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					                                                        BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    A Publication of the Bluegrass Area Development District

BLUEGRASS
A      D        D        -       V        A    N      T      A       G         E

     CENSUS BUREAU BEGINS TO RELEASE DATA FROM THE
     2010 COUNT
         In the waning days of December, the Bureau of the Census
     began to issue the results of the census that was undertaken
     across the nation beginning in April, 2010. During the decade
     that ended this past April, the national head count increased
     from about 281.5 million to 308.75 million—an increase of
     9.7 percent. During the same period, Kentucky’s population
     increased from just over 4 million persons to a new total of
     4,339,367 persons—an increase of 7.4 percent. City and county
     population totals are likely to be among the next sets of data
     released but those numbers are unlikely to be available before
     February, 2011 at the earliest.
         While Kentucky’s rate of growth does not measure up
     to the national rate of growth, it is apparent that Kentucky
     will not lose a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives
     with this Census, as Kentucky will continue to have six
     Congressional seats (among the 435 voting members in the
     House of Representatives). Twelve of the 435 House seats will
     shift among 18 states.
         Ten states will lose at lease one Congressional seat, while
     eight states will gain representation in the House. Primarily,
     the states losing Congressional representation are in the
     Rustbelt while the states gaining House seats are in the Sunbelt.
         States losing seats in the Congress will be: Michigan (1),
     Ohio (2), New York (2), Pennsylvania (1), Massachusetts (1),
     New Jersey (1), and Louisiana (1), Illinois (1), Iowa (1), and
     Missouri (1). States gaining Congressional representation
     will be: Texas (4), Florida (2), Georgia (1), South Carolina (1),
     Arizona (1), Utah (1), Nevada (1), and Washington State (1).
         By 2012, states will be required to redraw the boundaries of
     their Congressional seats, and will have to redraw their State
     House and State Senate district boundaries as well. Counties
     will have to redistrict for magisterial seats, and cities that elect
     councilpersons or city commissioners by district (as opposed to

                                                                      Page 1
    Volume 35, Number 1, February/March 2011
   BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

Highlights                                                                                                                                        Page

Additional ADD Community Development Block Grant Administrators Are Certified ..................10
Bluegrass ADD Employee Profile................................................................................................................12
Bourbon County Seeks Community Development Block Grant for Former TB Hospital ....................8
Census Bureau Begins to Release Data from the 2010 Count ....................................................................1
Centre College Again Recognized as a Top College.................................................................................16
City of Sadieville to Begin Sewer Construction .........................................................................................10
Crumb Rubber Grants Available to Kentucky Communities ...................................................................3
East Kentucky Power Drops Plans for a Coal-Fired Plant in Clark County .........................................17
Farmers Encouraged to Assist in the Development of Bio-Fuels Technology by
   Planting Switchgrass ................................................................................................................................23
Frankfort Ranked a “Best” City on Forbes.com ........................................................................................10
Frankfort Receives One of 14 Historic Preservation Grants ......................................................................7
From Mayor to Deputy Judge - the Interesting Journey of Jared Hollon ................................................9
Georgetown Submits Salvation Army Community Development Block Grant Application...............5
Highway Fatalities in Kentucky Decline in 2010.......................................................................................20
Jessamine County Offers Single-Stream Recycling ...................................................................................11
Lexington’s New Mayor Gray Names His Transition Team ...................................................................15
Long Term Care Options Counseling and Planning ................................................................................21
Madison County Fiscal Court Approves Rate Increase for the N.Madison County
   Sanitation District .....................................................................................................................................13
New Jobs, Industrial Expansion in Harrodsburg ......................................................................................10
New Lodge at the Blue Grass Army Depot Is Open to the Public..........................................................12
Nicholas County Applies for CDBG Funds for a New Senior Citizens Center Building......................7
Pathways – Information for Older Adults - Resource Guide Available ...........................................................4
Powell County Receives Grant for a New Animal Shelter ........................................................................7
Progress Shown on the Cynthiana Bypass .................................................................................................13
PSC Rules on the Kentucky-American Water Company Rate Case .......................................................17
Recycling of Electronics Is Available in Lexington ...................................................................................19
Section of New US 27 in Garrard County Opens to Traffic .....................................................................14
Seniors4Kids Continues Kentucky Pre-K Advocacy into the New Year ...............................................18
Stanford Annexation Is Implemented .........................................................................................................14
UK Going Green .............................................................................................................................................20
US 27 to I-75 Connector in Jessamine and Madison Enters New Phase ................................................15
Water and Sewer Rate Updates Available on the ADD Website ..............................................................6
Winchester Vaught Court Gravity Sanitary Sewer Project Completed .................................................16




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                                                  BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

“at large”) will be required to redistrict so as to meet as closely
as possible the “one man, one vote” mandate.
    While the precise population of the 17-county Bluegrass
ADD has not yet been released by Census Bureau, it is evident
(from 2009 estimates) that the population of the ADD grew by
something close to 13 percent—a growth rate that exceeds both
the national rate of growth as well as Kentucky’s lesser rate of
growth. This will mean that the Sixth Congressional District
which presently encompasses about 14 ½ of the 17 Bluegrass
Area counties will likely shrink further. Presently, Nicholas,
Harrison, and about one-third of Scott County are in the 4th
Congressional District while a narrow strip of western Lincoln
County is in the 1st Congressional District. The remainder
of the ADD is in the 6th Congressional District. The General
Assembly will likely address the issue of redistricting in its 60-
day session in 2012.
     Among the factoids released recently by the Census Bureau
is the fact that only one of the 50 states experienced a numerical
loss in population during the decade of the ‘00’s—that being
Michigan. The state gaining the most people was Texas, whose
population gain during the decade almost exactly mirrors the
population of present-day Kentucky—about 4.3 million people.
    It is probably not too early to mention that assistance is
available to counties and cities in offering suggestions for
district boundary drawing that will be required by 2012. The
ADD has mapping and computer technology that can analyze
the Census information and offer suggestions to public policy-
makers as to how the “one man, one vote” mandate might be
adhered to within any unit of local government.

CRUMB RUBBER GRANTS AVAILABLE TO KENTUCKY
COMMUNITIES
    The Kentucky Division of Waste Management is now
accepting grant applications for community projects that make
use of crumb rubber on public playgrounds, walking trails,
and athletic fields/gyms. Crumb rubber (coarsely or finely
granulated tire particles) has been found to be beneficial for
extending the life of turf surfaces and for reducing injuries on
athletes and children in playground areas.
   Available funding for this year is $300,000, which will be
awarded to various community projects across the state. The
grant is a 75/25 grant, requiring applicants to cover 25% of the

                                                               Page 3
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    project’s cost. Grant funds may be used to cover the purchase
    and transportation cost for the crumb rubber. The grant funds
    do not cover the cost to apply the crumb rubber or to promote
    the project, but costs can be counted toward the applicant’s
    match requirement. The application deadline to apply is
    January 31, 2011.
       For more on this opportunity, please contact mridley@
    bgadd.org.

    THE BLUEGRASS AREA AGENCY ON AGING
    AND INDEPENDENT LIVING MAKES PATHWAYS –
    INFORMATION FOR OLDER ADULTS - RESOURCE GUIDE
    AVAILABLE
        The Bluegrass Area Agency on Aging and Independent
    Living now has the 2011 edition of the Pathways - Information for
    Older Adults - Resource Guide available in both printed form and
    online at the Bluegrass Area Development District website at
    www.bgadd.org. The resource guide has been and continues
    to be the go-to source for information and listings of area-wide
    businesses, not-for-profit services, public offices, and a myriad
    of aging and disabilities advocacy and support organizations.
        Up until this most recent edition, the Lexington-Fayette
    Urban County Government Office of Aging Services and the
    Bluegrass Area Agency on Aging and Independent Living have
    acted as compilers and editors of Pathways, but with this year’s
    update and edit, we welcome the professional expertise and
    trusted publishing service of Senior Impact Publications, based
    in Cincinnati, OH. Senior Impact Publications has worked
    extensively in the field of regional resource guides for many
    years, and is compiling, editing, printing, and distributing the
    guide in exchange for the proceeds from the sale of advertising
    space in the guide.
        For a free copy of the Pathways - Information for Older Adults
    - Resource Guide, visit the ADD website listed previously, pick
    up a copy from your local or county Senior Citizen’s Center, or
    contact the Bluegrass Area Agency on Aging and Independent
    Living at (859) 269-8021.




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                                               BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE


GEORGETOWN SUBMITS SALVATION ARMY
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT
APPLICATION
    The City of Georgetown submitted a HUD Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) application for a Community
Project on December 15, 2010. The application was for the
renovation of the former Whitaker Bank Building, located at
1002 Lexington Road in Georgetown’s Washington Square
Shopping Center. The former Whitaker Bank is vacant. The
Salvation Army is looking to acquire the building with other
funding. The request is to use the CDBG funding to renovate
the building.
    The building would be renovated to accommodate The
Salvation Army’s programs and services to area residents
in need. The Salvation Army will be expanding services in
Georgetown in order to better serve Georgetown and Scott
County. The county’s unemployment rate rose from 5.5
percent in May, 2008 to 10.1 percent in May of 2009. There has
been a 61 percent increase in unemployment in Kentucky since
2008. With the increase in the amount of people unemployed,
there has been an increase in the number of people who
desperately need services, which also coincides with reductions
in resources. The Salvation Army’s goal is to have the space to




                                                            Page 5
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    expand and better accommodate programs including social
    services and children’s educational activities.
        The Salvation Army selected the location in order to be
    more accessible to people in low-income areas, which are
    in crucial need of its services. According to a study by The
    Timothy Group, the area selected is a prime service location
    with 25 percent of the residents in a two-mile radius having a
    household income of under $25,000 a year. According to the
    same study, unmet and underserved needs identified in the
    area are: emergency financial assistance, food pantry, clothing
    room, after-school youth programs, parenting/life skills
    classes, and homeless and soup kitchens.
        The renovation will encompass 3,910 square feet. The space
    will be designed to accommodate multiple functions. With
    the flexible design of the space, the Salvation Army would
    be able to feed a hundred people at a time. The Multipurpose
    Educational Room will be used for year- round educational
    programming including after-school, life skills, summer youth
    programs, as a computer lab and as an overflow dining area.
        For further information on this project, contact Kyle Scott at
    the ADD office.

    WATER AND SEWER RATE UPDATES AVAILABLE ON
    THE ADD WEBSITE
         Fully one-half of all water and/or sewer utilities operating
    in the Bluegrass Area have implemented rate increases in the
    last 12 months, according to Don Hassall, the ADD’s director of
    infrastructure development. “In mid-2010 the ADD published
    its annual update of comparative water and sewer charges for
    Bluegrass Area water and/or sewer utilities, but significant
    and numerous changes implemented in 2010 have rendered
    many tables of data outdated since the time the book was
    published just six months ago.”
        The ADD is seeking to update the comparative water and
    sewer rate information in real time as information about rate
    increases reaches the ADD staff. Updates are then posted on
    the ADD website and are available to all as downloads. Upon
    entering the ADD’s website (bgadd.org), go to Publications and
    scroll down to the section on Updates to the July, 2010 Water and
    Sewer Rate Book. All of the pages that have been updated are
    available there for viewing or for downloading, according to
    Hassall.

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                                                 BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

NICHOLAS COUNTY APPLIES FOR CDBG FUNDS FOR A
NEW SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER BUILDING
    Nicholas County Fiscal Court submitted a HUD
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) application
seeking $500,000 for a new senior citizens center. If approved
for funding, the Center will be built on 1.5 acres of land
contributed by the Nicholas County Fiscal Court. In addition
to the contribution of the land for the project, the Fiscal Court
is committed to the construction of an entrance/roadway and
parking lot. The City of Carlisle is committed to contribute the
construction of water and sewer lines to the building.
   The Nicholas County Senior Citizens Center serves as the
focal point for all the programs available to senior citizens
within the county. Due to health and safety hazards in their
current leased facility, the Nicholas County Senior Citizens
Center is temporarily moving to and leasing space in the old
hospital facility.
    For more information, contact Betsy Laski at the ADD -
blaski@bgadd.org.

FRANKFORT RECEIVES ONE OF 14 HISTORIC
PRESERVATION GRANTS
    Governor Beshear has announced that 13 projects across
the Commonwealth will share a total of $90,000 in grants from
the Kentucky Heritage Council. Among the winners is the City
of Frankfort, which will receive $8,715 to complete a historic
site survey focusing on 175 properties within the city.

POWELL COUNTY RECEIVES GRANT FOR A NEW
ANIMAL SHELTER
    Dogs, cats, and the occasional “other” animals will benefit
from a recent grant by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture
to Powell County. It was recently announced that a grant of
$102,832 has been awarded to the county for the construction
of a new shelter for animals. This bit of good news was
announced at the last meeting of the year of the Powell County
Fiscal Court. The Court will have almost an entirely new look
in January as only a single magistrate will be returning. In
November, the county’s voters elected a new judge-executive
and four new magistrates to serve on the Fiscal Court.



                                                              Page 7
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    BOURBON COUNTY SEEKS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
    BLOCK GRANT FOR FORMER TB HOSPITAL
        Bourbon County has applied for HUD Community
    Development Block Grant funding for the demolition of and
    asbestos removal from a former state tuberculosis hospital
    now owned by the county. The old TB hospital is a public
    nuisance and health and safety concern. The TB hospital was
    closed in the late 1970’s, and with no rehabilitation since then,
    the structure has continued to deteriorate. The structure is
    dilapidated and contaminated with asbestos. It is a critical
    health and safety concern for the community because of its
    condition and central location in the community.
        The old hospital is located adjacent to Cane Ridge
    Elementary School, attended by nearly 600 students, and
    across from the Bourbon County Legion Park which is highly
    utilized by families. The vacant structure also negatively effects
    all nearby property values due to its visual appearance and
    unsafe condition.




        The project, consisting of demolition and asbestos removal,
    will allow the community to properly and safely rid itself of a
    public nuisance and health and safety hazard. Positive impacts
    to the socio-economic status of the community, and health and

Page 8
                                              BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

welfare of the community, are anticipated through this project
due to future plans to expand Legion Park onto the property
once the structure has been cleared and deemed safe.
    Please contact Kyle Scott at the ADD office for further
information on this project.

FROM MAYOR TO DEPUTY JUDGE - THE INTERESTING
JOURNEY OF JARED HOLLON
    Stamping Ground Mayor Jared Hollon did not seek
reelection in 2010. After seven years in that position, Mr.
Hollon took up a different avenue of public service when
January, 2011 rolled around. He became deputy judge under
veteran Scott County Judge-executive George Lusby. With a
county growing as rapidly as Scott, something always needs
the attention of the judge-executive or his deputy who is now
Jared Hollon. Mr. Hollon fills the vacancy left by the recent
retirement of Mike Wright who served the people of Scott
County loyally and well for many years.
    As mayor of Stamping Ground, Mr. Hollon presided over
the implementation of several projects started by the city’s
previous mayor, Shirley Kettenring. Then, he presided over
the sale of Stamping Ground’s water and sewer utilities to the
Georgetown Municipal Water and Sewer Services (GMWSS)
and in turn, Stamping Ground residents were able to realize a
reduction in charges for water and sewer service at the same
time the utility systems were further improved. Operation
and ownership of the water and sewer facilities at Stamping
Ground now belong to GMWSS—along with the headaches
that accompany ownership/operation of municipal utilities.
Even in the early days when GMWSS was in the process
of assuming ownership/operation of the utility systems at
Stamping Ground, Judge Lusby and the Scott County Fiscal
Court played a part in that transition by “sweetening the
pot”—all to Stamping Ground’s financial advantage.




                                                           Page 9
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    ADDITIONAL BLUEGRASS ADD COMMUNITY
    DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT ADMINISTRATORS ARE
    CERTIFIED
       The Bluegrass ADD now has two more Certified Grants
    Administrators for Kentucky Community Development Block
    Grants (CDBG) on staff. Bob Casher, Public Administration
    Specialist, and Kyle Scott, Regional Planner, passed the October
    exam.
       Those interested in applying for, or having administered,
    a Community Development Block Grant may contact Bob
    Casher (bcasher@bgadd.org) or Kyle Scott (kscott@bgadd.org).

    FRANKFORT RANKED A “BEST” CITY ON FORBES.COM
        A Central Kentucky community recently made the Forbes.
    com’s list of “best cities with populations less than 100,000 to
    raise a family.” Frankfort was named 20th on the Forbes list
    that ranked communities based on five factors. These factors
    included: length of commute, percentage of population age
    25 and older with a high school education, median household
    income, and housing affordability.
         Forbes.com’s ranking did not account for the high quality of
    life or the close-knit, hometown feel the residents of Frankfort
    enjoy.

    NEW JOBS, INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION IN HARRODSBURG
        Corning, Inc. recently announced it is expanding its
    Harrodsburg facility. The company plans to invest $186
    million to expand its manufacturing of “Gorilla Glass,” a
    super light and scratch resistant glass product that is used in
    smart phones, computers, and televisions. The expansion and
    increase in Gorilla Glass productivity will also add 80 jobs
    and will include manufacturing, engineering, and operational
    positions.

    CITY OF SADIEVILLE TO BEGIN SEWER CONSTRUCTION
       The City of Sadieville held the bid opening for the
    Sadieville-to-Georgetown Sewer Line Connector project on
    Thursday, November 18, 2010. The City received 14 bids and
    awarded the contract to the lowest bidder, Grant’s Excavating.
    A pre-construction meeting was to be held during January.
    Construction is on schedule to begin in February and should


Page 10
                                                 BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

take approximately four months to complete.
   The project is funded by a $350,000 HUD Community
Development Block Grant and a $350,000 contribution from
Scott County Fiscal Court. Sadieville is decommissioning its
package wastewater treatment plant in favor of a permanent
connection to the Georgetown municipal sewer system.
  For more information, please contact Betsy Laski at the
ADD blaski@bgadd.org.

JESSAMINE COUNTY OFFERS SINGLE-STREAM
RECYCLING
    New equipment will make recycling more convenient
in Jessamine County, according to Environmental Services
Director Mike Cassidy. The new equipment involves a
conveyor belt and a compactor. The separation of recyclable
materials takes place at the Lexington Recycling Center,
which has a multi-million dollar set-up and is equipped to
separate the materials once they reach Lexington’s center from
Jessamine County in compacted bales.
    “Separation of the various waste components by the
householder is no longer necessary. It takes all of the work
out of recycling at the household level,” said Cassidy. “We
are hopeful that this innovation will encourage more residents
to avail themselves of the recycling service that is available
in Jessamine County.” Jessamine County’s new equipment,
purchased with grant money from the Kentucky Division of
Waste Management, cost about $135,000. With single-stream
recycling, materials such as aluminum cans, steel cans, plastics,
glass, and paper can be co-mingled as they arrive at Jessamine
County’s Recycling Center.
    “Single-stream recycling is an advantage not only to the
public, but to our staff as well”, said Cassidy. “With this new
equipment, it took just three hours to complete work that used
to take a week to accomplish.”
    For more information about opportunities to recycle in
Jessamine County, contact Jessamine County Environmental
Services at (859) 881-4545.




                                                              Page 11
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    BLUEGRASS ADD
    EMPLOYEE PROFILE
      Name: Margaret Ridley
      Department: Department for
       Community and Economic
       Development
      Title: Community
       Development Specialist
      Start Date: November 29, 2010
        Margaret Ridley joins
    the Bluegrass ADD after
    working for the state at a One-
    Stop Career Center as a Re-
    employment Specialist. While
    working at the career center, she helped job seekers identify
    and market their job skills by holding training courses on
    resume writing, interviewing, and networking. Prior to that,
    Margaret worked for a tourism program at an economic
    development center at Eastern Kentucky University and
    taught English as a Second Language abroad.
        Margaret, born in Western Kentucky, has lived, worked,
    and traveled all over Europe and parts of Africa and Central
    America. Although she loves learning about different
    communities and cultures, her favorite place is Kentucky.
    In 2007, she returned to Kentucky and enrolled in graduate
    courses at Eastern Kentucky University where she graduated
    with her Masters in Public Administration with an emphasis
    in community development. Margaret is excited about joining
    the Bluegrass ADD and looks forward to working with
    communities in the District.

    NEW LODGE AT THE BLUE GRASS ARMY DEPOT IS
    OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
        Part of the Blue Grass Army Depot’s initiative to give
    back to the community is the opening of a new lodge within
    the Depot property for rent for receptions and banquets. The
    depot conducted a ribbon-cutting ceremony in mid-December
    to introduce Lake Buck Lodge, a 4,420-square foot building.
    Col. Brian Rogers said, “What’s important about this place is
    that it’s not just big and has a beautiful view with seating for
    200 and a complete with a full kitchen, it is that the Depot is

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                                                BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

reaching out to the community and saying ‘welcome to your
depot.’”
   The depot is open to the public, said Rogers. To be
admitted, adult visitors need to show a government-issued ID
such as a driver’s license. Those in vehicles need also to show
proof of insurance and registration. Once inside the depot
grounds, visitors have access to areas such as a restaurant, golf
course, and swimming pool. “We feel that Madison County
needs to have a place where people can come,” said Rogers.
“The lodge is prefect for wedding receptions, balls, parties,
and other functions.” Catering service is available through the
depot.
   Lake Buck Lodge is located near a 15-acre lake. Future
plans for the lodge include adding a flat-screen television and
providing Internet access. For more information about the
lodge, call (859) 779-6464.

PROGRESS SHOWN ON THE CYNTHIANA BYPASS
   A new bridge across the CSX railroad tracks is a part of the
Cynthiana Bypass project that has been under construction for
some time. That bridge, on the north side of Cynthiana, was
opened to traffic just before Christmas.

MADISON COUNTY FISCAL COURT APPROVES RATE
INCREASE FOR THE NORTHERN MADISON COUNTY
SANITATION DISTRICT
    The action was not without controversy, but the Madison
County Fiscal Court did approve, in mid-December, a
substantial and multi-year sewer rate increase for the
Northern Madison County Sanitation District. Expenses were
running ahead of projections while revenues were lower than
projections. Part of the problem, according to Madison County
Judge-executive Kent Clark, is that reduced home construction
within the sewer-served area has caused the projected number
of sewer-served homes to fall short of projections. It was
expected that the District would have about 2,000 paying
customers by now, said Clark, but the District actually has only
about 1,700.
    The alternative to failing to enact a multi-year sewer rate
increase would be to default on the loans from the Kentucky
Infrastructure Authority. If that were to occur, the sanitation
district would likely be put into receivership, and the receiver

                                                             Page 13
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    would have the power to raise sewer rates far in excess of the
    rate increase that was actually enacted. Such a scenario would
    also likely disqualify the sanitation district from future low-
    interest loans from the Kentucky Infrastructure Authority, said
    NMCSD Chair Jim Rowe.
         According to the sewer rate schedule that was ultimately
    approved in mid-December, the minimum monthly sewer bill
    for 280 cubic feet of measured water use (about 2,100 gallons)
    would be $34.50. For every 100 cubic feet in excess of 280, the
    charge would be $5.75 per 100 cubic feet. However, the sewer
    bill would be capped at $57.50 per month regardless of how
    much water was measured as having been used.

    SECTION OF NEW US 27 IN GARRARD COUNTY OPENS
    TO TRAFFIC
        For those who travel US 27 through Garrard County know,
    it has been hard to miss the construction of the new US 27 in
    the northern section of the county. The new road roughly
    parallels the old road and even crosses it several times. In mid-
    December, the road contractor moved traffic over to the middle
    section of the new highway.
        Access by local traffic onto the new US 27 is possible at four
    locations. From north to south, those points of access are:
           •   Connector 2
           •   Canoe Creek Road
           •   KY 1355 (Mount Hebron Road), and
           •   Sutton Lane
        The intersection with KY 152 did not open at this time but
    motorists from KY 152 can access the new section of US 127
    at Connector 2. For up-to-date traffic and travel information
    concerning this and other major highway projects, dial 511 or
    visit www.511.ky.gov for the latest traffic updates.

    STANFORD ANNEXATION IS IMPLEMENTED
        It has been a long time in coming. Several years ago, the
    ADD prepared an Annexation Study for the City of Stanford.
    The study involved specific urbanized and urbanizing areas
    on the periphery of the city. Annexation of one of those areas
    was consummated late in December as a 296-acre tract was
    annexed into the city. The action follows a referendum on the
    issue of annexation. For the affected area, the issue was on


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                                                  BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

the November ballot, with voters approving the city’s plans to
annex by a 57 to 31 percent margin.
    The city claims that the annexation will be a win-win
situation for the city and for the affected residents. The city
will obtain additional tax revenues, while the residents will
benefit from first-time city police and fire services and should
see reduced homeowners insurance premiums due to an
improved fire protection grading of the annexed area. Street
lights will be installed as soon as arrangements can be made
with the power company.

LEXINGTON’S NEW MAYOR GRAY NAMES HIS
TRANSITION TEAM
    It’s a mix of familiar faces with some fresh faces thrown
into the mix. Lexington Mayor Jim Gray’s transition team
consists of the following:
       •   Transition team chair: Chris Frost, UK law professor
       •   Environmental quality: Emma Tubbs, founder of the
           Fayette County Neighborhood Council
       •   Finance and administration: Merl Hackbart, UK
           business professor
       •   General services: Bob Drakeford, former LFUCG
           economic development director
       •   Information technology: Jim Barnhart, Commonwealth
           Office of Technology
       •   Law: Mason Miller, an attorney
       •   Public safety: Glen Brown, former city jail director
       •   Public works: Nathan Billings, an attorney and chair of
           the Infill and Redevelopment Committee
       •   Social services, Teresa Isaac, a former Lexington mayor

US 27 TO I-75 CONNECTOR IN JESSAMINE AND
MADISON ENTERS NEW PHASE
    With the completion of the US 27 to I-75 Corridor Scoping
Study, the project to construct a new route from the proposed
Nicholasville Bypass to the KY 627 interchange on I-75 is
entering its next stage. The Phase I Environmental will examine
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements
in much greater detail than the original scoping study. The
review may trigger an Environmental Assessment that could
take 18 months to complete as a Kentucky River bridge is part
of the project.

                                                               Page 15
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

        This study will include the formation of a citizen’s advisory
    committee representing various stakeholders. Some of the key
    issues to be examined are the termini location, corridor width,
    access control issues, traffic modeling and a financial plan
    including tolling options. Kentucky’s FY2010-FY2012 Enacted
    Biennial Highway Plan included $16.5 million for planning and
    design.
        The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) has awarded
    this study to a consulting team led by H.W. Lochner, Inc. A
    work group from various KYTC disciplines and the ADD has
    held initial meetings to ensure quality and efficiency in this
    effort. The connector project was selected as the number one
    priority by the ADD’s Regional Transportation Committee
    during its previous priority cycle.

    WINCHESTER VAUGHT COURT GRAVITY SANITARY
    SEWER PROJECT COMPLETED
        The City of Winchester has completed the Vaught Court
    Outfall Sewer project, a component of the Lower Howards
    Creek Sanitary Sewer Improvements. This project was made
    possible by a $600,000 loan from the Kentucky Infrastructure
    Authority American Recovery and the Reinvestment Act
    (ARRA) Federally-Assisted Wastewater Revolving Loan
    Fund. The project is a part of the overall effort to eliminate
    13 recurring sanitary sewer overflows in the Lower Howards
    Creek watershed and 98 percent of the system-wide sanitary
    sewer overflow volume. This a required project of the Consent
    Decree the city has made with EPA.
      For more information, please contact Betsy Laski at the
    ADD - blaski@bgadd.org.

    CENTRE COLLEGE AGAIN RECOGNIZED AS A TOP
    COLLEGE
        Centre College has done it again. For the second
    consecutive year, Forbes magazine has recognized Centre
    College as the top college in the South. Centre ranked ahead
    of such prestigious institutions as Duke, Vanderbilt, and Rice
    University. No other Kentucky college, public or private,
    made the magazine’s rankings.
        Centre has 1,197 students, and an annual cost of $39,200 for
    tuition and living expenses on campus. The college admits 63
    percent of applicants, and the average ACT score of its students

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                                                 BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

is a mind-boggling 29.
    Centre President John Roush said in a statement that the
Forbes recognition “is only the latest in a series of accolades
that have begun to come our way regularly in recent years.
As my colleagues and friends know, I don’t take any of these
rankings as gospel, but there is a consistency in this recognition
that is hard to ignore.”
   Congratulations to Danville’s Centre College.

EAST KENTUCKY POWER DROPS PLANS FOR A COAL-
FIRED PLANT IN CLARK COUNTY
   East Kentucky Power Cooperative (EKPC) has shelved
plans to construct a coal-fired generating station in southeastern
Clark County. EKPC cited reduced demand for electricity
brought on by the recession as the reason for the company’s
backtracking.
    EKPC said that its decision not to construct a new generating
station for at least two years is “a prudent business decision.”
The EKPC spokesperson said that the poor economy had
diminished demand for electricity while natural gas prices and
the cost of electricity in the open market have both declined.
EKPC said that the new plant, which was to have carried with
it a cost of about $819 million, just is not needed in the near
future.

PSC RULES ON THE KENTUCKY-AMERICAN WATER
COMPANY RATE CASE
    In mid-December, the Kentucky Public Service Commission
issued its ruling in the Kentucky-American Water Company
rate case that some say may have influenced the November
outcome of the Lexington mayor’s race. The Commission
granted Kentucky-American a bit more than three-fourths
of what the company requested. The water company was
granted a 29 percent increase in rates, whereas the company
had requested a 37 percent rate increase. The company figures
that the average water customer would see about a $6 monthly
increase in its cost of water, up to about $35.40. A customer
who uses less than the average monthly residential quantity
would see a lesser increase while a customer who uses more
than an average residential customer would experience a
larger increase.


                                                              Page 17
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

        The water company has said that more than 90 percent of
    the requested increase would go toward paying for the $164
    million treatment plant on the Kentucky River’s Pool 3 north
    of Frankfort together with the pipeline to carry the water south
    and east to Lexington. About one-fourth of the rate increase
    that Kentucky-American received in 2009 also went toward the
    plant and pipeline.
         In late September, the company took advantage of the
    lengthy PSC review and approval process to implement the
    entire requested rate increase. The company will now have
    to rebate to all customers the excess money collected during
    the almost three months that the higher rates were in effect.
    Rather than receiving a refund for what now amounts to an
    overcharge, the company will show the amount due each
    customer as a credit against the customer’s next monthly water
    bill.

    SENIORS4KIDS CONTINUES KENTUCKY PRE-K
    ADVOCACY INTO THE NEW YEAR
        Generations United’s Seniors4Kids Campaign has been
    a champion for quality pre-kindergarten programs and
    education for Kentucky’s children for the last few years. The
    Seniors4Kids initiative, in partnership with the Pritchard
    Committee for Academic Excellence, has been working to
    increase the availability of and accessibility to quality pre-
    kindergarten education on both a local and statewide level
    since the partnership’s inception, and both bodies continue
    to recruit senior volunteers, aged 50-plus, as captains for the
    Seniors4Kids Campaign.
        On the federal level this year, the Campaign is looking
    to champion the inclusion of language and funding in the
    federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) to
    specifically support pre-kindergarten program development
    and education. Currently, no dedicated federal funding
    specifically supports pre-kindergarten programs or provides
    incentives to states to expand services beyond a few targeted
    groups.
        The partnership believes that high-quality pre-kindergarten
    programs are the first step to education reform; that all
    children need to enter elementary school prepared for success;
    and that the best strategy for expanding access to high-
    quality early learning is to include a dedicated funding stream
    within broader school reform efforts, to support and provide

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                                                    BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

incentives for greater state investment in pre-kindergarten
programs.
    Seniors4Kids volunteer captains participate in some of the
following activities in support of these efforts:
       •   Signing on as an older adult supporter of high-quality
           early education
       •   Sending emails, letters, and faxes
       •   Calling legislators at critical times
       •   Writing letters to the editor or an opinion editorial
       •   Visiting with federal policymakers in their local offices
       •   Helping recruit other Captains4Kids
    These activities are designed so that they can be undertaken
even if an individual has just a few minutes, allowing them
to still help make a difference for children in an easy and
manageable way. The Seniors4Kids Campaign also provides
more regular involvement for individuals who would like to
contribute more of their time and talents to help the program
grow. For more information on how you might help or
otherwise volunteer some of your time, please go to: http://
seniors4kids.org/OURWORK/OurStates/Kentucky.aspx
  Or contact Mary Musgrave, Kentucky State Seniors4Kids
Campaign Coordinator, at (859) 294-0415.

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONICS IS AVAILABLE IN
LEXINGTON
    Some electronic equipment, such as tube-type monitors
and printed circuit boards, can contain substances that are not
only harmful to the environment, but they can be reprocessed
for future use. Most landfills decline to accept electronic waste,
so the question becomes one of what to do with such materials
that are no longer wanted.
    The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government has
come up with an answer to the troublesome issue of what to
do with old or unused electronics and computer equipment.
Lexington offers E-waste recycling behind what was the
old Furrow’s store at 1306 Versailles Road. Accepted there
for recycling are virtually all electronic gear, including:
computers, printers, hand-held games, cell phones, microwave
ovens, televisions, CD and DVD players and other hand-held
electronic devices. The center also for accepts for recycling
holiday lights, fluorescent light bulbs, and rechargeable

                                                                  Page 19
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    batteries.
        The hours for the E-waste recycling center are 8 a.m. to
    noon on Monday, Tuesday, and Saturday and noon to 4 p.m.
    on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. For more information
    about Lexington’s recycling services, call LexCall at 311 or
    (859) 425-2255, or go to Livegreenlexington.com.

    UK GOING GREEN
        In an effort to lower the campus’s carbon footprint, the
    University of Kentucky announced a $25 million renovation
    of 61 campus buildings. Major upgrades involve retrofitting
    the school’s lighting with more energy efficient fixtures.
    Other projects included in the renovation plans include:
    water conservation, insulation, upgraded boilers, steam
    system improvements, solar water heating, and HVAC system
    replacements. Not only will the university save energy and
    be more sustainable, but it also expects monthly savings from
    lower utility costs. The annual savings should pay for the
    upgrade over a 12-year period.
       The renovations will help meet the university’s goal to
    decrease energy demands by 10-15 percent. For progress
    reports, check UK’s website -- energysavings.facilities.uky.edu.

    HIGHWAY FATALITIES IN KENTUCKY DECLINE IN 2010
    --PRELIMINARY FIGURES INDICATE 44 FEWER PEOPLE
    KILLED
        Highway fatalities in Kentucky declined in 2010 for the
    sixth consecutive year. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s
    preliminary figures indicate 747 people lost their lives on
    Kentucky roadways, a decline of 44 from the total for 2009. Of
    those fatalities, 125 occurred in the 17-county Bluegrass Area
    Development District.
        The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Kentucky State
    Police, highway safety groups and Area Development Districts
    are encouraged by the trend of fewer fatalities. Many factors
    combine to lower fatalities, but a primary lifesaver is Kentucky’s
    increased seat belt usage rate of 77.4 percent in 2008 compared
    with 75.0 percent rate in 2007 – an increase of 2.4 percent. Prior
    to Kentucky’s enactment of a primary seat belt law, the seat
    belt usage rate in 2001 was 61.9 percent. Statistics indicate that
    316 or 53.2 percent of the 747 fatalities were not using seat belts.


Page 20
                                                 BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    Additional contributing factors to the lower fatality rate
are safer roads, enhanced efforts to identify and correct safety
problems, Click It or Ticket efforts, increased attention on
distracted driving and increased impaired driving efforts.
    The cabinet’s figures are preliminary because data is still
being collected. A final report is expected by March. Highway
fatalities have declined each year since 2005, when the toll was
985.

LONG TERM CARE OPTIONS COUNSELING AND
PLANNING
    Long Term Care Options Counseling is a phrase that seems
to be appearing with more frequency in the national media
these days, and it is a phrase that is used with a casualness that
doesn’t give much time or attention to what long term care
options counseling is and what it can provide those individuals
and families that spend some time working through the
various issues and making plans to both finance and guide
their own care. A second associated term heard often these
days is Long Term Care Planning, which as the name suggests,
involves developing and implementing a plan relative to the
counseling that the individual or family has sought out.
    Long term care planning is about where and how an
individual sees themselves living at the latter stages of life,
when that person’s ability to meet their own needs and
otherwise manage their own personal care and household
management responsibilities may be compromised, and
assistance is needed to maintain themselves in the place they
have chosen to live.
    Long term care planning is about financial responsibility
and the control over the direction of one’s affairs that comes
with having developed a plan, clearly communicated and
documenting one’s plans and wishes; and making the savings,
insurance, or investment decisions necessary to provide for
that plan.
    Long term care planning is about acknowledging that there
are certain elements of aging, and even disease, that we cannot
predict and plan for, and that understanding as much, and
developing contingencies, and making clear both your wishes
and your expectations to others that may become involved
in your future care are all vital. Long term care options
counseling and planning is about doing your homework. It is

                                                               Page 21
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

    about understanding the breadth of service options given your
    wishes to live where and how you choose.
        The reason long term care options counseling and planning
    has received such a great amount of attention lately is that
    both state and federal governments are trying to control the
    spiraling costs of healthcare and long term care generally, and
    certainly one way to go about trying to control some of these
    costs is to make aware and put more financial responsibility
    back on the individual themselves. For example, the cost of
    a nursing home bed in the Commonwealth of Kentucky is
    approximately $40,000-$50,000/year, and after an individual
    has expended their own monthly income and assets, the state
    and federal government, through Medicaid, pays for that
    individual’s nursing care.
        If through efforts like long term care options counseling,
    state and federal governments can help forestall a nursing
    home placement for one individual by even six months, they
    have effectively saved $20,000-$25,000. And, if through long
    term care options counseling, some state or federal agency can
    encourage or provide information that leads to the sale of a long
    term care insurance policy that will pay for thousands of hours
    of community-based care services on behalf of the insured
    individual, then again, the state and federal government will
    save tens-of-thousands of public service dollars.
        So, what if all of that seems reasonable, you say, but why
    would I want to spend so much of my own money to provide
    for end-of-life care, if the state and federal government are
    willing to pick up the tab when I have no money? Why
    wouldn’t I just want to spend what I have now on things I
    want and things I want to do, and let Medicaid pick up the bill
    when I need that kind of help? Well, one reason -- even if you
    aren’t swayed by the argument that we should each, as much
    as possible, be responsible for ourselves -- is that Medicaid and
    the state and federal tax dollars and governments that pay for
    Medicaid can’t afford you and your care. As baby boomers age
    into needing the kinds of supportive services being discussed
    here, there is a greater demand and fewer individuals are
    paying into the system to support these needs.
        Additionally, the costs of these services are expensive
    to begin with, and their costs are steadily increasing. The
    combination of less revenue, greater demand, and higher costs
    means that it will be increasingly unlikely that you will get the


Page 22
                                                   BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

supportive services you need, and if you are fortunate enough
to be assessed as qualified and don’t end up on an extensive
waiting list, then you still will have very little control over who
will be dispatched to your home or apartment, what services
are provided, or when those services are scheduled to be
delivered.
     And finally, without the supportive services you’ve needed
to get to the present, it is increasingly likely that you will not
be living where you choose to live, but rather where you can
afford to live or at the very least, in a setting that has available
the supportive services you’ve come to need, whether or not
it is in a community you are familiar with, and whether or not
you know anybody there, or have access to the conveniences or
amenities you think important to your quality of life.
    Long term care options counseling and the planning
that grows out of an open, frank, and informed conversation
about long term care choices and limits is really about self-
determination. It is about the pride that comes from having
taken an active role in the planning and provision of one’s own
care. It is about working with financial planners, healthcare
professionals, aging and social services agencies, housing
specialists, insurance agents, employers, family, friends, and
concerned others to ensure the kind of future you want, as
much as you are able to do so.

KENTUCKY FARMERS ENCOURAGED TO ASSIST IN
THE DEVELOPMENT OF BIO-FUELS TECHNOLOGY BY
PLANTING SWITCHGRASS
    It all sounds a bit futuristic, but selected Kentucky farmers
are being offered a financial incentive to grow switchgrass.
USDA’s NRCS is offering funding assistance to farmers who
plant switchgrass. At a cost of about $200 per acre, the grass
is not the easiest crop to establish, but it is a perennial crop.
Switchgrass is a native Kentucky grass that has been tested as
a supplemental fuel for burning along with coal to produce
electricity. For farmers who choose to participate in this pilot
bio-fuels program, there is a 5-acre minimum, and the land
must be contiguous. Participating farmers must also agree that
the switchgrass stands must remain in place for five years.




                                                                Page 23
BLUEGRASS ADD-VANTAGE

          MEETING CALL
    Executive Committee                        2/23 & 3/23
                                                 7:00 p.m.

    Aging Council                                2/9 & 3/9
                                                10:00 a.m.

    Development Advisory Committee                2/15
                         (@OWL – Lexington) 10:00 a.m.

    Homeland Security Council                         2/16
                                                 1:00 p.m.

    Human Services Committee                          2/10
                                                10:00 a.m.

    Natural Resources & Environmental                  2/9
    Protection Advisory Committee                3:15 p.m.

    Regional Planning Council                          3/2
                                                11:00 a.m.

    Regional Transportation Committee                 3/14
                                                 1:30 p.m.

    Tourism, Historic Preservation &                   3/8
    Recreation Advisory Committee               10:00 a.m.
    (site to be determined)

    ALL meeting dates/times are subject to change.

    Executive Director
                                                             BLUEGRASS AREA DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT




    Lenny P. Stoltz II
                                                                                                                         Lexington, Kentucky 40517
                                                                                                                                                     Phone (859) 269-8021
                                                                                                   699 Perimeter Drive




                                                                                                                                                                            Fax (859) 269-7917




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