipt Message One:
(RETAILER NAME) is a proud participant in National Preparedness Month 2010. To learn more about
how you and your family can prepare for emergencies, visit ready.gov or call 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-
800-462-7585.



                                                                                                              32
Sample Invoice/Receipt Message Two:
Thank you for shopping at (RETAILER NAME) today. As a member of the (NAME OF TOWN)
community, we would like to encourage all of our neighbors to take action now to be prepared for
emergencies and disasters. That is why we are a proud participant in National Preparedness Month 2010.
Please visit ready.gov or call 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585 for more information on
emergency preparedness.




                                                                                                         33
                            NPM 2010 CUSTOMIZABLE COLLATERAL

We’ve included customizable versions of our collateral so you can localize and add your information to
NPM materials.

Add your logo and information to our NPM 2010 Poster by opening the PDF within an image editing
program, such as Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator and placing your desired text and images within the
space indicated below.

We suggest saving your project as a new file name and at print resolution (300dpi). The build is in RGB,
and can be saved as CMYK for some print applications. We suggest amending the title with “_CMYK.”

For the larger files, (11x17 and 21x31), you will need a professional grade printer to output the posters,
unless the output size is scaled down to run on a standard office printer.

To make customization even easier, the flyers and bill stuffer are available in Microsoft PowerPoint
format.

You can access all the customizable collateral at: http://ready.adcouncil.org/PreparednessToolKit.asp




                                                                                                             34
                                   Customize it! Your
                                      logo or other
                                    information goes
                                          here.




Customize it! Your logo or other information goes here.




                                                          35
APPENDIX B: ARTICLES, NOTICES, PROCLAMATIONS, AND OTHER
NOTIFICATIONS

             EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS E-MAIL FOR EMPLOYEES, MEMBERS,
                              AND STAKEHOLDERS

Send e-mails to your members, employees, and stakeholders motivating them to take steps toward
emergency preparedness and encouraging them to join in on your preparedness activities.

SUBJECT LINE
Become a Part of the Readiness Team

MESSAGE
September is National Preparedness Month (NPM), a nationwide effort sponsored by the Federal
Emergency Management Agency’s Ready Campaign in partnership with Citizen Corps. I am pleased to
announce (ORGANIZATION) is taking part in this nationwide effort to help (INSERT COMMUNITY
NAME) prepare for emergencies. This year, NPM focuses on encouraging you and other Americans to
take active steps toward getting involved and becoming prepared. Preparedness is everyone’s
responsibility. We have to work together, as a team, to ensure that individuals, families, and communities
are ready. Make a plan, get an emergency supply kit, stay informed, and work together as a team to keep
everyone safe.

We’re taking steps as an organization to become educated, trained, and better prepared, and we urge you
to take time this month to do the same at home, for your community. Take simple steps to better prepare
yourself and your family. Review the attached Family Emergency Plan template and Emergency Supply
Kit checklist, and start down the road to preparedness.

In addition, I encourage you to visit ready.gov for more information and www.citizencorps.gov to explore
ways that you can get involved in your community.

Thank you!

Sincerely,

(NAME OF YOUR ORGANIZATION’S LEADERSHIP)




                                                                                                             36
    EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG ENTRY
                      FOR A GENERAL AUDIENCE

Include articles about NPM in your newsletters or on your Web site. These articles should be bylined by
Darryl J. Madden, Director of the Ready Campaign.

                             September is National Preparedness Month
                                Be a Part of the Preparedness Team
                           By Darryl J. Madden, Director, Ready Campaign

How often do you think about emergencies or disasters? Probably not very often. Maybe after it happens
to someone else. However, taking just a few steps can give you the tools to ensure you and your family’s
safety in an emergency.

According to the 2009 Citizen Corps National Survey, only 36 percent of individuals believed there was a
high likelihood of a natural disaster to EVER happen in their community. But disasters happen every day
in many different forms – from hurricanes to snowstorms, even localized events such as floods and power
outages.

Many people think that it will be easy to grab items from your pantry if disaster strikes. But what if you
aren’t at home? What if your family is separated? What if you have to leave quickly? What about your
elderly neighbor? The Ready Campaign and Citizen Corps encourage you to take a few extra minutes this
month to plan for any emergency.

September is National Preparedness Month (NPM) and a good reminder that we all have a responsibility
to protect ourselves, our families, and our communities. Emergencies will happen, but taking action now
can help us minimize the impact they will have on our lives.

This year, NPM focuses on encouraging you and other Americans to take active steps toward getting
involved and becoming prepared. Preparedness is everyone’s responsibility. We have to work together, as
a team, to ensure that individuals, families, and communities are ready. Make a plan, Put together an
emergency supply kit. Stay Informed. Work as a team to keep everyone safe.

Throughout September, activities and events will take place across this country to highlight the
importance of emergency preparedness and promote individual involvement, such as first aid trainings,
town hall meetings and much more. Look for opportunities to participate in these events in your
community.

For more information on NPM or for help getting your family, business or community prepared, call 1-
800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585 or visit ready.gov, listo.gov or www.citizencorps.gov, where
you’ll find free preparedness resources such as Family Emergency Plan templates, Emergency Supply Kit
Checklists, and much more. The Ready Web site also has a special section for kids, ages 8-12, (Ready
Kids) and small- to medium-sized businesses (Ready Business). Emergencies can happen at any time and
to anyone. Are you Ready?
                                                   ###




                                                                                                             37
    COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG ENTRY
                      FOR A GENERAL AUDIENCE

                                Be a Part of the Preparedness Team
                           By Darryl J. Madden, Director, Ready Campaign

Being Ready starts with you! Taking steps now to prepare for disasters and emergencies of all types will
go far in ensuring everyone’s safety. We have to work together, as a team, to ensure that individuals,
families, and communities are prepared for emergencies and disasters. Important steps to take include:

           Making a family emergency plan.
           Getting an emergency supply kit.
           Staying informed.
           Working as a team to keep everyone safe.

September is National Preparedness Month and the perfect time to take action toward making your
communities and our nation safer, stronger, and better prepared.

Federal Emergency Management Agency’s grassroots preparedness initiative, Citizen Corps, supports
local opportunities for communities to become engaged in preparedness and resiliency by connecting
government and civic leaders, non-governmental organizations, and other community-based programs
through participation on their local Citizen Corps Council. Citizen Corps Councils support emergency
operations planning, training and exercises, and volunteer opportunities that enhance community safety.
Here are a few examples of how you can become more involved in your community:

•   Volunteering for local law enforcement agencies through the Volunteers in Police Service (VIPS)
    Program. VIPS volunteers conduct traffic control, crowd control, and other duties that support local
    law enforcement
•   Training to become a member of the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) in your area.
    CERT members support first responders before, during and after a disaster occurs by providing
    support for preparedness awareness and using their skills to execute response protocols to assist
    emergency responders
•   Joining a Neighborhood Watch group to assist with crime and terrorism prevention by working more
    closely with local law enforcement, and emphasize the importance of emergency preparedness among
    families and homes in your neighborhood
•   Donating time to a Medical Reserve Corps Unit through volunteering with medical and public health
    professionals to contribute skills and expertise throughout the year as well as during times of
    community need
•   Becoming an advocate for fire safety and prevention education in the community and assisting with
    administrative duties at your local fire station through Fire Corps
•   Getting involved with an American Red Cross Chapter by giving blood to ensure a safe supply,
    volunteering with your local chapter, getting trained to respond to local disasters like home fires, or
    making a donation to the Disaster Relief Fund
•   Helping other community members prepare, including those children and adults with disabilities and
    others with access and functional needs.

All over America, communities have organized Citizen Corps Councils to involve local government and
non-government in emergency management planning, mitigation, response, and recovery activities. You


                                                                                                              38
can get involved by contacting your local Council at www.citizencorps.gov; and you can get more
information about Ready by going to ready.gov and listo.gov.




                                                                                                  39
     EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG ENTRY
                        FOR A FAMILY AUDIENCE

                                     Taking Action to Be Ready
                           By Darryl J. Madden, Director, Ready Campaign

Do you have emergency supplies set aside in case there’s a disaster? Does your family have an emergency
plan? For many people, planning for an emergency or disaster isn’t a priority.

According to the 2009 Citizen Corps National Survey, only 36 percent of individuals believed there was a
high likelihood of a natural disaster to EVER happen in their community. Many people think they have
everything they need in the event of an emergency at hand, and can simply “grab and go.”

You are your family’s first responder, and in many ways you are your neighbor’s first responder. All of us
as participants in our communities and members of our families need to take concrete steps to proactively
prepare for emergencies and disasters. Local, state, and national authorities are going to help, but they
may not be able to get to you right away. We all need to be prepared for those first 72 hours before help
can reach us.

September is National Preparedness Month (NPM)—the perfect time to take action and get your family
Ready. Readiness comes in many forms and preparedness is everyone’s responsibility. We have to work
together, as a team, to ensure that our families, neighborhoods, and communities are Ready. Get an
emergency supply kit. Make a family emergency plan. Be informed about the risks in your area. Work
with your neighbor and know who might need just a little extra help.

To help get your family started, Ready Kids is a family-friendly, children-oriented tool to help parents and
teachers educate children, ages 8-12, about emergencies and how they can help families better prepare.
The Ready Kids Web site at ready.gov features fun activities such as a Scavenger Hunt, Pack It Up
Matching game, crossword puzzles and coloring pages, as well as age-appropriate, step-by-step
instructions on what families can do to better prepare for emergencies and the role kids can play in that
effort.

It’s important to explain to your children that families can prepare for emergencies before they take place
and that they can help, too. By doing so, you can alleviate anxiety if an emergency does occur and help to
nurture a more prepared society for generations to come. Visit ready.gov/kids today and get Ready!




                                                                                                               40
     EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG ENTRY
                      PREPAREDNESS ON A BUDGET

                               On a Budget? You Still Need to be Ready
                            By Darryl J. Madden, Director, Ready Campaign

Who isn’t pinching pennies these days? In fact, many of us have been putting things off in order to save
money. One thing you shouldn’t put off, though, is becoming prepared for emergencies and disasters. As
difficult as it may be financially, it’s something you just can’t turn away from.

September is National Preparedness Month, and in consideration of the many of us who are tightly
budgeting our dollars, here are a few tips* to save money and still be Ready.

    Plan for the types of disasters that can happen in the area where you live. So, if you live in the north,
    or in the mountains, you may need to plan for snowstorms, but if you live along the coast, hurricanes
    are most likely to affect you.

    Create your personalized Ready list. You may not need everything in ready-made kits. Choose the
    essentials to fit your needs. Don’t forget to keep supplies at work and in your car.

    Shop sales and used goods stores. Buy preparedness items throughout the year and you won’t notice
    the cost as much.

    Store water in safe, containers. You don’t need to buy expensive bottled water, just make sure your
    water containers are disinfected and airtight.

    Request preparedness items as a gift. We all get things we don’t need. Suggest preparedness supplies
    as gifts from your friends and family. It just might save your life.

    Think ahead. Don’t buy preparedness items just before a storm when they’re expensive and supplies
    will be in high demand. Buy items at the end of the season when you can get good deals.

    Review your insurance policy annually and make any necessary changes—renters, too! When a
    disaster strikes, you want to know that your coverage will get you back on your feet.

    Update contact records. Having accurate records for family, friends and neighbors will help you stay
    in contact and possibly help those in need.

    Trade one night out to fund your 72-hour kit. Taking a family of four to the movies can cost upwards
    of $80. Just one night staying in could fund your Ready kit.

Above all, start now, take small steps, and before you know it, you will be Ready!




*
Suggestions for budget preparedness come from the 2009 Ready Colorado Campaign.




                                                                                                                41
   EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG POST
                        FOR PET OWNERS

                               Planning for Your Pets in Emergencies
                           By Darryl J. Madden, Director, Ready Campaign

If you are like millions of animal owners nationwide, your pet is an important member of your household.
When planning your family for disaster, don’t overlook the needs of your cherished family pets. In order
to be safe and survive an emergency you must take steps to prepare today.

September is National Preparedness Month (NPM), which is a great time to take action and get your
family and your family pet Ready. This year, NPM is focusing on helping Americans take concrete steps
to be ready, and this includes your pets. Readiness comes in many forms and preparedness is everyone’s
responsibility. We have to work together, as a team, to ensure that our families, neighborhoods, and
communities are ready. Get an emergency supply kit. Make a family emergency plan. Work with your
neighbor and know who might need just a little extra help. These steps include preparing an animal
Emergency Supply Kit and developing a pet care buddy system.

The Ready Campaign and Citizen Corps, with support from Coalition Members across the nation,
including a range of state and local governments, businesses, and organizations, urge pet owners to take
action during NPM to plan for their pets’ safety if an emergency strikes their community. Throughout
September, activities and events will take place across this country to highlight the importance of
emergency preparedness and promote individual involvement, such as first aid trainings, town hall
meetings and much more. Look for opportunities to participate in these events in your community and
then take steps toward becoming better prepared—for you and your pets.

At ready.gov, or by calling 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585, pet owners can receive free
emergency preparedness information on how to properly prepare for their pets, including how to assemble
a pet Emergency Supply Kit, develop a pet care buddy system and how to make plans in advance for their
animals if they need to evacuate. In addition, an instructional video is available at:
http://ready.gov/america/about/instructional.html that demonstrates how to make an emergency plan for
your pets.




                                                                                                           42
   EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSLETTER/WEB SITE ARTICLE/BLOG POST
              FOR BUSINESS OWNERS/MANAGERS AUDIENCE

                                       Plan to Stay in Business
                          By Darryl J. Madden, Director, Ready Campaign

As a business owner or manager, you are a leader in your community who sets an example for your
employees, customers, and fellow businesses to follow. This September, the seventh annual National
Preparedness Month (NPM), join your community in preparing for emergencies and disasters of all types,
and leading efforts to encourage the community as a whole to become more prepared.

Disasters not only devastate individuals and neighborhoods, but entire communities, including businesses
of all sizes. As an employer in your community, having a business continuity plan can help protect your
company, its employees and its infrastructure, maximizing your chances of recovery after an incident.

Ready Business asks companies to take three simple steps: plan to stay in business; encourage your people
to become Ready; and protect your investment.

This year, the Ready Campaign and Citizen Corps, with support from Coalition Members across the
nation, including a wide range of businesses and organizations, is focusing NPM on encouraging
American individuals, families and businesses to take active steps toward becoming Ready. We must
work together, as a team, to ensure that our families, businesses, neighborhoods, and communities are
Ready.

Ready Business, an extension of the Ready Campaign, helps owners and managers of small and medium-
sized businesses prepare their employees, operations and assets in the event of an emergency. The Ready
Business section of ready.gov contains vital information for businesses on how to get started preparing
their business for their unique needs during an emergency.

For more information on NPM, or for help preparing your business, call 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-
462-7585 or visit ready.gov/business where business owners can download or order free Ready
publications and much more.




                                                                                                            43
                       EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SAMPLE TWEETS

Do you or your company communicate on Twitter? In September, use tweets like these to encourage
preparedness efforts. You can promote National Preparedness Month through your Facebook status or
Twitter by using any of our sample Twitter messages in your own updates. Information can be found on
the Ready Campaign’s official Twitter account (www.twitter.con/readydotgov). This year we will be
using the hashtag “#NPM10” with all our social messaging. Hashtags are a community-driven
convention for adding additional context and metadata to tweets. They’re like tags on Flickr or Facebook,
only added inline to your post. By including “#NPM10” with each one of your messages, you can help
promote preparedness among all your followers and fans!

   It's the first day of National Preparedness Month. Join the XXXX coalition members and help us get
   America Ready! www.ready.gov #NPM10

   This is National Preparedness Month, the perfect time for you and your family to make a plan, create a
   kit and stay informed! #NPM10

   Help your community or your office get Ready during National Preparedness Month. Visit ready.gov
   to get started #NPM10

   Citizen Corps works hard to help people prepare, train and volunteer in their communities. Visit
   www.citizencorps.gov #NPM10

   Preparedness on a budget: Fill clean, airtight containers with water, instead of buying bottled water
   #NPM10

   Preparedness on a budget: Pick up canned items on sale 2 or 3 at a time. Shop at used goods stores for
   blankets and electronics #NPM10

   In an emergency, once you know you are safe, check on a neighbor #NPM10

   In an emergency, do you know the best escape routes to get out of your house? #NPM10

   Choose an emergency contact who lives outside your area since it may be easier to call long distance
   after a disaster. #NPM10

   In case of a blackout, keep plastic containers with water in your refrigerator and freezer to help keep
   food cold for several hours #NPM10

   Does your community have an e-mail or text alert system? Visit your local emergency management
   Web site to find out #NPM10

   Teach your children how and when to call 9-1-1 or your local emergency medical services number for
   help. #NPM10

   During National Preparedness Month, consider those who need a little extra help during emergencies
   and make a plan to help them #NPM10



                                                                                                             44
In some emergencies, you may be required to turn off your utilities so it is important to learn how and
when to turn off utilities. #NPM10

Talk to your friends, neighbors and family this month and encourage them to prepare for emergencies
and disasters #NPM10

Explore all of our interactive tools to stay prepared: http://ready.adcouncil.org/beprepared/ #NPM10

Remember Fido! Get ur pet an emergency kit and create a buddy system. Click here for a community
pet preparedness kit: http://bit.ly/4jpnqt #NPM10

Choose an emergency contact person outside ur area, it may be easier 2 call long distance after a
regional emergency than locally #NPM10

Take a minute to check your family's first aid kit, note any depleted items – then, add them to your
shopping list #NPM10

Prepare & support your community before & after disasters by volunteering w/ local organizations
http://bit.ly/cMLBXd #NPM10

Be sure you know your workplace emergency plan, including multiple ways to exit your building
#NPM10

Remember to teach ur kids how & when to call 9-1-1 & where to find ur local Emergency Medical
Services # when they need help #NPM10

Every emergency supply kit is unique to you & your family & should be created with your special
needs in mind http://bit.ly/Ih7pJ #NPM10

Have kids? Ask your child's school for a copy of their emergency plan for you to keep at home or
work #NPM10

When making a Family Emergency Plan, include a contact outside ur area. It may be easier to call
long distance after a local emergency #NPM10

Place "Pets Inside" stickers on ur doors/windows, including info on the # & types of pets in ur home
to alert rescue workers #NPM10

In emergency, cellular voice networks may be out of service. Make sure everyone in your family
knows how to text #NPM10

Do you have flood insurance? Found out if you need it at www.floodsmart.gov #NPM10

Do you know what to do in the event of a tornado? Find out at
http://www.ready.gov/america/beinformed/tornadoes.html #NPM10

Know your child’s school and work’s emergency plan #NPM10.




                                                                                                          45
                NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH PROCLAMATION REQUEST

Government officials have the authority to issue proclamations for special occasions and events.
Proclamations call attention to a particular subject at the request of the public, and they designate a period
of time (day, week, or month) for raising awareness for a specific cause. Proclamations can be initiated by
an individual or local group identifying a cause that impacts the region and warrants a call to action.

Below is a template for use as a guideline for outreach to your own government officials asking to declare
September National Preparedness Month in your area.

(MONTH) (DAY), 2010

Dear (OFFICIAL’S NAME HERE):

For the past three years, the Ready Campaign and its partners have received a Presidential proclamation designating
September National Preparedness Month. Several state governments have also followed suit and provided
proclamations raising awareness for emergency preparedness in their respective states. Today, I am writing to urge
you to help (AUDIENCE – EX. MINNESOTANS) take concrete action toward preparing for emergencies and
disasters by declaring September National Preparedness Month in (REGION, TOWN or STATE).

National Preparedness Month creates an opportunity for people to become engaged in emergency preparedness on
an individual, family, neighborhood and community level. National Preparedness Month was created by the Federal
Emergency Management Agency’s Ready Campaign to increase the public’s engagement in preparing for
emergencies and to educate them on how to take steps toward becoming prepared.

Emergency preparedness is the responsibility of every citizen of (REGION, TOWN or STATE). We have to work
together, as a team, to ensure that our families, neighborhoods and communities are ready. Everyone needs to be
encouraged to put together an emergency supply kit, make a family emergency plan, work with their neighbors and
join in local efforts to become a community preparedness partner.

The Ready Campaign and (PARTNERING ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS LOCAL OFFICE OF
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT) encourage everyone to participate in citizen preparedness activities and to get
their families, their businesses, their neighborhoods and communities prepared. Only by working together as a team
can we be truly ready for emergencies and disasters.

For free information on how to get prepared, individuals can visit the Ready campaign Web sites at ready.gov and
listo.gov. These activities, along with a vigilant public, contribute to an overall level of preparedness that is critical
to the safety of our (REGION, TOWN or STATE) and the entire country.

We hope you will join us in encouraging our citizenry to engaged in emergency preparedness by declaring
September National Preparedness Month in (REGION, TOWN or STATE). Please see free to contact me with
questions.

Sincerely,


(YOUR NAME)
(TITLE, ORGANIZATION)
(PHONE/E-MAIL)




                                                                                                                             46
            NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH PROCLAMATION TEMPLATE

The following is a template you may submit for use as a guideline for the actual proclamation.

                                     PROCLAMATION
                   National Preparedness Month, September 2010
      WHEREAS, “National Preparedness Month” creates an important opportunity for every resident
of (REGION, TOWN or STATE) to prepare their homes, businesses, and communities for any type of
emergency from natural disasters to potential terrorist attacks; and

       WHEREAS, investing in the preparedness of ourselves, our families, businesses, and communities
can reduce fatalities and economic devastation in our communities and in our nation; and

        WHEREAS, the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Ready Campaign, Citizen Corps and
other federal, state, local, private, and volunteer agencies are working to increase public activities in
preparing for emergencies and to educate individuals on how to take action; and

        WHEREAS, emergency preparedness is the responsibility of every citizen of (REGION, TOWN
or STATE) and all citizens are urged to make preparedness a priority and work together, as a team, to
ensure that individuals, families, and communities are prepared for disasters and emergencies of any type;
and

        WHEREAS, all citizens of (REGION, TOWN or STATE) are encouraged to participate in
citizen preparedness activities and asked to review the Ready campaign’s Web sites at ready.gov or
listo.gov (in Spanish) and become more prepared.

        THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the (GOVERNING BODY) hereby proclaims
September, 2010 as National Preparedness Month, and encourages all citizens and businesses to develop
their own emergency preparedness plan, and work together toward creating a more prepared society.

       DATED this _____ Day of _____________ 2010 by the (GOVERNING BODY)

                                                    ___________________________________
                                                    NAME, TITLE




                                                                                                             47
            EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS EVENT INVITATION FLYER




                              In Support of
       National Preparedness Month 2010
                        Please Join Us For
                   Emergency Preparedness Night

                  September (DATE), 2010 at (TIME)
                (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS NAME)
                       (street address, city)

           Activities will include: [ADJUST LIST ACCORDINGLY]
                      Building an Emergency Supply Kit
                       Making a Family Emergency Plan
                      A Team Approach to Preparedness
           Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training
                   Reviewing Local Emergency Procedures
               Getting Involved in Preparing Our Community

    Please bring your family and emergency contact information, and we’ll
             walk you through making a Family Emergency Plan.

For more information or to request accessibility information or accommodations
  for people with disabilities, please contact (NAME) at (PHONE NUMBER).
      For more information on emergency preparedness, visit ready.gov.


                                                                                 48
                    EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS SPEAKER INVITATION

(MONTH) (DAY), 2010
Dear (RECIPIENT’S NAME HERE):
You serve our community every day as (TITLE/OCCUPATION, I.E. MAYOR, FIRE FIGHTER,
EMT, POLICE OFFICER, TOWN COUNCIL, ETC.), and your contributions benefit all who live and
work in (NAME OF TOWN). I hope you will join us to help share another very important message with
our community this September: Emergency Preparedness.

September is National Preparedness Month (NPM) 2010, a nationwide coordinated effort encouraging
families to take action now to prepare for emergencies in their homes, businesses and communities. This
nationwide effort is sponsored by the Ready Campaign and Citizen Corps. During the month, a wide
variety of national, state and local organizations will spearhead activities and outreach efforts that
highlight the importance of emergency preparedness and promote community involvement through a wide
variety of events and activities.

We at (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS NAME) are planning to participate in NPM at the local level by
hosting an Emergency Preparedness Night on September (DATE), at (TIME). We would be honored if
you would join us to speak to attendees about the importance of emergency preparedness, encourage our
community to take action toward becoming more prepared and provide information on our community’s
emergency plans.

We can do a lot to help our community be better prepared and your role as a (TITLE/OCCUPATION
FROM FIRST PARAGRAPH) makes you uniquely qualified to talk about emergency preparedness
with our attendees.

I hope you will agree to be our special guest speaker at the upcoming Emergency Preparedness Night. I
look forward to speaking with you further about this opportunity. Please feel free to call me at (PHONE
NUMBER) with any questions.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,



(YOUR NAME)
(TITLE)
(ORGANIZATION)
(PHONE/E-MAIL)




                                                                                                          49
                              EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS QUIZ

Include this Emergency Preparedness Quiz in your newsletter, on your Web site or on your blog. Give
the quiz to your members, employees or customers at local events, and then offer suggestions for
readiness activities and direct them to ready.gov for additional information.

                             WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO PREPARE?

Here are some actions you should be taking and things you need to know in order to be Ready.

   •   Do you have an Emergency Supply Kit in your home/office/car? The best way to prepare is to
       set aside supplies solely for emergencies or disasters. (Visit ready.gov for an Emergency Supply
       Kit checklist.)


   •   What emergencies could occur in your area? How could you prepare for those emergencies
       specifically? (Visit your local Office of Emergency Management for help with this answer.)



   •   Does your family have a plan? What if you are separated at the time of the disaster?



   •   Are you prepared to help your neighbor? In most emergencies, the best way to get help more
       quickly is by working with your close neighbors. Do you know of anyone who might need a little
       extra help?



   •   What are your local evacuation routes? How would you get out of town from work? How would
       you get out of town from home? (Visit your local Office of Emergency Management for help
       with this answer.)



   •   Does your city/county have a Citizen Corps Council? (If you don’t know, visit
       www.citizencorps.gov)



   •   Does your city/county have an emergency alert system? If so, are you signed up to get alerts?
       (Visit your local Office of Emergency Management for help with this answer.)


   •   Do you know the local radio station you would tune into to get emergency information? (Visit
       your local Office of Emergency Management for help with this answer.)

                                                                                                          50
                      EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS QUIZ FOR KIDS

                           WHAT SHOULD YOU DO TO BE READY?

This Emergency Preparedness Quiz can be included in your newsletter, on your Web site, or you may
give the quiz to kids at local events.
                                                         4. Which of the following is NOT an
        1. What is NOT one of the four steps you            important part of a Kid’s Emergency
           can take to help your family be                  Supply Kit?
           prepared for emergencies?
           A. Eat your vegetables                           A. Flashlight
           B. Get a kit                                     B. Batteries
           C. Make a plan                                   C. Water
           D. Be Informed                                   D. Video Games
           E. Get Involved
                                                         5. How quickly can a fire spread through a
        2. What should a Family Communications              house?
           Plan include?                                    A. 10 minutes
           A. Information about how we would                B. As little as five minutes
                get in touch with each other during         C. 30 minutes
                an emergency                                D. 45 minutes
           B. Where we would meet
           C. How we would remain in contact             6. In an emergency, what number should
           D. All of the above                              you dial to contact the police and fire
                                                            department?
        3. How much water should you have in                A. 911
           your Ready Kit?                                  B. 111
           A. One small water bottle for each               C. 711
                person                                      D. 311
           B. One gallon for the whole family
           C. One gallon of water per person             7. In an emergency, what should you have
                per day                                     available to hear news and official reports
           D. One gallon of water for the family            about what is occurring?
                per day                                     A. A hand-crank/battery-powered radio
                                                            B. A CD player
                                                            C. A board game
                                                            D. DVD player




                                                                                                      51
            EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

National Preparedness Month (NPM)
Question:   What is NPM?
Answer:     Sponsored by the Ready Campaign, and with support from Coalition Members across the
            nation, NPM is held each September to increase public awareness about emergency
            preparedness. During the month, Americans are encouraged to participate by hosting
            activities and initiatives. In recent years, more than 3,000 organizations joined the Ready
            Campaign as Coalition Members.

            This year, NPM focuses on encouraging you and other Americans to take active steps
            toward getting involved and becoming prepared. Preparedness is everyone’s responsibility.
            We have to work together, as a team, to ensure that individuals, families, neighborhoods
            and communities are ready. Put together an emergency supply kit. Make a family
            emergency plan. Be prepared to help your neighbor. Work as a team to keep everyone safe.
            For more information about NPM, visit the Ready Web site, ready.gov.

Question:   How can I better prepare myself and my family for an emergency?
Answer:     The Ready Campaign and its partner Citizen Corps ask Americans to take important steps
            to prepare, including getting an Emergency Supply Kit, making a Family Emergency Plan,
            becoming informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur where they
            live, and their appropriate responses, and getting involved in the community. More
            information, including an Emergency Supply Kit checklist and a Family Emergency Plan
            template, is available on the Ready Web site (ready.gov) or by calling 1-800-BE-READY,
            TTY 1-800-462-7585.

Question:   What should be included in an Emergency Supply Kit?
Answer:     In a basic Emergency Supply Kit, the Ready Campaign recommends including the
            following:

               •   One gallon of water per person per day for three days – remember to include
                   enough for your pets, too
               •   At least a three-day supply of non-perishable food. Select foods that require no
                   refrigeration, preparation or cooking and little or no water and choose foods your
                   family will eat: ready-to-eat canned meats, peanut butter, protein or fruit bars, dry
                   cereal or granola. Also pack a manual can opener and eating utensils
               •   Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert
                   and extra batteries for both
               •   Flashlight and extra batteries
               •   First aid kit
               •   Whistle to signal for help
               •   Dust mask, to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to
                   shelter-in-place
               •   Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
               •   Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities


                                                                                                           52
               •   Local maps

            Ready also encourages an individual to think about the special needs of family members:
               • Prescription medications, list of medications, dosage and schedule
               • Glasses
               • Infant formula and diapers
               • Hearing aid batteries
               • Pet food, extra water for your pet, leash and collar
               • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and
                   bank account records in a waterproof, portable container
               • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children

            For a complete list of items, we encourage people to visit ready.gov to download a free
            emergency supply checklist or call 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585.

Question:   How can I develop a Family Emergency Plan?
Answer:     Preparing a Family Emergency Plan is simple. You can get started by using a free Family
            Emergency Plan template available at ready.gov. A Family Emergency Plan can help a
            family to stay in contact if they are separated during an emergency.


Question:   How can I stay informed about emergencies?
Answer:     It’s important that you know the potential emergencies that can happen in your state,
            region and community. Go to ready.gov and click on Ready America, then Community and
            States Information to find out more information about your local area. For specific
            questions about the area where you live, contact your state or local Office of Emergency
            Management, and look for them at festivals and other events in your area. Ready
            recommends including a battery operated radio, such as a NOAA radio with tone alert, to
            stay apprised of developments during emergencies. It is always important to listen to and
            follow the advice of local officials in the event of an emergency.


Question:   How can I talk to kids about emergency preparedness?
Answer:     The Ready Kids Web site focuses on weather-related emergencies and helps parents
            educate children, ages 8-12, about emergencies and how they can help their families
            prepare. The Ready Campaign encourages parents to visit the Web site with their children.
            In addition, the Ready Campaign has developed Ready Kids in-school materials for
            teachers, which are available at ready.gov or by calling 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-
            462-7585.

            The Ready Campaign consulted a number of organizations experienced in education and
            children’s health, including the American Psychological Association, American Red Cross,
            U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to
            develop Ready Kids. Together, these experts agree that it is appropriate to reach children,
            parents and teachers to discuss potential emergencies and how to be prepared.

Question:   How can pet owners prepare for emergencies?



                                                                                                          53
Answer:     Pet owners should assemble an Emergency Supply Kit that includes enough pet food and
            water for three days, medications and medical records, leashes, ID tags and other
            appropriate supplies. It’s also recommended that pet owners have an emergency plan that
            considers the needs of their pets and they learn more about the types of emergencies that
            could happen in their area and the appropriate responses. Pet owners can download a free
            brochure from the Ready Web site at ready.gov, or request a copy by calling 1-800-BE-
            READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585.

            The Ready Campaign consulted with a number of organizations experienced in animal
            health and well-being to develop Ready for Pet Owners information. These organizations
            include American Kennel Club, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
            Animals, American Veterinary Medical Association and Humane Society of the United
            States.

Question:   How can older Americans and individuals with disabilities and other access and
            functional needs prepare for emergencies?
Answer:     Ready encourages individuals to make an Emergency Supply Kit, including food and
            water, medications, list of medications, dosage and schedule and medical records, and
            personal items such as eyeglasses, hearing aids, wheelchair battery charger and other
            appropriate supplies to maintain health and independence. Ready also recommends that
            individuals develop an emergency plan that considers their unique needs and a personal
            support network they can call upon in the event of an emergency. To learn more, visit
            ready.gov for a free brochure or call 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585.

            More than that, though, every individual should include their friends and neighbors, with
            disabilities and without, in their emergency planning. In an emergency, neighbors will
            need to be prepared to help each other until first responders come. Know if your neighbors
            have disabilities or other access and functional needs and help them prepare.

            The Ready Campaign consulted with a number of organizations experienced in the health
            and well-being of older Americans and individuals with disabilities and other special needs
            to develop Ready information tailored to their unique needs. These organizations include
            AARP, American Red Cross and the National Organization on Disability.

Question:   What steps should businesses take to prepare?
Answer:     Ready Business is designed to inform owners and managers of small- and medium-sized
            businesses about what they can do to prepare in the event of an emergency. The goal of
            this program is to raise the business community’s awareness of the need for emergency
            planning and motivate them to: plan to stay in business; talk to their employees; and
            protect their investment.

            Ready Business was developed by the Ready Campaign and launched in partnership with
            the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Small Business Administration, Society of Human
            Resource Management, The Business Roundtable, The 9/11 Public Discourse Project,
            ASIS International, Business Executives for National Security, International Safety
            Equipment Association, International Security Management Association, National
            Association of Manufacturers, National Federation of Independent Businesses and
            Occupational Safety and Health Administration. For more information about business
            emergency preparedness, visit ready.gov, and click on Ready Business.

                                                                                                          54
Ready Campaign
Question:   What is the Ready Campaign?
Answer:     The Ready Campaign is a national public service advertising campaign, sponsored by the
            Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in partnership with the Ad Council. It is
            designed to educate and empower Americans to prepare for and respond to emergencies,
            including natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks. The goal of the campaign is to get
            the public involved and ultimately to increase the level of basic preparedness across the
            nation.

            Ready asks individuals to do four key things: get an Emergency Supply Kit; make a Family
            Emergency Plan; be informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur
            and their appropriate responses; and get involved in community efforts. Individuals can
            visit ready.gov or call 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585 for information about
            emergency preparedness.

Question:   What does the Ready Campaign include?
Answer:     The Ready Campaign includes a general consumer platform called Ready America. In
            addition, the campaign has extensions for pet owners, older Americans, and individuals
            with disabilities and other access and functional needs. In 2004, the Ready Campaign and
            the Ad Council launched Ready Business, an extension of the Ready Campaign that
            focuses on business preparedness. Ready Business helps owners and managers of small to
            medium-sized businesses prepare their employees, operations and assets in the event of an
            emergency.

            In 2006, the Ready Campaign and The Ad Council launched Ready Kids, a tool to help
            parents and teachers educate children, ages 8 – 12, about emergencies and how they can
            help get their family prepared. Listo is the Spanish-language version of the Ready
            Campaign. Visit listo.gov for information in Spanish, or call 1-888-SE-LISTO. In addition,
            some state and local Offices of Emergency Management have translated preparedness
            information into additional languages. To find resources in your area, visit ready.gov.

Citizen Corps
Question:   What is Citizen Corps?
Answer:     Citizen Corps is FEMA's grassroots strategy to bring together government and community
            leaders to involve citizens in all-hazards emergency preparedness and resilience. The
            program was created in 2002 and is headquartered in the Federal Emergency Management
            Agency’s (FEMA) National Preparedness and Protection Division. Inspired by the vast
            outpouring of spontaneous volunteer support after the September 11, 2001, terrorist
            attacks, Citizen Corps strives to answer the essential questions “What can I do?” and “How
            can I help?” in a meaningful way. Citizen Corps does this by providing local opportunities
            for Americans of all abilities to prepare, train and volunteer to help address all types of
            natural and man-made hazards. Please visit www.citizencorps.gov for more information.

Question:   How does Citizen Corps work?



                                                                                                              55
Answer:     With so many different roles and functions to play in an emergency, successful response
            and recovery must be supported by well-coordinated planning, training and preparation.
            Citizen Corps Councils are designed to bring together government, community leaders,
            first responders, emergency managers, businesses, non-profit and volunteer organizations,
            and other groups with a direct interest in strengthening their communities. When disaster
            strikes, everyone knows what their role is, who they need to coordinate with, and how to
            get support where and when it is needed most.

Question:   Where are Citizen Corps Councils located?
Answer:     More than 2,300 state, local, tribal and territorial governments in all 56 states and U.S.
            territories have formed Citizen Corps Councils, and every day new Councils are formed in
            communities around the country. These Councils help drive local citizen preparedness and
            participation by assessing possible threats, identifying local resources, developing
            community action plans, and engaging the community through Citizen Corps partner
            programs which train and exercise volunteers. To find a Council near you, visit
            www.citizencorps.gov/cc/CouncilMapIndex.do.

Question:   What are Citizen Corps’ partner programs and affiliates?
Answer:     Citizen Corps works with 32 national partners which include other federal agencies and
            national organizations. Volunteer programs such as Community Emergency Response
            Teams (CERT), Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), Fire Corps, USA On Watch/
            Neighborhood Watch (NWP), and Volunteers in Police Service (VIPS) – provide national
            resources for training and exercising citizens at the state and local levels. In addition, 27
            Citizen Corps affiliate programs and organizations offer community resources for public
            education, outreach, and training; represent volunteers interested in helping make their
            community safer; or offer volunteer service opportunities to support first responders,
            disaster relief activities, and community safety efforts. Visit
            www.citizencorps.gov/programs/ for more information.




                                                                                                            56
                                APPENDIX C: READY TOOLS
  Detailed information on emergency planning and preparedness is available on the ready.gov website.
                            Here are just a few of the materials available.

                               EMERGENCY SUPPLY KIT CHECKLIST
The Ready Emergency Supply Kit Checklist includes the basic items to put in an Emergency Supply Kit.
It is available to download at ready.gov or you can order a limited amount of printed brochures by using
the form on page 57 or by calling the FEMA Warehouse at 1-800-480-2520.

                              FAMILY EMERGENCY PLAN TEMPLATE
Families may not be together in an emergency, so it is important to plan in advance how to contact one
another and what to do in different situations. To get started, Ready has designed a Family Emergency
Plan template that is available for download on ready.gov and clicking on “Make a Plan.” It is also
available in Spanish on www.listo.gov.

                           READY AND CITIZEN CORPS BROCHURES
Distribute emergency preparedness brochures to your employees, members, or communities. There are a
variety of brochures, booklets, and handouts available, including resources for parents and teachers,
children, older Americans and individuals with disabilities and other access and functional needs, pet
owners, small to medium-sized businesses and more. These materials are available at a limited quantity
and we are unable to make exceptions to those limits. You can order printed copies of existing Ready and
Citizen Corps publications by using the order forms on page 57 and 58 of this toolkit or calling by the
FEMA Distribution Center at 1-800-480-2520.

Since the quantity limit may be less than the amount you need for your community, some of the Ready
publications have been converted into two-page printer-friendly handouts. These are condensed versions
of our brochures and are an easy and inexpensive way to supplement the Ready brochures at events where
you expect mass attendance. These can also be easily sent to employees, colleagues, members or
stakeholders via email. You can access them at http://ready.gov/america/publications/allpubs.html. At the
same Web page you can also find information about downloading source files and reprinting the materials
at your own expense.




                                                                                                            57
READY ORDER FORM




                   58
                                        CITIZEN CORPS ORDER FORM




To place an order for Citizen Corps and other emergency preparedness materials, please call 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (EST),
Monday - Friday the FEMA Distribution Center at 1-800-480-2520.

Publication Title (Inventory Number)                                              Limit          Type
Citizen Corps Brochure: Preparing Makes Sense. Get Involved Now. (9-0511)         1000           Tri-fold
Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Brochure (9-0489)                        250            Tri-fold
FEMA -Disaster Preparedness Activity Book: Ages 4-7                               25             Activity Book
FEMA- Disaster Preparedness Activity Book: Ages 8-11                              25             Activity Book
FEMA- Preparing for Disaster (9-1984)                                             30             Pamphlet
FEMA- Getting Ready For Disaster - One Family's Experience (0-0030)               25             DVD
FEMA- Food and Water in an Emergency (9-1985)                                     30             Pamphlet
NOAA- Hurricanes Unleashing Nature's Fury (0-0125)                                50             Pamphlet
FEMA- Fact Sheet : Hurricanes (0-0047)                                            1000           Handout
FEMA- Fact Sheet: Floods (0-0435)                                                 250            Handout
FEMA- Fact Sheet: Tornados (0-0436)                                               250            Handout
FEMA- Fact Sheet: Thunderstorms (0-0437)                                          250            Handout
FEMA -Fact Sheet: Earthquakes (0-0439)                                            250            Handout




                                                                                                                       59
                                          REX ORDER FORM




                             “Rex” the Ready Kids
                          Mascot Now Available For Use
          Brought to you by Federal Emergency Management Agency
                         and The Advertising Council
Important:
All reservations must be made two weeks in advance through your state or local government, local Office
of Emergency Management or Citizen Corps Council. NO EXCEPTIONS. Requests will be taken on a
first come first serve basis. (Approximately six uses per month available.) A confirmation e-mail will be
sent upon receipt of the request to inform you of the availability. This contract must be filled out with all
the correct information. Rental fee is $150.00 plus shipping costs.

Date Needed: _____________________ Date Returning: _________________________
Organization Name: _______________________________________________________
Organization Contact: ______________________________________________________
Contact Phone: _____________________ Contact E-mail: ______________________
Address: _________________________________________________________________
City: _____________________ State: __________ Zip: __________
Credit Card Information - Name: _____________________________________________
Expiration Date: _____________________ CVS: ______________________________

                                    IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
I have read and fully understand the following financial and maintenance responsibilities invoiced
in the use of this costume:
     I agree to pay for any damage that occurs to the costume while it is in my possession.
     I acknowledge the rental agreement stating that I may only keep the costume for three days
        upon receipt. (i.e. Friday – Monday) or I will be charged for $50 per day.
     I will arrange and pay for the costume to be returned by the date indicated.
     I agree to pay $150 + shipping for its three-day use and comply with all instructions
        including maintenance, repacking and return of the costume.
     If the costume can’t be returned by set date, I will contact M&C to reschedule.

           2841 Oakland Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55407-1301 (612) 874-8176 • Fax (612) 874-6003
      www.mascotsandcostumes.com E-mail Address: contract.service@mascotsandcostumes.com

                                                                                                                60
                      READY PUBLIC SERVICE ADVERTISEMENTS (PSAs)

Ready PSAs, produced and distributed by the Ad Council, are available to be shared with your members,
employees, stakeholders, etc. Include Ready print ads in your organization or community newsletters and
publications, or post or play them in your break room or at local community centers and libraries. You
can also provide copies to your local newspapers, television and radio stations and encourage them to run
the PSAs during the month of September. We encourage you to reach out to your local media outlets in
July to ensure the spots can be played during NPM. Note that there are also customizable versions
available to state and local governments. You may view all of the Ready PSAs at ready.gov.

To download or order copies of the TV, radio, print, Internet or outdoor PSAs, visit the Ad Council’s PSA
Central Web site at http://psacentral.adcouncil.org/psacentral. All available materials are provided free of
charge. Please check the PSA Central Web site for the various lengths and sizes available for the below
listed public service advertisements (PSAs).

Television
   • World Upside Down (:60,
       :30, :15, :10)
   • Corner of the Ring (Spanish)

Radio
   •    Family Routine (:60, :30)
   •    World for Granted (:60, :30)
   •    World Upside Down (:15)
   •    Radionovela (Spanish)

Print
    •   Family Card
    •   Battery (Spanish)
    •   Water (Spanish)

Out-of-Home
   • 3 Steps
   • Upside Down House
   • Suburban Family
   • Urban Family
   • Flashlight (Spanish)
   • Battery (Spanish)

Web Banners
  • 3 Steps
  • Upside Down House
  • Suburban Family
  • Urban Family
  • Flashlight (Spanish)
  • Battery (Spanish)


                                                                                                               61
                  INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEOS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

The Ready Campaign has free instructional videos available for download at ready.gov, as well as a
Spanish-language video at listo.gov. The videos outline the four simple steps Americans should take to
prepare for emergencies: get an Emergency Supply Kit; make a Family Emergency Plan; be informed
about the types of emergencies that can happen in their area; and Work Together to Keep Everyone Safe.
The Ready Campaign also has instructional videos for pet owners, individuals with disabilities and other
access and functional needs, and older Americans.

Registered Coalition Members can also download the videos on the Coalition Member Web site. Once
registered, access to the Coalition Member Web site will be sent via e-mail. The video can be aired in
your break room or in-store. If you require a special format of the video, e-mail npm@dhs.gov.




                                                                                                           62
                                APPENDIX D: MEDIA TOOLS

                EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE




Press Release                                             (DATE- I.E. September 1,) 2010
                                                          Contact: (Contact Name), (Phone)

      (ORGANIZATION) Encourages Americans to Get Ready During National
                          Preparedness Month
             Seventh annual NPM helps Americans take steps toward becoming prepared

(CITY, STATE) – (ORGANIZATION) is proud to be participating in the seventh annual National
Preparedness Month (NPM) in September. Sponsored by FEMA’s Ready Campaign, NPM is a
nationwide effort encouraging individuals, families, businesses, and communities to work together and
take action to prepare for emergencies.

This year, NPM focuses on encouraging all Americans to take active steps toward getting involved and
becoming prepared. Preparedness is everyone’s responsibility. We have to work together, as a team, to
ensure that individuals, families, and communities are ready. Individuals are encouraged to: make a
family emergency plan; put together an emergency supply kit; be prepared to help your neighbor; and
work as a team to keep everyone safe.

(ORGANIZATION) is (INSERT EVENT AND ANY DETAILS HERE).

(INSERT QUOTE FROM YOUR ORGANIZATION HERE)
This is the (INSERT NUMBER OF YEARS ORGANIZATION HAS BEEN INVOLVED WITH
NPM) year (ORGANIZATION) has participated in NPM.
For more information about the Ready Campaign and National Preparedness Month, visit ready.gov or
call 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585.

(ORGANIZATION NAME)
(ORGANIZATION BOILERPLATE/DESCRIPTION OF ORGANIZATION)




                                                                                                        63
                 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS EVENT MEDIA ADVISORY

The Ready Campaign will be distributing a national media advisory to promote NPM 2010. This media
advisory can be tailored for your local efforts.

                          MEDIA ADVISORY
             Attention News Directors and Assignment Editors
  (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS NAME) PREPARES FOR EMERGENCIES; ENCOURAGES
          THE PUBLIC TO ATTEND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NIGHT

     LOCAL ACTIVITIES PART OF NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH 2010
WHO:          (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS NAME) invites the community to join together to
              become better informed as part of local National Preparedness Month 2010 activities.

WHAT:         This September marks National Preparedness Month 2010, the seventh year of a
              nationwide coordinated effort encouraging families to take simple steps to prepare for
              emergencies in their homes, businesses and communities. During National Preparedness
              Month, FEMA’s Ready Campaign and Citizen Corps will work with a wide variety of
              organizations to highlight the importance of emergency preparedness and promote
              community involvement across the nation through events and activities, such as first aid
              trainings, town hall meetings and emergency drills.

              As part of local National Preparedness Month activities, (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS
              NAME) will host an Emergency Preparedness Night where attendees will learn concrete
              steps on preparing their families, businesses and communities for emergencies and
              disasters; and receive valuable local emergency preparedness information so they know
              how to stay informed during an emergency situation. They will also learn ways to get
              involved in helping the community become prepared.

WHEN:         September (DATE), 2010, (TIME)

WHERE:        (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS NAME)
              (ADDRESS)
              (CITY/STATE)

WHY:          Preparedness is everyone’s responsibility. We have to work together, as a team, to ensure
              that individuals, families, and communities are ready. Individuals are encouraged to: put
              together an emergency supply kit; make a family emergency plan; be prepared to help your
              neighbor; and work as a team to keep everyone safe. (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS
              NAME) encourages our community to be better prepared and invites community members
              to attend Emergency Preparedness Night to learn how.

  For more information contact (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS NAME) at (PHONE NUMBER).


                                                                                                          64
              Please visit ready.gov for more information on emergency preparedness.


    EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS NEWSPAPER CALENDAR SECTION SUBMISSION

Preparedness is everyone’s responsibility. Americans have to work together, as a team, to ensure that
individuals, families, and communities are ready. During National Preparedness Month (NPM), the
(ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS NAME) will host an Emergency Preparedness Night on September
(DATE), 2010, (TIME), at (ADDRESS). Attendees will learn how to make an Emergency Supply Kit,
find out what needs to be included in a Family Emergency Plan, hear about the types of emergencies that
happen in our area, and discover ways to help neighbors and get involved in community efforts. The event
is part of (ORGANIZATION/BUSINESS NAME)’s participation in NPM 2010, a month set aside to
encourage individuals and families to take steps now to prepare for emergencies in their homes,
businesses, and communities. The event is open to the public and admission is free. For more information,
contact (NAME) at (PHONE NUMBER).


                                                  ###




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