Digital Citizenship Grant Application Narrative Template by cyc18471

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									Presentation topics
   Overview of Office of Proposal Development
   Generic competitive research strategies
        Identifying external funding
        Analyzing the funding agency
        Reading the proposal solicitation
        Understanding the review process
        Craft of Proposal Writing
   Finding graduate funding
   National Institutes of Health
   National Science Foundation


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     1
Office of proposal development

   A unit of the Office of Vice President for
    Research at Texas A&M University,
    partnered with:
        Office of Vice Chancellor for Research and
         Federal Relations,
        Office of Vice Chancellor for Academic and
         Student Affairs, and the
        Health Science Center


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     2
Office of proposal development
   Supports faculty in the development and writing of
    large and small research grants to federal agencies
    and foundations.
   Focuses on support of center-level initiatives,
    multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research
    teams, research affinity groups, new and junior
    faculty research, diversity in the research enterprise,
    and long-term proposal planning.
   Helps develop partnership initiatives at Texas A&M,
    across the A&M System universities, and HSC.
   Supports proposal development activities and
    training programs to help new faculty write more
    competitive proposals.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     3
Office of proposal development
   Jean Ann Bowman, Research Scientist
        B.S., Journalism; B.S. and Ph.D., Hydrology and Physical Geography
        Focuses on proposals dealing with earth, ecological, and environmental
         sciences, as well as those dealing with agriculture.
   Libby Childress, Administrative Assistant
        Handles scheduling, resources, and project coordination.
   Mike Cronan, Director
        B.S., Civil Engineering (Structures); B.A., Political Science; M.A., English;
        Registered Professional Engineer, Texas (063512)
        Helps develop partnerships. Leads center- and program-level proposals.
         Establishes new initiatives and sets the direction of the office.
   Lucy Deckard, Associate Director
        B.S. and M.S., Materials Science and Engineering
        Leads the new faculty initiatives. Focuses on proposals dealing with the
         physical sciences, interdisciplinary materials group, and equipment and
         instrumentation. Also leads training seminars on graduate and postdoctoral
         fellowships, undergraduate research, and CAREER awards.


Office of Proposal              Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005           Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                     4
Office of proposal development
   Susan Maier, Research Development Officer
     B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., Psychology

     Focuses on the Health Science Center‘s NIH biomedical science
      initiatives, as well as on the HSC‘s University partnership
      initiatives. Leads training seminars on NIH.
   Phyllis McBride, Assistant Director
     B.A., Journalism and English; M.A. and Ph.D., English

     Leads the one-day Craft of Grant Writing Seminars and the
      fifteen-week Craft of Grant Writing Workshops. Focuses on DHS
      and NIH initiatives, and provides editing and rewriting.
   Robyn Pearson, Research Development Officer
     B.A. and M.A., Anthropology

     Focuses on proposals dealing with the humanities, liberal arts,
      and social and behavioral sciences, and education. Provides
      support for the development of interdisciplinary research groups
      and provides editing and rewriting.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS            5
Identifying external funding
   Self-directed searches of funding agency web sites
    combined with the skilled use of Google, Yahoo or
    other search tools are highly effective and efficient
    ways of identifying research and educational funding
    opportunities for the university researcher.
   Individual researchers have the most substantive
    and nuanced understanding of their research
    interests, directions, and capacities, and therefore it
    is most productive if the searches for research
    opportunities are primarily filtered through their own
    perspectives.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     6
Funding opportunities search criteria
   Define disciplinary domain of interest (e.g.,
    science, social sciences, humanities,
    education, health and biomedical sciences,
    engineering);
   Characterize the nature of the research
    (basic, applied, applications);
   Identify a subset of funding agencies whose
    mission, strategic plan, and investment
    priorities are aligned with these specific
    research interests.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     7
Refining the funding search
   Identify research opportunities with regular
    grant cycles within a particular agency (e.g.,
    NIH and NSF have regular grant cycles of
    specific research programs that remain open
    for many years;
   Identify new research opportunities and
    investment directions at funding agencies;
   Expand the base of potential research
    funding sources.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     8
Google is your best friend!
   Google and Yahoo searches offer a robust
    complement to known web sites containing funding
    opportunities information.
   A modified question used as the search text string
    will identify sites helpful in the search for funding
    opportunities, help narrow the focus of the search,
    and in many cases identify funding sources perhaps
    unknown to the researcher.
   The search text may be as simple as ―funding
    undergraduate research‖, ―funding graduate
    fellowships‖, or ―research funding alerts.‖
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     9
Google is your best friend!

   http://www.google.com/
   http://www.yahoo.com/
   Search for research opportunities
   Find funded programs, abstracts
   Find workshops, conferences, seminars
   Find reports, publications, project documents



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     10
Six major funders for TAMU-System
       Funding Agency                URL Hotlink to Funding Opportunities
 National Science Foundation    http://www.nsf.gov/funding/
 Health & Human Services &      http://www.dhhs.gov/grants/index.shtml
 NIH Grants & Funding           http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/index.cfm

 NASA Research Opportunities    http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/
 Environmental Protection       http://www.epa.gov/ogd/competition/open_awards.htm
 Agency
 Department of Defense
 DARPA                         http://www.darpa.mil/baa/
 Army Research Office          http://www.aro.ncren.net/research/index.htm
 Naval Research Office         http://www.onr.navy.mil/default.asp
 Air Force Research Office     http://www.afosr.af.mil/oppts/afrfund.htm#Research

 USDA/CSREES                    http://www.csrees.usda.gov/qlinks/research.html


Office of Proposal             Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005          Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                  11
Fedgrants.gov

   One of the best portals to funding opportunities
   Tabular listing current funding opportunities and
    URLs for 45 research funding agencies (see
    following slide)
   FedGrants
        http://www.fedgrants.gov/Applicants/index.html
   FedGrants Grants Synopsis Search
        http://www.fedgrants.gov/grants/servlet/SearchServlet/
   FedGrants Notification Service
        http://www.fedgrants.gov/ApplicantRegistration.html
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     12
FedGrants




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     13
Grants.gov
   Home page: http://www.grants.gov
   To receive automated funding alerts tailored to your
    research interests, visit
    http://www.grants.gov/Find#receive.
   Select one of four automated funding alert options:
    ―Selected Notices Based on Funding Opportunity
    Number,‖ ―Selected Agencies and Categories of
    Funding Activities,‖ ―Selected Interest and Eligibility
    Groups,‖ or ―All Grants Notices.‖
   Click on the link for the option that best suits your
    needs, enter the required information, and click on
    the ―Submit to Mailing List‖ button.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     14
Electronic Funding Alert Services/ Email

   NSF, National Science Foundation
        http://www.nsf.gov/mynsf/
        MyNSF, formerly the Custom News Service,
         allows you to receive notifications about new
         content posted on the NSF website.
        Notification can be received via email or RSS.




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     15
Electronic Funding Alert Services/ Email

   NIH National Institutes of Health Listserv
        http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/listserv.htm
        Each week (usually on Friday afternoon), the NIH
         transmits an e-mail with Table of Contents (TOC)
         information for that week's issue of the NIH Guide,
         via the NIH LISTSERV.
        The TOC includes a link to the Current NIH Guide
         Weekly Publication as well as links to each NIH
         Guide RFA, PA and Notice published for that
         week.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     16
Electronic Funding Alert Services/ Email
   National Aeronautics and Space Administration
        http://research.hq.nasa.gov/subs.cfm
        Once you are registered for this service you can receive
         email notification of the release of research
         announcements pertaining to any or all of NASA offices.
   National Center for Environmental Research,
    Environmental Protection Agency
        http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncer_list/elists/
        Use this page to subscribe or unsubscribe to the NCER e-
         mail mailing list. NCER periodically sends out emails to our
         subscribers announcing new grant and/or funding
         opportunities or highlight new documents in specific subject
         areas.

Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS      17
Electronic Funding Alert Services/ Email

   U.S. Dept. of Education, EDINFO
        http://listserv.ed.gov/cgi-bin/wa?A1=ind05&L=edinfo
        Information from & about the U.S. Department of Education
         publications, funding opportunities & more.
   NEH Connect, National Endowment for the
    Humanities
        http://www.neh.gov/news/nehconnect.html
        Stay connected to the humanities with NEH Connect! Each
         month NEH Connect! delivers the latest news, projects,
         upcoming events, and grant deadlines from NEH.


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     18
Leveraging the internet in funding search

   VPR/Office of Proposal Development
        VPR/OPD Funding Opportunities Table
        http://anthropology.tamu.edu/downloads/ResearchFunding.pdf

   Monthly compilation of upcoming funding
    opportunities in all academic disciplines
    distributed System-wide by email
   Subscribe: mikecronan@tamu.edu



Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS       19
Leveraging the internet in funding search

   Duke University Funding Alert Newsletter
        http://www.ors.duke.edu/index.html
             Arts & Humanities; Community Development;
              Curriculum Development
             Environmental & Life Sciences; Funding News;
              Graduate Funding
             Health Sciences; International Opportunities;
              Multidisciplinary
             Physical Sciences & Engineering; Postdoctoral
              Funding; Social Sciences


Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     20
Leveraging the internet in funding search
   University of Iowa, Funding Opportunities
        http://research.uiowa.edu/grantTrack/grantbulletin.php
             Arts and Humanities; Biological Sciences; International;
              Multidisciplinary; Physical & Mathematical Sciences; Social
              Sciences
   Iowa State Opportunities by Due Date
        http://www.vpresearch.iastate.edu/OSP/FundingOpportunities.html
        http://www.vpresearch.iastate.edu/OSP/Maillogs.html

   Michigan State U. Graduate Fellowship Listings
        http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/3gradinf.htm
        Michigan State University provides links to fellowship
         funding lists in over 40 different academic disciplines.

Office of Proposal            Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005         Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS          21
Leveraging the internet in funding search
   Townsend Center for the Humanities, UC Berkeley
        http://townsendcenter.berkeley.edu/postdocs.shtml
        This is excellent listing of national Postdoctoral fellowships in the
         humanities organized in a table of URLs.
   The University of California at Berkeley
        http://www.spo.berkeley.edu/funding.html
        Links to table of programs, profiles, and URLs for
         researchers seeking funding in the following areas: Faculty
         Individual Prizes and Awards, Equipment Grants, New and
         Young Faculty Grants, Travel Grants, Women and
         Minorities Grants, and Postdoctoral Funding in the
         Biosciences.

Office of Proposal           Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005        Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS            22
Leveraging the internet in funding search

   U. Massachusetts New Faculty Research Funding
        This site offers an excellent, comprehensive compilation
         of federal agency and foundation research awards
         targeting tenure track faculty in the following areas:
         Agriculture & Food Science, Arts & Humanities, Cancer,
         Chemical Sciences, Computer & Information Science,
         Education, Engineering, Environmental Science, Health &
         Medical, History, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Nursing,
         Physical & Life Sciences, Religion, Social & Behavioral
         Sciences, Science Education
        http://www.umass.edu/research/ogca/funding/newfacultydisc.html



Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS           23
Leveraging the internet in funding search
   Funding for New Faculty & Junior Investigators
        http://www.umass.edu/research/ogca/funding/newfacultydisc.html
        http://www.physics.harvard.edu/grants.htm
        http://www.unh.edu/osr/funding/support/young_pi.pdf
        http://www.sfsu.edu/~ptf/docs/NewInvestigatorAwards.pdf
        http://www.spo.berkeley.edu/Fund/newfaculty.html
        http://grants.nih.gov/grants/new_investigators/index.htm
        http://www.columbia.edu/cu/opg/fund/newinvest-1102.pdf
   Above URLs at various universities offer a fairly
    exhaustive compilation of funding opportunities for
    new and junior faculty and career awards in most
    academic disciplines.

Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS           24
Analyzing the funding agency
   Analyzing the mission, strategic plan,
    investment priorities, and culture of a funding
    agency provides information key to
    enhancing proposal competitiveness.
   Competitiveness depends on a series of well-
    informed decision points made throughout
    the writing of a proposal related to arguing
    the merit of the research and culminating in a
    well-integrated document that convinces the
    reviewers to recommend funding.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     25
Analyzing the funding agency mission
   Funding agencies have a clearly defined agenda
    and mission.
   Funded grants are those that best meet that agenda
    and advance the mission of the funding agency. If a
    proposal does not meet an agency's mission, it will
    not be funded. This is perhaps the most difficult
    adjustment to be made in proposal development
    and writing.
   Having a "good idea" by itself is not enough. Good
    ideas have to be clearly connected and integrated
    with a funding agency‘s mission and agenda.
   The proposal must fit the mission and strategic
    plans of the funding agency.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     26
Analyzing the funding agency mission

   Funding agencies are not passive funders of
    programs, but see themselves as leaders in a
    national dialogue on scientific issues, and as part of
    the community defining the national agenda.
   A strong proposal allows the funding agency to form
    a partnership with the submitting institution that will
    carry out the agency's vision and mission.
   The applicant must understand the nature of this
    partnership and the expectations of the funding
    agency, both during proposal development and
    throughout a funded project.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     27
Analyzing the funding agency

   Knowledge about a funding agency helps the
    applicant make good decisions throughout
    the entire proposal development and writing
    process by better understanding the
    relationship of the research to the broader
    context of the funding agency‘s mission,
    strategic plan, and research investment
    priorities.


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     28
Analyzing the funding agency

   Who is the audience (e.g., agency, program officers,
    and reviewers) and what is the best way to address
    them?
   What is a fundable idea and how is it best
    characterized within the context of the agency
    research investment priorities?
   How are claims of research uniqueness and
    innovation best supported in the proposal text and
    reflective of agency strategic research plans?
   How does the applicant best communicate his or her
    passion, excitement, commitment, and capacity to
    perform the proposed research to review panels?

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     29
Analyzing the funding agency
   Mission                                        Leadership speeches
   Culture                                        Public testimony
   Language                                       Review criteria
   Investment priorities                          Review process
   Strategic plan                                 Review panels
   Organizational chart                           Project abstracts
   Management                                     Current funded projects
   Program officers                               Funded researchers
   Reports, publications

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS             30
Analyzing the funding agency

   It is important to differentiate between and among
    various funding agencies by mission, strategic plan,
    investment priorities, culture, etc.
   For example, researchers in the social and
    behavioral sciences and the physical,
    computational, and biological sciences may have
    relevant research opportunities at two or more
    agencies, e.g., NIH, NSF, DOD, EPA, but these
    agencies are very dissimilar in many ways—see
    following slide:

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     31
Analyzing the funding agency

   Research focus within                          Multidisciplinary or
    disciplines                                     interdisciplinary
   Research that is basic,                        Classified, non-classified
    applied, or applications                       Proprietary, non-proprietary
    driven                                         Independent research, or
   Research scope and                              dependent linkages to the
    performance time horizon                        agency mission, e.g., health
   Exploratory, open-ended                         care, education, economic
    research, or targeted to                        development, defense
    technology development



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                  32
Analyzing the funding agency
   It is important for the applicant to differentiate
    between basic research agencies (e.g., NSF,
    NIH) and mission-focused agencies (e.g.
    DOD, NASA, USDA), as well as to
    differentiate between hypothesis-driven
    research and need- or applications driven
    research at the agencies.
   Agencies funding basic research would likely
    share the following characteristics:

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     33
Analyzing the funding agency

   Independent agency                             Focus on fundamental
    and management                                  or basic research at the
   Independent research                            ―frontiers of science,‖
    vision, mission, and                            innovation, and
    objectives                                      creation of new
   Award criteria based on                         knowledge
    intellectual and                               Open ended,
    scientific excellence                           exploratory, long
   Peer panel reviewed,                            investment horizon
    ranked, and awarded                            Non-classified, non-
    by merit                                        proprietary

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS              34
Analyzing the funding agency

   Alternatively, an analysis of mission-oriented
    agencies (e.g., DOD, DOE, ED, USDA)
    would show characteristics related to
    research and development that will serve the
    agency‘s immediate goals and objectives, as
    seen on following slide:




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     35
Analyzing the funding agency
   Scope of work tightly defines research
    tasks/deliverables
   Predominately applied research for meeting near-
    term objectives, technology development and
    transfer, policy goals
   Predominately internal review by program officers
   Awards based on merit, but also on geographic
    distribution, political distribution, long term
    relationship with agency, Legislative, and Executive
    branch policies
   Classified and non-classified research

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     36
Analyzing the funding agency
   Learn to echo the language and usage of the funding
    agency is another factor that may enhance the overall
    competitiveness of a proposal.
   Funding agencies, like most institutions, often develop a
    unique phraseology to define and describe common,
    recurrent components of their mission and research
    agenda, e.g., ―broader impacts‖ or ―research and
    education integration‖ at NSF.
   Learning the language of the funding agency is important
    for writing the narrative section of a proposal, and helps
    in framing arguments more clearly and in better
    communicating them to program managers and
    reviewers.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     37
Reading the proposal solicitation
   The Request for Proposals (RFP) – also
    called the Program Announcement (PA),
    Request for Applications (RFA), or Broad
    Agency Announcement (BAA) – is one
    common starting point of the proposal writing
    process.
   Other starting points to the proposal process
    include investigator-initiated (unsolicited)
    proposals, or white papers and quad charts
    common to the defense agencies.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     38
Reading the proposal solicitation
   The generic program solicitation or RFP
    represents an invitation by a funding agency
    for applicants to submit requests for funding
    in research areas of interest to the agency.
   It is used continuously throughout proposal
    development and writing as a reference point
    to ensure that an evolving proposal narrative
    fully addresses and accurately reflects the
    goals and objectives of the funding agency,
    including review criteria listed in the
    document.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     39
Reading the proposal solicitation
   The RFP contains most of the essential information
    the researcher needs in order to develop and write a
    competitive proposal that is fully responsive to the
    agency‘s funding objectives and review criteria.
   The RFP is not a menu or smorgasbord offering the
    applicant a choice of addressing some research
    topics but not others, depending on interest, or
    some review criteria but not others.
   The RFP is a non-negotiable listing of performance
    expectations reflecting the stated goals, objectives,
    and desired outcomes of the agency.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     40
Identifying the Contents of the RFP
   Agency research goals, objectives, and performance
    expectations
   Statement and scope of work
   Proposal topics to be addressed by the applicant
   Deliverables or other outcomes
   Review criteria and process
   Research plan
   Key personnel, evaluation, & management
   Eligibility, due dates, available funding, funding limits,
    anticipated number of awards, performance period,
    proposal formatting requirements, budget and other
    process requirements, and reference documents.


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     41
Reviewing the RFP
   The RFP is not a document to skim quickly, read
    lightly, or read only once.
   The RFP defines a very detailed set of research
    expectations the applicant must meet in order to be
    competitive for funding.
   It needs to be read and re-read and fully
    understood, both in very discrete detail and as an
    integrated whole.
   The RFP sets the direction and defines the
    performance parameters of every aspect of proposal
    development and writing.
   Read it word by word; sentence by sentence;
    paragraph by paragraph; and page by page.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     42
Reviewing the RFP
   Clarify any ambiguity by repeated readings of
    the RFP.
   If these ambiguities cannot be resolved, call
    the funding agency and ask for clarification
    from a program officer.
   As much as possible, all ambiguity needs to
    be resolved prior to the proposal writing
    process so that ideas and arguments are
    clearly and tightly aligned with the scope and
    intent of the funding agency.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     43
Reviewing the RFP
   A well-written RFP clearly states the funding agency‘s
    research objectives in a concise and comprehensive
    fashion, devoid of wordiness, repetition, and vaguely
    contradictory re-phasing of program requirements.
   However, not all RFPs are clearly written. In some
    cases, the funding agency itself is unclear about specific
    research objectives, particularly in more cutting-edge or
    exploratory research areas.
   Therefore, never be timid about calling a program officer
    for clarification. Timidity is never rewarded in the
    competitive grant process.
   Where there is ambiguity, keep asking questions in order
    to converge on clarity.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     44
Role of the RFP in Proposal Organization
   In addition to presenting information about an
    agency‘s research agenda and culture, the RFP
    provides key instructions regarding the presentation
    and organizational structure of a proposal.
   The RFP can be used to develop the structure of the
    proposal narrative and as a template for developing
    the sequence and required detail of each section.
   Using the RFP as a proposal template during initial
    proposal outlining helps ensure that every RFP item
    is fully addressed.


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     45
Role of the RFP in Proposal Organization
   Major section headings within an RFP often have very
    detailed descriptive text defining the objectives of the
    program (goals, objectives, performance timeline,
    outcomes, research management, evaluation, etc.)
    that must be addressed in the proposal narrative.
   The detail in each section of the RFP, including the
    review criteria, can be selectively copied and pasted
    into the first draft of the proposal itself.
   This process provides initial section and subsection
    headings under which the applicant drafts out
    preliminary written responses to every requested item
    in the guidelines, thereby ensuring that the first draft of
    the proposal fully mirrors the program solicitation
    requirements in every way.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     46
Role of the RFP in Proposal Organization

   Reviewers will expect to see the text in the same
    general order as the RFP and the review criteria
    since that ordering conforms to instructions given to
    reviewers by the program officers.
   Using the RFP as a guide to create a proposal
    outline also has the advantage of making it easier
    for reviewers to compare the proposal to the
    program guidelines and review criteria, without
    having to search around in a long narrative to find
    out if each required topic has been addressed.


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     47
Addressing the Review Criteria in the RFP
   The description of review criteria is an
    especially important part of the RFP.
   A competitive proposal must clearly address
    each review criterion, and the proposal
    should be structured so that these
    discussions are easy for reviewers to find.
   Subject headings, graphics, bullets, and
    bolded statements using language similar to
    that used in the RFP can all be used to make
    the reviewers‘ jobs easier as they assess
    how well the proposal meets review criteria.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     48
Reading Material Referenced in the RFP

   If the RFP refers to any publications, reports,
    or workshops, it is important to read those
    materials, analyze how that work has
    influenced the agency‘s vision of the
    program, and cite those publications in the
    proposal in a way that illustrates that the
    applicant has read and absorbed the ideas
    behind those publications.


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     49
A stepwise process for developing a
competitive research proposal
   Preparing to write
   Developing the hypothesis & research plan
   Preliminary data & research readiness
   Writing the proposal
   Post review process
   Competitive resubmissions
   Multidisciplinary research & collaborations
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     50
Preparing to write the competitive proposal
   Understanding the program guidelines in planning,
    developing, and writing a competitive proposal.
   What should be your relationship with program officers?
   Developing a sound, testable hypothesis.
   Asking senior faculty to review, advise & assess
    competitiveness of ideas and research, particularly
    appropriateness to agency research agenda.
   What do you need to know about funding agency culture
    (& sub-cultures), language, mission, strategic plan, &
    research investment priorities?
   What do you need to know about agency review criteria,
    review process, & review panels?
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     51
Developing the hypothesis & research plan
   Who is your audience (e.g., agency, program officers and
    reviewers) and how do you best address them?
   What is a fundable idea and how is it best characterized?
   How are claims of research uniqueness and innovation best
    supported in the proposal text?
   Can research plans be overly ambitious?
   What are important distinctions to note between mission
    focused agencies (NASA, USDA) and basic research
    agencies (NSF, NIH) in proposing research plans?
   Differentiating between hypothesis driven research &
    application driven at basic research and mission agencies?
   How do you best communicate your passion, excitement,
    commitment, and capacity to perform your research to
    review panels?
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     52
Preliminary data & research readiness
   What evidence needs to be presented to show that the
    proposed work can be accomplished?
   What evidence of institutional support for the research,
    e.g., facilities, equipment & instrumentation, etc., is
    important to demonstrate and address in the proposal?
   What counts as preliminary data and how much is
    sufficient?
   How do you best map your research directions and
    interests to funding agency research priorities?
   What do you need to know about research currently
    funded by a particular agency within your research
    domain, e.g., through reports, publications, journals?
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     53
Writing the proposal
   Who do you need to impress with your research?
   How do you tell a good story grounded in good science that excites
    the reviewers and program officers?
   The successful proposal represents an accumulation of marginal
    advantage accrued at decision points over a period of weeks or
    months to ensure the proposal is competitive for funding—
     What are key decisions points in proposal development?

     How do you best plan and schedule proposal writing?

     How do you use program guidelines as a proposal template?

     Importance of good writing, clear arguments, and reviewer
       friendly text, structure, and organization in proposals
     What are other core competitive characteristics of a successful
       proposal needed to complement research merit?


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS            54
Post review process

   Respecting views of peers
   Response to reviewer comments
   Discussion of reviews with program officers
   Discussion of reviews with senior faculty
   Reviewing the reviews
   How do you make an assessment of reviews as a
    reliable guide for the next funding cycle?


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     55
Competitive resubmissions

   How do you best plan and position for a competitive
    resubmission?
   How do you conduct a reassessment of the intellectual
    merit and excellence of your research based on reviews?
   How to you assess if a research direction should be
    abandoned, or the research submitted to another agency?
   What are strategies for identifying more appropriate
    research directions and funding opportunities?



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     56
Multidisciplinary & Collaborative Research
Initiatives & Faculty Interdisciplinary Groups
   Role of centers and institutes in advancing faculty
    research careers and proposal success;
   Role of interdisciplinary faculty research groups
    in advancing faculty research careers and
    proposal success;
   How do you identify your best opportunities for
    research advancement along the continuum from
    single PI, multiple PI, multidisciplinary
    collaboratives, and center level research funding
    initiatives?
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     57
Understanding the review process
   When evaluating a grant application, reviewers will
    not only consider the quality of the ideas, but also
    the extent to which the application addresses the
    funding agency‘s review criteria.
   Therefore, it is important to identify these review
    criteria, understand exactly how the agency defines
    them, and determine the relative weight (if any) that
    the agency assigns to each of them.
   This information can then be used to develop an
    application that clearly addresses these criteria and
    that is therefore much more competitive.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     58
Identify the review criteria

   Most agencies publish their standard review
    criteria on their web pages and/or in their
    proposal preparation guides.
   Some agency programs will have additional
    review criteria that the program will delineate
    in the proposal solicitation; therefore, it is
    important to read the list of review criteria
    presented in this document, as well.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     59
Agency review criteria and review process
DHHS (NIH)
Center for Scientific Review                 http://cms.csr.nih.gov/
NIH review criteria                          http://www.niaid.nih.gov/ncn/grants/basics/basics_b3.htm
NIH peer review process                      http://cms.csr.nih.gov/AboutCSR/OverviewofPeerReviewProcess.htm
NIH review groups                            http://cms.csr.nih.gov/PeerReviewMeetings/CSRIRGDescription/
NIH study section rosters                    http://www.csr.nih.gov/Committees/rosterindex.asp
NSF
NSF review process, criteria     Sec. 3       http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/gpg/nsf04_23/3.jsp
DOD
AFOSR review process, criteria   Sec. 2.14    http://www.afosr.af.mil/pdfs/proguide.PDF
ARO review process, criteria     Sec. 3       http://www.aro.army.mil/research/arl/arobaa06a.pdf
DARPA review process, criteria               http://www.darpa.mil/body/information/proposal.html
ONR review process, criteria     Sec. 5       http://www.onr.navy.mil/02/baa/docs/baa_05_024.pdf
USDA
NRI review process, criteria                 http://www.csrees.usda.gov/funding/nri/pdfs/nri_review_guidelines.pdf
NASA
NASA review process, criteria    App. C       http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/procurement/nraguidebook/proposer2005.doc
Department of Energy
DOE review process, criteria                 http://www.sc.doe.gov/grants/process.html
US Department of Education
ED review process, criteria      Sec. 5       http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/about/grantmaking/pt504.html




Office of Proposal                        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005                     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                                          60
Understand the review process
   The review process varies – sometimes significantly
    – from one agency to the next (following slide).
   The review process may include a peer review,
    where outside experts from related fields are invited
    to review the proposal; an internal review, where
    agency personnel evaluate the proposal; or a
    combination of both.
   However, most agency review processes share
    some common features. At most agencies, for
    instance, an application will first undergo a merit
    review and, depending upon the results, an
    administrative review.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     61
Difference between NSF & NIH
   This is a fundamental difference between NIH's and NSF's selection
    methods--by the end of the NIH review, applications are ranked
    alongside other entries according to an overall numerical priority
    score. At NSF however, proposals are not given a numerical rating
    but are classified according to written "recommendations."
   Fred Stollnitz, program director at NSF explains further: "When
    panels review, [the reviewers] put each proposal into categories
    such as 'outstanding,' 'good and should be funded,' 'not ready in its
    present form,' or 'decline.' "
   A particularly vocal reviewer could influence the final rating of the
    panel or where the proposal should be classified, but because there
    is no absolute score, only opinions are noted in the review analysis
    report--not actual decisions. An opinionated NIH reviewer on the
    other hand could affect the scores an application receives and so
    alter its ranking.
                         Source: http://nextwave.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/1999/10/06/3




Office of Proposal                 Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005              Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                         62
NSF review panelists
   NSF panelists convey their opinions and recommendations in a
    "panel summary." They compose an overall analysis of review for
    each proposal that incorporate factors such as the panel
    summary, subject area, available resources, and the potential
    impact of the research. They then make final award decisions
    with the division director. Proposals that receive lower
    classifications by the panel can sometimes be funded over
    "higherrated― research proposals because their overall
    assessment by the program officer is more favorable.
   The budgetary consideration also plays a key role in the
    decision-making process. "The program officer doesn't just make
    'yes' or 'no' decisions," explains Stollnitz. "They have to balance
    all those proposals that should be funded with the actual funds
    that are available." Sometimes a proposal classified as 'good and
    should be funded' submitted by an investigator with minimal
    existing funds may be given the edge over an 'outstanding‗
    proposal submitted by an established and well-funded candidate.
                         Source: http://nextwave.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/1999/10/06/3




Office of Proposal                   Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005                Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                       63
NSF proposal process and timelines




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     64
NSF example review criterion 1

   What is the intellectual merit of the proposed activity?
   How important is the proposed activity to advancing
    knowledge and understanding within its own field or
    across different fields?
   How well qualified is the proposer (individual or team) to
    conduct the project? (If appropriate, the reviewer will
    comment on the quality of prior work.)
   To what extent does the proposed activity suggest and
    explore creative and original concepts?
   How well conceived and organized is the proposed
    activity?
   Is there sufficient access to resources?
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     65
NIH review criteria

   Significance. Does the study address an important
    problem?
   Approach. Are the methods appropriate to the aims
    of the project?
   Innovation. Does the project employ novel
    concepts or methods?
   Investigator. Is the investigator well trained to do
    the work?
   Environment. Does the environment contribute to
    success?
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     66
Write for the reviewers
   Reviewers are typically given multiple proposals to review, and
    often tight timelines for completion;
   ―While you may be viewing your grant application as the magnum
    opus of your life's ambitions and plans--for the next 5 years
    anyway--a reviewer sees it as one of six to 12 other "magnum
    opii" projects to evaluate.‖ (Source: http://nextwave.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2003/12/10/6)
   The proposal needs to clearly present everything the reviewers
    will need to read, understand, and evaluate the proposed
    research project;
   Synthesize key concepts and articulate the links between the
    overarching goal and the specific objectives, between the
    specific objectives and the hypotheses, between the hypotheses
    and the approach, between the approach and the expected
    outcomes, and, finally, between the expected outcomes and the
    significance and broader impacts of the project.

Office of Proposal                 Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005              Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                              67
Create reviewer-friendly text
   Divide the proposal into the required sections.
   Place the sections in the required order.
   Use parallel structure at both the section and sentence levels.
   Incorporate logical paragraph breaks.
   Open paragraphs with clear topic sentences.
   Discuss important items first.
   Avoid the use of inflated language.
   Use declarative sentences.
   Define potentially unfamiliar terms.
   Spell out acronyms and abbreviations.
   Employ appropriate style and usage.
   Use correct grammar, punctuation, and spelling.
   Run a spell-check and proofread the application.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS         68
Finding information on funded projects
   NSF Award Search Site:
http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/index.jsp

   NIH Award Search Site:
http://crisp.cit.nih.gov/crisp/crisp_query.generate_screen

   Dept. of Ed. Awards Search:
http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/grantaward/start.cfm

   USDA Awards Search:
http://cris.csrees.usda.gov/

   NEH Awards Search:
http://www.neh.gov/news/recentawards.html
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     69
                         Craft of writing

   Good writing lies at the core of the
    competitive proposal.
   It is the framework upon which the
    competitive applicant crafts and structures
    the arguments, ideas, concepts, goals,
    performance commitments, and the logical,
    internal connectedness and balance of the
    proposal.

Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     70
The proposal is the only reality
   In its final form, a proposal is not unlike a
    novel or a movie. It creates its own, self-
    contained reality.
   The proposal contains all the funding agency
    and review panel will know about your
    capabilities and your capacity to perform.
   With few exceptions, an agency bases its
    decision to fund or not fund entirely on the
    proposal and the persuasive reality it creates.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     71
Good writing is more than mechanics
   Strong, comprehensive, integrated knowledge base;
   Organizational clarity (stepwise logic/connections;
    sequencing);
   Structural clarity (integrative logic; logical transitions)
   Argumentative clarity (reasoning; ordering; synthesis)
   Descriptive clarity (who, what, how, when, why, &
    results)
   Clear, consistent vision sustained throughout text
   Comprehensive problem definition; corresponding
    innovative solutions
   Confidence in performance must and excitement for your
    ideas must be instilled in reviewers
   Capacity for synthesis
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     72
Internal consistency & synthesis
   A competitive proposal must be internally consistent
    by language, structure, and argument; all internal
    ambiguities must be resolved.
   The competitiveness of a proposal increases
    exponentially with the capacity of the author to
    synthesize information.
   Synthesis represents the relational framework and
    conceptual balance of the proposal. It is the
    synaptic connections among concepts, ideas,
    arguments, goals, objectives, and performance.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     73
Ideas matter (Slogans are not Ideas)
   Shaping ideas by language is hard work
   Do not confuse slogans, effusive exuberance,
    and clichés with substantive ideas
   Show the reviewers something new by
    developing ideas that are clear, concise,
    coherent, contextually logical, and insightful
   Capitalize on every opportunity you have to
    define, link, relate, expand, synthesize,
    connect, or illuminate ideas as you write the
    narrative.
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     74
Introductory writing tips
   The abstract, proposal summary, and
    introduction are key—that may be all many
    reviewers read– and it is here you must
    excite and grab the attention of the reviewers;
   Reviewers will assume errors in language
    and usage will translate into errors in the
    science;
   Don‘t be overly ambitious in what you
    propose, but convey credibility and capacity
    to perform;
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     75
Introductory writing tips
   Sell your proposal to a good scientist but not an
    expert;
   Some review panels may not have an expert in
    your field, or panels may be blended for
    multidisciplinary initiatives;
   Agencies & reviewers fund compelling, exciting
    science, not just correct science;
   Proposals are not journal articles—proposals
    must be user friendly and offer a narrative that
    tells a story that is memorable to reviewers;

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     76
Following agency guidelines
   Read solicitation and/or proposal guide
    carefully for formatting requirements and
    follow scrupulously
        Font and font size
        Page limits
        Biosketch formats
        Citation format
   Avoids disqualification of your proposal
   Avoids irritating reviewers

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     77
Set up a schedule to produce proposal


   Work back from deadline
   Allow plenty of time for routing
   Start budget early




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     78
Make your proposal easy to read

   Reviewers often have 8 or 10 proposals to
    read
   Use white space, underlining, bold, bullets,
    figures, flowcharts to make main points easy
    to find
   Put main idea of sections and paragraphs up
    front


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     79
Must convince reviewers…
   Your proposed project should be funded
        It‘s important and supports the agency mission
         and program goals
        It‘s exciting
        It has a good chance of succeeding
   You are the person who should conduct the
    proposed project
        Your team is knowledgeable and well-qualified
        You have the support and resources required

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     80
Proposal sections examples
       Project Summary
       Goals/Objectives/Specific Aims
       Introduction/Overview
       Background and Significance
       Approach/Methodology
       Research Plan
       Preliminary Data
       Broader Impacts (NSF)
       Literature Cited
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     81
Executive summary
   May be the only thing the reviewer reads
   Must ―grab‖ the reviewer
   Should communicate concisely:
        Intellectual framework of proposed project
        The goals and signficance of the proposed project
        Who will be conducting the project and, briefly, their
         qualifications
        Project outcomes
   Must communicate excitement
   Check for additional requirements
        E.g., intellectual merit and broader impacts in NSF proposals
        Project name, category, etc.
Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     82
Goals & specific aims

        State specific, measurable goals of
         your project
        Tie to program/agency mission and
         goals
        If hypothesis-based research, state
         your hypothesis
        Discuss expected outcomes
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     83
     The succinct proposal introduction

   Serves as reviewers‘ ―road map‖ to the full
    text
   Opportunity to make most important points up
    front
   States vision, concepts, goals, objectives,
    outcomes, and deliverables
   Briefly tells who you are; what you are going to
    do; how you are going to do it; who is going to
    do it; why you are going to do it; and
    demonstrates your capacity to perform
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     84
Background & literature review
   Spend some time researching this
   This section should tie closely to your proposed
    research and should tell a story
         What are the holes in current knowledge that your work
          will fill?
         How does your research extend and advance knowledge
          in the field?
   Do not be dismissive of previous research
   Be thorough in citing important work but be concise


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS      85
Significance

   Explain explicitly why proposed research is
    important
        Tie to agency and program goals
        Relate to review criteria
   Make this easy to find




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     86
Approach/research plan/methodology
   Be very clear about how you will accomplish your
    stated goals and objectives
   Include details
         What, specifically, will you do when you get the money?
         Schedules and milestones may be helpful
         This is especially important if you are a relatively new
          researcher
   Address any potential dead ends, roadblocks, show-
    stoppers and how you will deal with them
   Avoid ambiguous terminology – be very specific!

Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS       87
Preliminary data

   Understand the expectations of the agency
    and program
        How much preliminary data is expected?
        Higher risk research will require more preliminary
         data
        Less experienced researchers will generally need
         more preliminary data
   Preliminary data should strengthen reviewers‘
    perception of your chance of success
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     88
Collaborations/partnerships
   Work on these before you start writing
   Be clear about roles of collaborators and partners
   Establish split of resources
   Be sure collaborators and partners get something
    out of participating in the project
   If you need a letter of collaboration, offer to write a
    draft for your collaborator to edit
         Include specifics on what they will do and support they will
          provide
         Explain who the collaborator is and their motivation


Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS      89
Institutional support
   Is cost sharing (matching) required?
        What type? (Cash, in-kind?)
        What rules apply?
   Are other resources required?
   Work to set these up early
   Determine supporting documentation needed




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     90
    Connect narrative text to budget
   Budget categories are defined by the funding
    agency
   Be sure activities discussed in narrative are
    reflected in budget
   Connect narrative text to the budget to
    ensure appropriate balance and proportion,
   If a budget justification section is requested,
    use it to complement and deepen the
    narrative detail

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     91
Beware of boiler plate; don’t copy & paste

    Boiler plate refers only to the grant application forms
     required by the funding agency
    Thinking of proposal narrative as ―boiler plate‖ will
     result in a mediocre, disjoint proposal
    Begin each proposal as a new effort, not a copy &
     paste
    Be very cautious integrating text inserts
    Strong proposals clearly reflect a coherent, sustained,
     and integrated argument grounded on good ideas


    Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
    Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     92
 Outcomes or deliverables

   Develop short, hard-hitting lists off-set by
    bullets or other typographical formats
   Relate outcomes to goals and objectives
   Outcomes should be specific and measurable
   Timelines and schedules with milestones can
    orient reviewers and provide a quick overview
    of how program components fit together




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     93
Project assessment and evaluation
   How will you know if you were successful?
   Describe what will be measured in order to
    assess how well project met each of its
    objectives
        Who will conduct assessment?
        Discuss logistics
   Formative assessment: conducted
    throughout project and results fed back to
    improve project
   Summative assessment: final assessment at
    end of project
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     94
Craft of grant writing web sites
   http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/research/writing.htm
   http://nextwave.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/1999/08/27/1
   http://grants.library.wisc.edu/index.html
   http://www.research.umich.edu/proposals/PWG/pwgcomplete.html
   http://www.asru.ilstu.edu/grantwritingseries.htm
   http://grants.nih.gov/grants/grant_tips.htm
   http://www.epa.gov/seahome/grants/src/title.htm
   http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04016/start.htm
   http://www.aecom.yu.edu/ogs/Guide/Guide.htm
   http://www.awag.org/Grant%20Seekers%20Tool%20Kit/index.htm
   http://www.americanscientist.org/template/AssetDetail/assetid/23947?fullt
    ext=true&print=yes&print=yes
   http://www.pitt.edu/~offres/proposal/propwriting/websites.html



Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS          95
Funding graduate education (>$1B)




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     96
Funding graduate education




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     97
Funding graduate education




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     98
How to Fund Your Graduate Studies

               Types of Fellowships
               Why bother?
               Where‘s the $$$?
               How to apply and win
                        Overview of the Process and Strategies
                        Examples


Office of Proposal               Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005            Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     99
Important general distinction
   Funding available for domestic students
        Federal agencies
        Foundations
        Associations
        Industry
   Funding available for international students
        Foundations
        Associations
        Industry

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     100
Two Types of Fellowships
   Awards directly to Students
         Students compete directly for award
         Award is portable with student
         Examples:
               NSF Graduate Research Fellowship
               National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate
                Fellowship
               J. Javits, Ford Foundation, Humane Studies Fellowships
               Many targeted fellowships (e.g., Semiconductor Research
                Graduate Fellowship, Whitaker Fellowship for Biomedical
                Engineering, AT&T Fellowship, etc.)


Office of Proposal            Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005         Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS        101
Two Types of Fellowships

   Institutional Awards
      Awarded to departments, programs, etc.

      Students selected by department, program

       or faculty
      Examples: Graduate Assistantships in
       Areas of National Need (GAANN), larger
       programs (IGERT, AGEP, etc.)


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     102
    Graduate Fellowships – why bother?

   Guaranteed source of funding
   Stipends generally much higher than
    department RAs (NSF stipend $30K/yr)
   Fellowships are portable more autonomy in
    selecting advisor, research project
   Fellowship can be path to a job (e.g.,
    National Lab)



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     103
Fellowship Application is
“Mini-Research Proposal”
   You are selling yourself and your ideas
   Identify Fellowship opportunities for which
    you are eligible
   Analyze what they are looking for (review
    criteria)
   Write best possible application
   Gather and submit other required material
    (references, GRE scores, etc.)

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     104
Finding Potential Fellowships
   Excellent web resources available
      See hot link table (handout)

      Duke, Cornell, Mich. State have excellent sites listing fellowships
       by area, etc.
      Google

   Keep an open mind
      As research becomes more multi-disciplinary, you may find
       opportunities in unexpected places
      NIH, NSF fund aspects of social and behavioral sciences,
       philosophy (ethics), communication, etc.
   Talk to faculty in your department
   Look at large fellowship programs and smaller targeted
    programs (by discipline, demographic group, etc.)

Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS          105
Finding Potential Fellowships

        Variety of funders
             Federal agencies (NSF, DoD, NIH, EPA, NEH,
              Dept. of Ed., etc.)
             Foundations
             Professional Organizations
             Corporations




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     106
Example National Fellowships

   National Science Foundation, ~ 1000 awarded annually,
    due mid-Nov – mid-Dec depending on discipline
   NASA, ~ 90 new fellowships awarded annually, due
    February 2005
   Department of Defense, ~ 200 awarded annually, due
    January 2005
   EPA, ~ 100 awarded annually, due Nov. 23, 2004
   DHS, ~ 100 awarded annually due Feb. 2005 (?)
   DoED, GAANN (943); J. K. Javits (238)
   NIH, ~ 180 awarded annually


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     107
Example National Fellowships
   Humanities & Social Science Fellowships and
    Grants for Graduate and Professional Students
         http://www.ors.duke.edu/find/student/grad/gradhumsoc.ht
          ml
   Cornell, Humanities
         http://cuinfo.cornell.edu/Student/GRFN/list.phtml?category
          =HUMANITIES
   Michigan State University Hotlinks to 31 academic
    disciplines
         http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/3gradinf.htm



Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS      108
 Analysis of Applicant Instructions/RFP
   What are eligibility requirements?
   When is the application due?
   How many are awarded each year?
   What criteria are used to evaluate applications?
         E.g., is near-4.0 GPA required?
         Check with faculty in your department (may have been on
          review panel)
         Look at goals of funding organization
   What are the required components of the application
    and what is application process?
   Contact awarding organization if you have questions


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
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Putting together your application
   Find faculty mentor(s) if possible
         Faculty with whom you plan to do your graduate
          research
         Faculty in your undergraduate department
         Graduate coordinator in your department
         They will provide advice on research plan,
          critique your writing
   Ask for references early and check
   Make sure GRE scores, transcripts, etc. will
    be available on time

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     110
Typical Application Components

   Biographical information
   GRE scores
   Transcript
   Letters of Reference
   Essays/Proposal
         Discussion of proposed research
         Often, discussion of one or more research
          experiences
         Sometimes, other questions

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     111
What are They Looking For?
   Will you be a successful graduate student and
    researcher?
         Do you understand the research process?
         Do you do your homework?
               i.e., read the literature in your area, understand previous
                work, etc.
         Can you express your ideas well?
   Is your selected area of research something they
    want to support?
         Varies in importance depending on mission of funder
   Are you one of the best candidates in the applicant
    pool?

Office of Proposal             Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005          Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS           112
Writing Strategies
   Start early and get others to edit your work!
   Write in a scholarly style
         Make it clear you understand your subject
         Cite references if allowed
   Make it clear that you understand the
    research process
               Clear hypothesis, goals, objectives
               Discussion of your planned approach with sufficient
                detail to show your understanding of the topic




Office of Proposal           Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005        Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     113
    TIP: Good Writing Can’t Be Beat
Good writing is more than mechanics, and includes:
   Strong, comprehensive knowledge base
   Organizational clarity (stepwise logic/connections; sequencing)
   Structural clarity (integrative logic; transitions; fabric)
   Argumentative clarity (reasoning; ordering)
   Descriptive clarity (who, what, how, when, why, & results)
   Clear, consistent vision sustained throughout text
   Comprehensive problem definition; corresponding innovative
    solutions
   Confidence in performance must be instilled in reviewers
   Internal consistency




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS         114
Hotlinks to Writing Strategies

   Many resources available on how to write good
    proposals
   See hotlink table e-mailed to you
         ―Grant Doctor‖ in Science Magazine
         Agency-specific guides
         Google
   Excellent books on writing
         Strunk, Elements of Style (http://www.bartleby.com/141/)
         The Art of Writing Proposals, by the Social Science
          Research Council, available online at
          http://www.ssrc.org/publications/

Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS      115
Evaluation & Review Criteria

   Read application, related information
    carefully
         find out what they are looking for
   Investigate goals and culture of funder
         Reflect vision of the funding agency




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     116
Analyzing Funding Agency

      Every agency has a language
           Read their literature
           Use the agency‘s language in your essays/proposal
      Look at their funding priorities and goals
      Check ―dear colleague‖ letter, FAQs
           http://www.asee.org/resources/fellowships/ndseg/faq.cfm#requirements

      Examples:
            www.nsf.gov
            www.research.att.com/academic/alfp.html



Office of Proposal               Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005            Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS             117
References
   Select faculty who know you well
   Select faculty who will give you a positive
    reference!
   Undergraduate research experience great
    opportunity to develop references
   Follow up and make sure they sent in your
    reference letter



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     118
Example: NSF Graduate Research
Fellowships
   Typically due early November
   1000 to be awarded this year
   For any research area funded by NSF
         Includes Education, Social and Behavioral
          Sciences as well as Science and Engineering
         Look through NSF web site at www.nsf.gov for
          research areas



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     119
How to Apply for NSF Fellowship
    See www.ehr.nsf.gov/dge/programs/grf/ and
     https://www.fastlane.nsf.gov/grfp/ for
     application instructions, FAQ, etc.
    Apply on-line using NSF‘s ―Fastlane‖ system
     at www.fastlane.nsf.gov
    Parts of application
          Information form (name, school, etc.)
          Application form (includes two essay questions)
          Proposed Plan of Research
          Previous Research Experience
          References
          GRE, GPA form and transcript request form

Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     120
NSF Fellowship

   $30,000 per year plus $10,500 education
    allowance for 3 years
   Must be US Citizen or permanent resident
   May apply:
         during undergrad senior year
         prior to or during 1st year of grad school,
         or at beginning of 2nd year of grad school



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     121
Strategies to Win

   Good grades and GRE scores help
         GPAs typically 3.7 or higher but not always
   Undergraduate research experience
   Good essay answers
   Great research proposal
   Excellent references



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     122
Research Proposals
   Be original.
         ―A less polished essay that shows evidence of the student‘s own
          creativity is usually more impressive than a sophisticated plan
          that is not original.‖
   Be rigorous.
         ―The best research proposals…demonstrate that the applicant
          understands how to conduct research in his/her discipline using
          the scientific method‖
   Be clear and well-organized.
         ―The best proposals… demonstrate creativity in thinking about
          research questions as well as communication and organizational
          skills.‖


Office of Proposal          Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005       Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS        123
National Defense Science and Engineering
Graduate Fellowship
   Eligibility:
      US citizen or national

      Pursuing doctoral degree in, or closely related to, one of
        the following disciplines having the greatest benefit to
        national security:
          Aeronautical and Astronautical Eng                   Geosciences
          Biosciences
          Chemical Engineering                                 Materials Science and
          Chemistry                                            Engineering
          Civil Engineering                                    Mathematics
          Cognitive, Neural, and Behavioral                    Mechanical Engineering
          Sciences
          Computer and Computational Science                   Naval Architecture and
          Electrical Engineering                               Ocean Engineering
          Physics                                              Oceanography
          ·                                                    ·
Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                      124
NDSEG Fellowship

   3 year; $27K - $30K stipend/year
   Application
      Essays

      GRE

      Transcripts

      3 Letters of Reference

   Need 4.0 GPA or very near to be competitive



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     125
USDoEd Jacob K. Javits Fellowships

    http://www.ed.gov/programs/iegpsjavits/index.html
    Deadline: October 8, 2004
    About 70 awards anticipated this year
    Average size of awards: $41,511
    Funding for up to 48 months
    Includes a stipend for personal expenses and an
     institutional payment for tuition and fees
    No cost sharing or matching requirements



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     126
J. K. Javits Fellowships Eligibility

   Must be pursuing highest degree available in
    their field at an accredited US institution of
    higher learning
   Apply during or before your first full year of
    study
   Must be a citizen or national of the US, a
    permanent resident or intend to become a
    permanent resident


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     127
J. K. Javits Fellowships Fields of Study

   ARTS: creative writing, music performance, theory,
    composition & literature, studio arts, television, film,
    cinematography, theater, playwriting, screenwriting,
    acting, dance
   HUMANITIES: art history, archaeology, area
    studies, classics, comparative literature, folklore,
    foreign languages/literature, history, linguistics,
    philosophy, religion, speech, rhetoric, debate
   SOCIAL SCIENCES: anthropology, communications
    and media, economics, ethnic & cultural studies,
    geography, political science, psychology, public
    policy, sociology

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     128
US Department of Education
Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research
Award (DDRA)
    http://www.ed.gov/programs/iegpsddrap/index.html
    Purpose: for graduate students to engage in full-
     time dissertation research abroad in modern foreign
     languages and area studies
    Deadline: October 19, 2004
    Estimated number of awards: 150
    Average award size: $29,603
    Funding for 6 to 12 months
    No cost sharing or matching requirements

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     129
Fulbright-Hays DDRA
Eligibility
   Must be citizen or national of US or a permanent
    resident
   Must be a graduate student in good standing and
    admitted to a doctoral program in modern foreign
    languages and area studies
   Must be planning a teaching career in the US
   Must possess sufficient foreign language skills to
    conduct research project



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     130
Fulbright-Hays Fields of Study
    Fields of study include but are not limited to:
     ecology, anthropology, history, political science,
     geography, economics, biology, archaeology, art
     history, literature, folklore, sociology, architecture,
     religion, city and regional planning, international
     health
    Locations: Africa, East Asia, Southeast Asia & the
     Pacific Islands, South Asia, the Near East, East
     Central Europe and Eurasia, and the Western
     Hemisphere (Canada, Central & South America,
     Mexico & the Caribbean)
    Projects in Western Europe will not be funded

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     131
Spencer Foundation
Dissertation Fellowships
   http://www.spencer.org/programs/index.htm
   Purpose: to encourage new scholars to undertake
    research relevant to formal or informal education
   Deadline: November 10, 2004
   Estimated number of awards: about 30
   Award size: $20,000
   Up to two years
   Non-renewable


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     132
Spencer Foundation
Eligibility and Disciplines
   US citizenship not required, but must be a PhD
    candidate
   The dissertation topic must concern education, but
    can be in any academic discipline
   Recent awards include anthropology, art history,
    architecture, economics, education, history,
    linguistics, literature, philosophy, public health,
    political sciences, psychology, religion, sociology
   Candidates should be interested in pursuing further
    research in education once the PhD is attained


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     133
Andrew W. Mellon
Fellowships in Humanistic Studies
   http://www.woodrow.org/mellon/competition_2005.html
   A competitive award for first-year doctoral students
    only and cannot be deferred
   Application Request Deadline: Nov 12, 2004
   Submission Deadline: Dec 1, 2004
   Estimated number of awards: about 85
   Covers tuition and fees for the first year of a PhD
    graduate program and includes a stipend of $17,500



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     134
Mellon Fellowships Fields of Study

   Cultural anthropology, art history, classics,
    comparative literature, critical theory, cultural
    studies, English lit, creative writing, ethnic studies,
    ethnomusicology, film theory, foreign language,
    history, history of architecture, history & philosophy
    of math, history & philosophy of science, humanities,
    linguistics, music history & theory, philosophy,
    political history/philosophy, political theory, religion,
    rhetoric, women‘s studies


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     135
Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships

   Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New
    Americans--Support for Graduate Study
   http://www.pdsoros.org/about.html
   A "New American": (1) is a resident alien; i.e., holds
    a Green Card; or (2) has been naturalized as a U.S.
    citizen; or (3) is the child of two parents who are
    both naturalized citizens. A fellow may study at
    any accredited graduate program in the U.S., and
    may pursue a graduate degree in any professional
    field (e.g., engineering, medicine, law, social work,
    etc.) or scholarly discipline in the arts, humanities,
    social sciences, and sciences. (The fine and
    performing arts are included.)
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     136
Fellowships for Minorities
    Ford Foundation - Predoctoral Fellowships for Minorities.
     The $21,500 fellowships are awarded to individual minority
     students who demonstrate superior scholarship and show
     promise for future achievement as scholars, researchers, and
     teachers. November deadline.
     http://www.nationalacademies.org/fellowships
    American Sociological Association - Minority Fellowship
     Program. An annual stipend of $14,688 for up to three years for
     minority graduate students in the early stages of sociology
     graduate programs with emphasis on mental health issues and
     research. December deadline.
     http://www.asanet.org/student/mfp.html




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     137
Fellowships for Minorities

   United Negro College Fund & Merck Foundation Science
    Initiative - Graduate Science Research Dissertation
    Fellowships. $30,000 to assist African-American graduate
    students in completing coursework, conducting research, and
    preparing dissertation in the life or physical sciences. January
    deadline. http://www.uncf.org/merck/programs/grad.htm
   Social Science Research Council and the Andrew W. Mellon
    Foundation - SSRC-Mellon Minority Fellowship Program. Up
    to $,5000 to increase number of African Americans, Latinos, and
    Native Americans in the arts and sciences for students enrolled
    in Ph.D. programs in Mellon-designated fields. Citizenship:
    unspecified. Deadline: November (annual).
    http://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/mellon/


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS      138
Fellowships for Women

    American Association of University Women - International
     Fellowships. $18,000 awards to women graduate students
     studying in the United States who are not U.S. citizens.
     November deadline.
     http://www.aauw.org/fga/fellowships_grants/international.cf
     m
    American Association of University Women - Selected
     Professions Fellowships. Approximately $5,000-12,000 awards
     for women in the final year of graduate study in historically under-
     represented professions, including Business Administration, Law,
     Medicine, Architecture, Computer Sciences, Mathematics, and
     Engineering. December deadline.
     http://www.aauw.org/fga/fellowships_grants/selected.cfm



Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS        139
Fellowships for Women
    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation -
     Dissertation Grants in Women's Studies. Fifteen winners
     receive grants of $3,000. Must be students in doctoral programs
     who have completed pre-dissertation requirements in any field.
     October deadline. http://www.woodrow.org/womens-studies/
    The Coordinating Council for Women in History (CCWH) and
     the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians - CCWH/Ida
     B. Wells Graduate Student Award. $500 to assist in the
     completion of dissertation work in any field of history. The Wells
     Award is given to a female student who is specializing in any
     field, but is currently working on a historical project. October
     deadline. http://theccwh.org/awards.htm




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS        140
Fulbright Grants U.S. Student Program

   http://www.fulbrightonline.org/us/home.ht
    ml
   Fulbright Grants (U.S. Student Program) are
    for graduate study or research abroad.
    Grants are awarded to seniors and graduate
    students in all academic fields and in the
    creative and performing arts who are citizens
    of the United States.

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     141
National Science Foundation
   Funds research in:
               Biological Sciences (BIO)
               Computer and Info Science and Eng (CISE)
               Engineering (ENG)
               Education and Human Resources (EHR)
               Geosciences (GEO)
               Math and Physical Sciences (MPS)
               Polar Research (OPP)
               Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences
                (SBE)
               Cross-cutting Research

Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     142
NSF Organization
                          National Science Foundation
                               National Science                 Director
                                    Board                     Deputy Director


             Inspector                                                              Staff Offices
              General




                          Computer &
         Biological       Information                                                 Mathematical
                                             Engineering           Geosciences         & Physical
         Sciences           Science
                         & Engineering                                                 Sciences



          Social, Behavioral                                Budget,                Information
                                    Education
             & Economic                                     Finance                 Resource
                                    & Human
               Sciences                                     & Award               Management
                                    Resources
                                                           Management
           3/23/2005                                                                             22




Office of Proposal                       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005                    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS                         143
NSF Proposal & Award Process Timeline




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     144
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     145
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     146
      NSF Structure and Culture
    Each directorate has its own culture and priorities
    Get to know the directorates and divisions that could fund your
     work
       Read web site – goals, priorities of directorate, division,
        programs
       Get to know program directors
           E-mail and/or call with questions
               Be prepared to answer the question, ―What is your
                 research objective?‖ in 25 words or less
           Visit NSF
           Look for them at conferences
           Read about their background (e.g., google) and talk to
            colleagues
       Use funded programs data base to find out what has been
        funded recently
    Attend NSF national and regional workshops

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS          147
NSF Priority Investments




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     148
NSF mission
To support:
        Basic scientific research and research
         fundamental to the engineering process
        Programs to strength scientific and engineering
         research potential
        Science and engineering education programs at
         all levels and in all fields of science and
         engineering
        An information base on science and engineering
         appropriate for development of national and
         international policy


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     149
NSF: Goals and mission
   Agency goals are defined in terms of people, ideas
    and tools
        People: A diverse, competitive, and globally engaged U.S.
         workforce of scientists, engineers, technologists and well-
         prepared citizens;
        Ideas: Discovery across the frontier of science and
         engineering, connected to learning, innovation and service
         to society;
        Tools: Broadly accessible state-of-the-art science and
         engineering facilities, tools, and other infrastructure that
         enable discovery, learning and innovation



Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     150
RFPs: Analyzing an NSF Solicitation

   Who is eligible to submit?
   What is the funding level and funding period?
   What is NSF‘s objective?
   What are the review criteria?
   What is the review process?
   Do they refer to reports, other programs?
   What projects have been funded in the past?



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     151
Performance Expectations: Review Criteria
   Intellectual Merit
      How important is the proposed activity to advancing
       knowledge and understanding within its own field or
       across different fields?
      How well qualified is the proposer (individual or team)
       to conduct the project?
      To what extent does the proposed activity suggest
       and explore creative and original concepts?
      How well conceived and organized is the proposed
       activity?
      Is there sufficient access to resources?




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     152
Review Criteria
   Broader Impacts
       Advance discovery while promoting teaching, training and
        learning
       Broaden participation of under-rep. groups

       Dissemination

       Societal benefits

       Improve infrastructure for research

       Discuss throughout proposal AND in separate section in both
        Project Summary and Description
   Special Criteria
       Program specific

       Listed in solicitation under ―Proposal Review Information‖

   If you are funded:
       Must publish! (Always credit NSF for funding)

       Provide program director with ―nuggets‖

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS         153
Tips: Project Summary
    Most important part of proposal
    Clearly address intellectual merit and broader
     impacts separately (and label them) – if you don‘t ,
     your proposal will be returned without review!
    This is a sales document and may be the only thing
     the reviewer will read
          Must capture the reviewer‘s interest
          State up front the advantages of your project (technical,
           societal, diversity, etc.) – don‘t be shy!
          Summary should be clear and easy to read; spend a lot of
           time on this!




Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     154
Tips: Points to Emphasize

   State benefits of your research clearly
         Why is it important and how is it novel?
         How will it advance knowledge in field?
         Societal benefits
   Research Plan should be specific and detailed
         Clearly state measurable goals and outcomes
         Discuss how you will address any possible problems
   Be sure to emphasize integration of education and
    research
         Measurable goals (e.g., number of students, diversity
          goals, etc.)
         Connect to existing NSF projects if possible

Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     155
Talk to the NSF program officer

   Does my research topic fit well with your program?
   Does your program have funds to support my
    research if my proposal reviews well?
   What size grant is pushing the limits of your funding
    ability?
   What are your proposal submission deadlines?
   How are proposals submitted to your program
    reviewed?



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     156
Questions not to ask the program officer

   So, will you fund my research?
   Is this a good research topic?
   What research topic do you think I should work on?
   What are my odds?
   If I send a copy of my proposal to you, will you help
    me edit it? Will you tell me what you think of it?
   My proposal wasn‘t funded, so can I resubmit it as a
    SGER?


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     157
Should you meet the program officer

   Why? What do you intend to gain?
   Or is your goal to schmooze? (It doesn’t
    help!)
   Don‘t even think about taking your program
    officer to lunch
   If you decide to meet:
        Be prepared to listen (you don‘t learn by talking)
        Be prepared with questions
        Remember, the program officer is not the panel

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     158
Writing the NSF summary
   The most important statement is your statement of
    the research objective
   It should be sentence 1 of paragraph 1
   Do not begin with a weather report: ―The sky is
    falling. Tools are breaking. Designs are failing…‖
   Do not begin with a state-of-the-union address:
    ―Business is moving off shore. Manufacturing is
    going to the …‖
   Remember, this is not a tech paper, it is not a
    murder mystery (where we find out what the
    objective is on page 15)
   Don‘t forget the Intellectual Merit and Broader
    Impact statements

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     159
Recall new NSF requirements

   Your proposal will be returned without review
    if, in your Summary:
        You fail to include explicit statements of
         intellectual merit and broader impact (entitle them
         Intellectual Merit, Broader Impact)
        The font is too small
        The margins are too narrow
        Or if you have an unauthorized attachment


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     160
NSF project narrative
   The next 15 pages of your proposal give
    backup and detail to your summary
   Start with a restatement of your research
    objective, clarify it, and provide a research
    plan to accomplish it
   Restate and provide detail on your intellectual
    merit and broader impact
   Don’t cut and paste together new
    proposals from old declined proposals

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     161
Intellectual merit

   The Intellectual Merit is the contribution that
    your research makes to the knowledge base
   Questions:
        What is already known?
        What will your research add?
        What will this do to enhance or enable research in
         your or other fields?



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     162
Broader Impacts

   The Broader Impact focuses on the benefit to
    society at large as a result of your research
    result
   Means to benefit society include:
        Economic/environment/energy
        Education and training
        Providing opportunities for underrepresented groups
        Improving research and education infrastructure



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     163
Preparing to write a proposal to NSF
   What should a PI know about NSF‘s structure and
    mission before starting to write a proposal to NSF?
   How can a researcher evaluate if a research idea is
    appropriate for an NSF proposal?
   How can researchers find out what the funding
    opportunities are at NSF and if they have a chance at
    being competitive for a particular funding opportunity?
   How different are the cultures and expectations of the
    various directorates within NSF?
   Should a PI visit or talk to the program officer and if so,
    what should the PI say/ask?
   What are the important things to look for in an NSF
    solicitation?
Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     164
Preparing to write a proposal to NSF

   What does NSF want when they ask for
    goals, outcomes and evaluation?
   How much does the amount of funding
    requested influence chances of winning?
   What are some tips for the process of writing
    the proposal?
   Can connecting to other NSF programs
    improve competitiveness?

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     165
Writing the NSF Proposal
   What are the essential attributes of successful proposals to
    NSF?
     What are reviewers looking for when they evaluate ―intellectual
       merit‖?
     What does ―broader impacts‖ mean and how important is that
       criterion?
     What are examples of good ―broader impacts‖ elements in a
       proposal?
     What are examples of ―outreach‖ and‖ dissemination‖
       components?
   What are common mistakes that will kill a proposal‘s chances?
   How important is preliminary data?
   What level of technical detail should be included in the proposal?
   What are the roles and important elements of the various
    proposal sections?
     (Summary, Background, Research Plan, Citations, Budget, etc.)




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS       166
The Review Process

   How does the review process work?
   What sorts of things do reviewers generally
    like about a proposal and what irritates them?
   How much influence does the program
    director have on funding decisions?




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     167
Getting Reviews Back
   If funding is awarded, what are NSF‘s
    expectations and how will my performance
    affect chances of success with future
    proposals?
   If my proposal is declined, what should I
    consider when deciding whether to revise
    and resubmit?
   If my proposal is declined and I decide to
    resubmit, how do I figure out what to revise?

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     168
Funding opportunities
   see “Guide to Programs” at
    http://www.nsf.gov/funding/browse_all_funding.jsp
       Program Description or Program Announcement
        (―unsolicited‖)
       Solicitations
       Supplements
       Dear Colleague Letter
       SGER (Special Grants for Exploratory Research)



Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     169
     Examples of funding opportunities
         undergraduate education
  http://www.nsf.gov/od/lpa/news/publicat/nsf04009/ehr/due.htm
            Advanced Technological Education
            Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships
            Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (which
             includes the Assessment of Student Achievement)
            National Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
             Education Digital Library
            Robert Noyce Scholarship Program
            Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Talent
             Expansion Program
            Teacher Professional Continuum


Office of Proposal         Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005      Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS      170
Programs targeting predominantly
undergraduate institutions
   Biological Sciences Cross-disciplinary Research
    at Undergraduate Institutions
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04536/nsf04536.htm
   Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI)
http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf00144
   Research Opportunity Award Supplement (ROA)
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2005/nsf05548/nsf05548.pdf




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     171
Examples of funding opportunities
     Programs targeting minorities and minority-serving institutions
           http://www.nsf.gov/od/lpa/news/publicat/nsf04009/ehr/hrd.htm#1
          Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP)
          Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology
           (CREST)
          Historically Black Colleges and Universities–Undergraduate
           Program (HBCU-UP)
          Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP)
          Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP)
          Research Initiation Grants and Career Advancement Awards to
           Broaden Participation in the Biological Sciences
           http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=10676&org=NSF
           &from=fund




Office of Proposal            Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005         Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS          172
Example funding opportunities
    Grants Funding Equipment (web sites in handout)
         Major Research Instrumentation (MRI)
         Earth Sciences Instrumentation and Facilities (EAR/IF)
         Research Equipment for Chemical Transport System
          Division
         Chemical Research Instrumentation and Facilities
         Multi-user Equipment and Instrumentation Resources for
          Biological Sciences
         Archaeometry Awards
         Astronomical Sciences Advanced Technologies and
          Instrumentation (ATI)


Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS      173
          Example funding opportunities
                   CAREER
http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5262&from=fund
   Duration: 5 years
   Funding level: ―minimum‖ $400K total (except min. $500K
    total for BIO directorate)
   Eligibility:
        Have a PhD
        Untenured, holding tenure-track assistant prof. Position or
         equivalent
        Have not competed in CAREER more than two times previously
        Have not won a CAREER award
   Due: July 20 – 22 depending on directorate
   Typical 10 – 20% success rate
Office of Proposal        Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005     Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     174
Research in undergraduate institutions




Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     175
The 2002 User Friendly Handbook for
Project Evaluation, NSF
   The Handbook (topics below) discusses quantitative
    and qualitative evaluation methods, suggesting
    ways in which they can be used as complements in
    an evaluation strategy.
   As a result of reading this Handbook, it is expected
    that program managers will increase their
    understanding of the evaluation process and NSF's
    requirements for evaluation, as well as gain
    knowledge that will help them to communicate with
    evaluators and manage the actual evaluation.
   http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2002/nsf02057/start.htm

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     176
NSF User-Friendly Handbook for Mixed
Method Evaluations
   Like the earlier publication, this handbook is
    aimed at users who need practical rather
    than technically sophisticated advice about
    evaluation methodology.
   The main objective is to make PIs and PDs
    "evaluation smart" and to provide the
    knowledge needed for planning and
    managing useful evaluations.
   http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1997/nsf97153/start.htm

Office of Proposal       Vice President for Research, Texas A&M
Development 10/14/2005    Vice Chancellor for Research, TAMUS     177

								
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