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					                                              Public Affairs Office
                                           Washington, D.C. 20307-5001
                                                 (202) 782-7177
                                                NEWS RELEASE
Release No. 08-55
Date: Nov. 20, 2008
For Immediate Release

            Walter Reed Army Medical Center Launches Driving Simulator
                         New Simulator Helps Wounded Warriors Learn to Drive Again
WASHINGTON, D.C., November 20, 2008 – Walter Reed Army Medical Center’s Military Advanced Training
Center now possesses a state-of-the-art driving simulator to help wounded servicemembers return to driving
independence. This new capability allows patients to practice with adaptive driving equipment, gain confidence in
their driving proficiency and apply mental skills training in a commonplace activity.

Walter Reed leadership launched the driving simulator at an official ceremony today in Joel Auditorium as part of
Warrior Care Month.

The driving simulator adds a new dimension to Warrior Care and was a collaborative effort involving government
and corporate partners to include the Army Center for Enhanced Performance (ACEP), America’s Army, GM
Mobility, General Motors Automotive Service Education Program at the Community College of Baltimore County,
Bruno Independent Living Aids and other local businesses.

Physical and occupational therapists use the simulator as an assessment tool to identify possible deficit areas in
driving of which Soldiers may be unaware. Issues addressed with the simulator include: vehicle entry and egress
issues, driving with modifications and driving in civilian situations. Soldiers are able to go through driving
scenarios that test their abilities in having to swerve from road debris, tailgating, quickly recognizing and reacting
to common traffic signs and managing stresses associated with common driving situations.

“We are pleased to be able to launch this simulator during Warrior Care Month,” said Col. Norvell Van Coots,
commander, Walter Reed Health Care System. “Our wounded warriors will now be able to regain their driving
skills, using one of the most advanced and realistic rehabilitation tools created to help our recovering
servicemembers.”

Using state-of-the-art America’s Army technologies, the vehicle simulator developers created a realistic driving
simulation that reacts to the driver and provides valuable feedback in a non-threatening and constructive manner
enabling Warriors in Transition to learn to operate a vehicle safely. The simulator vehicle is a Chevrolet Colorado
Extended Cab chassis and is equipped with: active steering, brakes, accelerator, Gear select and instrument
panel; driver inputs tied to America’s Army gaming software, a Bruno Orbit Seat for passenger side; Minox hand
controls; adjustable seating height and an interior redesigned for easy cleaning and maintenance.

ACEP Performance Enhancement Specialists utilize the simulator to help Soldiers apply their mental skills
training in a commonplace activity. ACEP education mixes educational best practices with applied sport
psychology to train Soldiers to build confidence, control their attention, manage energy, set goals and integrate
imagery.
Warrior Care is honored through the month of November.

About Walter Reed Health Care System "Home of Warrior Care"
The Walter Reed Health Care System provides comprehensive health care for more than 150,000 Soldiers, other
service members, Family members and retirees in the National Capital Area. Its hub is Walter Reed Army Medical
Center, the clinical center of gravity of American military medicine. For more information, visit
www.wramc.amedd.army.mil.

About Army Center for Enhanced Performance
The Army Center for Enhanced Performance (ACEP) utilizes state-of-the-art technologies, educational best
practices and applied sport psychology techniques to teach Soldiers, Units and Families to acquire, practice and
master the mental and emotional skills that underlie human performance. Employing strategies founded at the
United States Military Academy at West Point, Army Centers for Enhanced Performance are open at installations
throughout the country. Soldiers benefit from cutting-edge, research-based mental strength education that will
give them the keys to maintaining resilience in complex and uncertain environments. Just as physical training
strengthens the body, ACEP training provides the foundation for strengthening the mind.

About America’s Army
Launched on July 4th 2002, America’s Army is an innovative PC action game that provides young adults with an
inside perspective and a virtual role in today’s high-tech Army. The America’s Army game affords players a
virtual “test drive” of Soldiering in the U.S. Army from basic training to the battlefield in the Global War on
Terrorism. With almost 10 million registered players, America’s Army is one of the world’s most successful
gaming franchises. Due to its ability to render exceptionally realistic and flexible environments, player interactions,
and scenarios, America’s Army is an ideal platform for developing training simulations and applications. The
America’s Army team delivers complete solutions ranging from customer requirements definition to rapid
prototyping and tactical hardware integration. America’s Army continually redefines the military game space and
creates vivid, immersive and adaptable environments for use within government agencies. Visit
www.americasarmy.com for more information.


                                                         ###
Staff Sgt. Brian Schar test drives the new state-of-the-art driving simulator that will help wounded servicemembers
return to driving independence. In September 2007, Schar was the troop commander on a routine mission in
Baghdad when his vehicle was hit by an explosively formed penetrator, resulting in shrapnel wounds and the loss
of his legs. This new capability allows patients to practice with adaptive driving equipment, gain confidence in their
driving proficiency and apply mental skills training in a commonplace activity. (U.S. Army Photo By Kristin Ellis)

				
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