Summary – Chapter 6 Communities on the Internet by 8be89c015e72c297

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									         Summary – Chapter 6
       Communities on the Internet

                 Natalie Ford
            Access the Internet (2005)



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           Virtual Communities

   May be geographically widespread, but
    share a common interest.
   May exist for social, cultural, sporting or
    political reasons, etc.
   Interact using the internet for the
    purposes of emailing, conferencing, chat
    and newsgroups.

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                Newgroups

   Online discussion groups, generally based
    around special interest, where a collection
    of messages are posted by individuals to a
    news server. Similar to a public bulletin
    board.
   The server is a computer that can host
    thousands of newsgroups on many
    subjects or topics.
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                Newgroups
   Organised in hierarchical manner, using
    categories and sub-categories, e.g. alt.
   To post or read newsgroup messages, you
    need to have a news reader. A news
    reader is simply a client software that is
    installed on your computer.
   Microsoft Internet Explorer comes bundled
    with its own news reader, ie. Outlook
    Express. See Figure 6.1 on page 74.
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               Newsgroups
   Web-based services, such as Usenet and
    Google, are directly accessible through
    your browser.
   Generally, your ISP will have news (NNTP)
    server so you can access and work with
    newsgroups, read more on page 73.
   Investigate all newsgroups and chat
    rooms carefully before subscribing.

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           Newsgroup culture

   Netiquette – ‘network ettiquette’ is the
    unofficial rules defining the proper
    behaviour on the Internet, e.g. sending
    spam and unwanted emails is bad
    ettiquette.
   Flame – an insult or derogatory message
    sent via email, Usenet or mailing lists to a
    person or group – not recommended.
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           Newsgroup culture

   Emoticons (smileys) – ‘emotion icons’ are
    used to represent human facial
    expressions and convey an emotion on the
    internet, created from typing certain
    characters on your keyboard eg. :-) is a
    smile.



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           Newsgroup culture

   Acronyms and abbreviation – Internet
    slang used in various computer-mediated
    communication (ie. Instant messaging,
    emails and chat room) between two or
    more individuals.
   For example, LOL means laugh out loud.



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        Real time technologies
   Ways of communicating which require
    immediate feedback or response.
   Alternatives to email and newsgroups.
   Examples of real time technologies:-
    Internet phone (e.g. Skype), Internet
    conferencing and Internet chatting.
   Limitation – coordinating a time to meet
    online.

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                      Skype

   A peer-to-peer Internet telephony network
    founded by the Niklas Zennström and
    Janus Frii.
   Skype allows for users to call other users
    from their computer and communicate via
    microphone, as well as call and be called
    from regular phones.

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                      Skype

   A communications system notable for its
    broad range of features, including instant
    messaging, file transfer, voice and video
    conferencing.




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           Internet Relay Chat
   IRC relies on the existence of ‘channels’,
    communication spaces dedicated to
    dialogue among a specific group of
    participants.
   Two popular server networks:- DALnet
    (www.dal.net) and Undernet
    (www.undernet.org)
   Need to install an IRC client, mIRC from
    www.mirc.net and configure the software.
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          Internet Relay Chat
   Join a chat room by logging onto an IRC
    server.
   After joining a chat channel, you would
    type command line instructions at a
    prompt (similar to DOS commands).
   Examples of command line instructions
    used to communicate in chat sessions –
    page 79.

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            ICQ – I seek you

   Popular instant messaging program
    (sometimes referred to as a buddy list
    program) can be used to chat, send
    emails, perform file transfers and
    undertake a range of other activities such
    as playing network games.
   Need to install ICQ software, available
    when you sign up for a Hotmail account.
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         Teacher Instructions…

   Read pages 72-80.
   Complete Chapter 6 - Activities




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       Thanks for your attention!




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