Eld Lesson Template by rxv14365

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									Lesson Design and Instructional
      Strategies for ELD
          Karina Martir
Agenda
 Gradual Release of Responsibility
  Model
 Checking for Understanding
 Lesson Re-Design
 Questioning in the ELD classroom
How do you learn new things?
 Pick one of the following activities.
 Think about how you learned the
  activity.
 Share with a partner your experience
  with how you learned.
 List similarities with your learning
  process.
Learned how to…
 ride a bike
 tie your shoe
 use new computer software
      In some classrooms…
                      Teacher Responsibility

                            Focus Lesson                          “I do it”
                                                                   (Teacher)


                                                                   “You do it
                                                                     alone”
                                                                        (Student)

                                                   Independent




                                               Student Responsibility



Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
    “I do it” > “You do it alone”

   I show you how I
    swim.




Now    you swim.
      In other classrooms…
       Teacher Responsibility



                                                             “You do it
                                                              alone”
                                                               (Student)
                                              Independent




                                    Student Responsibility

Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
             “You do it alone”


   You jump in alone or
    “sink or swim”
      Or you might see this…
                      Teacher Responsibility

                            Focus Lesson                         “I do it”
                                                                  (Teacher)

                                                                 “We do it”
                       Guided Instruction                        (Teacher/Student)




                                                                        “You do it
                                                   Independent            alone”



                                               Student Responsibility



Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
“I do it” “We do it” “You do it”
I show you how I swim.
I give you cues, prompts
and questions.
You practice
independently.
      Gradual Release of Responsibility
                      Teacher Responsibility
                                                              “I do it”
                            Focus Lesson
                                                               (Teacher)

                                                                   “We do it”
                       Guided Instruction
                                                                   (Teacher/Student)

                                                                        “You do it together”
                                                   Collaborative         (Student/Student)


                                                                            “You do it
                                                   Independent
                                                                              alone”
                                                                               (Student)
                                               Student Responsibility



Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
“I do it” “We do it” “You do it
     together” “You do it”
Instructional Delivery
How do I use the GRR Model?
 The GRR model is not necessarily a
  lesson template.
 It is a frame of reference to guide your
  lesson.
 Checklist
                        Instructional Planning & Delivery
    Which framework
     are you most
     familiar with?
                             Instructional Planning
                              Delivery Framework              The HOW

                                    M. Hunter
                                                     Holt’s
                      DI                             6-step
                               Strategies within
                               each framework:
                               WICR, SDAIE, RT,         X step
                  GRR        Questioning, Grouping      Lesson
                                Differentiating,        design
                                  Scaffolding
                      AIPD
                                                T, M, P, A

                                 Glencoe’s
 The WHAT =                      4 step
the standards/
 content/skills
      Focus Lesson
      “I do it”

       Teacher must clearly establish a
        purpose: ELD Language Objective
       Three methods used most often in focus
        lessons are:
             Modeling
             Metacognitive                   awareness
             Think-alouds
          5-20 minutes

Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
Language Objective
Students will be able to (Language Function),
     using (Grammar Form) …..

Students will be able to: make predictions,
                          describe objects,
                          sequence events,
using: future progressive tense.
        comparative adjectives.
         adverbs.
   The Language Objective
                    Language
                    FUNCTION




                   Desired
Grammar            Language
FORMS              Result
Why use language functions?
 Give a reason to use language
 Are used in both academic & social
  discourse
 Can develop higher level thinking
 Are embedded in reading/language arts
  and other subject areas
 Are used at every phase level
Sample Language Functions
Modeling
   Think aloud/Metacognitive Awareness




       Katie/blouse           Katie’s blouse
       The dog/bone           The dog’s bone
       The teacher/students   The teacher’s students
      Focus Lesson
      “I do it”

          Think-alouds
             Combines    cognition and metacognition as
              the teacher shares how he or she uses
              both to understand the content.
             Write it out before you do it in front of the
              class.
             Keep it tight and brief. (Think like the
              expert you are!)



Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
      Focus Lesson
      “I do it”

          Metacognitive Awareness
             Extends    the cognition through monitoring
                the use of the content being learned
          Instructional Strategies may look like:
             Public          Problem Solving




Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
    Metacognition
   Knowledge of general strategies for
    learning, thinking and problem-solving
       Rehearsal-repeating words or terms
       Organizational- outlining, drawing, thinking
        maps, graphic organizers, etc.

   Knowledge about cognitive tasks
       Knowledge of what strategies to use and how to
        use them

   Self-knowledge
       Knowledge of one’s own strengths and
        weaknesses in relation to cognition and learning
       Integrating knowledge of strategies, task at hand
        GIVEN your knowledge of self as learner
     Metacognition
   In order for students to self-regulate, they
    have to:
      Beaware of what they are doing
     Monitor as they work & process their
      experiences
     Reflect on what works & doesn’t, as they
      get to know their own learning strengths &
      weaknesses
 Metacognition does not naturally occur in all
  students without explicit instruction in how to
  monitor their own learning.
Break into ELD level groups
 Pick a unit from your Teacher’s Edition
 As a group identify a language objective
  for the unit and rewrite it using a
  language function, grammar usage and
  desired outcome.
ELD Modeling
Write down what the teacher modeling
 will look like for your unit.
 Be prepared to present your modeling
 to the group.
                            Guided Instruction
                                       (Teacher/Student)




Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
  Guided
Instruction
      Guided Instruction
      “We do it”
       Where the cognitive load begins to shift
        from teacher to student.
       Strategic use of cues, prompts, &
        questions
       Begin planning differentiated instruction
        based on the needs of the students




Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
      Guided Instruction
      “We do it”
          Effective Instructional Strategies may
           include:
             Guided Reading
             Guided Writing
             Student Think-alouds after teacher has
              modeled




Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
Guided Practice
Checking   for understanding
White  boards, choral response, think-pair-
 share, 4 Square/Group of 4, etc.

What are some reasons to check for
 understanding?
ELD level groups
 As a group write down what your guided
  instruction will look like.
 Include at least one form of checking for
  understanding and why that CFU
  strategy is appropriate.
                                    Collaborative
                                       (Student/Student)




Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
Collaborative
      Collaborative
       Provides opportunity for students to
        work together to complete specific
        tasks.
       Students work together to solve
        problems, discover information, and
        complete projects.
       Teacher works with small groups, while
        the other students are engaged in
        meaningful activities
Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
      Collaborative
          Effective Instructional Strategies may include:
               Reciprocal Teaching
               Visual Displays
                     Graphic organizers or Thinking Maps
             Literature Circles
             Labs or simulations
             Jigsaw
             Skills Practice (especially true of actions that
              students need to know to automaticity)



Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
Collaboration by ELD Levels
 Basics: Students use language
  objective with sentence stems to
  present dialogue in front of class.
 A: Students use language objective with
  self created sentences to present
  dialogue in front of class.
 B: Students use language objective to
  create story to present dialogue in front
  of class.
Collaboration by ELD Levels
 C: Students use language objective to
  create mini-drama to present in front of
  class.
 1P: Students use language objective to
  create a short play to present in front of
  class.
ELD Collaboration
 Write down what the collaboration will
  look like for your ELD unit.
 Please note how you will group
  students, and what will they work
  together to produce.
                         Independent Practice
                                              (Student)




Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
      Independent Practice
       Provides students with opportunities to
        apply what they have learned through
        focus lessons, guided instruction, and
        collaborative learning.
       Should help students become
        increasingly self-directed and engaged.
       Not a pile of worksheets or packets
       If homework, concept needs to be
        previously taught and learned.
Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
Examples of Independent Practice

   What are some effective examples of
    independent practice?




   What are some ineffective examples of
    independent practice?
ELD Independent Practice
   As a group write down what your ELD
    independent practice will look like for
    your unit.
      Indicators of a GRR Classroom
          Focus Lessons:
               The teacher establishes the purpose of the lesson
               The teacher uses “I” statements to model thinking
               Questioning is used to scaffold instruction
               The lesson builds on metacognitive awareness,
                especially indicators of success
               Focus lessons move to guided instruction, not
                immediately to independent learning.




Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
       Indicators of a GRR Classroom
       Guided Instruction
            Small-group arrangements are evident
            Grouping changes throughout the semester
            The teacher plays an active role in guided instruction,
             not just circulating and assisting individual students
            Dialogue occurs between students and teachers as
             they begin to apply a strategy or skill
            Teacher uses cues and prompts to scaffold
             understanding when a student makes an error and
             does not immediately tell the student the correct
             answer


Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
      Indicators of a GRR Classroom
          Collaborative Learning
             Small-group  arrangements are evident
             Grouping changes throughout the year
             The teacher has modeled concepts that
              students need to complete collaborative
              tasks
             Students have received guided instruction
              of the concepts needed to complete the
              collaborative tasks

Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
      Indicators of a GRR Classroom
          Independent Learning
             Students  have received focused lessons,
              guided instruction, and collaborative
              learning experiences related to the
              concepts needed to complete the
              independent task
             Independent tasks extend beyond practice
              to application and extension of new
              knowledge


Adapted from Doug Fisher & Nancy Frey, 2008
Questioning Carousel
   Go around the room and give reasons
    for each of the questions.
When might recitation questioning be
used?
 Review before a test
 Check for understanding (choral
  response, white boards, etc.)
 Provide opportunities for practice
 Model good questioning for students
 Assess student knowledge (before,
  during or after instruction)
Practice with purpose
   Look at the purpose for questioning and
    develop questions for the text excerpt.
Why is it important to establish a
  purpose for questioning?
 Guides instruction and learning
 Provides depth and complexity for the
  material
      Q-Card
Stems Associated
with Questioning and
Answering at all
Cognitive Levels
ELD Questioning
   Go through your re-designed lesson
    and create questions with purpose for
    each section of the Gradual Release of
    Responsibility.
     Questions?

Thank you for your time!

								
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